Category Archives: Storage

Symply offering StorNext 6-powered Thunderbolt 3 storage solution

Symply is at NAB New York providing tech previews of its SymplyWorkspace Thunderbolt 3-based SAN technology that uses Quantum’s StorNext 6.

SymplyWorkspace allows laptops and workstations equipped with Thunderbolt 3 to ingest, edit, finish and deliver media through a direct Thunderbolt 3 cable connection, with no adapter needed and without having to move content locally, even at 4K resolutions.

Based on StorNext 6 sharing software, users can connect up to eight laptops and workstations to the system and instantly share video, graphics and other data files using a standard Thunderbolt interface with no additional hardware or adapters.

While the company has not announced pricing it does expect to have systems for sale in Q4. The boxes are expected to start under $10,000 for 48TB and up to four users, making the system well-suited for users such as smaller post houses, companies with in-house creative teams and ad agencies.

Review: Sonnet Fusion PCIe 1TB and G-Drive Mobile Pro 500GB

By Brady Betzel

There are a lot of external Thunderbolt 3 SSD drives out in the wild these days, and they aren’t cheap. However, with a high price comes blazingly fast speeds. I was asked to review two very similar Thunderbolt 3 external SSD drives, so why not pit them against each other? Surprisingly (at least surprising to me), there are a couple of questions that you will want the answers to: Is there thermal throttling that will lower the read/write speeds when transferring large files for a sustained amount of time? Does it run so hot that it may burn you when touched?

I’ll answer these questions and a few others over the next few paragraphs, but in the end would I recommend buying a Thunderbolt 3 SSD? Yes, they are very, very fast. Especially when working with higher resolution multimedia files in apps like Premiere, Resolve, Pro Tools and many other data-intensive applications.

Sonnet Fusion Thunderbolt 3 PCIe Flash Drive
Up first (only because I received it first) is the Sonnet Fusion external SSD. I was sent the drive in a non-retail box, so I can’t attest to how it will arrive when you buy it in a retail setting, but the drive itself feels great. Like many other Sonnet products, the Fusion drive is hefty — and not in an overweight way. It feels like you are getting your money’s worth. Unlike the rubberized exterior of the popular LaCie Rugged drives, the Sonnet Fusion is essentially an aluminum heat sink wrapped around a powerful 1TB, Gen 3 M.2 PCIe, Toshiba RVD400-M22280 solid state drive. It’s sturdy and feels like you could drop it without receiving more damage than a little dent.

Attached to the drive is Sonnet’s “captive” Thunderbolt 3 cable, which I assume means the cable is attached to the external drive casing but can be removed without disassembling the case. I think more cable integrations should be called captive, it’s a great description. Anyway… the Thunderbolt 3 cable can be replaced/removed by removing the small four screws underneath the Fusion. It’s attached to a female Thunderbolt 3 port inside of the casing. I really wish Sonnet had integrated the wrapping of the cable around the drive, much like the LaCie Rugged drives in addition to the “captive” attachment. This would really help with transporting the drive and not worrying about the cable. It’s only a small annoyance, but since I’ve been spoiled by nice cable attachment I kind of expect it, especially with drives with a price tag like this. The Sonnet Fusion retails for $899 through stores like B&H, although I found it on Amazon.com for $799. Not cheap for an external drive, but in my opinion it is worth it.

The Sonnet Fusion is fast, like really fast, as in the fastest external drive I have tested. Sonnet claims a read speed of up to 2600MB/s and a write speed of up to 1600MB/s. The only caveat is that you must make sure your computer’s Thunderbolt 3 port is running x4 PCIe Gen 3 (four PCIe lanes) as opposed to x2 PCIe Gen 3 (only two PCIe lanes). If this is the case, your speed will be limited to around 1400MB/s as opposed to the proposed 1600MB/s write speed. You can find out more tech specs on Sonnet’s site. In addition you can find out if your computer has the PCIe lanes to run the Fusion at full speed here.

When testing the Sonnet Fusion I was lucky enough to have a few systems at my disposal: a 2018 iMac Pro, a 2018 Intel i9 MacBook Pro and an Intel i9 Puget Systems Genesis I with Thunderbolt 3 ports. All the systems provided similar results, which was nice to see. Using the AJA System Test, I adjusted the settings to 3840×2160, 4GB and ProRes 4444. I used one reading for an example image for this review, but they were generally the same every time I ran the test. I was getting around 1372MB/s write speed and 2200MB/s read speed. When transferring files on the Finder level I was consistently getting about 1GB/s write speeds, but it’s possible I was being limited by the write speed from the internal SSD! Incredible. For real-world numbers, I was able to transfer about 750GBs in under five minutes. Again, incredible speeds.

The key to the Sonnet Fusion SSD and what makes it a step above the competition is its enclosure acting as a heat sink in its 2.8×4.1×1.25-inch form factor. While this means there are no fans to increase the volume, it does mean that the drive can get extremely hot to touch, which can be an issue if you need to pack it up and go, or if you put it in your pocket (be careful!). This also means that with great heat dissipation comes less thermal throttling, which can slow down transfer speeds when using the drive over longer periods of time. This can be a real problem in some drives. Also keep in mind that this drive is bus powered and Sonnet’s instruction manual specifically states that it will not work with a Thunderbolt 2 adapter. The Sonnet Fusion comes with a one-year warranty that you can read about at this link.

