A Conversation: 3P Studio founder Haley Stibbard

Australia’s 3P Studio is a post house founded and led by artisan Haley Stibbard. The company’s portfolio of work includes commercials for brands such as Subway, Allianz and Isuzu Motor Company as well as iconic shows like Sesame Street. Stibbard’s path to opening her own post house was based on necessity.

After going on maternity to have her first child in 2013, she returned to her job at a content studio to find that her role had been made redundant. She was subsequently let go. Needing and wanting to work, she began freelancing as an editor — working seven days a week and never turning down a job. Eventually she realized that she couldn’t keep up with that type of schedule and took her fate into her own hands. She launched 3P Studio, one of Brisbane’s few women-led post facilities.

We reached out to Stibbard to ask about her love of post and her path to 3P Studio.

What made you want to get into post production? School?
I had a strong love of film, which I got from my late dad, Ray. He was a big film buff and would always come home from work when I was a kid with a shopping bag full of $2 movies from the video store and he would watch them. He particularly liked the crime stories and thrillers! So I definitely got my love of film and television from him.

We did not have any film courses at high school in the ‘90s, so the closest I could get was photography. Without a show reel it was hard to get a place at university in the college of art; a portfolio was a requirement and I didn’t have one. I remember I had to talk my way into the film program, and in the end I think they just got sick of me and let me into the course through the back door without a show reel — I can be very persistent when I want to be. I always had enjoyed editing and I was good at it, so in group tasks I was always chosen as the editor and then my love of post came from there.

What was your first job?
My very first job was quite funny, actually. I was working in both a shoe store and a supermarket at the time, and two post positions became available one day, an in-house editor for a big furniture chain and a job as a production assistant for a large VFX company at Movie World on the Gold Coast. Anyone who knows me knows that I would be the worst PA in the world. So, luckily for that company director, I didn’t get the PA job and became the in-house editor for the furniture chain.

I’m glad that I took that job, as it taught me so much — how to work under pressure, how to use an Avid, how to work with deadlines, what a key number was, how to dispatch TVCS to the stations, be quick, be accurate, how to take constructive feedback.

I made every mistake known to man, including one weekend when I forgot to remove the 4×3 safe bars from a TVC and my boss saw it on TV. I ended up having to drive to the office, climb the fence that was locked to get into the office and pull it off air. So I’ve learned a lot of things the hard way, but my boss was a very patient and forgiving man, and 18 years later is now a client of mine!

What job did you hold when you went out on maternity leave?
Before I left on maternity leave to have my son Dashiell, I was an editor for a small content company. I have always been a jack-of-all-trades and I took care of everything from offline to online, grading in Resolve, motion graphics in After Effects and general design. I loved my job and I loved the variety that it brought. Doing something different every day was very enjoyable.

After leaving that job, you started freelancing as an editor. What systems did you edit on at the time and what types of projects? How difficult a time was that for you? New baby, working all the time, etc.
I started freelancing when my son was just past seven months old. I had a mortgage and had just come off six months of unpaid maternity leave, so I needed to make a living and I needed to make it quickly. I also had the added pressure of looking after a young child under the age of one who still needed his mother.

So I started contacting advertising agencies and production companies that I thought may be interested in my skill set. I just took every job that I could get my hands on, as I was always worried that every job that I took could potentially be my last for a while. I was lucky that I had an incredibly well-behaved baby! I never said “no” to a job.

As my client base started to grow, my clients would always book me since they knew that I would never say “no” (they know I still don’t say no!). It got to the point where I was working seven days a week. I worked all day when my son was in childcare and all night after he would go to bed. I would take the baby monitor downstairs where I worked out of my husband’s ‘man den.’

As my freelance business grew, I was so lucky that I had the most supportive husband in the world who was doing everything for me, the washing, the cleaning, the cooking, bath time, as well has holding down his own full-time job as an engineer. I wouldn’t have been able to do what I did for that period of time without his support and encouragement. This time really proved to be a huge stepping stone for 3P Studio.

Do you remember the moment you decided you would start your own business?
There wasn’t really a specific moment where I decided to start my own business. It was something that seemed to just naturally come together. The busier I became, the more opportunities came about, like having enough work through the door to build a space and hire staff. I have always been very strategic in regard to the people that I have brought on at 3P, and the timing in which they have come on board.

