Tag Archives: Adobe

NAB 2019: First impressions

By Mike McCarthy

There are always a slew of new product announcements during the week of NAB, and this year was no different. As a Premiere editor, the developments from Adobe are usually the ones most relevant to my work and life. Similar to last year, Adobe was able to get their software updates released a week before NAB, instead of for eventual release months later.

The biggest new feature in the Adobe Creative Cloud apps is After Effects’ new “Content Aware Fill” for video. This will use AI to generate image data to automatically replace a masked area of video, based on surrounding pixels and surrounding frames. This functionality has been available in Photoshop for a while, but the challenge of bringing that to video is not just processing lots of frames but keeping the replaced area looking consistent across the changing frames so it doesn’t stand out over time.

The other key part to this process is mask tracking, since masking the desired area is the first step in that process. Certain advances have been made here, but based on tech demos I saw at Adobe Max, more is still to come, and that is what will truly unlock the power of AI that they are trying to tap here. To be honest, I have been a bit skeptical of how much AI will impact film production workflows, since AI-powered editing has been terrible, but AI-powered VFX work seems much more promising.

Adobe’s other apps got new features as well, with Premiere Pro adding Free-Form bins for visually sorting through assets in the project panel. This affects me less, as I do more polishing than initial assembly when I’m using Premiere. They also improved playback performance for Red files, acceleration with multiple GPUs and certain 10-bit codecs. Character Animator got a better puppet rigging system, and Audition got AI-powered auto-ducking tools for automated track mixing.

Blackmagic
Elsewhere, Blackmagic announced a new version of Resolve, as expected. Blackmagic RAW is supported on a number of new products, but I am not holding my breath to use it in Adobe apps anytime soon, similar to ProRes RAW. (I am just happy to have regular ProRes output available on my PC now.) They also announced a new 8K Hyperdeck product that records quad 12G SDI to HEVC files. While I don’t think that 8K will replace 4K television or cinema delivery anytime soon, there are legitimate markets that need 8K resolution assets. Surround video and VR would be one, as would live background screening instead of greenscreening for composite shots. No image replacement in post, as it is capturing in-camera, and your foreground objects are accurately “lit” by the screens. I expect my next major feature will be produced with that method, but the resolution wasn’t there for the director to use that technology for the one I am working on now (enter 8K…).

AJA
AJA was showing off the new Ki Pro Go, which records up to four separate HD inputs to H.264 on USB drives. I assume this is intended for dedicated ISO recording of every channel of a live-switched event or any other multicam shoot. Each channel can record up to 1080p60 at 10-bit color to H264 files in MP4 or MOV and up to 25Mb.

HP
HP had one of their existing Z8 workstations on display, demonstrating the possibilities that will be available once Intel releases their upcoming DIMM-based Optane persistent memory technology to the market. I have loosely followed the Optane story for quite a while, but had not envisioned this impacting my workflow at all in the near future due to software limitations. But HP claims that there will be options to treat Optane just like system memory (increasing capacity at the expense of speed) or as SSD drive space (with DIMM slots having much lower latency to the CPU than any other option). So I will be looking forward to testing it out once it becomes available.

Dell
Dell was showing off their relatively new 49-inch double-wide curved display. The 4919DW has a resolution of 5120×1440, making it equivalent to two 27-inch QHD displays side by side. I find that 32:9 aspect ratio to be a bit much for my tastes, with 21:9 being my preference, but I am sure there are many users who will want the extra width.

Digital Anarchy
I also had a chat with the people at Digital Anarchy about their Premiere Pro-integrated Transcriptive audio transcription engine. Having spent the last three months editing a movie that is split between English and Mandarin dialogue, needing to be fully subtitled in both directions, I can see the value in their tool-set. It harnesses the power of AI-powered transcription engines online and integrates the results back into your Premiere sequence, creating an accurate script as you edit the processed clips. In my case, I would still have to handle the translations separately once I had the Mandarin text, but this would allow our non-Mandarin speaking team members to edit the Mandarin assets in the movie. And it will be even more useful when it comes to creating explicit closed captioning and subtitles, which we have been doing manually on our current project. I may post further info on that product once I have had a chance to test it out myself.

Summing Up
There were three halls of other products to look through and check out, but overall, I was a bit underwhelmed at the lack of true innovation I found at the show this year.

Full disclosure, I was only able to attend for the first two days of the exhibition, so I may have overlooked something significant. But based on what I did see, there isn’t much else that I am excited to try out or that I expect to have much of a serious impact on how I do my various jobs.

