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Category Archives: Restoration

MPI restores The Wizard of Oz in 4K HDR

By Barry Goch

The classic Victor Fleming-directed film The Wizard of Oz, which was released by MGM in 1939 and won two of its six Academy Award nominations, has been beautifully restored by Burbank’s Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging (MPI).

Bob Bailey

To share its workflow on the film, MPI invited a group of journalists to learn about the 4K UHD HDR restoration of this classic film. The tour guide for our high-tech restoration journey was MPI’s VP of operations and sales Bob Bailey, who walked us through the entire restoration process — from the original camera negative to final color.

The Wizard of Oz, which starred Judy Garland, was shot on a Technicolor three-strip camera system. According to Bailey, it ran three black and white negatives simultaneously. “That is why it is known as three-strip Technicolor. The magazine on top of the camera was triple the width of a normal black and white camera because it contained each roll of negative to capture your red, green and blue records,” explained Bailey.

“When shooting in Technicolor, you weren’t just getting the camera. You would rent a package that included the camera, a camera crew with three assistants, the film, the processing and a Technicolor color consultant.”

George Feltenstein, SVP of theatrical catalog marketing for Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, spoke about why the film was chosen for restoration. “The Wizard of Oz is among the crown jewels that we hold,” he said. “We wanted to embrace the new 4K HDR technology, but nobody’s ever released a film that old using this technology. HDR, or high dynamic range, has a color range that is wider than anything that’s come before it. There are colors [in The Wizard of Oz] that were never reproducible before, so what better a film to represent that color?”

Feltenstein went on to explain that this is the oldest film to get released in the 4K format. He hopes that this is just the beginning and that many of the films in Warner Bros.’ classic library will also be released on 4K HDR and worked on at MPI under Bailey’s direction.

The Process
MPI scanned each of the three-strip Technicolor nitrate film negatives at 8K 16-bit, composited them together and then applied a new color grain. The film was rescanned with the Lasergraphics Director 10K scanner. “We have just under 15 petabytes of storage here,” said Bailey. “That’s working storage, because we’re working on 8K movies since [some places in the world] are now broadcasting 8K.”

Steven Anastasi

Our first stop was to look at the Lasergraphics Director. We then moved on to MPI’s climate-controlled vault, where we were introduced to Steven Anastasi, VP of technical operations at Warner Bros. Anastasi explained that the original negative vault has climate-controlled conditions with 25% humidity at 35 degrees Fahrenheit, which is the combination required for keeping these precious assets safe for future generations. He said there are 2 million assets in the building, including picture and sound.

It was amazing to see film reels for 2001: A Space Odyssey sitting on a shelf right in front of me. In addition to the feature reels, MPI also stores millions of negatives captured throughout the years by Warner productions. “We also have a very large library,” reported Anastasi. “So the original negatives from the set, a lot of unit photography, head shots in some cases and so forth. There are 10 million of these.”

Finally, we were led into the color bay to view the film. Janet Wilson, senior digital colorist at MPI, has overseen every remaster of The Wizard of Oz for the past 20 years. Wilson used a FilmLight Baselight X system for the color grade. The grading suite housed multiple screens: a Dolby Pulsar for the Dolby Vision pass, a Sony X300 and a Panasonic EZ1000 OLED 4K HDR.

“We have every 4K monitor manufactured, and we run the film through all of them,” said Bailey. “We painstakingly go through the process from a post perspective to make sure that our consumers get the best quality product that’s available out in the marketplace.”

“We want the consumer experience on all monitors to be something that’s taken into account,” added Feltenstein. “So we’ve changed our workflow by having a consumer or prosumer monitor in these color correction suites so the colorist has an idea of what people are going to see at home, and that’s helped us make a better product.”

