Arraiy 4.11.19

NAB NY: A DP’s perspective

By Barbie Leung

At this year’s NAB New York show, my third, I was able to wander the aisles in search of tools that fit into my world of cinematography. Here are just a few things that caught my eye…

Blackmagic, which had large booth at the entrance to the hall, was giving demos of its Resolve 15, among other tools. Panasonic also had a strong presence mid-floor, with an emphasis on the EVA-1 cameras. As usual, B&H attracted a lot of attention, as did Arri, which brought a couple of Arri Trinity rigs to demo.

During the HDR Video Essentials session, colorist Juan Salvo of TheColourSpace, talked about the emerging HDR 10+ standard proposed by Samsung and Amazon Video. Also mentioned was the trend of consumer displays getting brighter every year and that impact on content creation and content grading. Salvo pointed out the affordability of LG’s C7 OLEDs (about 700 Nits) for use as client monitors, while Flanders Scientific (which had a booth at the show) remains the expensive standard for grading. It was interesting to note that LG, while being the show’s Official Display Partner, was conspicuously absent from the floor.

Many of the panels and presentations unsurprisingly focused on content monetization — how to monetize faster and cheaper. Amazon Web Service’s stage sessions emphasized various AWS Elemental technologies, including automating the creation of video highlight clips for content like sports videos using facial recognition algorithms to generate closed captioning, and improving the streaming experience onboard airplanes. The latter will ultimately make content delivery a streamlined enough process for airlines that it would enable advertisers to enter this currently untapped space.

Editor Janis Vogel, a board member of the Blue Collar Post Collective, spoke at the #galsngear “Making Waves” panel, and noted the progression toward remote work in her field. She highlighted the fact that DaVinci Resolve, which had already made it possible for color work to be done remotely, is now also making it possible for editors to collaborate remotely. The ability to work remotely gives professionals the choice to work outside of the expensive-to-live-in major markets, which is highly desirable given that producers are trying to make more and more content while keeping budgets low.

Speaking at the same panel, director of photography/camera operator Selene Richholt spoke to the fact that crews are being monetized with content producers either asking production and post pros to provide standard service at substandard rates, or more services without paying more.

On a more exciting note, she cited recent 9×16 projects that she has shot with the camera mounted vertically (as opposed to shooting 16×9 and cropping in) in order to take full advantage of lens properties. She looks forward to the trend of more projects that can mix aspects ratios and push aesthetics.

Well, that’s it for this year. I’m already looking forward to next year.

 


Barbie Leung is a New York-based cinematographer and camera operator working in film, music video and branded content. Her work has played Sundance, the Tribeca Film Festival, Outfest and Newfest. She is also the DCP mastering technician at the Tribeca Film Festival.


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