Can you walk us through that bear of a process?
At the start of 2016, I made the decision to get out of the house. My work life was starting to blend in with my home life and I needed to have that separation. I worked out of a small office for 12 months, and about six months into that it came to a point where I was able to purchase an office space that would become our studio today.

I went to work planning the fit out for the next six months. The studio was an investment in the business and I needed a place that my clients could also bring their clients for approvals, screenings and collaboration on jobs, as well as just generally enjoying the space.

The office space was an empty white shell, but the beauty of coming into a blank canvas was that I was able to create a studio that was specifically built for post production. I was lucky in that I had worked in some of the best post houses in the country as an editor, and this being a custom build I was able to take all the best bits out of all the places I had previously worked and put them into my studio without the restriction of existing walls.

I built up the walls, ripped down the ceilings and was able to design the edit suites and infrastructure all the way down to designing and laying the cable runs myself that I knew would work for us down the line. Then, we saved money and added more equipment to the studio bit by bit. It wasn’t 0 to 100 overnight, I had to work at the business development side of the company a lot, and I spent a lot of long days sitting by myself in those edit suites doing everything. Soon, word of mouth started to circulate and the business started to grow on the back of some nice jobs from my existing loyal clients.

What type of work do you do, and what gear do you call on?
3P Studio is a boutique post production studio that specializes in full-service post production, we also shoot content when required.

Our clients range anywhere from small content videos for the web all the way up to large commercial campaigns and everything in between.

There are currently six of us working full time in the studio, and we handle everything in-house from offline editing to VFX to videography and sound design. We work primarily in the Adobe Creative suite for offline editing in Premiere, mixed with Maxon Cinema 4D/Autodesk Maya for 3D work, Autodesk Flame and Side Effects Houdini for online compositing and VFX, Blackmagic Resolve for color grading and Pro Tools HD for sound mixing. We use EditShare EFS shared storage nodes for collaborative working and sharing of content between the mix of creative platforms we use.

This year we have invested in a Red Digital Cinema camera as well as an EditShare XStream 200 EFS scale-out single-node server so we can become that one-stop shop for our clients. We have been able to create an amazing creative space for our clients to come and work with us, be it from the bespoke design of our editorial suites or the high level of client service we offer.

How did you build 3P Studios to be different from other studios you’ve worked at?
From a personal perspective, the culture that we have been able to build in the studio is unlike anywhere else I have worked in that we genuinely work as a team and support each other. On the business side, we cater to clients of all sizes and budgets while offering uncompromising services and experience whether they be large or small. Making sure they walk away feeling that they have had great value and exemplary service for their budget means that they will end up being a customer of ours for life. This is the mantra that I have been able to grow the business on.

What is your hiring process like, and how do you protect employees who need to go out on maternity or family leave?
When I interview people to join 3P, attitude and willingness to learn is everything to me — hands down. You can be the most amazing operator on the planet, but if your attitude stinks then I’m really not interested. I’ve been incredibly lucky with the team that I have, and I have met them along the journey at exactly the right times. We have an amazing team culture and as the company grows our success is shared.

I always make it clear that it’s swings and roundabouts and that family is always number one. I am there to support my team if they need me to be, not just inside of work but outside as well and I receive the same support in return. We have flexible working hours, I have team members with young families who, at times, are able to work both in the studio and from home so that they can be there for their kids when they need to be. This flexibility works fine for us. Happy team members make for a happy, productive workplace, and I like to think that 3P is forward thinking in that respect.

Any tips for young women either breaking into the industry or in it that want to start a family but are scared it could cost them their job?
Well, for starters, we have laws in Australia that make it illegal for any woman in this country to be discriminated against for starting a family. 3P also supports the 18 weeks paid maternity leave available to women heading out to start a family. I would love to see more female workers in post production, especially in operator roles. We aren’t just going to be the coffee and tea girls, we are directors, VFX artists, sound designers, editors and cinematographers — the future is female!

Any tips for anyone starting a new business?
Work hard, be nice to people and stay humble because you’re only as good as your last job.

Main Image: Haley Stibbard (second from left) with her team.


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