Our first view of the feature was a side-by-side comparison of the black and white scanned negative and the sepia color corrected footage. The first part of the film, which takes place in Kansas, was shot in black and white, and then a sepia look was applied to it. The reveal scene, when Dorothy passes through the door going into Oz, was originally shot in color. For this new release, the team generated a matte so Wilson could add this sepia area to the inside of the house as Dorothy transitioned into Oz.

“So this is an example of some of the stuff that we could do in this version of the restoration,” explained Wilson. “With this version, you can see that the part of the image where she’s supposed to be in the monochrome house is not actually black and white. It was really a color image. So the trick was always to get the interior of the house to look sepia and the exterior to look like all of the colors that it’s supposed to. Our visual effects team here at MPI — Mike Moser and Richie Hiltzik — was able to draw a matte for me so that I could color inside of the house independently of the exterior and make them look right, which was always a really tricky thing to do.”

Wilson referred back to the Technicolor three-strip, explaining that because you’ve got three different pieces of film — the different records — they’re receiving the light in different ways. “So sometimes one will be a little brighter than the other. One will be a little darker than the other, which means that the Technicolor is not a consistent color. It goes a little red, and then it goes a little green, and then it goes a little blue, and then it goes a little red again. So if you stop on any given frame, it’s going to look a little different than the frames around it, which is one of the tricky parts of color correcting technical art. When that’s being projected by a film projector, it’s less noticeable than when you’re looking at it on a video monitor, so it takes a lot of little individual corrections to smooth those kinds of things out.”

Wilson reported seeing new things with the 8K scan and 4K display. “The amount of detail that went into this film really shows up.” She said that one of the most remarkable things about the restoration was the amazing detail visible on the characters. For the first time in many generations, maybe ever, you can actually see the detail of the freckles on Dorothy’s face.

In terms of leveraging the expanded dynamic range of HDR, I asked Wilson if she tried to map the HDR, like in kind of a sweet spot, so that it’s both spectacular yet not overpowering at the same time.

“I ended up isolating the very brightest parts of the picture,” she replied. “In this case, it’s mostly the sparkles on their shoes and curving those off so I could run those in, because this movie is not supposed to have modern-day animation levels of brightness. It’s supposed to be much more contained. I wanted to take advantage of brightness and the ability to show the contrast we get from this format, because you can really see the darker parts of the picture. You can really see detail within the Wicked Witch’s dress. I don’t want it to look like it’s not the same film. I want it to replicate that experience of the way this film should look if it was projected on a good print on a good projector.”

Dorothy’s ruby slippers also presented a challenge to Wilson. “They are so red and so bright. They’re so light-reflective, but there were times when they were just a little too distracting. So I had to isolate this level at the same track with slippers and bring them down a little bit so that it wasn’t the first and only thing you saw in the image.”

If you are wondering if audio was part of this most recent restoration, the answer is no, but it had been remastered for a previous version. “As early at 1929, MGM began recording its film music using multiple microphones. Those microphonic angles allowed the mixer to get the most balanced monophonic mix, and they were preserved,” explained Feltenstein. “Twenty years ago, we created a 5.1 surround mix that was organically made from the original elements that were created in 1939. It is full-frequency, lossless audio, and a beautiful restoration job was made to create that track so you can improve upon what I consider to be close to perfection without anything that would be disingenuous to the production.”

In all, it was an amazing experience to go behind the scenes and see how the wizards of MPI created a new version of this masterpiece for today and preserved it for future generations.

This restored version of The Wizard of Oz is a must-see visual extravaganza, and there is no better way to see it than in UHD, HDR, Dolby Vision or HDR10+. What I saw in person took my breath away, and I hope every movie fan out there can have the opportunity to see this classic film in its never-before-seen glory.

The 4K version of The Wizard of Oz is currently available via an Ultra HD Blu-ray Combo Pack and digital.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation as well as a UCLA Extension Instructor, Post Production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya

Review: Neat Video 5 noise reduction plugin

By Brady Betzel

One of the best (and most underrated) tricks in an online editor’s tool kit is to have good image restoration techniques. Removing digital video imperfections — from flicker to digital video noise — is not easy, and not easy to do well. That is, unless you have good noise reduction software like Neat Video.

