How to use animation in reality TV

By Aline Maalouf

The world of animation is changing and evolving at a rapid pace — bringing photorealistic imagery to the small screen and the big screen — animation that is rendered with such detail, you can imagine the exact sensation of the water, feel the heat of the sunshine and experience the wilderness. Just look at the difference between the first Toy Story film, released in 1995, up to Toy Story 3’s release in 2010.

Over 15 years, there is a complete world of difference — we progressed from 2D to 3D, the colors are poignant, we visualize changes from shadows and lightness and the sequences move much more quickly. The third film was a major feat for a studio, and now either years later, the technology there is already on the cusp of being old news.

Technology is advancing faster than it can be implemented — and it isn’t just the Pixar’s and Disney’s of the world who have to stay ahead of the curve with each sequence released. Boutique companies are under just as much pressure to continually push the envelope on what’s possible in the animation space, while still delivering top results to clients within the sometimes demanding time constraints of film and television.

Aline Maalouf

Working in reality TV presents its own set of challenges in comparison to a fully animated program. To start, you need to seamlessly combine real-life interaction with animation — often showcasing what is there against what could be there. As animation continues to evolve, integrating with emerging technology, such as virtual reality, augmented reality and immersive platforms, understanding how users interact with the platform and how to best engage the audience will be crucial.

Here are four ways using animation can enhance a reality TV program:

Showcasing a World of Possibilities
With the introduction of 3D animation, we are able to create imagery so realistic that it is often hard to define what is “real” and what is virtually designed. The real anchor of hyper-realistic animation is the ability to add and play with light and shadows. Layers of light allow us to see reflection, to experience a room from a new angle and to challenge viewers to experience the room in both the daylight and at nighttime.

For example, within our work on Gusto TV’s Where To I Do, couples must select their perfect wedding venue — often viewing a blank space and trying to envision their theme inside it. Using animation, those spaces are brought to life in full, rich color, from dawn to the glaring midday sun to dusk and midnight — no additional film crew time required.

Speeds up Production Process
Gone are the days where studios are spending large budgets resetting room after room to showcase before-and-after options, particularly when it comes to renovation shows. It’s time-consuming and laborious. Working with an animation studio allows producers to showcase a renovated room three different ways, and the audience develops an early feel for the space without the need to see it physically set up.

It’s faster (with the right tools and technology to match TV timelines), allows more flexibility and eliminates the need to build costly sets for one-time use. Even outside of reality TV, the use of greenroom space, green stages and GCI technology allows a flexibility to filming that didn’t necessarily exist two decades ago.

Makes Viewers Part of the Program
If animation is done well, it should make the viewers feel more invested in the program — as if they are part of this experience. Animation should not break what is happening in reality. In order to make this happen, it is essential to have up-to-date software and hardware that bridges the gap between the vision and what is actually accomplished within each scene.

Software and hardware go hand-in-hand in creating high-quality animations. If the software is up to date and not the hardware, the work will be compromised as the rendering process will not be able to support the full project scope. One ripple in the wave of animation and the viewer is reminded that what they’re seeing doesn’t really exist.

Opens Doors to Immersive Experiences
Although we have scratched the surface of what’s possible when it comes to virtual reality, augmented reality and generating immersive experiences for viewers from the comfort of their living rooms, I anticipate there will be a wave of growth in this space over the next five years. Our studio is already building some of these capabilities into our current projects. Overall, studios and production companies are looking for new ways to engage an audience that is exposed to hours of content a day.

Rather than just simply viewing the animation of a wedding venue, viewers will be able to click through the space — guiding their own passage from point A to point B. They become the host of their own journey.

Programs of all genres are dazzling their audiences with the future of animation and reality TV is right there with it.


Aline Maalouf is co-founder/EVP of Neezo Studios, which has produced the animation and renderings for all six seasons of the Property Brothers and all live episodes of Brother vs Brother, in addition to other network shows.


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