G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD 500GB
Like the Sonnet Fusion, the G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD is a Thunderbolt 3 connected external hard drive that touts very high sustained transfer speeds of up to 2800MB/s (read speed). The G-Drive is physically lighter than the Sonnet, and is cheaper coming in at about 79 cents per GB or 68 cents if you purchase the 1TB version of the G-Drive — as compared to the Sonnet Fusion’s 88 cents per GB. So is this a “get what you pay for” scenario? I think so. The 500GB version costs $399.95 while the 1TB version retails for $699.95. A full $100 cheaper than the Sonnet Fusion.

The G-Drive Mobile Pro has a slender profile that matches what you think an external hard drive would look like. It measures 4.41x 3.15x.67 inches and weighs just .45 lbs. The exterior is attractive — the drive is surrounded by a blackish/dark grey rubberized plastic with silver plastic end caps. There are slits in the top and bottom of the case to dissipate heat, or maybe just to show off the internal electric blue aluminum heatsink. The Thunderbolt 3 connection is on the rear of the housing for easy connection with a status LED on the front. The cord is not attached to the drive, so there is a large chance of being misplaced. Again, I really wish manufacturers would think about cable storage and placement on these drives — LaCie Rugged drives have this nailed, and I hope others follow suite.

Included with the G-Drive Mobile Pro is .5 meter Thunderbolt 3 cable. It comes with a five-year limited warranty described on the included pamphlet that just may feature the tiniest font possible. The warranty ensures that the product is free from defects in materials and workmanship, with some exclusions including non-commercial use. In addition, the retail box shows off a couple of key specifics including “durable, shock resistant SSD” while the G-Technology website boasts of three-meter drop protection (on a carpeted concrete floor), as well as 1,000-pound crush-proof rating. Not sure if this is covered by the warranty or not, but since there really aren’t moving parts in an SSD, I don’t see why this wouldn’t hold up. An additional proclamation is that you can edit multi-stream 8K footage at full frame rate. This may technically be true in a read-only state but you would need a super-computer with multiple high-end GPUs to actually work with this size media. So take that with a grain of salt — not just on this drive but with any.

So on to the actual nuts and bolts of the G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD. The drive looks good on the outside and is immediately recognized by any Mac OS with direct Thunderbolt 3 connection (like all bus-powered drives). If you are using Windows you will have to format the drive before you can use it. G-Technology has an app to make that easy.

When doing real-world file transfers I was getting around the 1GB/s transfer speed consistently. So, theG-Drive Mobile Pro SSD is blazing fast. I was transferring 200GB of files in under two minutes.

Summing Up
In the end, if you haven’t seen the speed difference coming from a USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt 2 drive, you must try Thunderbolt 3. If you have Thunderbolt 3 ports and are using old Thunderbolt 2 drives, now is the time to upgrade. Not only can you use either of these drives like an internal drive, but if you are a Resolve colorist or a Premiere editor you can use these as your render cache or render drive. Not only will this speed up your coloring and editing, but you may even start to notice less errors and crashes since the pipes are open.

Personally, I love the Sonnet Fusion drive and the G-Drive Mobile Pro. If price is your main focus then obviously the G-Drive Mobile Pro is where you need to look. However, if a high-end look with some heft is your main interest, I think the Sonnet Fusion is an art piece you can have on your desktop.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

DG 7.9, 8.27, 9.26

The benefits of LTO

By Mike McCarthy

LTO stands for Linear Tape Open, and was initially developed nearly 20 years ago as an “open” format technology that allows manufacturing by any vendor that wishes to license the technology. It records any digital files onto half-inch magnetic tapes, stored in square single reel cartridges. The capacity started at 100GB and has increased by a factor of two nearly every generation; the most recent LTO-8 cartridges store 12TB of uncompressed data.

If you want to find out more about LTO, you should check out the LTO Consortium, which is made up of Hewlett Packard Enterprises, IBM and Quantum, although there are other companies that make LTO drives and tape cartridges. You might be familiar with their LTO Ultrium logo.

‘Tapeless’ Workflows
While initially targeting server markets, with the introduction of “tapeless workflows” in the media and entertainment industry, there became a need for long-term media storage. Since the first P2 cards and SxS sticks were too expensive for single write operations, they were designed to be reused repeatedly once their contents had been offloaded to hard drives. But hard drives are not ideal for long-term data storage, and insurance and bonding companies wanted their clients to have alternate data archiving solutions.

So, by the time the Red One and Canon 5D were flooding post facilities with CF cards, LTO had become the default archive solution for most high-budget productions. But this approach was not without limitations and pitfalls. The LTO archiving solutions being marketed at the time were designed around the Linux-based Tar system of storing files, while most media work is done on Windows and Mac OS X. Various approaches were taken by different storage vendors to provide LTO capabilities to M&E customers. Some were network appliances running Linux under the hood, while others wrote drivers and software to access the media from OS X or, in one case, Windows. Then there was the issue that Tar isn’t a self-describing file system, so you needed a separate application to keep track of what was on each tape in your library. All of these aspects cost lots of money, so the initial investment was steep, even though the margin cost of tape cartridges was the cheapest way to store data per GB.

