Cinnafilm 6.6.19

Category Archives: rendering

Apple intros long-awaited new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR

By Barry Goch

The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC19) kicked off on Monday with a keynote from Apple CEO Tim Cook, where he announced the eagerly awaited new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR.

Tim Cook’s keynote

In recent years, many working in M&E felt as if Apple had moved away from supporting creative pros in this industry. There was the fumbled rollout of FCPX and then the “trash can” MacPro with its limited upgrade path. Well, our patience has finally paid off and our faith in Apple restored. This week Apple delivered products beyond expectation.

This post pro, for one, is very happy that Apple is back making serious hardware for creative professionals. The tight integration of hardware and software, along with Apple’s build quality, makes its products unique in the market. There is confidence and freedom using Macs that creatives love, and the tower footprint is back!

The computer itself is a more than worthy successor to the original Mac Pro tower design. It’s the complete opposite concept of the current trash-can-shaped Mac Pro, with its closed design and limited upgradeability. The new Mac Pro’s motherboard is connected to a stainless steel space frame offering 360-degree access to the internals, which include 12 memory slots with up to 1.5TB of RAM capacity and eight PCI slots, which is the most ever in a Mac — more than the venerable 9600 Power Mac. The innovative graphics architecture in the new Mac Pro is an expansion module, or MPX module, which allows the installation of two graphic cards tied together through the Infinity Fabric link. This allows for data transfers up to five times faster between the GPUs on the PCIe bus.

Also new is the Apple Afterburner hardware accelerator card, which is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware card for accelerating ProRes and ProRes RAW workflows. Afterburner supports playback of up to three streams of 8K ProRes RAW or up to 12 streams of 4K ProRes RAW. The FPGA allows new instruction to be installed on the chipset, giving the MacPro Afterburner card a wealth of possibilities for future updates.

Plays Well With Others
Across the street from the San Jose Convention Center, where the keynote was held, Apple set up “The Studio” in the historic San Jose Civic. The venue was divided into areas of creative specialization: video, photography, music production, 3D and AR. It was really great to see complete workflows and to be able to interface with Apple creative pros. Oh, and Apple has announced support from third-party developers, such as Blackmagic, Avid, Adobe, Maxon’s Cinema 4D, Foundry, Red, Epic Games, Unity, Pixar and more.

Metal is Apple’s replacement for OpenCL/GL. It’s a low level language for interfacing with GPUs. Working closely with AMD, the new Mac Pro will use native Metal rendering for Resolve, OToy Octane, Maxon Cinema 4D and Red.

Blackmagic’s Grant Perry and Barry Goch at The Studio.

DaVinci Resolve is a color correction and online editing software for high-end film and television work. “It was the first professional software to adopt Metal and now, with the new Mac Pro and Afterburner, we’re seeing full-quality 8K performance in realtime with color correction and effects, something we could never dream of doing before,” explains Blackmagic CEO Grant Petty. “DaVinci Resolve running on the new Mac Pro is the fastest way to edit, grade and finish movies and TV shows.”

According to Avid’s director of product management for audio, Francois Quereuil, “Avid’s Pro Tools team is blown away by the unprecedented processing power of the new Mac Pro, and thanks to its internal expansion capabilities, up to six Pro Tools HDX cards can be installed within the system — a first for Avid’s flagship audio workstation. We’re now able to deliver never-before-seen performance and capabilities for audio production in a single system and deliver a platform that professional users in music and post have been eagerly awaiting.”

“Apple continues to innovate for video professionals,” reports Adobe’s VP of digital video and audio, Steven Warner. “With the power offered by the new Mac Pro, editors will be able to work with 8K without the need for any proxy workflows in a future release of Premiere Pro.”

And from Apple? Expect versions of FCPX and Logic to be available with release of the new MacPro and rest assured they will fully use the new hardware.

The Cost
The price for a Mac Pro with an eight-core Xeon W processor, 32GB of RAM, an AMD Radeon Pro 580X GPU and a 256GB SSD is $5999. The price for the fully loaded version with the 28-core Xeon processor, Afterburner, two MDX modules with four AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo graphics cards and 4TB of SSD internal storage will come in around $20,000, give or take. It will be available this fall.