It feels like most of the new things we are seeing are merely commoditized versions of products that may originally have been truly innovative when they were initially released, but now are just slightly more fleshed out versions over time.

There seems to be much less pioneering of truly new technology and more repackaging of existing technologies into other products. I used to come to NAB to see all the flashy new technologies and products, but now it feels like the main thing I am doing there is a series of annual face-to-face meetings, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Until next year…


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with over 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

Sundance Videos: Watch our editor interviews

postPerspective traveled to Sundance for the first time this year, and it was great. In addition to attending some parties, brunches and panels, we had the opportunity to interview a number of editors who were in Park City to help promote their various projects. (Watch here.)

Billy McMillin

We caught up with the editors on the comedy docu-series Documentary Now!, Michah Gardner and Jordan Kim. We spoke to Courtney Ware about cutting the film Light From Light, as well as Billy McMillin, editor on the documentary Mike Wallace is Here. We also chatted with Phyllis Housen, the editor on director Chinonye Chukwu’s Clemency and Kent Kincannon who cut Hannah Pearl Utt’s comedy, Before you Know It. Finally, we sat down with Bryan Mason, who had the dual roles of cinematographer and editor on Animals.

We hope you enjoy watching these interviews as much as we enjoyed shooting them.

Don’t forget, click here to view!

Oh, and a big shout out to Twain Richardson from Jamaica’s Frame of Reference, who edited and color graded the videos. Thanks Twain!

New codec, workflow options via Red, Nvidia and Adobe

By Mike McCarthy

There were two announcements last week that will impact post production workflows. The first was the launch of Red’s new SDK, which leverages Nvidia’s GPU-accelerated CUDA framework to deliver realtime playback of 8K Red footage. I’ll get to the other news shortly. Nvidia was demonstrating an early version of this technology at Adobe Max in October, and I have been looking forward to this development since I am about to start post on a feature film shot on the Red Monstro camera. This should effectively render the RedRocket accelerator cards obsolete, replacing them with cheaper, multipurpose hardware that can also accelerate other computational tasks.

While accelerating playback of 8K content at full resolution requires a top-end RTX series card from Nvidia (Quadro RTX 6000, Titan RTX or GeForce RTX 2080Ti), the technology is not dependent on RTX’s new architecture (RT and Tensor cores), allowing earlier generation hardware to accelerate smooth playback at smaller frame sizes. Lots of existing Red footage is shot at 4K and 6K, and playback of these files will be accelerated on widely deployed legacy products from previous generations of Nvidia GPU architecture. It will still be a while before this functionality is in the hands of end users, because now Adobe, Apple, Blackmagic and other software vendors have to integrate the new SDK functionality into their individual applications. But hopefully we will see those updates hitting the market soon (targeting late Q1 of 2019).

Encoding ProRes on Windows via Adobe apps
The other significant update, which is already available to users as of this week, is Adobe’s addition of ProRes encoding support on its video apps in Windows. Developed by Apple, ProRes encoding has been available on Mac for a long time, and ProRes decoding and playback has been available on Windows for over 10 years. But creating ProRes files on Windows has always been a challenge. Fixing this was less a technical challenge than a political one, as Apple owns the codec and it is not technically a standard. So while there were some hacks available at various points during that time, Apple has severely restricted the official encoding options available on Windows… until now.

With the 13.0.2 release of Premiere Pro and Media Encoder, as well as the newest update to After Effects, Adobe users on Windows systems can now create ProRes files in whatever flavor they happen to need. This is especially useful since many places require delivery of final products in the ProRes format. In this case, the new export support is obviously a win all the way around.

Adobe Premiere

Now users have yet another codec option for all of their intermediate files, prompting another look at the question: Which codec is best for your workflow? With this release, Adobe users have at least three major options for high-quality intermediate codecs: Cineform, DNxHR and now ProRes. I am limiting the scope to integrated cross-platform codecs supporting 10-bit color depth, variable levels of image compression and customizable frame sizes. Here is a quick overview of the strengths and weaknesses of each option:

ProRes
ProRes was created by Apple over 10 years ago and has become the de-facto standard throughout the industry, regardless of the fact that it is entirely owned by Apple. ProRes is now fully cross-platform compatible, has options for both YUV and RGB color and has six variations, all of which support at least 10-bit color depth. The variable bit rate compression scheme scales well with content complexity, so encoding black or static images doesn’t require as much space as full-motion video. It also supports alpha channels with compression, but only in the 444 variants of the codec.

