Audionamix – 7.1.20

Category Archives: Remote Collaboration

Colorfront intros Transkoder with remote/cloud capabilities

Colorfront, which provides dailies and transcoding, has a new remote working/cloud initiative that lets TV and film post users to continue working safely and efficiently to fulfill the growing global demand for content during the worldwide COVID-19 crisis. Colorfront has been developing its remote working practices, particularly cloud-based operations, over many years. Now, inspired by its customers’ determination to keep the industry moving, Colorfront has fast-tracked these capabilities to deliver direct, remote interactive operation of either existing in-facility Transkoder systems or high-performance, interactive Transkoders in the cloud. It means that studio and post companies can continue to QC, render, package and deliver their wide variety of UHD/4K, IMF/DCP, SDR/HDR projects safely and productively.

Colorfront’s remote working/cloud initiative has been trialed and beta tested by existing users in the US and is now being rolled out with new licensing options to select Colorfront Transkoder and QC Player customers with a minimum of five licenses on a valid subscription contract. “The Covid-19 pandemic has dramatically increased demand for content, but it also poses acute challenges to the commercial operations and revenues of professional media companies globally, who need and want to keep delivering content,” says Aron Jaszberenyi, managing director of Colorfront. “With our remote working/cloud initiative they can keep working safely and maintain crucial business continuity. These unprecedented times may also prove to be a new era for effective, remote/cloud-based TV and filmmaking workflows.”

For users with in-facility Transkoders, Colorfront has enabled high-quality and low-latency remote access to the full functionality of their systems. For cloud-based workflows, Colorfront is offering multi-GPU Transkoder instances in the cloud for fast and efficient rendering, available by the hour, through relationships with Amazon AWS and Microsoft Azure cloud services.

Colorfront uses AJA’s Io 4K Plus and Kona 5 video card for the remote streaming client to output 12G SDI to professional 4K HDR broadcast monitors, plus UHD HDR via HDMI with HDR signaling. Colorfront also enables Dolby Vision metadata in the video stream, which is output via Kona 5 on HDMI.

Now users can easily access interactive Transkoders, in facility or in the cloud, with professional, reference-quality remote video output, up to 10-bit 444 UHD HDR on broadcast monitors or consumer OLED HDR displays. They can also submit renders to Transkoder Engines and securely deliver multiple packaged version files to cloud-based storage or directly to OTT vendors.

Working with media in cloud storage, such as Amazon S3, Colorfront’s initiative offers realtime playback of IMF and DCP packages as well as post and camera formats including OpenEXR, Alexa LF ARRIRAW ARX, Sony Venice raw and Red 8K R3D Raw.

Colorfront’s new remote working/cloud initiative comes with new licensing options that allow customers on subscription to “burst” their licenses in the cloud for 90 days. For qualifying customers who own a minimum of five Colorfront Transkoder, Transkoder Engine or Colorfront QCPlayer hardware dongles, Colorfront will allow them to burst up to the same number of licenses in AWS EC2 or Microsoft Azure with no license charges for 90 days. After 90 days, they can renew their Colorfront cloud licenses quarterly or yearly. Usage charges for the hardware, storage and other cloud services are billed separately by the respective cloud-service providers.

Warner Bros. De Lane Lea’s Alfred controls assets in the cloud

Warner Bros. De Lane Lea (WB DLL) has launched Alfred, a secure, online portal that gives its clients complete control of their content. This platform plays a key role in the production and post production process, providing the ability to store, distribute and manage assets and data in a speedy and efficient manner.

Developed by the team at Warner Bros. De Lane Lea, Alfred has a number of applications that provide productions with flexible control over their content, including:
– Allowing clients to request media pulls including VFX, marketing and conform, at any time
– Automatically sending pulls to selected vendors and recipients
– Fully customized to suit all production requirements
– Providing media tracking for raw and delivered elements
– Giving visibility to clients on the status of processes within the facility, including conform and VFX, QC reports and deliverables

The service are available to all WB DLL clients from today.

Kevin Harwood, head of workflow at Warner Bros. De Lane Lea, oversaw the creation of Alfred from start to finish. “On a typical day, we’ll work through TBs of data and Alfred allows us and our clients to manage and track that data seamlessly, and for it to be accessed anywhere, at any time. Alfred is a flexible platform that can be moulded to each individual client’s needs.”