LTFS
Linear Tape File System (LTFS) was first introduced with LTO-5 and was intended to make LTO tapes easier to use and interchange between systems. A separate partition on the tape stores the index of data in XML and other associated metadata. It was intended to be platform independent, although it took a while for reliable drivers and software to be developed for use in Windows and OS X.

At this point, LTFS-formatted tapes in LTO tape drives operate very similarly to old 3.5-inch floppy drives. You insert a cartridge, it makes some funny noises, and then after a minute it asks you to format a new tape, or it displays the current contents of the tape as a new drive letter. If you drag files into that drive, it will start copying the data to the tape, and you can hear it grinding away. The biggest difference is when you hit eject it will take the computer a minute or two to rewind the tape, write the updated index to the first partition and then eject the cartridge for you. Otherwise it is a seamless drag and drop, just like any other removable data storage device.

LTO Drives
All you need in order to use LTO in your media workflow — for archive or data transfer — is an LTO drive. I bought one last year on Amazon for $1,600, which was a bit of a risk considering that I didn’t know if I was going to be able to get it to work on my Windows 7 desktop. As far as I know, all tape drives are SAS devices, although you can buy ones that have adapted the SAS interface to Thunderbolt or Fibre Channel.

Most professional workstations have integrated SAS controllers, so internal LTO drives fit into a 5.25-inch bay and can just connect to those, or any SAS card. External LTO drives usually use Small Form Factor cables (SFF-8088) to connect to the host device. Internal SAS ports can be easily adapted to SFF-8088 ports, or a dedicated eSAS PCIe card can be installed in the system.

Capacity & Compression
How much data do LTO tapes hold? This depends on the generation… and the compression options. The higher capacity advertised on any LTO product assumes a significant level of data compression, which may be achievable with uncompressed media files (DPX, TIFF, ARRI, etc.) The lower value advertised is the uncompressed data capacity, which is the more accurate estimate of how much data it will store. This level of compression is achieved using two different approaches, eliminating redundant data segments and eliminating the space between files. LTO was originally designed for backing up lots of tiny files on data servers, like credit card transactions or text data, and those compression approaches don’t always apply well to large continuous blocks of unique data found in encoded video.

Using data compression on media files which are already stored in a compressed codec doesn’t save much space (there is little redundancy in the data, and few gaps between individual files).

Uncompressed frame sequences, on the other hand, can definitely benefit from LTO’s hardware data compression. Regardless of compression, I wouldn’t count on using the full capacity of each cartridge. Due to the way the drives are formatted, and the way storage vendors measure data, I have only been able to copy 2.2TB of data from Windows onto my 2.5TB LTO-6 cartridges. So keep that in mind when estimating real-world capacity, like with any other data storage medium.

Choosing the ‘Right’ Version to Use
So which generation of LTO is the best option? That depends on how much data you are trying to store. Since most media files that need to be archived these days are compressed, either as camera source footage or final deliverables, I will be calculating based on the uncompressed capacities. VFX houses using DPX frames, or vendors using DCDMs might benefit from calculating based on the compressed capacities.

Prices are always changing, especially for the drives, but these are the numbers as of summer 2018. On the lowest end, we have LTO-5 drives available online for $600-$800, which will probably store 1-1.2TB of data on a $15 tape. So if you have less than 10TB of data to backup at a time, that might be a cost-effective option. Any version lower than LTO-5 doesn’t support the partitioning required for LTFS, and is too small to be useful in modern workflows anyway.

As I mentioned earlier, I spent $1,600 on an LTO-6 drive last year, and while that price is still about the same, LTO-7 and LTO-8 drives have come down in cost since then. My LTO-6 drive stores about 2.2TB of data per $23 tape. That allowed me to backup 40TB of Red footage onto 20 tapes in 90 hours, or an entire week. Now I am looking at using the same drive to ingest 250TB of footage from a production in China, but that would take well over a month, so LTO-6 is not the right solution for that project. But the finished deliverables will probably be a similar 10TB set of DPX and TIFF files, so LTO-6 will still be relevant for that application.

I see prices as low as $2,200 for LTO-7 drives, so they aren’t much more expensive than LTO-6 drives at this point, but the 6TB tapes are. LTO-7 switched to a different tape material, which increased the price of the media. At $63 they are just over $10 per TB, but that is higher than the two previous generations.

LTO-8 drives are available for as low as $2,600, and store up to 12TB on a single $160 tape. LTO-8 drives can also write up to 9TB onto a properly formatted LTO-7 tape in a system called “LTO-7 Type M” This is probably the cheapest cost per TB approach at the moment, since 9TB on a $63 tape is $7/TB.

Compatibility Between Generations
One other consideration is backwards compatibility. What will it take to read your tapes back in the future? The standard for LTO has been that drives can write the previous generation tapes and read tapes from two generations back.