Pro Display XDR
The new Pro Display XDR is amazing. I was invited into a calibrated viewing environment that also housed Dell, Eizo, Sony BVM-X300 and Sony-X310 HDR monitors. We were shown the typical extreme bright and colorful animal footage for monitor demos. Personally, I would have preferred to have seen more shots of people from a TV show or feature and not the usual extreme footage used to show off how bright the monitor could get.

For example, it would have been cool to see the Jony Ive video — which plays on the Apple site and describes the offerings of the MacPro and the monitor — talking about the design of the product on the monitor.

Anyway, the big hang-up with the monitor is the stand. The price tag of $1,000 for a monitor stand is a lot compared to the price of the monitor itself. When the price of the stand was announced during the keynote, there was a loud gasp, which unfortunately dampened the excitement and momentum of the new releases. It too will be available in the fall.

Display Specs
This Retina 6K 32-inch (diagonal) display offers 6016×3384 pixels (20.4 million pixels) at 218 pixels per inch. The sustained brightness is 1000-nits sustained (full screen) with 1600 nits peak and a contrast ratio of one million to one. It works in P3 wide color gamut with 10-bit depth for 1.073 billion colors. Available reference modes include HDR video (P3-ST 2084), Digital Cinema (P3-DCI), Digital Cinema (P3-D65) and HDTV video (BT.709-BT.1886). Supported HDR formats are HLG, HDR 10 and Dolby Vision.

Portrait mode

The Cost
The standard glass version is $4,999. The nano-texture anti-glare glass version is $5,999. As mentioned, the Pro Stand is $999 and VESA mount adapter is $199. Both are sold separately and have a Thunderbolt 3 connection only.

Pros and Cons
MacPro Pros: innovative design, expandability
Cons: Lack of Nvidia support, no Afterburner support for other formats beyond ProRes and no optical audio output.

Pro Display XDR Pros: Ability to sustain 1,000 nits, beautiful design and execution.
Cons: Lack of Rec 2020 color space and ACES profile, plus the high cost of the display stand.

Summing Up
The Pro is back for Apple and third-party apps like Avid and Resolve. I really can’t wait to get my hands on the new MacPro and Pro Display XDR and put them through their paces.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation as well as a UCLA Extension Instructor, Post Production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya

Review: Maxon Cinema 4D Release 20

By Brady Betzel

Last August, Maxon made available its Cinema 4D Release 20. From the new node-based Material Editor to the all new console used to debug and develop scripts, Maxon has really upped the ante.

At the recent NAB show, Maxon announced that they acquired Redshift Rendering Technologies, the makers of the Redshift rendering engine. This acquisition will hopefully tie in an industry standard GPU-based rendering engine inside of Cinema 4D R20’s workflow and speed up rendering. As of now there is still the same licensing fees attached to Redshift as there were before the acquisition: Node-Locked is $500 and Floating is $600.

Digging In
The first update to Cinema 4D R20 that I wanted to touch on is the new node-based Material Editor. If you are familiar with Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve or Nuke’s applications, then you have seen how nodes work. I love how nodes work, allowing the user to not only layer up effects — or in Cinema 4D R20’s case — diffusion to camera distance. There are over 150 nodes inside of the material editor to build textures with.

One small change that I noticed inside of the updated Material Editor was the new gradient settings. When you are working with gradient knots you can now select multiple knots at once and then right click and double the selected knots, invert the knots, select different knot interpolations (including stepped, smooth, cubic, linear, and blend) and even distribute the knots to clean up your pattern. A real nice and convenient update to gradient workflows.

In Cinema 4D R20, not only can you add new nodes from the search menu, but you can also click the node dots in the Basic properties window and route nodes through there. When you are happy with your materials made in the node editor, you can save them as assets in the scene file or even compress them in a .zip file to share with others.

In a related update category, Cinema 4D Release 20 has introduced the Uber Material. In simple terms (and I mean real simple), the Uber Material is a node-based material that is different from standard or physical materials because it can be edited inside of the Attribute Manager or Material Editor but retain the properties available in the Node Editor.

The Camera Tracking and 2D Camera View has been updated. While the Camera Tracking mode has been improved, the new 2D Camera View mode has combined the Film Move mode with the Film Zoom mode. Adding the ability to use standard shortcuts to move around a scene instead of messing with the Film Offset or Focal Length in the Camera Object Properties dialogue. For someone like me who isn’t a certified pro in Cinema 4D, these little shortcuts really make me feel at home. Much more like apps I’m used to such as Mocha Pro or After Effects. Maxon has also improved the 2D tracking algorithm for much tighter tracks as well as added virtual keyframes. The virtual keyframes are an extreme help when you don’t have time for minute adjustments.

