Tag Archives: ACE Eddie Awards

ACE Eddie Awards: Parasite and Jojo Rabbit among winners

By Dayna McCallum

The 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards concluded with wins for Parasite (edited by Jinmo Yang) for Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Jojo Rabbit (edited by Tom Eagles) for Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy). Yang’s win marks the first time in ACE Eddie Awards history that a foreign language film won the top prize.

The winner of the Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) category has gone on to win the Oscar for film editing in 11 of the last 15 years. In other feature categories, Toy Story 4 (edited by Axel Geddes, ACE) won Best Edited Animated Feature Film and Apollo 11 (edited by Todd Douglas Miller) won Best Edited Documentary.

For the second year in a row, Killing Eve won for Best Edited Drama Series (Commercial Television) for “Desperate Measures” (edited by Dan Crinnion). Tim Porter, ACE, took home his second Eddie for Game of Thrones “The Long Night” in the Best Edited Drama Series (Non-Commercial Television) category, and Chernobyl “Vichnaya Pamyat” (edited by Jinx Godfrey and Simon Smith) won Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television.

Other television winners included Better Things “Easter” (edited by Janet Weinberg) for Best Edited Comedy Series (Commercial Television), and last year’s Eddie winner for Killing Eve,  Gary Dollner, ACE, for Fleabag “Episode 2.1″ in the Best Edited Comedy Series (Non-Commercial Television) category.

Lauren Shuler Donner received the ACE’s Golden Eddie honor, presented to her by Marvel’s Kevin Feige. In her heartfelt acceptance speech, she noted to an appreciative crowd, “I’ve witnessed many times an editor make chicken salad our of chicken shit.”

Alan Heim and Tina Hirsch received Career Achievement awards presented by filmmakers Nick Cassavetes and Ron Underwood respectively. Cathy Repola, national executive director of the Motion Picture Editors Guild, was presented  with the ACE Heritage Award. American Cinema Editors president Stephen Rivkin, ACE, presided over the evening’s festivities for the final time, as his second term is ending.  Actress D’Arcy Carden, star of NBC’s The Good Place, served as the evening’s host.

Here is the complete list of winners:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMA):
Parasite 
Jinmo Yang

Tom Eagles – Jojo Rabbit

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
Jojo Rabbit
Tom Eagles

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Toy Story 4
Axel Geddes, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Apollo 11
Todd Douglas Miller

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):
What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali
Jake Pushinsky, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Better Things: “Easter”
Janet Weinberg, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Fleabag: “Episode 2.1”
Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION: 
Killing Eve: “Desperate Times”
Dan Crinnion

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Game of Thrones: “The Long Night”
Tim Porter, ACE

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Chernobyl: “Vichnaya Pamyat”
Jinx Godfrey & Simon Smith

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
VICE Investigates: “Amazon on Fire”
Cameron Dennis, Kelly Kendrick, Joe Matoske, Ryo Ikegami

ANNE V. COATES AWARD FOR STUDENT EDITING
Chase Johnson – California State University, Fullerton


Main Image: Parasite editor Jinmo Yang

Ford v Ferrari’s co-editors discuss the cut

By Oliver Peters

After a failed attempt to acquire European carmaker Ferrari, an outraged Henry Ford II sets out to trounce Enzo Ferrari on his own playing field — automobile endurance racing. That is the plot of 20th Century Fox’s Ford v Ferrari, directed by James Mangold. In the end, Ford’s effort falls short, leading him to independent car designer Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon). Shelby’s outspoken lead test driver Ken Miles (Christian Bale) complicates the situation by making an enemy out of Ford senior VP Leo Beebe.

Michael McCusker

Nevertheless, Shelby and his team are able to build one of the greatest race cars ever — the GT40 MkII — setting up a showdown between the two auto legends at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans.

The challenge of bringing this clash of personalities to the screen was taken on by director James Mangold (Logan, Wolverine, 3:10 to Yuma) and his team of long-time collaborators.

I recently spoke with film editors Michael McCusker, ACE, (Walk the Line, 3:10 to Yuma, Logan) and Andrew Buckland (The Girl On the Train) — both of whom were recently nominated for an Oscar and ACE Eddie Award for their work on the film — about what it took to bring Ford v Ferrari together.

The post team for this film has worked with James Mangold on quite a few films. Tell me a bit about the relationship.
Michael McCusker: I cut my very first movie, Walk the Line, for Jim 15 years ago and have since cut his last six movies. I was the first assistant editor on Kate & Leopold, which was shot in New York in 2001. That’s where I met Andrew, who was hired as one of the local New York film assistants. We became fast friends. Andrew moved to LA in 2009, and I hired him to assist me on Knight & Day.