While Neat Video might not be that well-known, once you see how simply (or intricatly) Neat Video 5 works inside of apps like Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, it will be hard to forget the company’s name.

(While the software was recently updated to 5.1.5 — with expanded GPU support as well as support for new versions of Resolve, Adobe and Nuke — nothing really changes for this review. You can check out a detailed list of the updates here.)

Neat Video 5 is a noise reduction plugin. In a Windows OS environment, Neat Video is compatible with apps like Adobe After Effects, Adobe Premiere Pro, DaVinci Resolve, Avid Media Composer, Vegas, Magix, Edius, Virtual Dub, and the OFX-compatible apps Nuke, Fusion, Scratch, HitFilm, Mamba, Natron, Flame, Baselight and DustBuster. In a macOS environment, Neat Video 5 is compatible with After Effects, Premiere, Final Cut Pro X, Motion 5, OFX, Resolve and Media Composer. In Linux, the software is compatible with OFX-compatible apps and Resolve.

Neat Video 5 comes in three flavors: Demo, Home and Pro. The Demo version works in up to 1280×720 resolution with a watermark. Home is literally made for the home user: It will process video up to 1920×1080 resolutions, it will use up to one GPU, and it is for non-commercial use. The cost is just $74.90 for most apps (Resolve is $89.90). The Pro version has no resolution restrictions, will work on two or more GPUs simultaneously, and can be used commercially. The Pro version starts at $129.90 per app ($159.90 for Resolve). Because Neat Video 5 for OFX works with so many apps, it only comes in Pro ($249.90) and Studio ($349.90) versions. The Studio version adds the ability for a floating license. You can see all of the pricing details here.

If there is one line you should take away from this review, it is this: Neat Video 5 is by far the easiest and best noise reduction software I have used in any application to date. And while this review is focusing on the Resolve version of Neat Video 5, all other apps work in much the same way. You can find Neat Video’s software-specific Quick Start Guides to help. Once you install and register your Neat Video 5 license, removing digital video noise is as easy as applying Neat Video 5 to a node in the color tab, clicking on “Prepare Noise Profile,” clicking on “Auto Profile,” and clicking “Apply.” Then, unless you want to fine-tune your noise reduction, you are done. Obviously, I have somewhat simplified how Neat Video 5 works, but essentially it can be done in as little as three steps per clip, and the results are typically amazing. If they aren’t amazing, you can jump back into Neat Video 5 and manually adjust specifics until the noise reduction looks correct. But I will say that in about 90% of cases, the Auto Profiling will do all of the noise reduction work necessary.

For tinkerers, or for those who need to go far beyond an Auto Profile, you can manually adjust your settings. But taking a step back, Neat Video needs an area of your image that has a uniform color and noise profile to process how it removes noise. The automatic profiling will do its best to find an area, but it doesn’t always work. What you need to keep in mind when building a good noise profile inside of Neat Video is that the area being processed needs to be as uniform as possible (think dark night sky or a wall painted in one color) — meaning no prominent features, a high noise level (something in the high four area is better), the largest possible sample area and no warnings from Neat Video.

So, if your automatic profile doesn’t do the job, you can find an area of your image that meets the above requirements and then build a profile. From there you can use one of the Neat Video 5 features, like “Profile Check.” Profile Check will highlight details that aren’t being affected by Neat Video, giving you a clear representation of what noise is being reduced and whether you need to adjust your profile to better reduce video noise.

At this point you might be wondering where you tweak advanced settings. When you load Neat Video, you will be in Beginner mode. To get into Advanced mode, go to the Tools menu, where you will see a lot of advanced functions that can help you fine-tune your noise profile. And if you still can’t get a good noise reduction profile, you can try out the “Generic Profile,” which can help you build a profile even if your video doesn’t have a large enough area of uniform noise. There are also presets — such as like light flicker, moire flicker, repeat frame issues, dust and scratch filters (including scan lines), jitter of details, artifact removal filter and more — that can solve certain problems.