Volume Modeling
What seems to be one of the largest updates in Cinema 4D R20 is the addition of Volume Modeling with the OpenVDB-based Volume Builder. According to www.openvdb.org, “OpenVDB is an Academy Award-winning C++ library comprising a hierarchical data structure and a suite of tools for the efficient manipulation of sparse, time-varying, volumetric data discretized on three-dimensional grids,” developed by Ken Museth at DreamWorks Animation. It uses 3D pixels called voxels instead of polygons. When using the Volume Builder you can combine multiple polygon and primitive objects using Boolean operations: Union, Subtract or Intersect. Furthermore you can smooth your volume using multiple techniques, including one that made me do some extra Google work: Laplacian Flow.

Fields
When going down the voxel rabbit hole in Cinema 4D R20, you will run into another new update: Fields. Prior to Cinema 4D R20, we would use Effectors to affect strength values of an object. You would stack and animate multiple effectors to achieve different results. In Cinema 4D R20, under the Falloff tab you will now see a Fields list along with the types of Field Objects to choose from.

Imagine you make a MoGraph object that you want its opacity to be controlled by a box object moving through your MoGraph but also physically modified by a capsule poking through. You can combine these different field object effectors by using compositing functions in the Fields list. In addition you can animate or alter these new fields straight away in the Objects window.

Summing Up
Cinema 4D Release 20 has some amazing updates that will greatly improve efficiency and quality of your work. From tracking updates to field updates, there are plenty of exciting tools to dive into. And if you are reading this as an After Effects user who isn’t sure about Cinema 4D, now is the time to dive in. Once you learn the basics, whether it’s from Youtube tutorials or you sign up for www.cineversity.com classes, you will immediately see an increase in the quality of your work.

Combining Adobe After Effects, Element 3D and Cinema 4D R20 is the ultimate in 3D motion graphics and 2D compositing — accessible to almost everyone. And I didn’t even touch on the dozens of other updates to Cinema 4D R20 like the multitude of ProRender updates, FBX import/export options, new node materials and CAD import support for Cataia, Iges, JT, Solidworks and Step formats. Check out Cinema 4D Release 20’s newest features on YouTube and on their website.

And, finally, I think it’s safe to assume that Maxon’s acquisition of RedShift renderer poses a bright future for Cinema 4D users.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Cinnafilm 6.6.19

Quantum offers new F-Series NVMe storage arrays

During the NAB show, Quantum introduced its new F-Series NVMe storage arrays designed for performance, availability and reliability. Using non-volatile memory express (NVMe) Flash drives for ultra-fast reads and writes, the series supports massive parallel processing and is intended for studio editing, rendering and other performance-intensive workloads using large unstructured datasets.

Incorporating the latest Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) networking technology, the F-Series provides direct access between workstations and the NVMe storage devices, resulting in predictable and fast network performance. By combining these hardware features with the new Quantum Cloud Storage Platform and the StorNext file system, the F-Series offers end-to-end storage capabilities for post houses, broadcasters and others working in rich media environments, such as visual effects rendering.

The first product in the F-Series is the Quantum F2000, a 2U dual-node server with two hot-swappable compute canisters and up to 24 dual-ported NVMe drives. Each compute canister can access all 24 NVMe drives and includes processing power, memory and connectivity specifically designed for high performance and availability.

The F-Series is based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform, a software-defined block storage stack tuned specifically for video and video-like data. The platform eliminates data services unrelated to video while enhancing data protection, offering networking flexibility and providing block interfaces.

According to Quantum, the F-Series is as much as five times faster than traditional Flash storage/networking, delivering extremely low latency and hundreds of thousands of IOPs per chassis. The series allows users to reduce infrastructure costs by moving from Fiber Channel to Ethernet IP-based infrastructures. Additionally, users leveraging a large number of HDDs or SSDs to meet their performance requirements can gain back racks of data center space.

The F-Series is the first product line based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform.


NAB 2019: Maxon acquires Redshift Rendering Technologies

Maxon, makers of Cinema 4D, has purchased Redshift Rendering Technologies, developers of the Redshift rendering engine. Redshift is a flexible GPU-accelerated renderer targeting high-end production. Redshift offers an extensive suite of features that makes rendering complicated 3D projects faster. Redshift is available as a plugin for Maxon’s Cinema 4D and other industry-standard 3D applications.