Andrew Buckland

I always want to keep myself available for Jim — he chooses good material, attracts great talent and is a filmmaker who works across multiple genres. Since I’ve worked with him, I’ve cut a musical movie, a western, a rom-com, an action movie, a straight-up superhero movie, a dystopian superhero movie and now a racing film.

As a film editor, it must be great not to get typecast for any particular cutting style.
McCusker: Exactly. I worked for David Brenner for years as his first. He was able to cross genres, and that’s what I wanted to do. I knew even then that the most important decisions I would make would be choosing projects. I couldn’t have foreseen that Jim was going to work across all these genres — I simply knew that we worked well together and that the end product was good.

In preparing for Ford v Ferrari, did you study any other recent racing films, like Ron Howard’s Rush?
McCusker: I saw that movie, and liked it. Jim was aware of it, too, but I think he wanted to do something a little more organic. We watched a lot of older racing films, like Steve McQueen’s Le Mans and John Frankenheimer’s Grand Prix.

Jim’s original intention was to play the racing in long takes and bring the audience along for the ride. As he was developing the script, and we were in preproduction, it became clear that there was more drama for him to portray during the racing sequences than he anticipated. So the races took on more of an energized pace.

Energized in what way? Do you mean in how you cut it or in a change of production technique, like more stunt cameras and angles?
McCusker: I was fortunate to get involved about two-and-a-half months prior to the start of production. We were developing the Le Mans race in previs. This required a lot of editing and discussions about shot design and figuring out what the intercutting was going to be during that sequence, which is like the fourth act of the movie.

You’re dealing with Mollie and Peter [Miles’ wife and son] at home watching the race, the pit drama, what’s going on with Shelby and his crew, with Ford and Leo Beebe and also, of course, what’s going on in the car with Ken. It’s a three-act movie unto itself, so Jim was trying to figure out how it was all going to work before he had to shoot it. That’s where I came in. The frenetic pace of Le Mans was more a part of the writing process — and part of the writing process was the previs. The trick was how to make sure we weren’t just following cars around a track. That’s where redundancy can tend to beleaguer an audience in racing movies.

What was the timeline for production and post?
McCusker: I started at the end of May 2018. Production began at the beginning of August and went all the way through to the end of November. We started post in earnest at the beginning of November of last year, took some time off for the holidays, and then showed the film to the studios around February or March.

When did you realize you were going to need help?
The challenge was that there was going to be a lot of racing footage, which meant there was going to be a lot of footage. I knew I was going to need a strong co-editor, so Andrew was the natural choice. He had been cutting on his own and cutting with me over the years. We share a common approach to editing and have a similar aesthetic.

There was a point when things got really intense and we needed another pair of hands, so I brought in Dirk Westervelt to help out for a couple of months. That kept our noses above water, but the process was really enjoyable. We were never in a crisis mode. We got a great response from preview audiences and, of course, that calms everybody down. At that point it was just about quality control and making sure we weren’t resting on our laurels.

How long was your initial cut, and what was your process for trimming the film down to the present run time?
McCusker: We’re at 2:30:00 right now and I think the first cut was 3:10 or 3:12. The Le Mans section was longer. The front end of the movie had more scenes in it. We ended up lifting some scenes and rearranging others. Plus, the basic trimming of scenes brought the length down.

But nothing was the result of a panic, like, “Oh my God, we’ve got to get to 2:30!” There were no demands by the studio or any pressures we placed upon ourselves to hit a particular running time. I like to say that there’s real time and there’s cinematic time. You can watch Once Upon a Time in America, which is 3:45, and feels like it’s an hour. Or you can watch an 89-minute movie and feel like it’s drudgery. We just wanted to make sure we weren’t overstaying our welcome.

How extensively did you rearrange scenes during the edit? Or did the structure of the film stay pretty much as scripted?
McCusker: To a great degree it stayed as scripted. We had some scenes in the beginning that we felt were a little bit tangential and weren’t serving the narrative directly, and those were cut.

The real endeavor of this movie starts the moment that these two guys [Shelby and Miles] decide to tackle the challenge of developing this car. There’s a scene where Miles sees the car for the first time at LAX. We understood that we had to get to that point in a very efficient way, but also set up all the other characters — their motives and their desires.