Recent tests on my Windows 10 workstation resulted in ProRes taking 3x to 5x as much CPU power to playback as similar DNxHR of Cineform files, especially as frame sizes get larger. The codec supports 8K frame sizes but playback will require much more processing power. I can’t even playback UHD files in ProRes 444 at full resolution, while the Cineform and DNxHR files have no problem, even at 444. This is less of concern if you are only working at 1080p.

Multiply those file sizes by four for UHD content (and by 16 for 8K content).

Cineform
Cineform, which has been available since 2004, was acquired by GoPro in 2011. They have licensed the codec to Adobe, (among other vendors) and it is available as “GoPro Cineform” in the AVI or QuickTime sections of the Adobe export window. Cineform is a wavelet compression codec, with 10-bit YUV and 12-bit RGB variants, which like ProRes support compressed alpha channels in the RGB variant. The five levels of encoding quality are selected separately from the format, so higher levels of compression are available for 4444 content compared to the limited options available in the other codecs.

It usually plays back extremely efficiently on Windows, but my recent tests show that encoding to the format is much slower than it used to be. And while it has some level of support outside of Adobe applications, it is not as universally recognized as ProRes or DNxHD.

DNxHD
DNxHD was created by Avid for compressed HD playback and has now been extended to DNxHR (high resolution). It is a fixed bit rate codec, with each variant having a locked multiplier based on resolution and frame rate. This makes it easy to calculate storage needs but wastes space for files that are black or contain a lot of static content. It is available in MXF and Mov wrappers and has five levels of quality. The top option is 444 RGB, and all variants support alpha channels in Mov but uncompressed, which takes a lot of space. For whatever reason, Adobe has greatly optimized DNxHR playback in Premiere Pro, of all variants, in both MXF and Mov wrappers. On my project 6Below, I was able to get 6K 444 files to playback, with lots of effects, without dropping frames. The encodes to and from DNxHR are faster in Adobe apps as well.

So for most PC Adobe users, DNxHR-LB (low bandwidth) is probably the best codec to use for intermediate work. We are using it to offline my current project, with 2.2K DNxHR-LB, Mov files. People with a heavy Mac interchange may lean toward ProRes, but up your CPU specs for the same level of application performance.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

Lenovo intros 15-inch VR-ready ThinkPad P52

Lenovo’s new ThinkPad P52 is a 15-inch, VR-ready and ISV-certified mobile workstation featuring an Nvidia Quadro P3200 GPU. The all-new hexa-core Intel Xeon CPU doubles the memory capacity to 128GB and increases PCIe storage. Lenovo says the ThinkPad excels in animation and visual effects project storage, the creation of large models and datasets, and realtime playback.

“More and more, M&E artists have the need to create on-the-go,” reports Lenovo senior worldwide industry manager for M&E Rob Hoffmann. “Having desktop-like capabilities in a 15-inch mobile workstation, allows artists to remain creative anytime, anywhere.”

The workstation targets traditional ISV workflows, as well as AR and VR content creation or deployment of mobile AI. Lenovo points to Virtalis, a VR and advanced visualization company, as an example of who might take advantage of the workstation.

“Our virtual reality solutions help clients better understand data and interact with it. Being able to take these solutions mobile with the ThinkPad P52 gives us expanded flexibility to bring the technology to life for clients in their unique environments,” says Steve Carpenter, head of solutions development for Virtalis. “The ThinkPad P52 powering our Virtalis Visionary Render software is perfect for engineering and design professionals looking for a portable solution to take their first steps into the endless possibilities of VR.”

The P52 also will feature a 4K UHD display with 400nits, 100% Adobe color gamut and 10-bit color depth. There are dual USB-C Thunderbolt ports supporting the display of 8K video, allowing users to take advantage of the ThinkPad Thunderbolt Workstation Dock.

The ThinkPad P52 will be available later this month.

A glimpse at what was new at NAB

By Lance Holte

I made the trek out to Las Vegas last week for the annual NAB show to take in the latest in post production technology, discuss new trends and products and get lost in a sea of exhibits. With over 1,700 exhibitors, it’s impossible to see everything (especially in the two days I was there), but here are a handful of notable things that caught my eye.

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve Studio 14: While the “non-studio” version is still free, it’s hard to beat the $299 license for the full version of Resolve. As 4K and 3D media becomes increasingly prevalent, and with the release of their micro and mini panels, Resolve can be a very affordable solution for editors, mobile colorists and DITs.