“Rendering can be the most time-consuming and demanding aspect of 3D content creation,” said David McGavran, CEO of Maxon. “Redshift’s speed and efficiency combined with Cinema 4D’s responsive workflow make it a perfect match for our portfolio.”

“We’ve always admired Maxon and the Cinema 4D community, and are thrilled to be a part of it,” said Nicolas Burtnyk, co-founder/CEO, Redshift. “We are looking forward to working closely with Maxon, collaborating on seamless integration of Redshift into Cinema 4D and continuing to push the boundaries of what’s possible with production-ready GPU rendering.”

Redshift is used by post companies, including Technicolor, Digital Domain, Encore Hollywood and Blizzard. Redshift has been used for VFX and motion graphics on projects such as Black Panther, Aquaman, Captain Marvel, Rampage, American Gods, Gotham, The Expanse and more.


Milk VFX provides 926 shots for YouTube’s Origin series

London’s Milk VFX, known for its visual effects work on Adrift, Annihilation and Altered Carbon, has just completed production on YouTube Premium’s new sci-fi thriller original series, Origin.

Milk created all of the 926 VFX shots for Origin in 4K, encompassing a wide range of VFX work, in a four-month timeframe. Milk executed rendering entirely in the cloud (via the AWS Cloud Platform); allowing the team to scale its current roster of projects, which include Amazon’s Good Omens and feature film Four Kids and It.

VFX supervisor and Milk co-founder Nicolas Hernandez supervised the entire roster of VFX work on Origin. Milk also supervised the VFX shoot on location in South Africa.

“As we created all the VFX for the 10-episode series it was even more important for us to be on set,” says Hernandez. “As such, our VFX supervisor Murray Barber and onset production manager David Jones supervised the Origin VFX shoot, which meant being based at the South Africa shoot location for several months.”

The series is from Left Bank Pictures, Sony Pictures Television and Midnight Radio in association with China International Television Corporation (CiTVC). Created by Mika Watkins, Origin stars Tom Felton and Natalia Tena and will premiere on 14 November on YouTube Premium.

“The intense challenge of delivering and supervising a show on the scale of Origin — 900 4K shots in four months — was not only helped by our recent expansion and the use of the cloud for rendering, but was largely due to the passion and expertise of the Milk Origin team in collaboration with Left Bank Pictures,” says Cohen.

In terms of tools, Milk used Autodesk Maya, Side Effects Houdini, Foundry’s Nuke and Mari, Shotgun, Photoshop, Deadline for renderfarms and Arnold for rendering and a variety of in-house tools. Hardware includes HPz series workstations and Nvidia graphics. Storage used was Pixitmedia’s PixStor.

The series, from director Paul W.S. Anderson and the producers of The Crown and Lost, follows a group of outsiders who find themselves abandoned on a ship bound for a distant land. Now they must work together for survival, but quickly realize that one of them is far from who they claim to be.

 


Chaos Group to support Cinema 4D with two rendering products

At the Maxon Supermeet 2018 event, Chaos Group announced its plans to support the Maxon Cinema 4D community with two rendering products: V-Ray for Cinema 4D and Corona for Cinema 4D. Based on V-Ray’s Academy Award-winning raytracing technology, the development of V-Ray for Cinema 4D will be focused on production rendering for high-end visual effects and motion graphics. Corona for Cinema 4D will focus on artist-friendly design visualization.

Chaos Group, which acquired the V-Ray for Cinema 4D product from LAUBlab and will lead development on the product for the first time, will offer current customers free migration to a new update, V-Ray 3.7 for Cinema 4D. All users who move to the new version will receive a free V-Ray for Cinema 4D license, including all product updates, through January 15, 2020. Moving forward, Chaos Group will be providing all support, sales and product development in-house.

In addition to ongoing improvements to V-Ray for Cinema 4D, Chaos Group is also released the Corona for Cinema 4D beta 2 at Supermeet, with the final product to follow in January 2019.

Main Image: Daniel Sian created Robots using V-ray for Cinema 4D.


AMD Radeon Vega mobile graphics coming to MacBook Pro

New AMD Radeon Vega Mobile graphics processors — including the AMD Radeon Pro Vega 20 and Radeon Pro Vega 16 graphics — will be available as configuration options on Apple’s 15-inch MacBook Pro starting in late November.