It’s an interesting movie, because it starts off with a lot of characters. But then it develops into a movie about two guys and their friendship. So it goes from an ensemble piece to being about Ken and Carroll, while at the same time the scope of the movie is opening up and becoming larger as the racing is going on. For us, the trickiest part was the front end — to make sure we spent enough time with each character so that we understood them, but not so much time that audience would go, “Enough already! Get on with it!”

Did that help inform your cutting style for this film?
McCusker: I don’t think so. Where it helped was knowing the sound of the broadcasters and race announcers. I liked Chris Economaki and Jim McKay — guys who were broadcasting the races when I was a kid. I was intrigued about how they gave us the narrative of the race. It came in handy while we were making this movie, because we were able to get our hands on some of Jim McKay’s actual coverage of Le Mans and used it in the movie. That brings so much authenticity.

Let’s talk sound. I would imagine the sound design was integral to your rough cuts. How did you tackle that?
Andrew Buckland: We were fortunate to have the sound team on very early during preproduction. We were cutting in a 5.1 environment, so we wanted to create sound design early. The engine sounds might not have been the exact sounds that would end up in the final, but they were adequate enough to allow you to experience the scenes as intended. Because we needed to get Jim’s response early, some of the races were cut with the production sound — from the live mics during filming. This allowed Jim and us to quickly see how the scenes would flow.

Other scenes were cut strictly MOS because the sound design would have been way too complicated for the initial cut of the scene. Once the scene was cut visually, we’d hand over the scene to sound supervisor Don Sylvester, who was able to provide us with a set of 5.1 stems. That was great, because we could recut and repurpose those stems for other races.

McCusker: We had developed a strategy with Don to split the sound design into four or five stems to give us enough discrete channels to recut these sequences. The stems were a palette of interior perspectives, exterior perspectives, crowds, car-bys, and so on. By employing this strategy, we didn’t need to continually turn over the cut to sound for patch-up work.

Then, as Don went out and recorded the real cars and was developing the actual sounds for what was going to be used in the mix, he’d generate new stems and we would put them into the Media Composer. This was extremely informative to Jim, because he could experience our Avid temp mix in 5.1 and give notes, which ultimately informed the final sound design and the mix.

What about temp music? Did you also weave that into your rough cuts?
McCusker: Ted Caplan, our music editor, has also worked with Jim for 15 years. He’s a bit of a renaissance man — a screenwriter, a novelist, a one-time musician and a sound designer in his own right. When he sits down to work with music, he’s coming at it from a story point-of-view. He has a very instinctual knowledge of where music should start, and it happens to dovetail into the aesthetic that Jim, Andrew, and I are working toward. None of us like music to lead scenes in a way that anticipates what the scene is going to be about before you experience it.

For this movie, it was challenging to develop what the musical tone of the movie would be. Ted was developing the temp track along with us from a very early stage. We found over time that not one particular musical style was going to work. This is a very complex score. It includes a kind of surf-rock sound with Carroll Shelby in LA, an almost jaunty, lounge jazz sound for Detroit and the Ford executives, and then the hard-driving rhythmic sound for the racing.

The final score was composed by Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders.

I presume you were housed in multiple cutting rooms at a central facility.
McCusker: We cut at 20th Century Fox, where Jim has a large office space. We cut Logan and Wolverine there before this movie. It has several cutting spaces and I was situated between Andrew and Don. Ted was next to Don and John Berri, our additional editor. Assistants were right around the corner. It makes for a very efficient working environment.

Since the team was cutting with Avid Media Composer, did any of its features stand out to you for this film?
Both: FluidMorph! (laughing)

McCusker: FluidMorph, speed-ramping — we often had to manipulate the shot speeds to communicate the speed of the cars. A lot of these cars were kit cars that could drive safely at a certain speed for photography, but not at race speed. So we had to manipulate the speed a lot to get the sense of action that these cars have.

What about Avid’s ScriptSync? I know a lot of narrative editors love it.
McCusker: I used ScriptSync once a few years ago and I never cut a scene faster. I was so excited. Then I watched it, and it was terrible. To me there’s so much more to editing than hitting the next line of dialogue. I’m more interested in the lines between the lines — subtext. I do understand the value of it in certain applications. For instance, I think it’s great on straight comedy. It’s helpful to get around and find things when you are shooting tons of coverage for a particular joke. But for me, it’s not something I lean on. I mark up my own dailies and find stuff that way.

