Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: rendering

Quantum offers new F-Series NVMe storage arrays

During the NAB show, Quantum introduced its new F-Series NVMe storage arrays designed for performance, availability and reliability. Using non-volatile memory express (NVMe) Flash drives for ultra-fast reads and writes, the series supports massive parallel processing and is intended for studio editing, rendering and other performance-intensive workloads using large unstructured datasets.

Incorporating the latest Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) networking technology, the F-Series provides direct access between workstations and the NVMe storage devices, resulting in predictable and fast network performance. By combining these hardware features with the new Quantum Cloud Storage Platform and the StorNext file system, the F-Series offers end-to-end storage capabilities for post houses, broadcasters and others working in rich media environments, such as visual effects rendering.

The first product in the F-Series is the Quantum F2000, a 2U dual-node server with two hot-swappable compute canisters and up to 24 dual-ported NVMe drives. Each compute canister can access all 24 NVMe drives and includes processing power, memory and connectivity specifically designed for high performance and availability.

The F-Series is based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform, a software-defined block storage stack tuned specifically for video and video-like data. The platform eliminates data services unrelated to video while enhancing data protection, offering networking flexibility and providing block interfaces.

According to Quantum, the F-Series is as much as five times faster than traditional Flash storage/networking, delivering extremely low latency and hundreds of thousands of IOPs per chassis. The series allows users to reduce infrastructure costs by moving from Fiber Channel to Ethernet IP-based infrastructures. Additionally, users leveraging a large number of HDDs or SSDs to meet their performance requirements can gain back racks of data center space.

The F-Series is the first product line based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform.

NAB 2019: Maxon acquires Redshift Rendering Technologies

Maxon, makers of Cinema 4D, has purchased Redshift Rendering Technologies, developers of the Redshift rendering engine. Redshift is a flexible GPU-accelerated renderer targeting high-end production. Redshift offers an extensive suite of features that makes rendering complicated 3D projects faster. Redshift is available as a plugin for Maxon’s Cinema 4D and other industry-standard 3D applications.

“Rendering can be the most time-consuming and demanding aspect of 3D content creation,” said David McGavran, CEO of Maxon. “Redshift’s speed and efficiency combined with Cinema 4D’s responsive workflow make it a perfect match for our portfolio.”

“We’ve always admired Maxon and the Cinema 4D community, and are thrilled to be a part of it,” said Nicolas Burtnyk, co-founder/CEO, Redshift. “We are looking forward to working closely with Maxon, collaborating on seamless integration of Redshift into Cinema 4D and continuing to push the boundaries of what’s possible with production-ready GPU rendering.”

Redshift is used by post companies, including Technicolor, Digital Domain, Encore Hollywood and Blizzard. Redshift has been used for VFX and motion graphics on projects such as Black Panther, Aquaman, Captain Marvel, Rampage, American Gods, Gotham, The Expanse and more.

Arraiy 4.11.19

Milk VFX provides 926 shots for YouTube’s Origin series

London’s Milk VFX, known for its visual effects work on Adrift, Annihilation and Altered Carbon, has just completed production on YouTube Premium’s new sci-fi thriller original series, Origin.

Milk created all of the 926 VFX shots for Origin in 4K, encompassing a wide range of VFX work, in a four-month timeframe. Milk executed rendering entirely in the cloud (via the AWS Cloud Platform); allowing the team to scale its current roster of projects, which include Amazon’s Good Omens and feature film Four Kids and It.

VFX supervisor and Milk co-founder Nicolas Hernandez supervised the entire roster of VFX work on Origin. Milk also supervised the VFX shoot on location in South Africa.

“As we created all the VFX for the 10-episode series it was even more important for us to be on set,” says Hernandez. “As such, our VFX supervisor Murray Barber and onset production manager David Jones supervised the Origin VFX shoot, which meant being based at the South Africa shoot location for several months.”

The series is from Left Bank Pictures, Sony Pictures Television and Midnight Radio in association with China International Television Corporation (CiTVC). Created by Mika Watkins, Origin stars Tom Felton and Natalia Tena and will premiere on 14 November on YouTube Premium.

“The intense challenge of delivering and supervising a show on the scale of Origin — 900 4K shots in four months — was not only helped by our recent expansion and the use of the cloud for rendering, but was largely due to the passion and expertise of the Milk Origin team in collaboration with Left Bank Pictures,” says Cohen.

