Tag Archives: Andy Brown

An artist’s view of SIGGRAPH 2019

By Andy Brown

While I’ve been lucky enough to visit NAB and IBC several times over the years, this was my first SIGGRAPH. Of course, there are similarities. There are lots of booths, lots of demos, lots of branded T-shirts, lots of pairs of black jeans and a lot of beards. I fit right in. I know we’re not all the same, but we certainly looked like it. (The stats regarding women and diversity in VFX are pretty poor, but that’s another topic.)

Andy Brown

You spend your whole career in one industry and I guess you all start to look more and more like each other. That’s partly the problem for the people selling stuff at SIGGRAPH.

There were plenty of compositing demos from of all sorts of software. (Blackmagic was running a hands-on class for 20 people at a time.) I’m a Flame artist, so I think that Autodesk’s offering is best, obviously. Everyone’s compositing tool can play back large files and color correct, composite, edit, track and deliver, so in the midst of a buzzy trade show, the differences feel far fewer than the similarities.

Mocap
Take the world of tracking and motion capture as another example. There were more booths demonstrating tracking and motion capture than anything in the main hall, and all that tech came in different shapes and sizes and an interesting mix of hardware and software.

The motion capture solution required for a Hollywood movie isn’t the same as the one to create a live avatar on your phone, however. That’s where it gets interesting. There are solutions that can capture and translate the movement of everything from your fingers to your entire body using hardware from an iPhone X to a full 360-camera array. Some solutions used tracking ball markers, some used strips in the bodysuit and some used tiny proximity sensors, but the results were all really impressive.

Vicon

Vicon

Some tracking solution companies had different versions of their software and hardware. If you don’t need all of the cameras and all of the accuracy, then there’s a basic version for you. But if you need everything to be perfectly tracked in real time, then go for the full-on pro version with all the bells and whistles. I had a go at live-animating a monkey using just my hands, and apart from ending with him licking a banana in a highly inappropriate manner, I think it worked pretty well.

AR/VR
AR and VR were everywhere, too. You couldn’t throw a peanut across the room without hitting someone wearing a VR headset. They’d probably be able to bat it away whilst thinking they were Joe Root or Max Muncy (I had to Google him), with the real peanut being replaced with a red or white leather projectile. Haptic feedback made a few appearances, too, so expect to be able to feel those virtual objects very soon. Some of the biggest queues were at the North stand where the company had glasses that looked like the glasses everyone was wearing already (like mine, obviously) except the glasses incorporated a head-up display. I have mixed feelings about this. Google Glass didn’t last very long for a reason, although I don’t think North’s glasses have a camera in them, which makes things feel a bit more comfortable.

Nvidia

Data
One of the central themes for me was data, data and even more data. Whether you are interested in how to capture it, store it, unravel it, play it back or distribute it, there was a stand for you. This mass of data was being managed by really intelligent components and software. I was expecting to be writing all about artificial intelligence and machine learning from the show, and it’s true that there was a lot of software that used machine learning and deep neural networks to create things that looked really cool. Environments created using simple tools looked fabulously realistic because of deep learning. Basic pen strokes could be translated into beautiful pictures because of the power of neural networks. But most of that machine learning is in the background; it’s just doing the work that needs to be done to create the images, lighting and physical reactions that go to make up convincing and realistic images.

The Experience Hall
The Experience Hall was really great because no one was trying to sell me anything. It felt much more like an art gallery than a trade show. There were long waits for some of the exhibits (although not for the golf swing improver that I tried), and it was all really fascinating. I didn’t want to take part in the experiment that recorded your retina scan and made some art out of it, because, well, you know, its my retina scan. I also felt a little reluctant to check out the booth that made light-based animated artwork derived from your date of birth, time of birth and location of birth. But maybe all of these worries are because I’ve just finished watching the Netflix documentary The Great Hack. I can’t help but think that a better source of the data might be something a little less sinister.

The walls of posters back in the main hall described research projects that hadn’t yet made it into full production and gave more insight into what the future might bring. It was all about refinement, creating better algorithms, creating more realistic results. These uses of deep learning and virtual reality were applied to subjects as diverse as translating verbal descriptions into character design, virtual reality therapy for post-stroke patients, relighting portraits and haptic feedback anesthesia training for dental students. The range of the projects was wide. Yet everyone started from the same place, analyzing vast datasets to give more useful results. That brings me back to where I started. We’re all the same, but we’re all different.

Main Image Credit: Mike Tosti


Andy Brown is a Flame artist and creative director of Jogger Studios, a visual effects studio with offices in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and London.

Behind the Title: Jogger Studios’ CD Andy Brown

This veteran creative director can also often be found at the controls of his Flame working on a new spot.

NAME: Andy Brown

COMPANY: Jogger Studios (@joggerstudios)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a boutique post house with offices in the US and UK providing visual effects, motion graphics, color grading and finishing. We are partnered with Cut + Run for editorial and get to work with their editors from around the world. I am based in our Jogger Los Angeles office, after having helped found the company in London.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Overseeing compositing, visual effects and finishing. Looking after staff and clients. Juggling all of these things and anticipating the unexpected.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m still working “on the box” every day. Even though my title is creative director, it is the hands-on work that is my first love as far as project collaborations go. Also I get to re-program the phones and crawl under the desks to get the wires looking neater when viewed from the client couch.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The variety, the people and the challenges. Just getting to work on a huge range of creative projects is such a privilege. How many people get to go to work each day looking forward to it?

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The hours, occasionally. It’s more common to have to work without clients nowadays. That definitely makes for more work sometimes, as you might need to create two or three versions of a spot to get approval. If everyone was in the room together you reach a consensus more quickly.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the start of the day best, when everyone is coming into the office and we are getting set up for whatever project we are working on. Could be the first coffee of the day that does it.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I want to say classic car dealer, but given my actual career path the most likely alternative would be editor.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
There were lots of reasons, when I look at it. It was either the Blue Peter Book of Television (the longest running TV program for kids, courtesy of the BBC) or my visit to the HTV Wales TV station with my dad when I was about 12. We walked around the studios and they were playing out a film to air, grading it live through a telecine. I was really struck by the influence that the colorist was having on what was seen.

I went on to do critical work on photography, film and television at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at Birmingham University. Part of that course involved being shown around the Pebble Mill BBC Studios. They were editing a sequence covering a public enquiry into the Handsworth riots in 1985. It just struck me how powerful the editing process was. The story could be told so many different ways, and the editor was playing a really big part in the process.

Those experiences (and an interest in writing) led me to think that television might be a good place to work. I got my first job as a runner at MPC after a friend had advised me how to get a start in the business.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We worked on a couple of spots for Bai recently with Justin Timberlake creating the “brasberry.” We had to make up some graphic animations for the newsroom studio backdrop for the shoot and then animate opening title graphics to look just enough like it was a real news report, but not too much like a real news report.

We do quite a bit of food work, so there’s always some burgers, chicken or sliced veggies that need a bit of love to make them pop.

There’s a nice set extension job starting next week, and we recently finished a job with around 400 final versions, which made for a big old deliverables spreadsheet. There’s so much that we do that no one sees, which is the point if we do it right.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Sometimes the job that you are most proud of isn’t necessarily the most amazing thing to look at. I used to work on newspaper commercials back in the UK, and it was all so “last minute.” A story broke, and all of a sudden you had to have a spot ready to go on air with no edit, no footage and only the bare bones of a script. It could be really challenging, but we had to get it done somehow.

But the best thing is seeing something on TV that you’ve worked on. At Jogger Studios, it is primarily commercials, so you get that excitement over and over again. It’s on air for a few weeks and then it’s gone. I like that. I saw two of our spots in a row recently on TV, which I got a kick out of. Still looking for that elusive hat-trick.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The Flame, the Land Rover Series III and, sadly, my glasses.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Just friends and family on Instagram, mainly. Although like most Flame operators, I look at the Flame Learning Channel on YouTube pretty regularly. YouTube also thinks I’m really interested in the Best Fails of 2018 for some reason.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
More often than not it is podcasts. West Wing Weekly, The Adam Buxton Podcast, Short Cuts and Song Exploder. Plus some of the shows on BBC 6 Music, which I really miss.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I go to work every day feeling incredibly lucky to be doing the job that I do, and it’s good to remember that. The 15-minute walk to and from work in Santa Monica usually does it.

Living so close to the beach is fantastic. We can get down to the sand, get the super-brella set up and get in the sea with the bodyboards in about 15 minutes. Then there’s the Malibu Cars & Coffee, which is a great place to start your Sunday.

Jogger moves CD Andy Brown from London to LA

Creative director Andy Brown has moved from Jogger’s London office to its Los Angeles studio. Brown led the development of boutique VFX house Jogger London, including credits for the ADOT PSA Homeless Lights via Ogilvy & Mather, as well as projects for Adidas, Cadbury, Valentino, Glenmorangie, Northwestern Mutual, La-Z-Boy and more. He’s also been involved in post and VFX for short films such as Foot in Mouth, Containment and Daisy as well as movie title sequences (via The Morrison Studio), including Jupiter Ascending, Collide, The Ones Below and Ronaldo.

Brown got his start in the industry at MPC, where he worked for six years, eventually assuming the role of digital online editor. He then went on to work in senior VFX roles at some of London’s post houses, before assuming head of VFX at One Post. Following One Post’s merger with Rushes, Brown founded his own company Four Walls, establishing the company’s reputation for creative visual effects and finishing.

Brown oversaw Four Walls’ merger with LA’s Jogger Studios in 2016. Andy has since helped form interconnections with Jogger’s teams in London, New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Austin, with high-end VFX, motion graphics and color grading carried out on projects globally.

VFX house Jogger is a sister company of editing house Cut + Run.