Neat Video 5 is faster than previous generations. As in previous versions, there is even a tool that inside of Neat Video preferences that will run your CPU and GPU through a benchmark to specify whether you should run on CPU only, GPU only, or a combo of both. In Neat Video 5, if you have trouble with a clip, you can use up to four “Variants” of noise reduction in the new playback window to see how each profile works with your clip.

In terms of playback and rendering, noise reduction is never fast. However, inside of Neat Video the new playback window will typically play back your footage to preview the noise reduction before you jump back into Resolve. Inside of Resolve, even in just 1080p, my sequence would crawl to just a few frames of playback per second. It is one of the most processor- and GPU-intensive tasks you will run on your computer.

In my testing I applied Neat Video 5 to the first node in my color correction tree, followed by a basic color correction in a one-minute timeline. I took those same clips and compared my Neat Video results to Resolve’s Temporal and Spatial noise reduction tools. In terms of visual results, Neat Video 5 was superior. If that’s not the case for you, then jump into YCbCr viewer mode inside of Neat Video 5, isolate each channel and tweak each channel individually so you won’t affect your overall noise reduction if it isn’t necessary. Not only did Neat Video 5 handle normal noise in the shadows well but on clips with very tight lines, it was able to keep a lot of the details while removing the noise. Resolve’s noise reduction tools had a harder time removing noise but keeping detail. Temporal noise reduction really didn’t do much, and while Spatial noise reduction did work it would heavily blur and distort the image — essentially not acceptable.

To get a good example of how Neat Video 5 slams a computer system, I exported 1080p MP4s. Resolve’s built-in Temporal noise reduction took 1:03, while the Spatial noise reduction took 1:05. The Neat Video 5 render of the same one-minute timeline took 3:51 — almost four times as long. I was curious how much longer a 4K render would take. Using 4K (UHD) media, I applied a simple color correction and on a previous serial node that applied Neat Video 5. I exported a 4K (UHD) MP4, which took 52 seconds without Neat Video 5 applied and 16:27 with Neat Video applied — at least 16 times more render time! So while Neat Video 5 is an amazing tool, there is a trade-off in high render times.

To find additional training on more advanced noise reduction techniques in Neat Video, check out the video tutorials. I find myself watching these just because of how much you can learn about noise reduction in general. They aren’t as exciting as watching Game of Thrones or The Handmaid’s Tale, but they will push your knowledge in noise reduction to the next level.

Summing Up
I’ve used Neat Video for a while, so when I was approached to review Version 5 I immediately said yes. Noise reduction is post skill that not many possess.

If you are an online editor or colorist looking to separate yourself from the pack, learn all the noise reduction techniques you can and definitely check out Neat Video 5. Not only can Neat Video 5 work automatically, but you can fine-tune your noise reduction as much as you want.

And when demoing your color correction services, think about using Neat Video 5 to remove camera noise, flickering and chroma issues; color correcting your footage; and, finally, adding some grain back into your shot. Not only will your footage look better, but you’ll have a technical workflow that will definitely impress clients. Just don’t forget to account for the extra render time.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producer’s Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

AMD 2.1

Storage for Color and Post

By Karen Moltenbrey

At nearly every phase of the content creation process, storage is at the center. Here we look at two post facilities whose projects continually push boundaries in terms of data, but through it all, their storage solution remains fast and reliable. One, Light Iron, juggles an average of 20 to 40 data-intensive projects at a time and must have a robust storage solution to handle its ever-growing work. Another, Final Frame, recently took on a project whose storage requirements were literally out of this world.