So if you invested in an LTO-2 drive and have tons of tapes, they will still work when you upgrade to an LTO-4 drive. You can then copy them to newer cartridges with the same hardware at a 4:1 ratio since the capacity will have doubled twice. The designers probably figured that after two generations (about five years) most data will have been restored at some point, or be irrelevant (the difference between backups and archives).

If you need your media archived longer than that, it would probably be wise to transfer it to fresh media of a newer generation to ensure it is readable in the future. The other issue is transfer if you are using LTO cartridges to move data from one place to another. You must use the same generation of tape and be within one generation to go both ways. If I want to send data to someone who has an LTO-5 drive, I have to use an LTO-5 tape, but I can copy the data to the tape with my LTO-6 drive (and be subject to the LTO-5 capacity and performance limits). If they then sent that LTO-5 tape to someone with an LTO-7 drive, they would be able to read the data, but wouldn’t be able to write to the tape. The only exception to this is that the LTO-8 drives won’t read LTO-6 tapes (of course, because I have a bunch of LTO-6 tapes now, right?).

So for my next 250TB project, I have to choose between a new LTO-7 drive with backwards compatibility to my existing gear or an LTO-8 drive that can fit 50% more data on a $63 cartridge, and use the more expensive 12TB ones as well. Owning both LTO-6 and LTO-8 drives would allow me to read or write to any LTFS cartridge (until LTO-9 is released), but the two drives couldn’t exchange tapes with each other.

Automated Backup Software & Media Management
I have just been using HPE’s free StoreOpen Utility to operate my internal LTO drive and track what files I copy to which tapes. There are obviously much more expensive LTO-based products, both in hardware with robotic tape libraries and in software with media and asset management programs and automated file backup solutions.

I am really just exploring the minimum investment that needs to be made to take advantage of the benefits of LTO tape, for manually archiving your media files and backing up your projects. The possibilities are endless, but the threshold to start using LTO is much lower than it used to be, especially with the release of LTFS support.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


Quantum upgrades Xcellis scale-out storage with StoreNext 6.2, NVMe tech

Quantum has made enhancements to its Xcellisscale-out storage appliance portfolio with an upgrade to StorNext 6.2 and the introduction of NVMe storage. StorNext 6.2 bolsters performance for 4K and 8K video while enhancing integration with cloud-based workflows and global collaborative environments. NVMe storage significantly accelerates ingest and other aspects of media workflows.

Quantum’s Xcellis scale-out appliances provide high performance for increasingly demanding applications and higher resolution content. Adding NVMe storage to the Xcellis appliances offers ultra-fast performance: 22 GB/s single-client, uncached streaming bandwidth. Excelero’s NVMesh technology in combination with StorNext ensures all data is accessible by multiple clients in a global namespace, making it easy to access and cost-effective to share Flash-based resources.

Xcellis provides cross-protocol locking for shared access across SAN, NFS and SMB, helping users share content across both Fibre Channel and Ethernet.

With StorNext 6.2, Quantum now offers an S3 interface to Xcellis appliances, allowing them to serve as targets for applications designed to write to RESTful interfaces. This allows pros to use Xcellis as either a gateway to the cloud or as an S3 target for web-based applications.

Xcellis environments can now be managed with a new cloud monitoring tool that enables Quantum’s support team to monitor critical customer environmental factors, speed time to resolution and ultimately increase uptime. When combined with Xcellis Web Services — a suite of services that lets users set policies and adjust system configuration — overall system management is streamlined.

Available with StorNext 6.2, enhanced FlexSync replication capabilities enable users to create local or remote replicas of multitier file system content and metadata. With the ability to protect data for both high-performance systems and massive archives, users now have more flexibility to protect a single directory or an entire file system.

StorNext 6.2 lets administrators provide defined and enforceable quotas and implement quality of service levels for specific users, and it simplifies reporting of used storage capacity. These new features make it easier for administrators to manage large-scale media archives efficiently.

The new S3 interface and NVMe storage option are available today. The other StorNext features and capabilities will be available by December 2018.

 


mLogic at IBC with four new storage solutions

mLogic will be at partner booths during IBC showing four new products at: the mSpeed Pro, mRack Pro, mShare MDC and mTape SAS.

The mLogic mSpeed Pro (pictured) is a 10-drive RAID system with integrated LTO tape. Thishybrid storage solution and hard drive provides high-speed access to media for coloring, editing and VFX, while also providing an extended, long-term archive for content to LTO tape, which promises more than 30+ years of media preservation.

mSpeed Pro supports multiple RAID levels, including RAID-6 for the ultimate in fault tolerance. It connects to any Linux, macOS, or Windows computer via a fast 40Gb/second Thunderbolt 3 port. The unit ships with the mLogic Linear Tape File System (LTFS) Utility, a simple drag-and-drop application that transfers media from the RAID to the LTO.

The mLogic mSpeed Pro will be available in 60, 80 and 100TB with an LT0-7 or LTO-8 tape drive. Pricing starts at $8,999.