Tell me a bit more about your organizational process. Do you start with a Kem roll or stringouts of selected takes?
McCusker: I don’t watch dailies, at least in a traditional sense. I don’t start in the morning, watch the dailies and then cut. And I don’t ask my assistants to organize any of my dailies in bins. I come in and grab the scene that I have in front on me. I’ll look at the last take of every set-up quickly and then I spend an enormous amount of time — particularly on complex scenes — creating a bin structure that I can work with.

Sometimes it’s the beats in a scene, sometimes I organize by shot size, sometimes by character — it depends on what’s driving the scene. I learn my footage by organizing it. I remember shot sizes. I remember what was shot from set-up to set-up. I have a strong visual memory of where things are in a bin. So, if I ask an assistant to do that, then I’m not going to remember it. If there are a lot of resets or restarts in a take, I’ll have the assistant mark those up. But, I’ll go through and mark up beats or pivotal points in a scene, or particularly beautiful moments, and then I’ll start cutting.

Buckland: I’ve adopted a lot of Mike’s methodology, mainly because I assisted Mike on a few films. But it actually works for me, as well. I have a similar aesthetic to Mike.

Was this was shot digitally?
McCusker: It was primarily shot with ARRI Alexa 65 LFs, plus some other small-format cameras. A lot of it was shot with old anamorphic lenses on the Alexa that allowed them to give it a bit of a vintage feeling. It’s interesting that as you watch it, you see the effect of the old lenses. There’s a fall-off on the edges, which is kind of cool. There were a couple of places where the subject matter was framed into the curve of the lens, which affects the focus. But we stuck with it, because it feels “of the time.”

Since the film takes place in the 1960s and has a lot of racing sequences, I assume there a lot of VFX?
McCusker: The whole movie is a period film and we would temp certain things in the Avid for the rough cuts. John Berri was wrangling visual effects. He’s a master in the Avid and also Adobe After Effects. He has some clever ways of filling in backgrounds or greenscreens with temp elements to give the director an idea of what’s going to go there. We try to do as much temp work in the Avid as we are capable of doing, but there’s so much 3D visual effects work in this movie that we weren’t able to do that all of the time.

The racing is real. The cars are real. The visual effects work was for a lot of the backgrounds. The movie was shot almost entirely in Los Angeles with some second unit footage shot in Georgia. The modern-day Le Mans track isn’t at all representative of what Le Mans was in 1966, so there was no way to shoot that. Everything had to be doubled and then augmented with visual effects. In addition to Georgia, where they shot most of the actual racing for Le Mans, they went to France to get some shots of the actual town of Le Mans. Of those, I think only about four of those shots are left. (laughs)

Any final thoughts about how this film turned out?
McCusker: I’m psyched that people seem to like the film. Our concern was that we had a lot of story to tell. Would we wear audiences out? We continually have people tell us, “That was two and a half hours? We had no idea.” That’s humbling for us and a great feeling. It’s a movie about these really great characters with great scope and great racing. You can put all the big visual effects in a film that you want to, but it’s really about people.

Buckland: I agree. It’s more of a character movie with racing. Also, because I am not a racing fan per se, the character drama really pulled me into the film while working on it.


Oliver Peters is an experienced film and commercial editor/colorist. In addition, he regularly interviews editors for trade publications. He may be contacted through his website at oliverpeters.com.

The 70th annual ACE Eddie Award nominations

The American Cinema Editors (ACE), the honorary society of the world’s top film editors, has announced its nominations for the 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards recognizing outstanding editing in 11 categories of film, television and documentaries.

For the first time in ACE’s history, three foreign language films are among the nominees, including The Farewell, I Lost My Body and Parasite, despite there not being a specific category for films predominantly in a foreign language.

Winners will be revealed during a ceremony on Friday, January 17 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel and will be presided over by ACE president, Stephen Rivkin, ACE. Final ballots open December 16 and close on January 6.

Here are the nominees:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMA):
Ford v Ferrari
Michael McCusker, ACE & Andrew Buckland

The Irishman
Thelma Schoonmaker, ACE

Joker 
Jeff Groth

Marriage Story
Jennifer Lame, ACE

Parasite
Jinmo Yang

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
Dolemite is My Name
Billy Fox, ACE

The Farewell
Michael Taylor & Matthew Friedman

Jojo Rabbit
Tom Eagles

Knives Out
Bob Ducsay

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Fred Raskin, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Frozen 2
Jeff Draheim, ACE

I Lost My Body
Benjamin Massoubre

Toy Story 4
Axel Geddes, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
American Factory
Lindsay Utz