The new editorial and audio tools are particularly appealing to someone like me, who is often more hands-on on the editorial side than the grading side of post. To that regard, the new tracking features look to provide extra ease of use for quick and simple grades. I also love that Blackmagic has gotten rid of the dongles, which removes the hassle of tracking numerous dongles in a post environment where systems and rooms are swapped regularly. Oh, and there’s bin, clip and timeline locking for collaborative workflows, which easily pushes Resolve into the competition for an end-to-end post solution.

Adobe Premiere CC 2017 with After Effects and Audition Adobe Premiere is typically my editorial application of choice, and the increased integration of AE and Audition promise to make an end-to-end Creative Cloud workflow even smoother. I’ve been hoping for a revamp of Premiere’s title tool for a while, and the Essential Graphics panel/new Title Tool appears to greatly increase and streamline Premiere’s motion graphics capabilities — especially as someone who does almost all my graphics work in After Effects and Photoshop. The more integrated the various applications can be, the better; and Adobe has been pushing that aspect for some time now.

On the audio side, Premiere’s Essential Sound Panel tools for volume matching, organization, cleanup and other effects without going directly into Audition (or exporting for ProTools, etc.) will be really helpful, especially for smaller projects and offline mixes. And as a last note, the new Camera Shake Deblur effect in After Effects is fantastic.

Dell UltraSharp 4K HDR Monitor — There were a lot of great looking HDR monitors at the show, but I liked that this one fell in the middle of the pack in terms of price point ($2K), with solid specs (1000 nits, 97.7% of P3, and 76.9% of Rec. 2020) and a reasonable size (27 inches). Seems like a good editorial or VFX display solution, though the price might be pushing budgetary constraints for smaller post houses. I wish it was DCI 4K instead of UHD and a little more affordable, but that will hopefully come with time.

On that note, I really like HP’s DreamColor Z31x Studio Display. It’s not HDR, but it’s 99% of the P3 colorspace, and it’s DCI 4K — as well as 2K, by multiplying every pixel at 2K resolution into exactly 4 pixels — so there’s no odd-numbered scaling and sharpening required. Also, I like working with large monitors, especially at high resolutions. It offers automated (and schedulable) color calibration, though I’d love to see a non-automated display in the future if it could bring the price down. I could see the HP monitor as a great alternative to using more expensive HDR displays for the majority of workstations at many post houses.

As another side note, Flanders Scientific’s OLED 55-inch HDR display was among the most beautiful I’ve ever seen, but with numerous built-in interfaces and scaling capabilities, it’s likely to come at a higher price.

Canon 4K600STZ 4K HDR laser projector — This looks to be a great projection solution for small screening rooms or large editorial bays. It offers huge 4096×2400 resolution, is fairly small and compact, and apparently has very few restraints when it comes to projection angle, which would be nice for a theatrical edit bay (or a really nice home theater). The laser light source is also attractive because it will be low maintenance. At $63K, it’s at the more affordable end of 4K projector pricing.

Mettle 360 Degree/VR Depth plug-ins: I haven’t worked with a ton of 360-degree media, but I have dealt with the challenges of doing depth-related effects in a traditional single-camera space, so the fact that Mettle is doing depth-of-field effects, dolly effects and depth volumetric effects with 360-degree/VR content is pretty incredible. Plus, their plug-ins are designed to integrate with Premiere and After Effects, which is good news for an Adobe power user. I believe they’re still going to be in beta for a while, but I’m very curious to see how their plug-ins play out.

Finally, in terms of purely interesting tech, Sony’s Bravia 4K acoustic surface TVs are pretty wild. Their displays are OLED, so they look great, and the fact that the screen vibrates to create sound instead of having separate speakers or an attached speaker bar is awfully cool. Even at very close viewing, the screen doesn’t appear to move, though it can clearly be felt vibrating when touched. A vibrating acoustic surface raises some questions about mounting, so it may not be perfect for every environment, but interesting nonetheless.


Lance Holte is an LA-based post production supervisor and producer. He has spoken and taught at such events as NAB, SMPTE, SIGGRAPH and Createasphere. You can email him at lance@lanceholte.com.

Steve Holyhead

AJA brings on Steve Holyhead from Fox Broadcasting

Steve Holyhead has joined AJA as senior product manager for desktop products. He joins AJA from Fox Broadcasting Company where he was director of technical operations.