The mRack Pro is a 2U rack-mountable archiving solution that features full-height LTO-8 drives and Thunderbolt 3 connectivity. Full-height (FH) LTO-8 drives offer numerous benefits over their half-height counterparts, including:
– Having larger motors that move media faster
– Working more optimally in LTFS (Linear Tape File System) environments
– Providing increased mechanical reliability
– Being a better choice for high-duty cycle workloads
– Having a lower operating temperature

The mRack Pro is available with one or two LTO-8 FH drives. Pricing starts at $7,999.

mLogic’s mShare is a metadata controller (MDC) with PCIe switch and embedded Storage Area Network (SAN) software, all integrated in a single compact rack-mount enclosure. Designed to work with mLogic’s mSAN Thunderbolt 3 RAID, the unit can be configured with Apple Xsan or Tiger Technology Tiger Store software. With mShare and mSAN, collaborative workgroups can be configured over Thunderbolt at a fraction of the cost of traditional SAN solutions. Pricing TBD.

Designed for archiving media in the Linux and Windows environments, mTape SAS is a desktop LTO-7 or LTO-8 that ships bundled with a high-speed SAS PCIe adapter to install in host computers. The mTape SAS can also be bundled with Xendata Workstation 6 archiving software for Windows. Pricing starts at $3,399.


Review: Mobile Filmmaking with Filmic Pro, Gnarbox, LumaFusion

By Brady Betzel

There is a lot of what’s become known as mobile filmmaking being done with cell phones, such as the iPhone, Samsung Galaxy and even the Google Pixel. For this review, I will cover two apps and one hybrid hard drive/mobile media ingest station built specifically for this type of mobile production.

Recently, I’ve heard how great the latest mobile phone camera sensors are, and how those embracing mobile filmmaking are taking advantage of them in their workflows. Those workflows typically have one thing in common: Filmic Pro.

One of the more difficult parts of mobile filmmaking, whether you are using a GoPro, DSLR or your phone, is storage and transferring the media to a workable editing system. The Gnarbox, which is designed to help solve this issue, is in my opinion one of the best solutions for mobile workflows that I have seen.

Finally, editing your footage together in a professional nonlinear editor like Adobe Premiere Pro or Blackmagic’s Resolve takes some skills and dedication. Moreover, if you are doing a lot of family filmmaking (like me), you usually have to wait for the kids to go to sleep to start transferring and editing. However, with the iOS app LumaFusion — used simultaneously with the Gnarbox — you can transfer your GoPro, DSLR or other pro camera shots, while your actors are taking a break, allowing you to clear your memory cards or get started on a quick rough cut to send to executives that might be waiting off site.

Filmic Pro
First up is Filmic Pro V.6. Filmic Pro is an iOS and Android app that gives you fine-tuned control over your phone’s camera, including live image analyzation features, focus pulling and much more.

There are four very useful live analytic views you can enable at the top of the app: Zebra Stripes, Clipping, False Color and Focus Peaking. There is another awesome recording view that allows simultaneous focus and exposure adjustments, conveniently placed where you would naturally rest your thumbs. With the focus pulling feature you can even set start and end focus points that Filmic Pro will run for you — amazing!

There are many options under the hood of Filmic Pro, including the ability to record at almost any frame rate and aspect ratio, such as 9:16 vertical video (Instagram TV anyone?). You can also film at one particular frame rate, such as 120fps and record at a more standard frame rate of 24fps, essentially processing your high-speed footage in the phone. Vertical video is one of those constant questions that arises when producing video for mobile viewing. If you don’t want the app to automatically change to vertical video recording mode, you can set an orientation lock in the settings. When recording video there are four data rate options: Filmic Extreme, with 100Mb/s for any frame size 2K or higher and 50Mb/s for 1080p or lower; Filmic Quality, which limits the data rate to 35Mb/s (your phone’s default data rate); or Economy, which you probably don’t need to use.

I have only touched on a few of the options inside of Filmic Pro. There are many more, including mic input selections, sample rate selections (including 48kHz), timelapse mode and, in my opinion, the most powerful feature, Log recording. Log recording inside of a mobile phone can unlock some unnoticed potential in your phone’s camera chip, allowing for a better ability to match color between cameras or expose details in shadows when doing color correction in post.

The only slightly bad news is that on top of the $14.99 price for the Filmic Pro app itself, to gain access to the Log ability (labeled Cinematographer’s Toolkit) you have to pay an additional $9.99. In the end, $25 is a really, really, really small price to pay for the abilities that Filmic Pro unlocks for you. And while this won’t turn your phone into an Arri Alexa or Red Helium (yet), you can raise your level of mobile cinematography quickly, and if you are using your phone for some B-or C-roll, Filmic Pro can help make your colorist happy, thanks to Log recording.

One feature that I couldn’t test because I do not own a DJI Osmo is that you can control the features on your iOS device from the Osmo itself, which is pretty intriguing. In addition, if you use any of the Moondog Labs anamorphic adapters, Filmic Pro can be programmed to de-squeeze the footage properly.

You can really dive in with Filmic Pro’s library of tutorials here.

Gnarbox 1.0
After running around with GoPro cameras strapped to your (or your dog’s) head all day, there will be some heavy post work to get it offloaded onto your computer system. And, typically, you will have much more than just one GoPro recording during the day. Maybe you took some still photos on your DSLR and phone, shot some drone footage and had GoPro on a chest mount.

