OWC 12.4

Magix Movie Edit Pro Plus for when you want simple edits

By Brady Betzel

In the middle of 2016, Sony sold its nonlinear editing software Vegas to a 20-year-old German company called Magix. When they contacted me about reviewing their NLE Movie Edit Pro Plus, since I am always interested in the latest gear and software, I said, “sure.”

I was sent a copy of Movie Edit Pro Plus, and as I am typing this intro I am downloading around 5GB of additional content and templates to use inside the software. Immediately upon opening Movie Edit Pro Plus I get the feeling that this isn’t a professional NLE and to be honest, that isn’t a problem. Sometimes I just want to use something that is plug-and-play, so maybe that is how Movie Edit Pro Plus can work for you. Think of a Window’s version of iMovie when you don’t want to jump into FCPX to make a slideshow or family video. It even comes with prebuilt templates.

There are three versions of Movie Edit Pro: Standard, Plus and Pro. I am going over Plus, which retails for $99. The Pro version costs $129.99 while the Standard is around $49, but I was kind of confused by their site, which is running a deal where you get all the Pro benefits when you buy the $49 Standard edition. The Plus version adds features that include up to 99 tracks for video and audio, proxy video editing, shot matching, color correcting and some more templates and effects.

Immediately, I wanted to check out their keyboard shortcuts since I like to edit with as little clicking as possible. I found them in the help manual, but wouldn’t mind an onscreen keyboard layout/reassignment (me being a picky editor, I know). Then I loaded up their demo project that I was able to download and zoomed into the sequence using the scroll wheel on my mouse and the bar on the bottom of the timeline. It was a little strange as it zoomed into an arbitrary part of the sequence as opposed to where my edit indicator was on the timeline. To accurately zoom in you will need to use the keyboard shortcuts CTRL + Up Arrow or Down Arrow. Then I noticed you can place anything anywhere. Pretty crazy —you can put audio on video layers and put effects like timecode display anywhere you want… kind of like FCPX. It’s liberating I guess, but my OCD can’t really handle that yet. I’m really trying to get used to FCPX, I promise.

Sometimes I can’t help myself when I review products and I forget to start at the basics, like where to import your footage, audio or stills. So to back up a little bit, in the default view of Movie Edit Pro you get a few tabs on the top right: Import, Fades, Title and Effects. Each window has sub menus under the Fades menu you can see different types of transitions. It’s a little clunky but they get the job done. They have some cool preset transitions like card turns or slides. They are easy to apply by dragging them over the edit point between two clips. Once you apply it you can change the duration, for which you can only enter seconds or fractions of seconds, not frames like normal NLEs would use. By now you probably are getting the point that this is more of a beginner NLE or one for someone who wants to simply edit something without much technical thought.

On the plus side you do get a good amount of presets including title animations, subtitles, and even 3D title animations. One of my favorite plug-ins that comes with Magix Movie Edit Pro Plus is the Travel Route tool located in the Magix Tools drop down located under the Import tab. The Travel Route tool lets you set different stops along a trip, assign a way of travel like an airplane or car, and then animate your route. Animating a vacation along a map isn’t the easiest thing to accomplish, even for an After Effects wiz, so this being included is an awesome feature. You can preview your animation and, if you like it, create an export of it to use in your edit.

There are a lot of tools that come with Movie Edit Pro Plus that I haven’t mentioned yet, like Beat Based editing which allows you to automate an edit along a beat in a song, recording your actual edit so that you can create tutorials or timelapses of your edit easily, chroma key effects to key out that greenscreen you shot on, 360 video creation and much more. In the end you can share your content using the Export Wizard to sites like YouTube or even your phone.

In the end, Magix Movie Edit Pro Plus is not a professional nonlinear editor. If you are looking for a Premiere Pro or FCPX replacement this isn’t it. This isn’t bad though; sometimes I need an app that does home movie type editing fast and easy with templates — this is where Movie Edit Pro Plus might fit in for you.

Check out their website for more features, including image stabilization powered by proDAD’s Mercalli V2 technology.


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