Apollo 11
Todd Douglas Miller

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice
Jake Pushinsky, ACE & Heidi Scharfe, ACE

Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
David J. Turner & Thomas G. Miller, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):
Abducted in Plain Sight
James Cude

Bathtubs Over Broadway
Dava Whisenant

Leaving Neverland
Jules Cornell

What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali
Jake Pushinsky, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Better Things: “Easter”
Janet Weinberg, ACE

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: “I Need To Find My Frenemy” 
Nena Erb, ACE

The Good Place: “Pandemonium” 
Eric Kissack

Schitt’s Creek: “Life is a Cabaret”
Trevor Ambrose

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Barry: “berkman > block”
Kyle Reiter, ACE

Dead to Me: “Pilot”
Liza Cardinale

Fleabag: “Episode 2.1”
Gary Dollner, ACE

Russian Doll: “The Way Out”
Todd Downing

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Chicago Med: “Never Going Back To Normal”
David J. Siegel, ACE

Killing Eve: “Desperate Times”
Dan Crinnion

Killing Eve: “Smell Ya Later”
Al Morrow

Mr. Robot: “401 Unauthorized”
Rosanne Tan, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Euphoria: “Pilot””
Julio C. Perez IV

Game of Thrones: “The Long Night”
Tim Porter, ACE

Mindhunter: “Episode 2”
Kirk Baxter, ACE

Watchmen: “It’s Summer and We’re Running Out of Ice”
David Eisenberg

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Chernobyl: “Vichnaya Pamyat”
Jinx Godfrey & Simon Smith

Fosse/Verdon: “Life is a Cabaret”
Tim Streeto, ACE

When They See Us: “Part 1”
Terilyn A. Shropshire, ACE

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Deadliest Catch: “Triple Jeopardy”
Ben Bulatao, ACE, Rob Butler, ACE, Isaiah Camp, Greg Cornejo, Joe Mikan, ACE

Surviving R. Kelly: “All The Missing Girls”
Stephanie Neroes, Sam Citron, LaRonda Morris, Rachel Cushing, Justin Goll, Masayoshi Matsuda, Kyle Schadt

Vice Investigates: “Amazon on Fire”
Cameron Dennis, Kelly Kendrick, Joe Matoske, Ryo Ikegami

Main Image: Marriage Story

ACE announces new Eddie Awards timing

American Cinema Editors (ACE) has set the 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards, which recognize outstanding editing in film and television, for Friday, January 17, 2020 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. That date is almost three weeks earlier than usual as the truncated awards season landscape — ignited by the Oscars moving up to Feb. 9, 2020 — takes shape.

The television categories eligibility dates have also changed — television contenders must have aired between Jan. 1, 2019 and Nov. 1, 2019. Feature film eligibility remains the same with contenders having to be released between Jan. 1, 2019 and Dec. 31, 2019.

The black-tie awards ceremony will unveil winners for outstanding editing in 11 categories of film and television including:

Best Edited Feature Film (Drama)

Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy)

Best Edited Animated Film

Best Edited Documentary (Feature)

Best Edited Documentary (Non-Theatrical)

Best Edited Drama Series for Non-Commercial Television

Best Edited Drama Series for Commercial Television

Best Edited Comedy Series for Non-Commercial Television

Best Edited Comedy Series for Commercial Television

Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television

Best Edited Non-Scripted Series

Three special honors will be handed out that evening including two Career Achievement recipients presented to film editors of outstanding merit and the Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year honor presented to a filmmaker who exemplifies distinguished achievement in the art and business of film. Honorary award recipients will be announced later this year.

Submissions for the ACE Eddie Awards open September 13 and close on November 1. For more information or to submit for awards consideration beginning September 13, visit the ACE web site.

Key dates for the 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards are:

September 13, 2019 Submissions for Nominations Begin

November 1, 2019 Submissions for Nominations End

November 18, 2019 Nomination Ballots Sent

December 9, 2019 Nomination Ballots Due

December 11, 2019 Nominations Announced

December 16, 2019 Final Ballots Sent

December 20, 2019 Deadline for Advertising

January 5, 2020 Blue Ribbon Screenings (Television categories)

January 6, 2020 Final Ballots Due

January 15, 2020 Nominee Cocktail Party

January 17, 2020 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards

 

ACE celebrates editing with 69th Eddie Award noms

The American Cinema Editors (ACE) has announced the nominations for its 69th Annual ACE Eddie Awards, which recognize outstanding editing in 11 categories of film, television and documentaries.