Holyhead recently moved to Grass Valley, where AJA is headquartered, from Los Angeles. In addition to working at Fox, his 20-plus years of industry experience includes developing professional digital video workflows with BloomCast, managing post operations at Discovery Communications and working as a technology evangelist, producer and technical marketing manager for both Discreet (now Autodesk) and Avid. He has also developed Avid and Adobe training courses for multiple partners, including Lynda.com.

“Steve brings a blend of real-world production and technology developer experience to AJA. His understanding of production, broadcast and post, together with his experience both designing enterprise scale workflows and as a master trainer for Adobe, Apple and Avid products, will make powerful contributions to the success of our customers,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

Updates to Adobe Creative Cloud include project sharing, more

By Brady Betzel

Adobe has announced team project sharing!! You read that right — the next Adobe Creative Cloud update, to be released later this year, will have the one thing I’ve always said kept Adobe from punching into Avid’s NLE stake with episodic TV and film editors.

While “one thing” is a bit of hyperbole, Team Projects will be much more than just simple sharing within Adobe Premiere Pro. Team Projects, in its initial stage, will also work with Adobe After Effects, but not with Adobe Audition… at least not in the initial release. Technically speaking, sharing projects within Creative Cloud seems like it will follow a check-in/check-out workflow, allowing you to approve another person’s updates to override yours or vice-versa.

During a virtual press demo, I was shown how the Team Projects will work. I asked if it would work “offline,” meaning without Internet connection. Adobe’s representative said that Team Projects will work with intermittent Internet disconnections, but not fully offline. I asked this because many companies do not allow their NLEs or their storage to be attached to any Internet-facing network connections. So if this is important to you, you may need to do a little more research once we actually can get our hands on this release.

My next question was if Team Projects was a paid service. The Adobe rep said they are not talking the business side of this update yet. I took this as an immediate yes, which is fine, but officially they have no comment on pricing or payment structure, or if it will even cost extra at all.

Immediately after I asked my last question, I realized that this will definitely tie in with the Creative Cloud service, which likely means a monthly fee. Then I wondered where exactly will my projects live? In the cloud? I know the media can live locally on something like an Avid ISIS or Nexis, but will the projects be shared over the Internet? Will we be able to share individual sequences and/or bins or just entire projects? There are so many questions and so many possibilities in my mind, it really could change the multiple editor NLE paradigm if Adobe can manage it properly. No pressure Adobe.

Other Updates
Some other Premiere Pro updates include: improved caption and subtitling tools; updated Lumetri Color tools, including much needed improvement to the HSL secondaries color picker; automatic recognition of VR/360 video and what type of mapping it needs; improved virtual reality workflow; destination publishing will now include Behance (No Instagram export option?); improved Live Text Templates, including a simplified workflow that allows you to share Live Text Templates with other users (will even sync Fonts if they aren’t present from Typekit) and without need for an After Effects License; native DNxHD and DNxHR QuickTime export support, audio effects from Adobe Audition, Global FX mute to toggle on and off all video effects in a sequence; and, best of all, a visual keyboard to map shortcuts! Finally, another prayer for Premiere Pro has been answered. Unfortunately, After Effects users will have to wait for a visual keyboard for shortcut assignment (bummer).

After Effects has some amazing updates in addition to Project Sharing, including a new 3D render engine! Wow! I know this has been an issue for anybody trying to do 3D inside of After Effects via Cineware. Most people will purchase VideoCopilot’s Element 3D to get around this, but for those that want to work directly with Maxon’s Cinema 4D, this may be the update that alleviates some of your 3D disdain via Cineware. They even made mention that you do not need a GPU for this to work well. Oh, how I would love for this to come to fruition. Finally, there’s a new video preview architecture for faster playback that will hopefully allow for a much more fluid and dynamic playback experience.

After Effects C4D RenderAdobe Character Animator has some updates too. If you haven’t played with Character Animator you need to download it now and just watch the simple tutorials that come with the app — you will be amazed, or at least your kids will be. If you haven’t seen how the Simpson’s used Character Animator, you should check it out with a YouTube search. It is pretty sweet. In terms of incoming updates, there will be faster and easier puppet creation, improved round trip workflow between Photoshop and Illustrator, and the ability to use grouped keyboard triggers.

Summing Up
In the end, the future is still looking up for the Adobe Creative Cloud video products, like Premiere Pro and After Effects. If there is one thing to jump out of your skin over in the forthcoming update it is Team Projects. If Team Projects works and works well, the NLE tide may be shifting. That is a big if though because there have been some issues with previous updates — like media management within Premiere Pro — that have yet to be completely ironed out.

