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Category Archives: Women in Production & Post

Meet the Artist: The Mill’s Anne Trotman

Anne Trotman is a senior Flame artist and VFX supervisor at The Mill in New York. She specializes in beauty and fashion work but gets to work on a variety of other projects as well.

A graduate of Kings College in London, Trotman took on what she calls “a lot of very random temp jobs” before finally joining London’s Blue Post Production as a runner.

“In those days a runner did a lot of ‘actual’ running around SoHo, dropping off tapes and picking up lunches,” she says, admitting she was also sent out for extra green for color bars and warm sake at midnight. After being promoted to the machine room, she spent her time assisting all the areas of the company, including telecine grading, offline, online, VFX and audio. “This gave me a strong understanding of the post production process as a whole.”

Trotman then joined the 2D VFX teams from Blue, Clear Post Production, The Hive and VTR to create a team at Prime Focus London. She moved into film compositing where she headed up the 2D team as a senior Flame operator. Overseeing projects, including shot allocation and VFX reviews. Then she joined SFG-Technicolor’s commercials facility in Shanghai. After a year in China she joined The Mill in New York, where she is today.

We reached out to Trotman to find out more about The Mill, a technology and visual effects studio, how she works and some recent projects. Enjoy.

Bumble

Can you talk about some recent high-profile projects you’ve completed?
The most recent high-profile project I’ve worked on was for Bumble’s Super Bowl 2019 spot. It was its first commercial ever. Being that Bumble is a female-founded company, it was important for this project to celebrate female artists and empowerment, something I strongly support. Therefore, I was thrilled to lead an all-female team for this project. The agency creatives and producers were all female and so was almost the whole post team, including the editor, colorist and all the VFX artists.

How did you first learn Flame, and how has your use of it evolved over the years?
I had been assisting artists working on a Quantel Editbox at Blue. They then installed a Flame and hired a female artist who had worked on Gladiator. That’s when I knew I had found my calling. Working with technical equipment was very attractive to me, and in those days it was a dark art, and you had to work in a company to get your hands on one. I worked nights doing a lot of conforming and rotoscoping. I also started doing small jobs for clients I knew well. I remember assisting on an Adele pop video, which is where my love of beauty started.

When I first started using Flame, the whole job was usually completed by one artist. These days, jobs are much bigger, and with so many versions for social media, some days a lot of my day is coordinating the team of artists. Workshare and remote artists are becoming a big part of our industry, so communicating with artists all over the world has become a big part of my job in order to bring everything together to create the final film.

In addition to Flame, what other tools are used in your workflow?
Post production has changed so much in the past five years. My job is not just to press buttons on a Flame to get a commercial on television anymore; that’s only a small part. My job is to help the director and/or the agency position a brand and connect it with the consumer.

My workflow usually starts with bidding an agency or a director’s brief. Sometimes they need tests to sell an idea to a client. I might supervise a previz artist on Maxon Cinema 4D to help them achieve the director’s vision. I attend most of the shoots, which gives me an insight into the project while assessing the client’s goals and vision. I can take Flame on a laptop to my shoots to do tests for the director to help explain how certain shots will look after post. This process is so helpful all around in order for me to see if what we are shooting is correct and for the client to understand the director’s vision.

At The Mill, I work closely with the colorists who work on FilmLight Baselight before completing the work on Flame. All the artists at The Mill use Flame and Foundry Nuke, although my Flame skills are 100% better than my Nuke skills.

What are the most fulfilling aspects of the work you do?
I’m lucky to work with many directors and agency creatives that I now call friends. It still gives me a thrill when I’m able to interpret the vision of the creative or director to create the best work possible and convey the message of the brand.

I also love working with the next generation of artists. I especially love being able to work alongside the young female talent at The Mill. This is the first company I’ve worked at where I’ve not been “the one and only female Flame artist.”

At the Mill NY, we currently have 11 full-time female 2D artists working in our team, which has a 30/70 male to female ratio. Still a way to go to get to 50/50, so if I can inspire another female intern or runner who is thinking of becoming a VFX artist or colorist, then it’s a good day. Helping the cycle continue for female artists is so important to me.

What is the greatest challenge you’ve faced in your career?
Moving to Shanghai. Not only did I have the challenge of the language barrier to overcome but also the culture — from having lunch at noon to working with clients from a completely different background than mine. I had to learn all I could about the Chinese culture to help me connect with my clients.

Covergirl with Issa Rae

Out of all of the projects you’ve worked on, which one are you the most proud of?
There are many, but one that stands out is the Covergirl brand relaunch (2018) for director Matt Lambert at Prettybird. As an artist working on high-profile beauty brands, what they stand for is very important to me. I know every young girl will want to use makeup to make themselves feel great, but it’s so important to make sure young women are using it for the right reason. The new tagline “I am what I make-up” — together with a very diverse group of female ambassadors — was such a positive message to put out into the world.