Winners will be revealed during ACE’s annual black-tie awards ceremony on February 1.  ACE president, Stephen Rivkin, ACE, will host. Final ballots open January 11 and close on January 21.   

Here are the nominees:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):

BlacKkKlansman

Barry Alexander Brown 

Tom Cross, ACE

Bohemian Rhapsody

John Ottman, ACE 

First Man

Tom Cross, ACE

Roma

Alfonso Cuarón & Adam Gough 

A Star is Born

Jay Cassidy, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):

Crazy Rich Asians

Myron Kerstein

Deadpool 2

Craig Alpert, ACE, Elísabet Ronaldsdóttir and Dirk Westervelt

The Favourite

Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE

Green Book

Patrick J. Don Vito

Vice

Hank Corwin, ACE 

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:

Incredibles 2

Stephen Schaffer, ACE

Isle of Dogs

Andrew Weisblum, ACE, Ralph Foster and  Edward Bursch

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Robert Fisher, Jr.

 

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):

Free Solo

Bob Eisenhardt, ACE

Carla Gutierrez

RBG

Carla Gutierrez

Three Identical Strangers

Michael Harte

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Jeff Malmberg & Aaron Wickenden, ACE

 

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):

A Final Cut for Orson: 40 Years in the Making

Martin Singer

Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind

Greg Finton, ACE and Poppy Das, ACE

Wild Wild Country, Part 3

Neil Meiklejohn

The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling

Joe Beshenkovsky, ACE 

 

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Atlanta: Teddy Perkins

Atlanta: “Alligator Man”

Isaac Hagy

Atlanta: “Teddy Perkins”

Kyle Reiter

The Good Place: “Don’t Let the Good Life Pass You By” 

Eric Kissack

Portlandia: “Rose Route” 

Jordan Kim, Ali Greer, Heather Capps & Stacy Moon

 

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Barry: “Make Your Mark” 

Jeff Buchanan

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Insecure: “Obsessed-Like”

Nena Erb, ACE 

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: “Simone”

Kate Sanford, ACE

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: “We’re Going to the Catskills!”

Tim Streeto, ACE

 

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION

The Americans: “Start”

Daniel Valverde 

Better Call Saul: “Something Stupid”

Skip Macdonald, ACE 

Better Call Saul: “Winner”

Chris McCaleb 

Killing Eve: “Nice Face”

Gary Dollner, ACE

 

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Bodyguard: “Episode 1”

Steve Singleton

Ozark

Homecoming: “Redwood”

Rosanne Tan

Ozark: “One Way Out”

Cindy Mollo, ACE & Heather Goodwin Floyd 

Westworld: “The Passenger”

Andrew Seklir, ACE, Anna Hauger and Mako Kamitsuna

 

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story: “A Random Killing”

Emily Greene

Escape at Dannemora: “Better Days”

Malcolm Jamieson & Geoffrey Richman ACE 

Sharp Objects: “Milk”

Véronique Barbe, Dominique Champagne, Justin Lachance, Maxime Lahaie, Émile Vallée and Jai M. Vee

 

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:

Anthony Bourdain – Parts Unknown: “West Virginia”

Hunter Gross, ACE

Deadliest Catch: “Storm Surge”

Rob Butler, ACE

Naked & Afraid: “Fire and Fury”

Molly Shock, ACE and Jnani Butler

 

ACE celebrates editing, names 68th annual Eddie nominees

Awards season has begun, as evidenced by the American Cinema Editors (ACE) naming their nominees for the 68th annual ACE Eddie Awards. The Eddies recognize outstanding editing in 10 categories of film, television and documentaries. Trophies will be handed out during ACE’s annual awards ceremony on January 26.

Here are the nominees for the 68th annual ACE Eddie Awards:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
Blade Runner 2049
Joe Walker, ACE

The Shape of Water

Dunkirk
Lee Smith, ACE

Molly’s Game
Alan Baumgarten, ACE, Josh Schaeffer & Elliot Graham, ACE

The Post
Michael Kahn, ACE & Sarah Broshar

The Shape of Water
Sidney Wolinsky, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
Baby Driver
Jonathan Amos, ACE & Paul Machliss, ACE

Get Out 
Gregory Plotkin

I, Tonya
Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE

Lady Bird
Nick Houy

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Jon Gregory, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Coco
Steve Bloom

Despicable Me 3
Clair Dodgson

The Lego Batman Movie
David Burrows, ACE, Matt Villa & John Venzon, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Cries From Syria
Aaron I. Butler