Like I said, if Adobe does this right it will be game-changing for them in the shared editing environment. In my opinion, Adobe is beginning to get its head above water in the video department. I would love to see these latest updates come in guns blazing and working. From the demo I saw it looks promising, but really there is only one way to find out: hands-on experience.

Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com, and follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff. Earlier this year, Brady was nominated for an Emmy for his work on Disney’s Unforgettable Christmas Celebration.

Experiencing autism in VR via Happy Finish

While people with autism might “appear” to be like the rest of us, the way they experience the world is decidedly different. Imagine sensory overload times 10. In an effort to help the public understand autism, the UK’s National Autistic Society and agency Don’t Panic have launched a campaign called “Too Much Information” (#autismTMI) that is set to challenge myths, misconceptions and stereotypes relating to this neurobiological disorder.

In order to help tell that story, the NAS called on London’s Happy Finish to help create a 360-degree VR film that puts viewers into the shoes of a child with autism during a visit to the store. A 2D film had previously been developed based on the experience of a 10-year-old boy autistic boy named Alexander. Happy Finish provided visual effects for that version, which, since March of last year, has over 54 million views and over 850K shares. The new 360-degree VR experience takes the viewer into Alexander’s world in a more immersive way.

After interviewing several autistic adults as part of the research, Happy Finish worked on this idea that aims to trigger viewer’s empathy and understanding. Working with Don’t Panic and The National Autistic Society, they share Alexander’s experience in an immersive and moving way.

The piece was shot by DP Michael Hornbogen using a six-camera GoPro array in 3D printed housing. For stitching, Happy Finish called on Autopano by Kolor, The Foundry’s Nuke and Adobe After Effects. Editing was in Adobe Premiere. Color grading was via Blackmagic’s Resolve.

“It was a long process of compositing using various tools,” explains Jamie Mossahebi, director of the VR shooting at Happy Finish. “We created 18 versions and amended and tweaked based on initial feedback from autistic adults.”

He says that most of the studio’s VR experiences aim to create something comfortable and pleasant, but this one needed to be uncomfortable while remaining engaging. “The main challenge was to be as realistic as possible, for that, we focused a lot on the sound design as well as a testing a wide variety of visual effects, selecting the key ones that contributed to making it as immersive and as close to a sensory overload as possible,” explains Mossahebi, who directed the VR film.

“This is Don’t Panic’s first experience of creating a virtual reality campaign,” says Richard Beer, creative director of Don’t Panic. “The process of creating a virtual reality film has a whole different set of rules: it’s about creating a place for people to visit and a person for them to become, rather than simply telling a story. This interactivity of virtual reality gives it a unique sense of “presence” — it has the power to take us somewhere else in time and space, to help us feel, just for a while, what it’s like to be someone else – which is why it was the perfect tool to communicate exactly what a sensory overload feels like for someone with autism for the NAS.”

Sponsored by Tangle Teaser and Intu, the film will tour shopping centers around the UK and will also be available through Autism TMI Virtual Reality Experience view app.

Learning about LTO and Premiere workflows

By Chelsea Taylor

In late March, I attended a workflow event by Facilis Technology and StorageDNA in New York City. I didn’t know much going in other than it would be about collaborative workflows and shared storage for Adobe Premiere. While this event was likely set up to sell some systems, I did end up learning some worthwhile information about archiving and backup.

Full disclosure: going into this event I knew very little about LTO archiving. Previously I had been archiving all of my projects by throwing a hard drive into the corner of my edit. Well, not really but close! It seems that a lot of companies out there don’t put too much importance on archiving until after it becomes a problem (“All of our edits are crashing and we don’t know why!”).

At my last editing job where we edited short form content on Avid, our media manager would consolidate projects in Avid, create a FileMaker database that cataloged footage, manually add metadata, then put the archived files onto different G-Tech G-RAID drives (which of course could die after a couple of years). In short, it wasn’t the best way to archive and backup media, especially when an editor wanted to find something. They would have to walk over to the computer where the database was, figure out how to use the UI, search for the project (If it had the right metadata), find the physical drive, plug the drive into their machine, go through different files/folders until they found what they were looking for, copy the however many large files to the SAN, and then start working. Suffice to say I had a lot to learn about archiving and was very excited to attend this event.