In terms of tools, Milk used Autodesk Maya, Side Effects Houdini, Foundry’s Nuke and Mari, Shotgun, Photoshop, Deadline for renderfarms and Arnold for rendering and a variety of in-house tools. Hardware includes HPz series workstations and Nvidia graphics. Storage used was Pixitmedia’s PixStor.

The series, from director Paul W.S. Anderson and the producers of The Crown and Lost, follows a group of outsiders who find themselves abandoned on a ship bound for a distant land. Now they must work together for survival, but quickly realize that one of them is far from who they claim to be.

 


Chaos Group to support Cinema 4D with two rendering products

At the Maxon Supermeet 2018 event, Chaos Group announced its plans to support the Maxon Cinema 4D community with two rendering products: V-Ray for Cinema 4D and Corona for Cinema 4D. Based on V-Ray’s Academy Award-winning raytracing technology, the development of V-Ray for Cinema 4D will be focused on production rendering for high-end visual effects and motion graphics. Corona for Cinema 4D will focus on artist-friendly design visualization.

Chaos Group, which acquired the V-Ray for Cinema 4D product from LAUBlab and will lead development on the product for the first time, will offer current customers free migration to a new update, V-Ray 3.7 for Cinema 4D. All users who move to the new version will receive a free V-Ray for Cinema 4D license, including all product updates, through January 15, 2020. Moving forward, Chaos Group will be providing all support, sales and product development in-house.

In addition to ongoing improvements to V-Ray for Cinema 4D, Chaos Group is also released the Corona for Cinema 4D beta 2 at Supermeet, with the final product to follow in January 2019.

Main Image: Daniel Sian created Robots using V-ray for Cinema 4D.


AMD Radeon Vega mobile graphics coming to MacBook Pro

New AMD Radeon Vega Mobile graphics processors — including the AMD Radeon Pro Vega 20 and Radeon Pro Vega 16 graphics — will be available as configuration options on Apple’s 15-inch MacBook Pro starting in late November.

AMD Radeon Vega Mobile graphics offers performance upgrades in 3D rendering, video editing and other creative applications, as well as 1080p HD gaming at ultra settings in the most-used AAA and eSports games.

Built around AMD’s Vega architecture, the new graphics processors were engineered to excel in notebooks for cool and quiet operation. In addition, the processor’s thin design features HBM2 memory (2nd-generation high-bandwidth memory), which takes up less space in a notebook compared to traditional GDDR5-based graphics processors.

 


DeepMotion’s Neuron cloud app trains digital characters using AI

DeepMotion has launched DeepMotion Neuron, the first tool for completely procedural, physical character animation, for presale. The cloud application trains digital characters to develop physical intelligence using advanced artificial intelligence (AI), physics and deep learning. With guidance and practice, digital characters can now achieve adaptive motor control just as humans do, in turn allowing animators and developers to create more lifelike and responsive animations than those possible using traditional methods.

DeepMotion Neuron is a behavior-as-a-service platform that developers can use to upload and train their own 3D characters, choosing from hundreds of interactive motions available via an online library. Neuron will enable content creators to tell more immersive stories by adding responsive actors to games and experiences. By handling large portions of technical animation automatically, the service also will free up time for artists to focus on expressive details.

DeepMotion Neuron is built on techniques identified by researchers from DeepMotion and Carnegie Mellon University who studied the application of reinforcement learning to the growing domain of sports simulation, specifically basketball, where real-world human motor intelligence is at its peak. After training and optimization, the researchers’ characters were able to perform interactive ball-handling skills in real-time simulation. The same technology used to teach digital actors how to dribble can be applied to any physical movement using Neuron.

DeepMotion Neuron’s cloud platform is slated for release in Q4 of 2018. During the DeepMotion Neuron prelaunch, developers and animators can register on the DeepMotion website for early access and discounts.


Siggraph: Chaos Group releases the open beta for V-Ray for Houdini

With V-Ray for Houdini now in open beta, Chaos Group is ensuring that its rendering technology can be used on to each part of the VFX pipeline. With V-Ray for Houdini, artists can apply high-performance raytracing to all of their creative projects, connecting standard applications like Autodesk’s 3ds Max and Maya, and Foundry’s Katana and Nuke.

“Adding V-Ray for Houdini streamlines so many aspects of our pipeline,” says Grant Miller, creative director at Ingenuity Studios. “Combined with V-Ray for Maya and Nuke, we have a complete rendering solution that allows look-dev on individual assets to be packaged and easily transferred between applications.” V-Ray for Houdini was used by Ingenuity on the Taylor Swift music video for Look What You Made Me Do. (See our main image.) 