There was also 28 Weeks Later, a feature film from director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo. My first time working on a feature was an amazing experience. I got to make lifelong friends working on this project. My technical abilities as an artist grew so much that year, from learning the patience needed to work on the same shot for two months to discovering the technical difficulties in compositing fire to be able to blow up parts of London. Such fun!

Finally, there was also a spot for the Target Summer 2019 campaign. It was directed by Whitelabel’s Lacey, who I collaborate with together on a lot of projects. Tristan Sheridan was the DP and the agency was Mother NY.

Target Summer Campaign

What advice do you have for a young professional trying to break into the industry?
Try everything. Don’t get pigeonholed into one area of the industry too early on. Learn about every part of the post process; it will be so helpful to you as you progress through your career.

I was lucky my first boss in the industry (Dave Cadle) was patient and gave me time to find out what I wanted to focus on. I try to be a positive mentor to the young runners and interns at The Mill, especially the young women. I was so lucky to have had female role models throughout my career, from the person that employed me to the first person that started training me on Flame. I know how important it is to see someone like you in a role you are thinking of pursuing.

Outside of work, how do you enjoy spending your free time?
I travel as much as I can. I love learning about new cultures; it keeps me grounded. I live in New York City, which is a bubble, and if you stay here too long, you start to forget what the real world looks like. I also try to give back when I can. I’ve been helping a director friend of mine with some films focusing on the issue of female homelessness around the world. We collaborated on some lovely films about women in LA and are currently working on some London-based ones.

You can find out more here.

Anne Trotman Image: Photo by Olivia Burke

Behind the Title: Ntropic Flame artist Amanda Amalfi

NAME: Amanda Amalfi

COMPANY: Ntropic (@ntropic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Ntropic is a content creator producing work for commercials, music videos and feature films as well as crafting experiential and interactive VR and AR media. We have offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City and London. Some of the services we provide include design, VFX, animation, color, editing, color grading and finishing.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Flame Artist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being a senior Flame artist involves a variety of tasks that really span the duration of a project. From communicating with directors, agencies and production teams to helping plan out any visual effects that might be in a project (also being a VFX supervisor on set) to the actual post process of the job.

Amanda worked on this lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

It involves client and team management (as you are often also the 2D lead on a project) and calls for a thorough working knowledge of the Flame itself, both in timeline management and that little thing called compositing. The compositing could cross multiple disciplines — greenscreen keying, 3D compositing, set extension and beauty cleanup to name a few. And it helps greatly to have a good eye for color and to be extremely detail-oriented.

WHAT MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT YOUR ROLE?
How much it entails. Since this is usually a position that exists in a commercial house, we don’t have as many specialties as there would be in the film world.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
First is the artwork. I like that we get to work intimately with the client in the room to set looks. It’s often a very challenging position to be in — having to create something immediately — but the challenge is something that can be very fun and rewarding. Second, I enjoy being the overarching VFX eye on the project; being involved from the outset and seeing the project through to delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
We’re often meeting tight deadlines, so the hours can be unpredictable. But the best work happens when the project team and clients are all in it together until the last minute.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
The evening. I’ve never been a morning person so I generally like the time right before we leave for the day, when most of the office is wrapping up and it gets a bit quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably a tactile art form. Sometimes I have the urge to create something that is tangible, not viewed through an electronic device — a painting or a ceramic vase, something like that.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I loved films that were animated and/or used 3D elements growing up and wanted to know how they were made. So I decided to go to a college that had a computer art program with connections in the industry and was able to get my first job as a Flame assistant in between my junior and senior years of college.

ANA Airlines

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Most recently I worked on a campaign for ANA Airlines. It was a fun, creative challenge on set and in post production. Before that I worked on a very interesting project for Facebook’s F8 conference featuring its AR functionality and helped create a lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

IS THERE A PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked on a spot for Vaseline that was a “through the ages” concept and we had to create looks that would read as from 1880s, 1900, 1940s, 1970s and present day, in locations that varied from the Arctic to the building of the Brooklyn Bridge to a boxing ring. To start we sent the digitally shot footage with our 3D and comps to a printing house and had it printed and re-digitized. This worked perfectly for the ’70s-era look. Then we did additional work to age it further to the other eras — though my favorite was the Arctic turn-of-the-century look.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Flame… first and foremost. It really is the most inclusive software — I can grade, track, comp, paint and deliver all in one program. My monitors — the 4K Eizo and color-calibrated broadcast monitor, are also essential.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mostly Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
I generally have music on with clients, so I will put on some relaxing music. If I’m not with clients, I listen to podcasts. I love How Did This Get Made and Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hiking and cooking are two great de-stressors for me. I love being in nature and working out and then going home and making a delicious meal.

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Marvel Studios’ Victoria Alonso to keynote SIGGRAPH 2019

Marvel Studios executive VP of production Victoria Alonso has been name keynote speaker for SIGGRAPH 2019, which will run from July 28 through August 1 in downtown Los Angeles. Registration is now open. The annual SIGGRAPH conference is a melting pot for researchers, artists and technologists, among other professionals.