I arrived at the event about 30 minutes early, which turned out to be a good thing because I was immediately greeted by some of the experts and presenters from Facilis and StorageDNA. Not fully realizing who I was talking to, I started asking tons of questions about their products. What does StorageDNA do? How can it integrate with Premiere? Why is LTO tape archiving better? Who adds the metadata? How fast can you access the backup? And before I knew it, I was in a heated discussion with Jeff Krueger, worldwide VP of sales at StorageDNA, and Doug Hynes, director of product and solution marketing at StorageDNA, about their products and the importance of archiving. Fully inspired to archive and with tons more questions, our conversation got cut short as the event was about to begin.

While the Facilis offerings look cool (I want all of them!), I wasn’t at the event to buy things — I wanted to hear about the workflow and integration with Adobe Premiere (which is a language I better understand). As someone who would be actually using these products and not in charge of buying them, I didn’t care about the tech specs or new features. “Secure sharing with permissions. Low-level media management. Block-level virtualized storage pools.” It was hardware spec after hardware spec (which you can check out on their website). As the presenter spoke of the new features and specifications of their new models, I just kept thinking about what Jeff Krueger had told me right before the event about archiving, which I will share with you here.

StorageDNA presented on a product line called DNAevolution, which is an archive engine built on LTO tapes. Each model provides different levels of LTO automation, LTO drives and server hardware. As an editor, I was more concerned with the workflow.

The StorageDNA Workflow for Premiere
1. Card contents are ingested onto the SAN.
2. The high-res files are written to LTO/ LTFS through DNAevolution and become permanent camera master files.
3. Low-res proxies are created and ingested onto the SAN for use in editorial. DNAevolution is pointed to the proxies, indexes them and links to the high-res clips on LTO.
4. Once the files are written to and verified on LTO, you can delete the high-res files from your spinning disk storage.
5. The editor works with the low-res proxies in Premiere Pro.
6. When complete, the editor exports an EDL that DNAevolution parses and locates the high-res files on LTO from the database.
7. DNAevolution restores high-res files to the finishing station or SAN storage.
8. The editor can relink the media and distribute in high-res/4K.

The StorageDNA Archive Workflow
1. In the DNAevolution Archive Console, select your Premiere Pro project file.
2. DNAevolution scans the project, and generates a list of files to be archived. It then writes all associated media files and the project itself to LTO tape(s).
3. Once the files are written to and verified on LTO, you can delete the high-res files from your spinning disk storage.

Why I Was impressed
All of your media is immediately backed up, ensuring it is in a safe place and not taking up your local or shared storage. You can delete the high-res files from your SAN storage immediately and work with proxies, onlining later down the line. The problem I’ve had with SAN storage is that it fills up very quickly with large files, eventually slowing down your systems and leading to playback problems. Why have all of your RAW unused media just sitting there eating up your valuable space when you can free it up immediately?

DNAevolution works easily with Adobe’s Premiere, Prelude and Media Encoder. It uses the Adobe CC toolset to automate the process of creating LTO/LTFS camera masters while creating previews via Media Encoder.

DNAevolution archives all media from your Premiere projects with a single click and notifies you if files are missing. It also checks your files for existing camera and clip metadata. Meaning if you add all of that in at the start it will make archiving much easier.

You have direct access to files on LTO tape, enabling third-party applications access to media directly on LTO, such as transcoding, partial restore and playout. DNAevolution’s Archive Asset Management toolset allows you to browse/search archived content and provides proxy playback. It even has a drag and drop functionality with Premiere where you literally drop a file straight from the archive into your Premiere timeline, with little rendering, and start editing.

I have never tested an LTO archive workflow and am curious what other people’s experiences have been like. Feel free to leave your thoughts on LTO vs. Cloud vs. Disk in the comments below.

Chelsea Taylor is a freelance editor who has worked on a wide range of content: from viral videos and sizzles to web series and short films. She also works as an assistant editor on feature films and documentaries. Check out her site a at StillRenderingProductions.com.

Automatic Duck’s Wes Plate talks about building bridges

By Randi Altman

If you’ve worked in post production during the past 14 years, there is a very good chance you know Automatic Duck and its president, Wes Plate. Over their time in business, Wes and his father, Harry, have created a number of software tools designed to make different programs and formats work together… the ultimate facilitators.

In 2011, Automatic Duck licensed its technology to Adobe, and Wes joined them as head of its Prelude team. While Adobe had acquired the technological assets of Automatic Duck, it did not acquire Automatic Duck, the company.