V-Ray for Houdini uses the same smart rendering technology introduced in V-Ray Next, including powerful scene intelligence, fast adaptive lighting and production-ready GPU rendering. V-Ray for Houdini includes two rendering engines – V-Ray and V-Ray GPU – allowing visual effects artists to choose the one that best takes advantage of their hardware.

V-Ray for Houdini, Beta 1 features include:
• GPU & CPU Rendering – High-performance GPU & CPU rendering capabilities for high-speed look development and final frame rendering.
• Volume Rendering – Fast, accurate illumination and rendering of VDB volumes through the V-Ray Volume Grid. Support for Houdini volumes and Mac OS are coming soon.
• V-Ray Scene Support – Easily transfer and manipulate the properties of V-Ray scenes from applications such as Maya and 3ds Max.
• Alembic Support – Full support for Alembic workflows including transformations, instancing and per object material overrides.
• Physical Hair – New Physical Hair shader renders realistic-looking hair with accurate highlights. Only hair as SOP geometry is supported currently.
• Particles – Drive shader parameters such as color, alpha and particle size through custom, per-point attributes.
• Packed Primitives – Fast and efficient handling of Houdini’s native packed primitives at render time.
• Material Stylesheets – Full support for material overrides based on groups, bundles and attributes. VEX and per-primitive string overrides such as texture randomization are planned for launch.
• Instancing – Supports copying any object type (including volumes) using Packed Primitives, Instancer and “instancepath” attribute.
• Light Instances – Instancing of lights is supported, with options for per-instance overrides of the light parameters and constant storage of light link settings.

To join the beta, check out the Chaos Group website.

V-Ray for Houdini is currently available for Houdini and Houdini Indie 16.5.473 and later. V-Ray for Houdini supports Windows, Linux and Mac OS.


Review: HP’s lower-cost DreamColor Z24x display

By Dariush Derakhshani

So, we all know how important a color-accurate monitor is in making professional-level graphics, right? Right?!? Even at the most basic level, when you’re stalking online for the perfect watch band for your holiday present of a smart watch, you want the orange band you see in the online ad to be what you get when it arrives a few days later. Even if your wife thinks orange doesn’t suit you, and makes you look like “you’re trying too hard.”

Especially as a content developer, you want to know what you’re looking at is an accurate representation of the image. Ever walk into a Best Buy and see multiple screens showing the same content but with wild ranging differences in color? You can’t have that discrepancy working as a pro, especially in collaboration; you need color accuracy. In my own experience, that position has been filled by HP’s 10-bit DreamColor displays for many years now, but not everyone is awash in bitcoins, and justifying a price tag of over $1,200 is sometimes hard to justify, even for a studio professional.

Enter HP’s DreamColor Z24x display at half the price, coming in around $550 online. Yes, DreamColor for half the cost. That’s pretty significant. For the record, I haven’t used a 24-inch monitor since the dark ages; when Lost was the hot TV show. I’ve been fortunate enough to be running at 27-inch and higher, so there was a little shock when I started using the Z24x HP sent me for review. But this is something I quickly got used to.

With my regular 32-inch 4K display still my primary — so I can fit loads of windows all over the place — I used this DreamColor screen as my secondary display, primarily to check output for my Adobe After Effects comps, Adobe Premiere Pro edits and to hold my render view window as I develop shaders and lighting in Autodesk Maya. I felt comfortable knowing the images I shared with my colleagues across town would be seen as I intended them, evening the playing field when working collaboratively (as long as everyone is on the same LUT and color space). Speaking of color spaces, the Z24x hits 100% of sRGB, 99% of AdobeRGB and 96% of DCI P3, which is just slightly under HP’s Z27x DreamColor. It is, however, slightly faster with a 6ms response rate.

The Z24x has a 24-inch IPS panel from LG that exhibits color in 10-bit, like its bigger 27-inch Z27x sibling. This gives you over a billion colors, which I have personally verified by counting them all —that was one, long weekend, I can tell you. Unlike the highest-end DreamColor screens though, the Z24x dithers up from 8-bit to 10-bit (called an 8-bit+FRC). This means it’s better than an 8-bit color display, for sure, but not quite up to real 10-bit, making it color accurate but not color critical. HP’s implementation of dithering is quite good, when subjectively compared to my full 10-bit main display. Frankly, a lot of screens that claim 10-bit may actually be 8-bit+FRC anyway!