Jane
Joe Beshenkovsky, ACE, Will Znidaric, Brett Morgen

Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold

Ann Collins

LA 92
TJ Martin, Scott Stevenson, Dan Lindsay

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (SMALL SCREEN):
The Defiant Ones – Part 1
Lasse Järvi, Doug Pray

Five Came Back: The Price of Victory
Will Znidaric

The Nineties – Can We All Get Along?
Inbal Lessner, ACE

Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge – 01
Ben Sozanski, ACE, Geeta Gandbhir; Andy Grieve, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Black-ish: “Lemons”
John Peter Bernardo, Jamie Pedroza

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: “Josh’s Ex-Girlfriend Wants Revenge”
Kabir Akhtar, ACE & Kyla Plewes

Portlandia: “Amore”
Heather Capps, Ali Greer, Jordan Kim

Will & Grace: “Grandpa Jack”
Peter Beyt

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Curb Your Enthusiasm: “Fatwa!”
Steven Rasch, ACE

Curb Your Enthusiasm: “The Shucker”
Jonathan Corn, ACE

Glow: “Pilot”
William Turro, ACE

Veep: “Chicklet”
Roger Nygard, ACE & Gennady Fridman

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Better Call Saul: “Chicanery”
Skip Macdonald, ACE

Better Call Saul: “Witness”
Kelley Dixon, ACE & Skip Macdonald, ACE

Fargo: “Aporia”
Henk Van Eeghen, ACE

Fargo: “Who Rules the Land of Denial”
Andrew Seklir, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Big Little Lies: “You Get What You Need”
David Berman

Stranger Things

Game of Thrones: “Beyond the Wall”
Tim Porter, ACE

The Handmaid’s Tale: “Offred”
Julian Clarke, ACE & Wendy Hallam Martin

Stranger Things: “The Gate”
Kevin D. Ross, ACE

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Feud: “Pilot”
Adam Penn, ACE & Ken Ramos

Genius: Einstein “Chapter One”
James D. Wilcox

The Wizard of Lies
Ron Patane

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Deadliest Catch: “Lost at Sea”
Rob Butler, ACE & Ben Bulatao, ACE
 
Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath: “The Perfect Scientology Family”
Reggie Spangler, Ben Simoff, Kevin Hibbard & Vince Oresman

Vice News Tonight: “Charlottesville: Race & Terror”
Tim Clancy, Cameron Dennis, John Chimples & Denny Thomas

Final ballots will be mailed on January 5, and voting ends on January 18. The Blue Ribbon screenings, where judging for all television categories and the documentary film category take place, occurs on January 14. Projects in the aforementioned categories are viewed and judged by committees comprised of professional editors (all ACE members). All 950+ ACE members vote during the final balloting of the ACE Eddies, including active members, life members, affiliate members and honorary members.

ACE awards its Eddies for best editing

Friday evening in Beverly Hills, some of the top editors in the business gathered for the 66th Annual ACE Eddie Awards, which recognize the best editing of 2015 in film, television and documentaries. The night’s host was actor Adam Devine.

Mad Max: Fury Road, which was edited by Margaret Sixel (our main photo), won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and The Big Short, cut by Hank Corwin, ACE, won Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy). Inside Out, edited by Kevin Nolting, ACE, won Best Edited Animated Feature Film, and Amy, edited by Chris King, won Best Edited Documentary (Feature).

Let’s take a look at the full list of winners:

Hank Corwin

Hank Corwin

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC)
Mad Max: Fury Road
Margaret Sixel

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY)
The Big Short
Hank Corwin, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Inside Out
Kevin Nolting, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)
Amy
Chris King

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (TELEVISION)  
The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst “A Body in the Bay”
Zac Stuart-Pontier, Richard Hankin, ACE, Caitlyn Greene, Shelby Siegel

BEST EDITED HALF-HOUR SERIES FOR TELEVISION
Inside Amy Schumer: “12 Angry Men
”
Nick Paley

Tom Wilson

Tom Wilson

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
Mad Men: “Person to Person”
Tom Wilson

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
House of Cards: “Chapter 39″
Lisa Bromwell, ACE

BEST EDITED LONGFORM (MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE) FOR TELEVISION
Bessie
Brian A. Kates, ACE

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown: “Bay Area”
Hunter Gross, ACE

BEST STUDENT EDITING
Chris Dold – University of North Carolina, School of the Arts

Steve Martin and Nancy Myers

Award-winning filmmaker Nancy Meyers received the organization’s ACE Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year honor, which was presented to her by long-time friend and collaborator Steve Martin.