Fast forward a few years and the Plates and Automatic Duck are back with new products. As you might expect, Automatic Duck Ximport AE and Automatic Duck Media Copy 4.0 are designed to make post pros’ lives easier. Ximport AE transfers entire timelines, including cuts, third-party effects and transitions from Final Cut Pro X to Adobe After Effects. Media Copy 4.0 uses AAF and XML to simplify copying and moving media files from any Final Cut Pro 7, Final Cut Pro X or Avid Media Composer/Symphony project. Both products are being sold via Red Giant.

XimportAE-After Effects copy

XimportAE — After Effects

On the heels of this news, we reached out to Wes Plate, who, after working for Adobe for two years, is back at the family business.

When you joined Adobe, they bought your technology. How did that work with this AE plug-in?
We do have the ability to use some of what Adobe acquired from us, but we are also limited in some ways. We told them we had an idea for a product — translating Final Cut Pro X into After Effects, and they said, “Okay.” We used some of the After Effects code from the past, but we also had to add a whole bunch of new code for Final Cut Pro X. We are still really good working partners with Adobe and we could not have made this product without rewriting everything from scratch without their help or without their permission.

Why now, and why this?
After leaving Adobe at the start of 2014, I was trying to figure what was going to be next. At that same time, I had been hearing a lot of people on social media talking about how Final Cut Pro X had improved and become a great NLE, so I gave it a try. I really enjoy using FCP X as an editing tool, but while I am editing I want to take clips or a section of timeline and bring it in to After Effects… it’s how I work.

Harry and I were looking for a project, Final Cut Pro X is growing in the marketplace, and I need to get from Final Cut Pro X to After Effects if I am going to use it as an NLE. All of that together meant Automatic Duck should build a bridge from Final Cut Pro X to After Effects.

XimportAE — Final Cut Pro X copy

XimportAE-Final Cut Pro X

Before your plug-in, how were people getting from FCP X to After Effects?
When I started down this path, there was a free utility on the market that would translate a Final Cut Pro X XML into a file format called JavaScript; After Effects would then run that JavaScript to create a comp. I tried it but I couldn’t make it work, which gave us even more reason to jump into this. That particular tool is now in version two and available for purchase through the App Store, but we still feel like what we are creating makes much more sense. Another option is to use Intelligent Assistance’s XtoCC app to convert FCPX XML to FCP7 XML and then import that into After Effects. But that workflow is also not as complete as what Ximport AE can do.

Makes more sense how?
Our solution makes it super easy to get from Final Cut Pro X to After Effects. To get from Final Cut Pro X to After Effects, the first step is to export the XML, then switch to After Effects and import our new product, Automatic Duck Ximport AE. You can change some settings or change some options, but essentially all you have to do now is open the XML file and our plugin brings it directly to After Effects.

Red Giant is selling your new products. Can you explain the relationship?
There is an enormous amount of work that goes into selling a product. What we enjoy the most is making the product, interacting with users and making sure their problems are solved, but dealing with credit cards and that type of thing is less interesting to us and takes our attention away from what we want to do.

Our friend Stu Maschwitz, who designed Magic Bullet, and also Peder Norrby from Trapcode, have been very happy with their relationship with Red Giant, which is essentially publishing their products and doing the sales, marketing and support. Another benefit for us using Red Giant‘s infrastructure for products and distribution is we are now able to offer trial versions of Ximport AE and also Media Copy, our media copying utility.

Media Copy

Media Copy

As we look toward future product development, we’ll be evaluating FCPX as an editing platform to invest in and spend considerable time developing solutions for. The great thing about our partnership with Red Giant is that it gives us access to their expertise and resources. I can foresee opportunities to partner up on products that, all by ourselves, we might not be able to execute or have what we need to make some workflows and solutions possible. I’m excited about what we’ll be able to do both with Red Giant and opportunities that we see coming forward from the FCPX landscape.

Can you talk about Automatic Duck Classic and how that came to be?
After joining Adobe, Automatic Duck retained some products that we were allowed to sell, but we just didn’t have the time to properly support them. So instead we made the products available for free on our website. When we started to prepare for the relaunch and updated our website the download links for the free stuff went away. We didn’t realize people still needed those tools, and I kept seeing posts on social media asking where the links went. We realized that there was still a need for people to get projects between FCP7 and Avid. The old products that we used to give away for free will be coming back on the website at no cost.

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For more details on the products click here.