He continues, “Being able to access and manage content wherever you are is always important, especially now, we’re confident Alfred will help facilitate productions having to find creative solutions when working remotely.”

 

Audionamix – 7.1.20

Telestream’s Prism waveform monitor upgraded for SDI, IP workflows

Telestream has upgraded its Prism waveform monitor with new functionality and software-based features. Since purchasing this monitor technology, Telestream has developed it into a single solution that is suited to both SDI and IP workflow applications.

Prism can now be configured for all the traditional SDI waveform monitoring tools required in operations, compliance, quality control and post workflows up to 8K resolution. Simultaneously, the same product offers a comprehensive suite of IP-based waveform monitoring tools up to 4K resolution on 25G Ethernet. Prism includes enhanced high dynamic range and wide color gamut reports and tools to increase efficiency.

Prism is a software-based solution, which means it can be installed on one physical device that’s used to support a complete range of applications and features. The Prism user interface and API are remotely accessible, enabling remote work and socially distanced production environments, which are especially relevant during the pandemic. Prism enables multi-user flexibility, where the operators do not need to be at the same physical location as the device.

In addition to remote working, touch-screen and dual-screen options are supported, allowing users to adapt to their preferred working environment. All functionality is available on the same user interface whether working remotely or using a touch screen.


Posting John Krasinski’s Some Good News

By Randi Altman

Need an escape from a world filled with coronavirus and murder hornets? You should try John Krasinski’s weekly YouTube show, Some Good News. It focuses on the good things that are happening during the COVID-19 crisis, giving people a reason to smile with things such as a virtual prom, Krasinski’s chat with astronauts on the ISS and bringing the original Broadway cast of Hamilton together for a Zoom singalong.

L-R: Remy, Olivier, Josh and Lila Senior

Josh Senior, owner of Leroi and Senior Post in Dumbo, New York, is providing editing and post to SGN. His involvement began when he got a call from a mutual friend of Krasinski’s, asking if he could help put something together. They sent him clips via Dropbox, and a workflow was born.

While the show is shot at Krasinski’s house in New York at different times during the week, Senior’s Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays are spent editing and posting SGN.

In addition to his post duties, Senior is an EP on the show, along with his producing partner Evan Wolf Buxbaum at their production company, Leroi. The two work in concert with Allyson Seeger and Alexa Ginsburg, who executive produced for Krasinski’s company, Sunday Night Productions. Production meetings are held on Tuesday, and then shooting begins. After footage is captured, it’s still shared via Dropbox or good old iMessage.

Let’s find out more…

What does John use for the shoot?
John films on two iPhones. A good portion of the show is screen-recorded on Zoom, and then there’s the found footage user-generated content component.

What’s your process once you get the footage? And, I’m assuming, it’s probably a little challenging getting footage from different kinds of cameras?
Yes. In the alternate reality where there’s no coronavirus, we run a pretty big post house in Dumbo, Brooklyn. And none of the tools of the trade that we have there are really at play here, outside of our server, which exists as the ever-present backend for all of our remote work.

The assets are pulled down from wherever they originate. The masters are then housed behind an encrypted firewall, like we do for all of our TV shows at the post house. Our online editor is the gatekeeper. All the editors, assistant editors, producers, animators, sound folks — they all get a mirrored drive that they download, locally, and we all get to work.

Do you have a style guide?
We have a bible, which is a living document that we’ve made week over week. It has music cues, editing style, technique, structure, recurring themes, a living archive of all the notes that we’ve received and how we’ve addressed them. Also, any style that’s specific to segments, post processing, any phasing or audio adjustments that we make all live within a document, that we give to whoever we onboard to the show.

Evan Wolf Buxbaum

Our post producers made this really elegant workflow that’s a combination of Vimeo and Slack where we post project files and review links and share notes. There’s nothing formal about this show, and that’s really cool. I mean, at the same time, as we’re doing this, we’re rapidly finishing and delivering the second season of Ramy on Hulu. It comes out on May 29.

I bet that workflow is a bit different than SGN’s.
It’s like bouncing between two poles. That show has a hierarchy, it’s formalized, there’s a production company, there’s a network, there’s a lot of infrastructure. This show is created in a group text with a bunch of friends.