“Victoria is the ultimate symbol of where the computer graphics industry is headed and a true visionary for inclusivity,” says SIGGRAPH 2019 conference chair Mikki Rose. “Her outlook reflects the future I envision for computer graphics and for SIGGRAPH. I am thrilled to have her keynote this summer’s conference and cannot wait to hear more of her story.”

One of few women in Hollywood to hold such a prominent title, Alonso’s dedication to the industry has been admired for a long time, leading to multiple awards and honors, including the 2015 New York Women in Film & Television Muse Award for Outstanding Vision and Achievement, the Advanced Imaging Society’s first female Harold Lloyd Award recipient, and the 2017 VES Visionary Award (another female first). A native of Buenos Aires, her career began in visual effects and included a four-year stint at Digital Domain.

Alonso’s film credits include productions such as Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven, Tim Burton’s Big Fish, Andrew Adamson’s Shrek, and numerous Marvel titles — Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Thor, Captain America: The First Avenger, Iron Man 3, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America: Civil War, Thor: The Dark World, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, Doctor Strange, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Thor: Ragnarok, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War, Ant-Man and the Wasp and, most recently, Captain Marvel.

“I’ve been attending SIGGRAPH since before there was a line at the ladies’ room,” says Alonso. “I’m very much looking forward to having a candid conversation about the state of visual effects, diversity and representation in our industry.”

She adds, “At Marvel Studios, we have always tried to push boundaries with both our storytelling and our visual effects. Bringing our work to SIGGRAPH each year offers us the opportunity to help shape the future of filmmaking.”

The 2019 keynote session will be presented as a fireside chat, allowing attendees the opportunity to hear Alonso discuss her life and career in an intimate setting.


Marvel’s Victoria Alonso to receive HPA’s Charles S. Swartz Award

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has announced that Victoria Alonso, producer and executive VP of production for Marvel Studios, will receive the organization’s 2018 Charles S. Swartz Award at the HPA Awards on November 15. The HPA Awards recognize creative artistry, innovation and engineering excellence, and the Charles S. Swartz Award honors the recipient’s significant impact across diverse aspects of the industry.

A native of Buenos Aires, Alonso moved to the US at the age of 19. She worked her way up through the industry, beginning as a PA and then working four years at the VFX house Digital Domain. She served as VFX producer on a number of films, including Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven, Tim Burton’s Big Fish, Andrew Adamson’s Shrek and Marvel’s Iron Man. She won the Visual Effects Society (VES) Award for outstanding supporting visual effects/motion picture for Kingdom of Heaven, with two additional shared nominations (best single visual effects, outstanding visual effects/effects-driven motion picture) for Iron Man.

Eventually, she joined Marvel as the company’s EVP of visual effects and post, doubling as co-producer on Iron Man, a role she reprised on Iron Man 2, Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger. In 2011, she advanced to executive producer on the hit The Avengers and has since executive produced Marvel’s Iron Man 3, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Captain America: Civil War, Thor: The Dark World, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, Doctor Strange, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Thor: Ragnarok, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War and most recently, Ant-Man and the Wasp.

She is currently at work on the untitled fourth installment of Avengers and Captain Marvel.

The Charles S. Swartz Award was named after executive Charles Swartz, who had a far ranging creative and technical career, eventually leading the Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California, a leading industry think tank and research center. The Charles S. Swartz Award is awarded at the discretion of the HPA Awards Committee and the HPA Board of Directors, and is not given annually.


Director Natalia Leite joins Humble’s roster

Bi-coastal production studio Humble has signed director Natalia Leite to its roster. Humble is Leite’s commercial representation, but she brings her rich experience as a writer and director for features, indie films and Vice documentaries.

Her MFA, a psychological thriller about rape crimes at a university, premiered at SXSW 2017 and was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize. She also worked on Every Woman, a Vice documentary about traditionally female-held jobs that are often looked down upon. It garnered over 12 million views.

Leite believes in weaving social commentary into her work, especially when it comes to female empowerment.

Her first work with Humble included two docu-style brand films for Vans Off the Wall brand titled Girls Skate India, and Vision Walk, which featured young women building a community and encouraging others to seek and live their passions. Girls Skate India was shortlisted for the 2018 AICP Awards and the AICP Next Awards.

Leite also teamed up with agency Sid Lee to direct a new campaign for The North Face, Move Mountains, that highlights the inspiring stories of female creators, athletes, educators and innovators who are moving mountains in their fields.

“For me, joining Humble was a perfect marriage,” says Leite. “Humble is a collaborative and supportive team that has embraced my passion and personal directing style. There, I will be able to continue telling stories about causes I care about, while branching out more into branded content work.”

Most recently, Leite wrote and directed a short film for a Condé Nast series on LGBT perspectives, which premiered during Pride Week in New York in June. Leite’s project, Kiki and the Mxfits, follows one trans girl whose high school popularity skyrockets when she rebels and uses the girl’s bathroom.