AMD Radeon Vega Mobile graphics offers performance upgrades in 3D rendering, video editing and other creative applications, as well as 1080p HD gaming at ultra settings in the most-used AAA and eSports games.

Built around AMD’s Vega architecture, the new graphics processors were engineered to excel in notebooks for cool and quiet operation. In addition, the processor’s thin design features HBM2 memory (2nd-generation high-bandwidth memory), which takes up less space in a notebook compared to traditional GDDR5-based graphics processors.

 


DeepMotion’s Neuron cloud app trains digital characters using AI

DeepMotion has launched DeepMotion Neuron, the first tool for completely procedural, physical character animation, for presale. The cloud application trains digital characters to develop physical intelligence using advanced artificial intelligence (AI), physics and deep learning. With guidance and practice, digital characters can now achieve adaptive motor control just as humans do, in turn allowing animators and developers to create more lifelike and responsive animations than those possible using traditional methods.

DeepMotion Neuron is a behavior-as-a-service platform that developers can use to upload and train their own 3D characters, choosing from hundreds of interactive motions available via an online library. Neuron will enable content creators to tell more immersive stories by adding responsive actors to games and experiences. By handling large portions of technical animation automatically, the service also will free up time for artists to focus on expressive details.

DeepMotion Neuron is built on techniques identified by researchers from DeepMotion and Carnegie Mellon University who studied the application of reinforcement learning to the growing domain of sports simulation, specifically basketball, where real-world human motor intelligence is at its peak. After training and optimization, the researchers’ characters were able to perform interactive ball-handling skills in real-time simulation. The same technology used to teach digital actors how to dribble can be applied to any physical movement using Neuron.

DeepMotion Neuron’s cloud platform is slated for release in Q4 of 2018. During the DeepMotion Neuron prelaunch, developers and animators can register on the DeepMotion website for early access and discounts.


Siggraph: Chaos Group releases the open beta for V-Ray for Houdini

With V-Ray for Houdini now in open beta, Chaos Group is ensuring that its rendering technology can be used on to each part of the VFX pipeline. With V-Ray for Houdini, artists can apply high-performance raytracing to all of their creative projects, connecting standard applications like Autodesk’s 3ds Max and Maya, and Foundry’s Katana and Nuke.

“Adding V-Ray for Houdini streamlines so many aspects of our pipeline,” says Grant Miller, creative director at Ingenuity Studios. “Combined with V-Ray for Maya and Nuke, we have a complete rendering solution that allows look-dev on individual assets to be packaged and easily transferred between applications.” V-Ray for Houdini was used by Ingenuity on the Taylor Swift music video for Look What You Made Me Do. (See our main image.) 

V-Ray for Houdini uses the same smart rendering technology introduced in V-Ray Next, including powerful scene intelligence, fast adaptive lighting and production-ready GPU rendering. V-Ray for Houdini includes two rendering engines – V-Ray and V-Ray GPU – allowing visual effects artists to choose the one that best takes advantage of their hardware.

V-Ray for Houdini, Beta 1 features include:
• GPU & CPU Rendering – High-performance GPU & CPU rendering capabilities for high-speed look development and final frame rendering.
• Volume Rendering – Fast, accurate illumination and rendering of VDB volumes through the V-Ray Volume Grid. Support for Houdini volumes and Mac OS are coming soon.
• V-Ray Scene Support – Easily transfer and manipulate the properties of V-Ray scenes from applications such as Maya and 3ds Max.
• Alembic Support – Full support for Alembic workflows including transformations, instancing and per object material overrides.
• Physical Hair – New Physical Hair shader renders realistic-looking hair with accurate highlights. Only hair as SOP geometry is supported currently.
• Particles – Drive shader parameters such as color, alpha and particle size through custom, per-point attributes.
• Packed Primitives – Fast and efficient handling of Houdini’s native packed primitives at render time.
• Material Stylesheets – Full support for material overrides based on groups, bundles and attributes. VEX and per-primitive string overrides such as texture randomization are planned for launch.
• Instancing – Supports copying any object type (including volumes) using Packed Primitives, Instancer and “instancepath” attribute.
• Light Instances – Instancing of lights is supported, with options for per-instance overrides of the light parameters and constant storage of light link settings.

To join the beta, check out the Chaos Group website.

V-Ray for Houdini is currently available for Houdini and Houdini Indie 16.5.473 and later. V-Ray for Houdini supports Windows, Linux and Mac OS.