What are you using to edit and color Some Good News?
We edit in Adobe Premiere, and that helps mitigate some of the challenges of the mixed media that comes in. We typically color inside of Adobe, and we use Pro Tools for our sound mix. We online and deliver out of Resolve, which is pretty much how we work on most of our things. Some of our shows edit in Avid Media Composer, but on our own productions we almost always post in Premiere — so when we can control the full pipeline, we tend to prefer Adobe software.

Are review and approvals with John and the producers done through iMessage in Dropbox too?
Yes, and we post links on Vimeo. Thankfully we actually produce Some Good News as well as post it, so that intersection is really fluid. With Ramy it’s a bit more formalized. We do notes together and, usually internally, we get a cut that we like. Then it goes to John, and he gives us his thoughts and we retool the edit; it’s like a rapid prototyping rather than a gated milestone. There are no network cuts or anything like that.

Joanna Naugle

For me, what’s super-interesting is that everyone’s ideas are merited and validated. I feel like there’s nothing that you shouldn’t say because this show has no agenda outside of making people happy, and everybody’s uniquely qualified to speak to that. With other projects, there are people who have an experience advantage, a technical advantage or some established thought leadership. Everybody knows what makes people happy. So you can make the show, I can make the show, my mom can make the show, and because of that, everything’s almost implicitly right or wrong.

Let’s talk about specific episodes, like the ones featuring the prom and Hamilton? What were some of the challenges of working with all of that footage. Maybe start with Hamilton?
That one was a really fun puzzle. My partner at Senior Post, Joanna Naugle, edited that. She drew on a lot of her experience editing music videos, performance content, comedy specials, multicam live tapings. It was a lot like a multicam live pre-taped event being put together.

We all love Hamilton, so that helps. This was a combination of performers pre-taping the entire song and a live performance. The editing technique really dissolves into the background, but it’s clear that there’s an abundance of skill that’s been brought to that. For me, that piece is a great showcase of the aesthetic of the show, which is that it should feel homemade and lo-fi, but there’s this undercurrent of a feat to the way that it’s put together.

Getting all of those people into the Zoom, getting everyone to sound right, having the ability to emphasize or de-emphasize different faces. To restructure the grid of the Zoom, if we needed to, to make sure that there’s more than one screen worth of people there and to make sure that everybody was visible and audible. It took a few days, but the whole show is made from Thursday to Sunday, so that’s a limiting factor, and it’s also this great challenge. It’s like a 48-hour film festival at a really high level.

What about the prom episode?
The prom episode was fantastic. We made the music performances the day before and preloaded them into the live player so that we could cut to them during the prom. Then we got to watch the prom. To be able to participate as an audience member in the content that you’re still creating is such a unique feeling and experience. The only agenda is happiness, and people need a prom, so there’s a service aspect of it, which feels really good.

John Krasinski setting up his shot.

Any challenges?
It’s hard to put things together that are flat, and I think one of the challenges that we found at the onset was that we weren’t getting multiple takes of anything, so we weren’t getting a lot of angles to play with. Things are coming in pretty baked from a production standpoint, so we’ve had to find unique and novel ways to be nonlinear when we want to emphasize and de-emphasize certain things. We want to present things in an expositional way, which is not that common. I couldn’t even tell you another thing that we’ve worked on that didn’t have any subjectivity to it.

Let’s talk sound. Is he just picking up audio from the iPhones or is he wearing a mic?
Nope. No, mic. Audio from the iPhones that we just run through a few filters on Pro Tools. Nobody mics themselves. We do spend a lot of time balancing out the sound, but there’s not a lot of effect work.

Other than SGN and Ramy, what are some other shows you guys have worked on?
John Mulaney & the Sack Lunch Bunch, 2 Dope Queens, Random Acts of Flyness, Julio Torres: My Favorite Shapes by Julio Torres and others.

Anything that I haven’t asked that you think is important?
It’s really important for me to acknowledge that this is something that is enabling a New York-based production company and post house to work fully remotely. In doing this week over week, we’re really honing what we think are tangible practices that we can then turn around and evangelize out to the people that we want to work with in the future.

I don’t know when we’re going to get back to the post house, so being able to work on a show like this is providing this wonderful learning opportunity for my whole team to figure out what we can modulate from our workflow in the office to be a viable partner from home.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 


Video Chat: Posting Late Night With Seth Meyers from home

By Randi Altman

For many, late-night shows have been offering up laughs during a really tough time, with hosts continuing to shoot from dens, living rooms, backyards and country houses, often with spouses and kids pitching in as crew.