While the Z27x gives you 2560×1440 as you expect of most 27inch displays, if not full on 4K, the Z24x is at a comfortable 1920×1200, just enough for a full 1080p image and a little room for a slider or info bar. Being the res snob that I am, I had wondered if that was just too low, but at 24-inches I don’t think you would want a higher resolution, even if you’re sitting only 14-inches away from it. And this is a sentiment echoed by the folks at HP who consulted with so many of their professional clients to build this display. That gives a pixel density of about 94PPI, a bit lower than the 109PPI of the Z27x. This density is about the same as a 1080p HD display at 27-inch, so it’s still crisp and clean.

Viewing angles are good at about 178 degrees, and the screen is matte, with an anti-glare coating, making it easier to stare at without blinking for 10 hours at a clip, as digital artists usually do. Compared to my primary display, this HP’s coating was more matte and still gave me a richer black in comparison, which I liked to see.

Connection options are fairly standard with two DisplayPorts, one HDMI, and one DVI dual link for anyone still living in the past. You also get four USB ports and an analog 3.5mm audio jack if you want to drive some speakers, since you can’t from your phone anymore (Apple, I’m looking at you).

Summing Up
So while 24-inches is a bit small for my tastes for a display, I am seriously impressed at the street price of the Z24x, allowing a lot more pros and semi-pros to get the DreamColor accuracy HP offers at half the price. While I wouldn’t recommend color grading a show on the Z24x, this DreamColor does a nice job of bringing a higher level of color confidence at an attractive price. As a secondary display, the z24x is a nice addition to an artist workflow with budget in mind — or who has a mean, orange-watch-band-hating spouse.


Dariush Derakhshani is a VFX supervisor and educator in Southern California. You can follow his random tweets at @koosh3d.


Saddington Baynes adds senior lighting artist Luis Cardoso

Creative production house Saddington Baynes has hired Luis Cardoso as a senior lighting artist, adding to the studio’s creative team with specialist CGI skills in luxury goods, beauty and cosmetics. He joins the team following a four-year stint at Burberry, where he worked on high-end CGI.

He specializes in Autodesk 3ds Max, Chaos Group’s V-Ray and Adobe Photoshop. Cardoso’s past work includes imagery for all Burberry fragrances, clothing and accessories and social media assets for the Pinterest Cat Lashes campaign. He also has experience under his belt as senior CG artist at Sectorlight, and later in his career Assembly Studios.

At Saddington Baynes, Cardoso will be working on new motion cinematic sequences for online video to expand the beauty, fragrance, fashion and beverage departments and take the expertise further, particularly in regards to video lighting.

According to executive creative director James Digby-Jones, “It no longer matters whether elements are static or moving; whether the brief is for a 20,000-pixel image or 4K animation mixed with live action. We stretch creative and technical boundaries with fully integrated production that encompasses everything from CGI and motion to shoot production and VR capability.”

Chaos Group acquires Render Legion and its Corona Renderer

Chaos Group has purchased Prague-based Render Legion, creator of the Corona Renderer. With this new product and Chao’s own V-Ray, the company is offering even more rendering solutions for M&E and the architectural visualization world.

Known for its ease of use, the Corona Renderer has become a popular choice for architectural visualization, but according to Chaos Group’s David Tracy, “There are a few benefits for M&E. Corona plans to implement some VFX-related features, such as hair and skin with the help of the V-Ray team. Also, Corona is sharing technology, like the way they optimize dome lights. That will definitely be a benefit for V-Ray users in the VFX space.”

The Render Legion team, including its founders and developers, will join Chaos Group as they continue to develop Corona using additional support and resources provided through the deal.

Chaos Group’s Academy Award-winning renderer, V-Ray will continue to be a core component of the company’s portfolio. Both V-Ray and Corona will benefit from joint collaborations, bringing complementary features and optimizations to each product.

The Render Legion acquisition is Chaos Group’s largest investment to date. It is the third investment in a visualization company in the last two years, including interactive presentation platform CL3VER and virtual reality pioneer Nurulize. According to Chaos Group, the computer graphics industry is expected to reach $112 billion in 2019, fueled by a rise in the demand for 3D visuals. This, they say, has presented a prime opportunity for companies who make the creation of photorealistic imagery more accessible.

Main Image: ( L-R) Chaos Group co-founder Vlado Koylazov and Render Legion CEO/co-founder Ondřej Karlík.