Review: HP’s lower-cost DreamColor Z24x display

By Dariush Derakhshani

So, we all know how important a color-accurate monitor is in making professional-level graphics, right? Right?!? Even at the most basic level, when you’re stalking online for the perfect watch band for your holiday present of a smart watch, you want the orange band you see in the online ad to be what you get when it arrives a few days later. Even if your wife thinks orange doesn’t suit you, and makes you look like “you’re trying too hard.”

Especially as a content developer, you want to know what you’re looking at is an accurate representation of the image. Ever walk into a Best Buy and see multiple screens showing the same content but with wild ranging differences in color? You can’t have that discrepancy working as a pro, especially in collaboration; you need color accuracy. In my own experience, that position has been filled by HP’s 10-bit DreamColor displays for many years now, but not everyone is awash in bitcoins, and justifying a price tag of over $1,200 is sometimes hard to justify, even for a studio professional.

Enter HP’s DreamColor Z24x display at half the price, coming in around $550 online. Yes, DreamColor for half the cost. That’s pretty significant. For the record, I haven’t used a 24-inch monitor since the dark ages; when Lost was the hot TV show. I’ve been fortunate enough to be running at 27-inch and higher, so there was a little shock when I started using the Z24x HP sent me for review. But this is something I quickly got used to.

With my regular 32-inch 4K display still my primary — so I can fit loads of windows all over the place — I used this DreamColor screen as my secondary display, primarily to check output for my Adobe After Effects comps, Adobe Premiere Pro edits and to hold my render view window as I develop shaders and lighting in Autodesk Maya. I felt comfortable knowing the images I shared with my colleagues across town would be seen as I intended them, evening the playing field when working collaboratively (as long as everyone is on the same LUT and color space). Speaking of color spaces, the Z24x hits 100% of sRGB, 99% of AdobeRGB and 96% of DCI P3, which is just slightly under HP’s Z27x DreamColor. It is, however, slightly faster with a 6ms response rate.

The Z24x has a 24-inch IPS panel from LG that exhibits color in 10-bit, like its bigger 27-inch Z27x sibling. This gives you over a billion colors, which I have personally verified by counting them all —that was one, long weekend, I can tell you. Unlike the highest-end DreamColor screens though, the Z24x dithers up from 8-bit to 10-bit (called an 8-bit+FRC). This means it’s better than an 8-bit color display, for sure, but not quite up to real 10-bit, making it color accurate but not color critical. HP’s implementation of dithering is quite good, when subjectively compared to my full 10-bit main display. Frankly, a lot of screens that claim 10-bit may actually be 8-bit+FRC anyway!

While the Z27x gives you 2560×1440 as you expect of most 27inch displays, if not full on 4K, the Z24x is at a comfortable 1920×1200, just enough for a full 1080p image and a little room for a slider or info bar. Being the res snob that I am, I had wondered if that was just too low, but at 24-inches I don’t think you would want a higher resolution, even if you’re sitting only 14-inches away from it. And this is a sentiment echoed by the folks at HP who consulted with so many of their professional clients to build this display. That gives a pixel density of about 94PPI, a bit lower than the 109PPI of the Z27x. This density is about the same as a 1080p HD display at 27-inch, so it’s still crisp and clean.

Viewing angles are good at about 178 degrees, and the screen is matte, with an anti-glare coating, making it easier to stare at without blinking for 10 hours at a clip, as digital artists usually do. Compared to my primary display, this HP’s coating was more matte and still gave me a richer black in comparison, which I liked to see.

Connection options are fairly standard with two DisplayPorts, one HDMI, and one DVI dual link for anyone still living in the past. You also get four USB ports and an analog 3.5mm audio jack if you want to drive some speakers, since you can’t from your phone anymore (Apple, I’m looking at you).

Summing Up
So while 24-inches is a bit small for my tastes for a display, I am seriously impressed at the street price of the Z24x, allowing a lot more pros and semi-pros to get the DreamColor accuracy HP offers at half the price. While I wouldn’t recommend color grading a show on the Z24x, this DreamColor does a nice job of bringing a higher level of color confidence at an attractive price. As a secondary display, the z24x is a nice addition to an artist workflow with budget in mind — or who has a mean, orange-watch-band-hating spouse.


Dariush Derakhshani is a VFX supervisor and educator in Southern California. You can follow his random tweets at @koosh3d.