NBC’s Late Night With Seth Meyers is one of those shows. They had their last in-studio taping on March 13, followed by a scheduled hiatus week, followed by the news they wouldn’t be able to come back to the studio. That’s when his team started preproduction and workflow testing to figure out questions like “How are we going to transfer files?” and “How are we going to get it on the air?”

I recently interviewed associate director and lead editor Dan Dome about their process and how that workflow has been allowing Meyers to check in daily from his wasp-ridden and probably haunted attic.

(Watch our original Video Interview here or below.)

How are you making this remote production work?
We’re doing a combination of things. We are using our network laptops to edit footage that’s coming in for interviews or comedy pieces. That’s all being done locally, meaning on our home systems and without involving our SAN or anything like that. So we’re cutting interviews and comedy pieces and then sending links out for approval via Dropbox. Why Dropbox? The syncing features are really great when uploading and downloading footage to all the various places we need to send it.

Once a piece is approved and ready to go into the show — we know the timings are right, we know the graphics are right, we know the spelling is correct, audio levels look good, video levels look good — then we upload that back to Dropbox and back to our computers at 30 Rock where our offices are located. We’re virtually logging into our machines there to compile the show. So, yeah, there are a few bits and pieces to building stuff remotely. And then there are a few bits and pieces to actually compiling the show on our systems back at home base.

What do you use for editing?
We’re still on Adobe Premiere. We launched on Premiere when the show started in February of 2014, and we’re still using that version — it’s solid and stable, and doing a daily show, we don’t necessarily get a ton of time to test new versions. So we have a stable version that we like for doing the show composite aspect of things.

When we’re back at 30 Rock and editing remote pieces, we’re using the newer versions of Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015.2 9.2.0 (41 Build). At home we are using Premiere Pro CC 2020 14.0.4 (Build 18).

Let talk about how Seth’s been shooting. What’s his main camera?
Some of the home studio recording has been on iPads and iPhones. Then we’re using Zoom to do interviews, and there are multiple records of that happening. The files are then uploaded and downloaded between the edit team, and our director is in on the interviews, setting up cameras and trying to get it to look the best it can.

Once those interviews are done, the different records get uploaded to Dropbox. On my home computer, I use a 6TB CalDigit drive for Dropbox syncing and media storage. (Devon Schwab and Tony Dolezal, who are also editing pieces, use 4TB G-RAID drives with Thunderbolt 3.) So as soon as they tell me the file is up, I sync locally on the folder I know it’s going to, the media automatically downloads, and we simultaneously download it to our systems at 30 Rock. So it syncs there as well. We have multiple copies of it, and if we need to, we can hand off a project between me, Devin or Tony; we can do that pretty easily.

Have you discovered any challenges or happy surprises working this way?
It has been a nice happy surprise that it’s like, “Oh wow, this is working pretty well.” We did have a situation where we thought we might lose power on the East coast because of rains and winds and things like that. So we had safeguards in place for that, as far as having an evergreen show that was ready to go for that night in case we did end up losing power. It would have been terrible, but everything held up, and it worked pretty well.

So there are certainly some challenges to working this way, but it’s amazing that we are working and we can keep our mind on other things and just try to help entertain people while this craziness is going on.

You can watch our original Video Interview with Dome here:


Chimney Group: Adapting workflows in a time of crisis

By Dana Bonomo

In early March, Chimney delivered a piece for TED, created to honor women on International Women’s Day featuring Reshma Saujani, founder of Girls Who Code. This was in the early days of coronavirus taking hold in the United States. We had little comprehension at that point of the true extent to which we would be impacted as a country and as an industry. As the situation grew and awareness around the severity of the COVID-19 health crisis sunk in, we started to realize that it would be animated projects like this one that we would come to rely upon.

TED & Ultimate Software: International Women’s Day

This film showcases the use of other creative solutions when live-action projects can’t be shot. But the real function of work like this is that, on an emotional level, it feels good to make something with a socially actionable message.