Amazon’s The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Light Iron
Light Iron provides a wide range of services, from dailies to post on feature films, indies and episodic shows, to color/conform/beauty work on commercials and short-form projects. The facility’s clients include Netflix, Amazon Studios, Apple TV+, ABC Studios, HBO, Fox, FX, Paramount and many more. Light Iron has been committed to evolving digital filmmaking techniques over the past 10 years and understands the importance of data availability throughout the pipeline. Having a storage solution that is reliable, fast and scalable is paramount to successfully servicing data-centric projects with an ever-growing footprint.

More than 100 full-time employees located at Light Iron’s Los Angeles and New York locations regularly access the company’s shared storage solutions. Both facilities are equipped for dailies and finishing, giving clients an option between its offices based on proximity. In New York, where space is at a premium, the company also offers offline editorial suites.

The central storage solution used at both locations is a Quantum StorNext file system along with a combination of network-attached and direct-attached storage. On the archive end, both sites use LTO-7 tapes for backing up before moving the data off the spinning disc storage.

As Lance Hayes, senior post production systems engineer, explains, the facility segments the storage between three different types of options. “We structured our storage environment in a three-tiered model, with redundancy, flexibility and security in mind. We have our fast disks (tier one), which are fast volumes used primarily for playbacks in the rooms. Then there are deliverable volumes (tier two), where the focus is on the density of the storage. These are usually the destination for rendered files. And then, our nearline network-attached storage (tier three) is more for the deep storage, a holding pool before output to tape,” he explains.

Light Iron has been using Quantum as its de facto standard for the past several years. Founded in 2009, Light Iron has been on an aggressive growth trajectory and has evolved its storage strategy in response to client needs and technological advancement. Before installing its StorNext system, it managed with JBOD (“just a bunch of discs”) direct-attached storage on a very limited number of systems to service its staff of then-30-some employees, says Keenan Mock, senior media archivist at Light Iron. Light Iron, though, grew quickly, “and we realized we needed to invest in a full infrastructure,” he adds.

Lance Hayes

At Light Iron, work often starts with dailies, so the workflow teams interact with production to determine the cameras being used, the codecs being shot, the number of shoot days, the expected shooting ratio and so forth. Based on that information, the group determines which generation of LTO stock makes the most sense for the project (LTO-6 or LTO-7, with LTO-8 soon to be an option at the facility). “The industry standard, and our recommendation as well, is to create two LTO tapes per shoot day,” says Mock. Then, those tapes are geographically separated for safety.

In terms of working materials, the group generally restores only what is needed for each individual show from LTO tape, as opposed to keeping the entire show on spinning disc. “This allows us to use those really fast discs in a cost-effective way,” Hayes says.

Following the editorial process, Light Iron restores only the needed shots plus handles from tape directly to the StorNext SAN, so online editors can have immediate access. The material stays on the system while the conform and DI occur, followed by the creation of final deliverables, which are sent to the tier two and tier three spinning disk storage. If the project needs to be archived to tape, Mock’s department takes care of that; if it needs to be uploaded, that usually happens from the spinning discs.

Light Iron’s FilmLight Baselight systems have local storage, which is used mainly as cache volumes to ensure sustained playback in the color suite. In addition, Blackmagic Resolve color correctors play back content directly to the SAN using tier two storage.

Keenan Mock

Light Iron continually analyzes its storage infrastructure and reviews its options in terms of the latest technologies. Currently, the company considers its existing storage solution to be highly functional, though it is reviewing options for the latest versions of flash solutions from Quantum in 2020.

Based on the facility’s storage workflow, there’s minimal danger of maxing out the storage space anytime soon.

While Light Iron is religious about creating a duplicate set of tapes for backup, “it’s a very rare occurrence [for the duplicate to be needed],” notes Mock, “But it can happen, and in that circumstance, Light Iron is prepared.”

As for the shared storage, the datasets used in post, compared to other industries, are very large, “and without shared storage and a clustered file system, we wouldn’t be able to do the jobs we are currently doing,” Hayes notes.