Meyers joins an impressive list of filmmakers who have received ACE’s highest honor, including Norman Jewison, Francis Ford Coppola, Clint Eastwood, Robert Zemeckis, Alexander Payne, Ron Howard, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, Kathleen Kennedy, Steven Spielberg, Christopher Nolan, Frank Marshall and Richard Donner, among others.

Career Achievement Awards went to industry veterans Carol Littleton, ACE, and Ted Rich, ACE.  Their work was highlighted with clip reels exhibiting their contributions to film and television throughout their careers.

—————-
Thanks to Dan Restuccio for his photos from the event.

ACE shares names of Eddie Award nominees for best editing

Nominations for the 66th Annual ACE Eddie Awards — recognizing outstanding editing in 10 categories of film, television and documentaries — were announced.

Awards will be handed out during ACE’s annual ceremony on Friday, January 29 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. American Cinema Editors (ACE) president Alan Heim will host.

Here is the list of nominated editors:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC)
Mad Max: Fury Road
Margaret Sixel

The Martian
Pietro Scalia, ACE

The Revenant
Stephen Mirrione, ACE

Sicario
Joe Walker, ACE

Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Maryann Brandon, ACE, and Mary Jo Markey, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY)
Ant-Man
Dan Lebental, ACE, and Colby Parker, Jr., ACE

The Big Short
Hank Corwin, ACE

Joy
Jay Cassidy, ACE, Alan Baumgarten, ACE, 
Christopher Tellefsen, ACE, and Tom Cross, ACE

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
David Trachtenberg

Trainwreck
William Kerr, ACE, and Paul Zucker

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Anomalisa
Garret Elkins

Inside Out
Kevin Nolting, ACE

The Good Dinosaur
Stephen Schaffer, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)
Amy
Chris King

Cobain: Montage of Heck
Joe Beshenkovsky and Brett Morgen

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief
Andy Grieve

He Named Me Malala
Greg Finton, ACE, Brian Johnson and Brad Fuller

The Wrecking Crew
Claire Scanlon

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (TELEVISION)
Keith Richards: Under the Influence
Joshua L. Pearson

The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst “Chapter 1”
Richard Hankin, ACE, Zac Stuart-Pontier, Caitlyn Greene and Shelby Siegel

The Seventies: The United State vs. Nixon
Chris A. Peterson, ACE

BEST EDITED HALF-HOUR SERIES FOR TELEVISION
Inside Amy Schumer: 12 Angry Men
Nick Paley

Silicon Valley: Two Days of the Condor
Brian Merken, ACE

Veep: Election Night
Gary Dollner

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
Better Call Saul: “Five-O”
Kelley Dixon, ACE

Better Call Saul: “Uno”
Skip Macdonald, ACE

Fargo: “Did You Do This? No, You Did It!”
Skip Macdonald, ACE, and Curtis Thurber

The Good Wife: “Restrain”
Scott Vickrey, ACE

Mad Men: “Person to Person”
Tom Wilson

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
Game of Thrones: “The Dance of Dragons”
Katie Weiland

Game of Thrones: “Hardhome”
Tim Porter

Homeland: “The Tradition of Hospitality”
Harvey Rosenstock, ACE

House of Cards: “Chapter 39”
Lisa Bromwell, ACE

The Knick: “Wonderful Surprises”
Mary Ann Bernard

BEST EDITED LONGFORM (MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE) FOR TELEVISION
Bessie
Brian A. Kates, ACE

Dolly Parton’s Coat of Many Colors
Maysie Hoy, ACE

Orange is the New Black: “Trust No Bitch” (90 minute episode)
William Turro

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown: “Bay Area”
Hunter Gross, ACE

Deadliest Catch: “Zero Hour”
Josh Earl, ACE, and Ben Bulatao

Whale Wars: “The Darkest Hour”
Eric Driscoll, Nik Jamgocyan, Chris Kirkpatrick, David Michael Maurer, ACE, Greg McDonald, Marcus Miller and Alexandria Scott

Final Ballots will be mailed on January 8 and voting ends on January 20. The Blue Ribbon screenings where judging for all television categories and the documentary film category take place on January 17. Projects in the above categories are viewed and judged by committees comprised of professional editors (all ACE members).  All 800-plus ACE members vote during the final balloting of the ACE Eddies, including active members, life members, affiliate members and honorary members.