In just the last few weeks, platforms have been saturated with COVID-19-related content: salutes to healthcare workers, PSAs from federal, state and local authorities and brands sharing messages of unity. Finding opportunities that can include some form of social purpose help provide hope to our communities while also raising the spirits of those creating it. We are currently in production on two of these projects and they help us feel like we’re contributing in some small way with the resources we have.

As a global company, Chimney is always highlighting our worldwide service capabilities, with 12 offices on four continents, and our abilities to work together. We’ve routinely used portals such as Zoho and Slack in the past, yet now I’m enjoying the shift in how we’re communicating with each other in a more connected and familiar way. Just a short time ago we might have used a typical workflow, and today we’re sharing and exchanging ideas and information at an exponential rate.

As a whole, we prefer to video chat, have more follow-ups and create more opportunities to work on internal company goals in addition to just project pipelines and calendars. There’s efficiency in brainstorming and solving creative challenges in real time, either as a virtual brainstorm or idea exchange in PM software and project communication channels. So at the end of a meeting, internal review or present, current project kick off, we have action items in place and ready to facilitate on a global scale.

Our company’s headquarters is in Stockholm, Sweden. You may have heard that Sweden’s health officials have taken a different approach to handling COVID-19 than most countries, and it is resulting in less drastic social distancing and isolation measures while still being quite mindful of safety. Small shoots are still possible with crews of 10 or less — so we can shoot in Sweden with a fully protected crew, executing safe and sanitary protocols —and we can livestream to clients worldwide from set.

This is Chimney editor Sam O’Hare’s work-from-home setup.

Our CEO North America Marcelo Gandola is encouraging us individually to schedule personal development time, whether it’s for health and wellness, master classes on subjects that interest us, certifications for our field of expertise, or purely creative and expressive outlets. Since many of us used our commute time for that before the pandemic, we can still use that time for emotional recharging in different ways. By setting aside time for this, we regain some control of our situation. It lifts our morale and it can be very self-affirming, personally and professionally.

While most everyone has remote work capabilities these days, there’s a level of creative energy in the air, driven by the need to employ different tactics — either by working with what you have (optimizing existing creative assets, produced content, captured content from the confines of home) or replacing what was intended to be live-action with some form of animation or graphics. For example, Chimney’s Creative Asset Optimization has been around for some time now. Using Edisen, our customization platform, we can scale brands’ creative content on any platform, in any market at any time, without spending more. From title changes to language versioning and adding incremental design elements, clients get bigger volumes of content with high-quality creative for all channels and platforms. So a campaign that might have had a more limited shelf life on one platform can now stretch to an umbrella campaign with a variety of applications depending on its distribution.

Dana Bonomo

They say that necessity is the mother of invention, and it’s exciting to see how brands and makers are creatively solving current challenges. Our visual effects team recently worked on a campaign (sorry we can’t name this yet) that took existing archival footage and — with the help of VFX — generated content that resonated with audiences today. We’re also helping clients figure out remote content capture solutions in lieu of their live events getting canceled.

I was recently on a Zoom call with students at my alma mater, SUNY Oneonta, in conversation with songwriter and producer John Mayer. He said he really feels for students and younger people during this time, because there’s no point of reference for them to approach this situation. The way the younger generation is adapting — reacting by living so fully despite so many limitations — they are the ones building that point of reference for the future. I think that holds true for all generations… there will always be something to be learned. We don’t fully know what the extent of our learning will be, but we’re working creatively to make the most of it.

Main Image: Editor Zach Moore’s cat is helping him edit


Dana Bonomo is managing director at Chimney Group in NYC.


Frame.io offers beta version of Transfer, updates app to v3.6

Frame.io has launched Frame.io v3.6 along with a beta version of a new application called Frame.io Transfer. Frame.io v3.6’s new features are designed for the evolving needs remote workflows, with a particular focus on speed and security. The expanded toolset addresses the need for fast project downloads with the Frame.io Transfer app, boosts security with features like Watermark ID for enterprise accounts and improves collaboration with new features like iOS Offline Mode and Folder Sharing.

Frame.io Transfer works on both Mac and Windows OS. Transfer lets users download large files and sophisticated folder structures — even entire projects — with one click. It supports EDL and XML formats so users can identify specific files, accelerating the process of relinking to original camera files for final conforms, color grading or sharing assets for VFX. Transfer allows users to monitor active downloads and to drag and drop to reprioritize their order. