Tag Archives: AI

Dell EMC’s ‘Ready Solutions for AI’ now available

Dell EMC has made available its new Ready Solutions for AI, with specialized designs for Machine Learning with Hadoop and Deep Learning with Nvidia.

Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI eliminate the need for organizations to individually source and piece together their own solutions. They offer a Dell EMC-designed and validated set of best-of-breed technologies for software — including AI frameworks and libraries — with compute, networking and storage. Dell EMC’s portfolio of services include consulting, deployment, support and education.

Dell EMC’s Data Science Provisioning Portal offers an intuitive GUI that provides self-service access to hardware resources and a comprehensive set of AI libraries and frameworks, such as Caffe and TensorFlow. This reduces the steps it takes to configure a data scientist’s workspace to five clicks. Ready Solutions for AI’s distributed, scalable architecture offers the capacity and throughput of Dell EMC Isilon’s All-Flash scale-out design, which can improve model accuracy with fast access to larger data sets.

Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI: Deep Learning with Nvidia solutions are built around Dell EMC PowerEdge servers with Nvidia Tesla V100 Tensor Core GPUs. Key features include Dell EMC PowerEdge R740xd and C4140 servers with four Nvidia Tesla V100 SXM2 Tensor Core GPUs; Dell EMC Isilon F800 All-Flash Scale-out NAS storage; and Bright Cluster Manager for Data Science in combination with the Dell EMC Data Science Provisioning Portal.

Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI: Machine Learning with Hadoop includes an optimized solution stack, along with data science and framework optimization to get up and running quickly, and it allows expansion of existing Hadoop environments for machine learning.

Key features include Dell EMC PowerEdge R640 and R740xd servers; Cloudera Data Science Workbench for self-service data science for the enterprise; the Apache Spark open source unified data analytics engine; and the Dell EMC Data Science Provisioning Engine, which provides preconfigured containers that give data scientists access to the Intel BigDL distributed deep learning library on the Spark framework.

New Dell EMC Consulting services are available to help customers implement and operationalize the Ready Solution technologies and AI libraries, and scale their data engineering and data science capabilities. Dell EMC Education Services offers courses and certifications on data science and advanced analytics and workshops on machine learning in collaboration with Nvidia.

SIGGRAPH conference chair Roy C. Anthony: VR, AR, AI, VFX, more

By Randi Altman

Next month, SIGGRAPH returns to Vancouver after turns in Los Angeles and Anaheim. This gorgeous city, whose convention center offers a water view, is home to many visual effects studios providing work for film, television and spots.

As usual, SIGGRAPH will host many presentations, showcase artists’ work, display technology and offer a glimpse into what’s on the horizon for this segment of the market.

Roy C. Anthony

Leading up to the show — which takes place August 12-16 — we reached out to Roy C. Anthony, this year’s conference chair. For his day job, Anthony recently joined Ventuz Technology as VP, creative development. There, he leads initiatives to bring Ventuz’s realtime rendering technologies to creators of sets, stages and ProAV installations around the world

SIGGRAPH is back in Vancouver this year. Can you talk about why it’s important for the industry?
There are 60-plus world-class VFX and animation studios in Vancouver. There are more than 20,000 film and TV jobs, and more than 8,000 VFX and animation jobs in the city.

So, Vancouver’s rich production-centric communities are leading the way in film and VFX production for television and onscreen films. They are also are also busy with new media content, games work and new workflows, including those for AR/VR/mixed reality.

How many exhibitors this year?
The conference and exhibition will play host to over 150 exhibitors on the show floor, showcasing the latest in computer graphics and interactive technologies, products and services. Due to the increase in the amount of new technology that has debuted in the computer graphics marketplace over this past year, almost one quarter of this year’s 150 exhibitors will be presenting at SIGGRAPH for the first time

In addition to the traditional exhibit floor and conferences, what are some of the can’t-miss offerings this year?
We have increased the presence of virtual, augmented and mixed reality projects and experiences — and we are introducing our new Immersive Pavilion in the east convention center, which will be dedicated to this area. We’ve incorporated immersive tech into our computer animation festival with the inclusion of our VR Theater, back for its second year, as well as inviting a special, curated experience with New York University’s Ken Perlin — he’s a legendary computer graphics professor.

We’ll be kicking off the week in a big VR way with a special session following the opening ceremony featuring Ivan Sutherland, considered by many as “the father of computer graphics.” That 50-year retrospective will present the history and innovations that sparked our industry.

We have also brought Syd Mead, a legendary “visual futurist” (Blade Runner, Tron, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Aliens, Time Cop, Tomorrowland, Blade Runner 2049), who will display an arrangement of his art in a special collection called Progressions. This will be seen within our Production Gallery experience, which also returns for its second year. Progressions will exhibit more than 50 years of artwork by Syd, from his academic years to his most current work.

We will have an amazing array of guest speakers, including those featured within the Business Symposium, which is making a return to SIGGRAPH after an absence of a few years. Among these speakers are people from the Disney Technology Innovation Group, Unity and Georgia Tech.

On Tuesday, August 14, our SIGGRAPH Next series will present a keynote speaker each morning to kick off the day with an inspirational talk. These speakers are Tony Derose, a senior scientist from Pixar; Daniel Szecket, VP of design for Quantitative Imaging Systems; and Bob Nicoll, dean of Blizzard Academy.

There will be a 25th anniversary showing of the original Jurassic Park movie, being hosted by “Spaz” Williams, a digital artist who worked on that film.

Can you talk about this year’s keynote and why he was chosen?
We’re thrilled to have ILM head and senior VP, ECD Rob Bredow deliver the keynote address this year. Rob is all about innovation — pushing through scary new directions while maintaining the leadership of artists and technologists.

Rob is the ultimate modern-day practitioner, a digital VFX supervisor who has been disrupting ‘the way it’s always been done’ to move to new ways. He truly reflects the spirit of ILM, which was founded in 1975 and is just one year younger than SIGGRAPH.

A large part of SIGGRAPH is its slant toward students and education. Can you discuss how this came about and why this is important?
SIGGRAPH supports education in all sub-disciplines of computer graphics and interactive techniques, and it promotes and improves the use of computer graphics in education. Our Education Committee sponsors a broad range of projects, such as curriculum studies, resources for educators and SIGGRAPH conference-related activities.

SIGGRAPH has always been a welcoming and diverse community, one that encourages mentorship, and acknowledges that art inspires science and science enables advances in the arts. SIGGRAPH was built upon a foundation of research and education.

How are the Computer Animation Festival films selected?
The Computer Animation Festival has two programs, the Electronic Theater and the VR Theater. Because of the large volume of submissions for the Electronic Theater (over 400), there is a triage committee for the first phase. The CAF Chair then takes the high scoring pieces to a jury comprised of industry professionals. The jury selects then become the Electronic Theater show pieces.

The selections for the VR Theater are made by a smaller panel comprised mostly of sub-committee members that watch each film in a VR headset and vote.

Can you talk more about how SIGGRAPH is tackling AR/VR/AI and machine learning?
Since SIGGRAPH 2018 is about the theme of “Generations,” we took a step back to look at how we got where we are today in terms of AR/VR, and where we are going with it. Much of what we know today couldn’t have been possible without the research and creation of Ivan Sutherland’s 1968 head-mounted display. We have a fanatic panel celebrating the 50-year anniversary of his HMD, which is widely considered and the first VR HMD.

AI tools are newer, and we created a panel that focuses on trends and the future of AI tools in VFX, called “Future Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning Tools for VFX.” This panel gains insight from experts embedded in both the AI and VFX industries and gives attendees a look at how different companies plan to further their technology development.

What is the process for making sure that all aspects of the industry are covered in terms of panels?
Every year new ideas for panels and sessions are submitted by contributors from all over the globe. Those submissions are then reviewed by a jury of industry experts, and it is through this process that panelists and cross-industry coverage is determined.

Each year, the conference chair oversees the program chairs, then each of the program chairs become part of a jury process — this helps to ensure the best program with the most industries represented from across all disciplines.

In the rare case a program committee feels they are missing something key in the industry, they can try to curate a panel in, but we still require that that panel be reviewed by subject matter experts before it would be considered for final acceptance.

 

Dell makes updates to its Precision mobile workstation line

Recently, Dell made updates to its line of Precision mobile workstations targeting the media and entertainment industries. The Dell Precision 7730 and 7530 mobile workstations feature the latest eighth-generation IntelCore and Xeon processors, AMD Radeon WX and Nvidia Quadro professional graphics, 3200MHz SuperSpeed memory and memory capacity up to 128GB.

The Dell Precision 7530 is a 15-inch VR-ready mobile workstation with large PCIe SSD storage capacity, especially for a 15-inch mobile workstation — up to 6TB. Dell says the 7730 enables new uses such as AI and machine learning development and edge inference systems.

Also new is the 15-inch Dell Precision 5530 two-in-one, which targets content creation and editing and features a very thin design. A flexible 360-degree hinge enables multiple modes of interaction, including support for touch and pen. It features the next-generation InfinityEdge 4K Ultra HD display. The Dell Premium pen offers precise pressure sensitivity (4,096 pressure points), tilt functionality and low latency for an experience that is reminiscent of drawing on paper. The new MagLev keyboard design reduces keyboard thickness “without compromising critical keyboard shortcuts in content creation workflows,” and ultra-thin GORE Thermal Insulation keeps the system cool.

This workstation weighs 3.9 pounds and delivers next-generation professional graphics up to Nvidia Quadro P2000. With enhanced 2666MHz memory speeds up to 32GB, users can accelerate their complicated workflows. And with up to 4TB of SSD storage, users can access, transfer and store large 3D, video and multimedia files quickly and easily.

The fully customizable 15-inch Dell Precision 3530 mobile workstation features eighth-generation Intel Core and next-generation Xeon processors, memory speeds up to 2666MHz and Nvidia Quadro P600 professional graphics. It also features a 92WHr battery and wide range of ports, including HDMI 2.0, Thunderbolt and VGA.

GTC embraces machine learning and AI

By Mike McCarthy

I had the opportunity to attend GTC 2018, Nvidia‘s 9th annual technology conference in San Jose this week. GTC stands for GPU Technology Conference, and GPU stands for graphics processing unit, but graphics makes up a relatively small portion of the show at this point. The majority of the sessions and exhibitors are focused on machine learning and artificial intelligence.

And the majority of the graphics developments are centered around analyzing imagery, not generating it. Whether that is classifying photos on Pinterest or giving autonomous vehicles machine vision, it is based on the capability of computers to understand the content of an image. Now DriveSim, Nvidia’s new simulator for virtually testing autonomous drive software, dynamically creates imagery for the other system in the Constellation pair of servers to analyze and respond to, but that is entirely machine-to-machine imagery communication.

The main exception to this non-visual usage trend is Nvidia RTX, which allows raytracing to be rendered in realtime on GPUs. RTX can be used through Nvidia’s OptiX API, as well as Microsoft’s DirectX RayTracing API, and eventually through the open source Vulkan cross-platform graphics solution. It integrates with Nvidia’s AI Denoiser to use predictive rendering to further accelerate performance, and can be used in VR applications as well.

Nvidia RTX was first announced at the Game Developers Conference last week, but the first hardware to run it was just announced here at GTC, in the form of the new Quadro GV100. This $9,000 card replaces the existing Pascal-based GP100 with a Volta-based solution. It retains the same PCIe form factor, the quad DisplayPort 1.4 outputs and the NV-Link bridge to pair two cards at 200GB/s, but it jumps the GPU RAM per card from 16GB to 32GB of HBM2 memory. The GP100 was the first Quadro offering since the K6000 to support double-precision compute processing at full speed, and the increase from 3,584 to 5,120 CUDA cores should provide a 40% increase in performance, before you even look at the benefits of the 640 Tensor Cores.

Hopefully, we will see simpler versions of the Volta chip making their way into a broader array of more budget-conscious GPU options in the near future. The fact that the new Nvidia RTX technology is stated to require Volta architecture CPUs leads me to believe that they must be right on the horizon.

Nvidia also announced a new all-in-one GPU supercomputer — the DGX-2 supports twice as many Tesla V100 GPUs (16) with twice as much RAM each (32GB) compared to the existing DGX-1. This provides 81920 CUDA cores addressing 512GB of HBM2 memory, over a fabric of new NV-Link switches, as well as dual Xeon CPUs, Infiniband or 100GbE connectivity, and 32TB of SSD storage. This $400K supercomputer is marketed as the world’s largest GPU.

Nvidia and their partners had a number of cars and trucks on display throughout the show, showcasing various pieces of technology that are being developed to aid in the pursuit of autonomous vehicles.

Also on display in the category of “actually graphics related” was the new Max-Q version of the mobile Quadro P4000, which is integrated into PNY’s first mobile workstation, the Prevail Pro. Besides supporting professional VR applications, the HDMI and dual DisplayPort outputs allow a total of three external displays up to 4K each. It isn’t the smallest or lightest 15-inch laptop, but it is the only system under 17 inches I am aware of that supports the P4000, which is considered the minimum spec for professional VR implementation.

There are, of course, lots of other vendors exhibiting their products at GTC. I had the opportunity to watch 8K stereo 360 video playing off of a laptop with an external GPU. I also tried out the VRHero 5K Plus enterprise-level HMD, which brings the VR experience to whole other level. Much more affordable is TP-Cast’s $300 wireless upgrade Vive and Rift HMDs, the first of many untethered VR solutions. HTC has also recently announced the Vive Pro, which will be available in April for $800. It increases the resolution by 1/3 in both dimensions to 2880×1600 total, and moves from HDMI to DisplayPort 1.2 and USB-C. Besides VR products, they also had all sorts of robots in various forms on display.

Clearly the world of GPUs has extended far beyond the scope of accelerating computer graphics generation, and Nvidia is leading the way in bringing massive information processing to a variety of new and innovative applications. And if that leads us to hardware that can someday raytrace in realtime at 8K in VR, then I suppose everyone wins.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

Axle Video rebrands as Axle AI

Media management company Axle Video has rebranded as Axle AI. The company has also launched their new Axle AI software, allowing users to automatically index and search large amounts of video, image and audio content.

Axle AI is available either as software, which runs on standard Mac hardware, or as a self-contained software/hardware appliance. Both options provide integrations with leading cloud AI engines. The appliance also includes embedded processing power that supports direct visual search for thousands of hours of footage with no cloud connectivity required. Axle AI has an open architecture, so new third-party capabilities can be added at any time.

Axle has also launched Axle Media Cloud with Wasabi, a 100% cloud-based option for simple media management. The offering is available now and is priced at $400 per month for 10 terabytes of managed storage, 10 user accounts and up to 10 terabytes of downloaded media per month.

In addition, Axle Embedded is a new version of axle software that can be run directly on storage solutions from a range of industry partners, including, G-Technology and Panasas. As with Axle Media Cloud, all of Axle AI’s automated tagging and search capabilities are simple add-ons to the system.