Final Frame
With offices in New York City and London, Final Frame is a full-featured post facility offering a range of services, including DI of every flavor, 8mm to 77mm film scanning and restoration, offline editing, VFX, sound editing (theatrical and home Dolby Atmos) and mastering. Its work spans feature films, documentaries and television. The facility’s recent work on the documentary film Apollo 11, though, tested its infrastructure like no other, including the amount of storage space it required.

Will Cox

“A long time ago, we decided that for the backbone of all our storage needs, we were going to rely on fiber. We have a total of 55 edit rooms, five projection theaters and five audio mixing rooms, and we have fiber connectivity between all of those,” says Will Cox, CEO/supervising colorist. So, for the past 20 years, ever since 1Gb fiber became available, Final Frame has relied on this setup, though every five years or so, the shop has upgraded to the next level of fiber and is currently using 16Gb fiber.

“Storage requirements have increased because image data has increased and audio data has increased with Atmos. So, we’ve needed more storage and faster storage,” Cox says.

While the core of the system is fiber, the facility uses a variety of storage arrays, the bulk of which are 16Gb 4000 Series SAN offerings from Infortrend, totaling approximately 2PB of space. In addition, the studio uses 8GB Promise Technology VTrak arrays, also totaling about 1PB. Additionally installed at the facility are some JetStor 8GB offerings. For SAN management, Final Frame uses Tiger Technology’s Tiger Store.

Foremost in Cox’s mind when looking for a storage solution is interoperability, since Final Frame uses Linux, Mac and Windows platforms; reliability and fault tolerance are important as well. “We run RAID-6 and RAID-60 for pretty much everything,” he adds. “We also focus on how good the remote management is. We’ve brought online so much storage, we need the storage vendors to provide good interfaces so that our engineers and IT people can manage and get realtime feedback about the performance of the arrays and any faults that are creeping in, whether it’s due to failed drives or drives that are performing less than we had anticipated.”

Final Frame has also brought on a good deal more SSD storage. “We manage projects a bit differently now than we used to, where we have more tiered storage,” Cox adds. “We still do a lot of spinning discs, but SSD is moving in, and that is changing our workflows somewhat in that we don’t have to render as many files and as many versions when we have really fast storage. As a result, there’s some cost-savings on personnel at the workflow level when you have extremely fast storage.”

When working with clients who are doing offline editing, Final Frame will build an isolated SAN for them, and when it comes time to finish the project, whether it’s a picture or audio, the studio will connect its online and mixing rooms to that SAN. This setup is beneficial to security, Cox contends, as it accelerates the workflow since there’s no copying of data. However, aside from that work, everyone generally has parallel access to the storage infrastructure and can access it at any time.

More recently, in addition to other projects, Final Frame began working on Apollo 11, a film directed by Todd Douglas Miller. Miller wanted to rescan all the original negatives and all the original elements available from the Apollo 11 moon landing for a documentary film using audio and footage (16mm and 35mm) from NASA during that extraordinary feat. “He asked if we could make a movie just with the archival elements of what existed,” says Cox.

While ramping up and determining a plan of attack — Final Frame was going to scan the data at 4K resolution — NASA and NARA (National Archives and Records Administration) discovered a lost cache of archives containing 65mm and 70mm film.

“At that point, we decided that existing scanning technology wasn’t sufficient, and we’d need a film scanner to scan all this footage at 16K,” Cox adds, noting the company had to design and build an entirely new 16K film scanner and then build a pipeline that could handle all that data. “If you can imagine how tough 4K is to deal with, then think about 16K, with its insanely high data rates. And 8K is four times larger than 4K, and 16K is four times larger than 8K, so you’re talking about orders-of-magnitude increases in data.”