As touched on earlier, the Gnarbox 1.0 is a stand-alone WiFi-enabled hard drive and media ingestion station that has SD, microSD, USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports to transfer media to the internal 128GB or 256GB Flash memory. You simply insert the memory cards or the camera’s USB cable and connect to the Gnarbox via the App on your phone to begin working or transferring.

There are a bunch of files that will open using the Gnarbox 1.0 iOS and Android apps, but there are some specific files that won’t open, including ProRes, H.265 iPhone recordings, CinemaDNG, etc. However, not all hope is lost. Gnarbox is offering up the Gnarbox 2.0 via IndieGogo and can be pre-ordered. Version 2.0 will offer compatibility with file types such as ProRes, in addition to having faster transfer times and app-free backups.

So while reading this review of the Gnarbox 1.0, keep Version 2 in the back of your mind, since it will likely contain many new features that you will want… if you can wait until the estimated delivery of January 2019.

Gnarbox 1.0 comes in two flavors: a 128GB version for $299.99, and the version I was sent to review, which is 256GB for $399.99. The price is a little steep, but the efficiency this product brings is worth the price of admission. Click here for all the lovely specs.

The drive itself is made to be used with an iPhone or Android-based device primarily, but it can be put into an external hard drive mode to be used with a stand-alone computer. The Gnarbox 1.0 has a write speed of 132MB/s and read speed of 92MB/s when attached to a computer in Mass Storage Mode via the USB 3.0 connection. I actually found myself switching modes a lot when transferring footage or photos back to my main system.

It would be nice to have a way to switch to the external hard drive mode outside of the app, but it’s still pretty easy and takes only a few seconds. To connect your phone or tablet to the Gnarbox 1.0, you need to download the Gnarbox app from the App Store or Google Play Store. From there you can access content on your phone as well as on the Gnarbox when connected to it. In addition to the Gnarbox app, Gnarbox 1.0 can be used with Adobe Lightroom CC and the mobile NLE LumaFusion, which I will cover next in the review.

The reason I love the Gnarbox so much is how simply, efficiently and powerfully it accomplishes its task of storing media without a computer, allowing you to access, edit and export the media to share online without a lot of technical know-how. The one drawback to using cameras like GoPros is it can take a lot of post processing power to get the videos on your system and edited. With the Gnarbox, you just insert your microSD card into the Gnarbox, connect your phone via WiFi, edit your photos or footage then export to your phone or the Gnarbox itself.

If you want to do a full backup of your memory card, you open the Gnarbox app, find the Connected Devices, select some or all of the clips and photos you want to backup to the Gnarbox and click Copy Files. The same screen will show you which files have and have not been backed up yet so you don’t do it multiple times.

When editing photos or video there are many options. If you are simply trimming down a video clip, stringing out a few clips for a highlight reel, adding some color correction, and even some music, then the Gnarbox app is all you will need. With the Gnarbox 1.0, you can select resolution and bit rates. If you’re reading this review you are probably familiar with how resolutions and bit rates work, so I won’t bore you with those explanations. Gnarbox 1.0 allows for 4K, 2.7K. 1080p and 720p resolutions and bitrates of 65 Mbps, 45Mbps, 30Mbps and 10Mbps.

My rule of thumb for social media is that resolution over 1080p doesn’t really apply to many people since most are watching it on their phone, and even with a high-end HDR, 4K, wide gamut… whatever, you really won’t see much difference. The real difference comes in bit rates. Spend your megabytes wisely and put all your eggs in the bit rate basket. The higher the bit rates the better quality your color will be and there will be less tearing or blockiness. In my opinion a higher bit rate 1080p video is worth more than a 4K video with a lower bit rate. It just doesn’t pay off. But, hey, you have the options.

Gnarbox has an awesome support site where you can find tutorial GIFs and writeups covering everything from powering on your Gnarbox to bitrates, like this one. They also have a great YouTube playlist that covers most topics with the Gnarbox, its app, and working with other apps like LumaFusion to get you started. Also, follow them on Instagram for some sweet shots they repost.

LumaFusion
With Filmic Pro to capture your video and with the Gnarbox you can lightly edit and consolidate your media, but you might need to go a little further in the editing than just simple trims. This is where LumaFusion comes in. At the moment, LumaFusion is an iOS only app, but I’ve heard they might be working on an Android version. So for this review I tried to get my hands on an iPad and an iPad Pro because this is where LumaFusion would sing. Alas, I had to settle for my wife’s iPhone 7 Plus. This was actually a small blessing, because I was afraid the app would be way too small to use on a standard iPhone. To my surprise it was actually fine.

LumaFusion is an iOS-based nonlinear editor, much like Adobe Premiere or FCPX, but it only costs $19.99 in the App store. I added LumaFusion to this review because of its tight integration with Gnarbox (by accessing the files directly on the Gnarbox for editing and output), but also because it has presets for Filmic Pro aspect ratios: 1.66:1, 17:9, 2.2:1, 2.39:1, 2.59:1. LumaFusion will also integrate with external drives like the Western Digital wireless SSD, as well as cloud services like Google Drive.

In the actual editing interface LumaFusion allows for advanced editing with titles, music, effects and color correction. It gives you three video and audio tracks to edit with, allowing for J and L cuts or transitions between clips. For an editor like me who is so used to Avid Media Composer that I want to slip and trim in every app, LumaFusion allows for slips, trims, insert edits, overwrite edits, audio track mixing, audio ducking to automatically set your music levels — depending on when dialogue occurs — audio panning, chroma key effects, slow and fast motion effects, titles with different fonts and much more.

There is a lot of versatility inside of LumaFusion, including the ability to export different frame rates between 18, 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 48, 50, 59.94, 60, 120 and 240 fps. If you are dealing with 360-degree video, you can even enable the 360-degree metadata flag on export.

LumaFusion has a great reference manual that will fill you in on all the aspects of the app, and it’s a good primer on other subjects like exporting. In addition, they have a YouTube playlist. Simply, you can export for all sorts of social media platforms or even to share over Air Drop between Mac OS and iOS devices. You can choose your export resolution such as 1080p or UHD 4K (3840×2160), as well as your bit rate, and then you can select your codec, whether it be H.264 or H.265. You can also choose whether the container is a MP4 or MOV.

Obviously, some of these output settings will be dictated by the destination, such as YouTube, Instagram or maybe your NLE on your computer system. Bit rate is very important for color fidelity and overall picture quality. LumaFusion has a few settings on export, including: 12Mbps, 24Mbps, 32Mbps and 50Mbps if in 1080p, otherwise 100 Mbps if you are exporting UHD 4k (3840×2160).

LumaFusion is a great solution for someone who needs the fine tuning of a pro NLE on their iPad or iPhone. You can be on an exotic vacation without your laptop and still create intricately edited highlight reels.

Summing Up
In the end, technology is amazing! From the ultra-high-end camera app Filmic Pro to the amazing wireless media hub Gnarbox and even the iOS-based nonlinear editor LumaFusion, you can film, transfer and edit a professional-quality UHD 100Mbps clip without the need for a stand-alone computer.

If you really want to see some amazing footage being created using Filmic Pro you should follow Richard Lackey on all social media platforms. You can find more info on his website. He has some amazing imagery as well as tips on how to shoot more “cinematic” video using your iPhone with Filmic Pro.

The Gnarbox — one of my favorite tools reviewed over the years — serves a purpose and excels. I can’t wait to see how the Gnarbox 2.0 performs when it is released. If you own a GoPro or any type of camera and want a quick and slick way to centralize your media while you are on the road, then you need the Gnarbox.

LumaFusion will finish off your mobile filmmaking vision with titles, trimming and advanced edit options that will leave people wondering how you pulled off such a professional video from your phone or tablet.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


Dell EMC’s ‘Ready Solutions for AI’ now available

Dell EMC has made available its new Ready Solutions for AI, with specialized designs for Machine Learning with Hadoop and Deep Learning with Nvidia.

Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI eliminate the need for organizations to individually source and piece together their own solutions. They offer a Dell EMC-designed and validated set of best-of-breed technologies for software — including AI frameworks and libraries — with compute, networking and storage. Dell EMC’s portfolio of services include consulting, deployment, support and education.

Dell EMC’s Data Science Provisioning Portal offers an intuitive GUI that provides self-service access to hardware resources and a comprehensive set of AI libraries and frameworks, such as Caffe and TensorFlow. This reduces the steps it takes to configure a data scientist’s workspace to five clicks. Ready Solutions for AI’s distributed, scalable architecture offers the capacity and throughput of Dell EMC Isilon’s All-Flash scale-out design, which can improve model accuracy with fast access to larger data sets.

Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI: Deep Learning with Nvidia solutions are built around Dell EMC PowerEdge servers with Nvidia Tesla V100 Tensor Core GPUs. Key features include Dell EMC PowerEdge R740xd and C4140 servers with four Nvidia Tesla V100 SXM2 Tensor Core GPUs; Dell EMC Isilon F800 All-Flash Scale-out NAS storage; and Bright Cluster Manager for Data Science in combination with the Dell EMC Data Science Provisioning Portal.

Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI: Machine Learning with Hadoop includes an optimized solution stack, along with data science and framework optimization to get up and running quickly, and it allows expansion of existing Hadoop environments for machine learning.

Key features include Dell EMC PowerEdge R640 and R740xd servers; Cloudera Data Science Workbench for self-service data science for the enterprise; the Apache Spark open source unified data analytics engine; and the Dell EMC Data Science Provisioning Engine, which provides preconfigured containers that give data scientists access to the Intel BigDL distributed deep learning library on the Spark framework.

New Dell EMC Consulting services are available to help customers implement and operationalize the Ready Solution technologies and AI libraries, and scale their data engineering and data science capabilities. Dell EMC Education Services offers courses and certifications on data science and advanced analytics and workshops on machine learning in collaboration with Nvidia.


DigitalGlue’s Creative.Space optimized for Resolve workflows

DigitalGlue’s Creative.Space, an on-premise managed storage (OPMS) service, has been optimized for Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve workflows, meeting the technical requirements for inclusion in Blackmagic’s Configuration Guide. DigitalGlue is an equipment, integration and software development provider, that also designs and implements solutions for complete turnkey content creation, post production and distribution.

According to DigitalGlue CEO/CTO Tim Anderson, each Creative.Space system is pre-loaded with a Resolve optimized PostreSQL database server enabling users to simply create databases in Resolve using the same address they use to connect to their storage. In addition, users can schedule database backups with snapshots, ensuring that work is preserved timely and securely. Creative.Space also uses media intelligent caching to move project data and assets into a “fast lane” allowing all collaborators to experience seamless performance.

“We brought a Creative.Space entry-level Auteur unit optimized with a DaVinci Resolve database to the Blackmagic training facility in Burbank,” explains Nick Anderson, Creative.Space product manager. “The Auteur was put through a series of rigorous testing processes and passed each with flying colors. Our Media Intelligent caching allowed the unit to provide full performance to 12 systems at a level that would normally require a much larger and more expensive system.”

Auteur was the first service in the Creative.Space platform to launch. Creative.Space targets collaborative workflows by optimizing the latest hardware and software for efficiency and increased productivity. Auteur starts at 120TB RAW capacity across 12 drives in a 24-bay 4RU chassis with open bays for rapid growth. Every system is custom-built to address each client’s unique needs. Entry level systems are designed for small to medium workgroups using compressed 4K, 6K and 8K workflows and can scale for 4K uncompressed workflows (including 4K OpenEXR) and large multi-user environments.


Avid adds to Nexis product line with Nexis|E5

The Nexis|E5 NL nearline storage solution from Avid is now available. The addition of this high-density on-premises solution to the Avid Nexis family allows Avid users to manage media across all their online, nearline and archive storage resources.

Avid Nexis|E5 NL includes a new web-based Nexis management console for managing, controlling and monitoring Nexis installations. NexislE5 NL can be easily accessed through MediaCentral | Cloud UX or Media Composer and also integrates with MediaCentral|Production Management, MediaCentral|Asset Management and MediaCentral|Editorial Management to help collaboration, with advanced features such as project and bin sharing. Extending the Nexis|FS (file system) to a secondary storage tier makes it easy to search for, find and import media, enabling users to locate content distributed throughout their operations more quickly.

Build for project parking, staging workflows and proxy archive, Avid reports that Nexis | E5 NL streamlines the workflow between active and non-active assets, allowing media organizations to park assets as well as completed projects on high-density nearline storage, and keep them within easy reach for rediscovery and reuse.

Up to eight Nexis|E5 NL engines can be integrated as one virtualizable pool of storage, making content and associated projects and bins more accessible. In addition, other Avid Nexis Enterprise engines can be integrated into a single storage system that is partitioned for better archival organization.

Additional Nexis|E5 NL features include:
• It’s scalable from 480TB of storage to more than 7PB by connecting multiple Nexis|E5 NL engines together as a single nearline system for a highly scalable, lower-cost secondary tier of storage.
• It offers flexible storage infrastructure that can be provisioned with required capacity and fault-tolerance characteristics.
• Users can configure, control and monitor Nexis using the updated management console that looks and feels like a MediaCentral|Cloud UX application. Its dashboard provides an overview of the system’s performance, bandwidth and status, as well as access to quickly configure and manage workspaces, storage groups, user access, notifications and other functions. It offers the flexibility and security of HTML5 along with an interface design that enables mobile device support.

DigitalGlue’s Creative.Space intros all-Flash 1RU OPMS storage

Creative.Space, a division of DigitalGlue that provides on-premise managed storage (OPMS) as a service for production and post companies as well as broadcast networks, has added the Breathless system to its offerings. The product will make its debut at Cine Gear in LA next month.

The Breathless Next Generation Small Form Factor (NGSFF) media storage system offers 36 front-serviceable NVMe SSD bays in 1RU. It is designed for 4K, 6K and 8K uncompressed workflows using JPEG2000, DPX and multi-channel OpenEXR. There are 4TB of NVMe SSDs currently available, but a 16TB version will be available in later this year, allowing 576TB of Flash storage to fit in 1RU. Breathless performs 10 million random read IOPS (Input/Output Operations per Second) of storage performance (up to 475,000 per drive).

Each of the 36 NGSFF SSD bays connects to the motherboard directly over PCIe to deliver maximum potential performance. With dual Intel Skylake-SP CPUs and 24 DDR4 DIMMs of memory, this system is perfect for I/O intensive local workloads, not just for high-end VFX, but also realtime analytics, database and OTT content delivery servers.

Breathless’ OPMS features 24/7 monitoring, technical support and next-day repairs for an all-inclusive, affordable fixed monthly rate of $2,495.00, based on a three-year contract (16TB of SSD).

Breathless is the second Creative.Space system to launch, joining Auteur, which offers 120TB RAW capacity across 12 drives in a 24-bay 4 RU chassis. Every system is custom-built to address each client’s needs. Entry level systems are designed for small to medium workgroups using compressed 4K, 6K and 8K workflows and can scale for 4K uncompressed workflows (including 4K OpenEXR) and large multi-user environments.

DigitalGlue, an equipment, integration and software development provider, also designs and implements turnkey solutions for content creation, post and distribution.