Adding to the complexity, the facility had no idea how much footage it would be using. Alas, Final Frame ultimately considered its storage structure and the costs needed to take it to the next level for 16K scanning and determined that amount of data was just too much to move and too much to store. “As it was, we filled up a little over a petabyte of storage just scanning the 8K material. We were looking at 4PB, quadrupling the amount of storage infrastructure needed. Then we would have had to run backups of everything, which would have increased it by another 4PB.”

Considering these factors, Final Frame changed its game plan and decided to scan at 8K. “So instead of 2PB to 2.5PB, we would have been looking at 8PB to 10PB of storage if we continued with our earlier plan, and that was really beyond what the production could tolerate,” says Cox.

Even scanning at 8K, the group had to have the data held in the central repository. “We were scanning in, doing what were extensively dailies, restoration and editorial, all from the same core set of media. Then, as editorial was still going on, we were beginning to conform and finish the film so we could make the Sundance deadline,” recalls Cox.

In terms of scans, copies and so forth, Final Frame stored about 2.5PB of data for that project. But in terms of data created and then destroyed, the amount of data was between 12PB and 15PB. To handle this load, the facility needed storage that could perform quickly, be very redundant and large. This led the company to bring on an additional 1PB of Fibre Channel SAN storage to add to the 1.5PB already in place — dedicated to just the Apollo 11 project. “We almost had to double the amount of storage infrastructure in the whole facility just to run this one project,” Cox points out. The additional storage was added in half-petabyte array increments, all connected to the SAN, all at 16Gb fiber.

While storage is important to any project, it was especially true for the Apollo 11 project due to the aggressive deadlines and excessively large storage needs. “Apollo 11 was a unique project. We were producing imagery that was being returned to the National Archives to be part of the historic record. Because of the significance of what we were scanning, we had to be very attentive to the longevity and accuracy of the media,” says Cox. “So, how it was being stored and where it was being stored were important factors on this project, more so than maybe any other project we’ve ever done.”


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran writer, covering visual effects and post production.


Cinelab London adds sound mastering supervisor and colorist

Cinelab London, which provides a wide range of film and digital restoration services, has added two new creatives to its staff — sound mastering supervisor Jason Stevens and senior colorist Mike David.

Stevens brings with him over 20 years of experience in sound and film archive restoration. Prior to his new role, he was part of the archive and restoration team at Pinewood Studios. Having worked there his whole career, Stevens’ worked on many big films, including the recent Yesterday, Rocketman and Judy. His clients have included the BFI, Arrow Films, Studio Canal and Fabulous Films.

During his career, Stevens has also been involved in short films, commercials and broadcast documentaries, recently completing a three-year project for Adam Matthew, the award-winning digital publisher of unique primary source collections from archives around the world.

“We have seen Jason’s enviable skills and talents put to their best use over the six years we have worked together,” says Adrian Bull, co-founder and CEO of Cinelab London. “Now we’re thrilled to have him join our growing in-house team. Talents like Jason’s are rare. He brings a wealth of creative and technical knowledge, so we feel lucky to be able to welcome him to our film family.”

Colorist Mike Davis also joins from Pinewood Studios (following its recent closure) where he spent five years grading feature films and episodic TV productions and specializing in archive and restoration. He has graded over 100 restoration titles for clients such as BFI, Studio Canal and Arrow Films on projects such as A Fish Called Wanda, Rita, Sue & Bob Too and Waterworld.

Davis has worked with the world’s leading DPs, handling dailies and grading major feature films including Mission Impossible, Star Wars: Rogue One and Annihilation. He enjoys working on a variety of content including short films, commercials, broadcast documentaries and Independent DI projects. He recently worked on Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje’s Farming, which won Best British Film at the Edinburgh Film Festival in June.

Davis started his career at Ascent Media, assisting on film rushes, learning how to grade and operate equipment. By 2010, he segued into production, spending time on set and on location working on stereoscopic 3D projects and operating 3D rigs. Returning to grading film and TV at Company 3, Davis then strengthened his talents working in long format film at Pinewood Studios.

Main Image: (L-R) Stevens and Davis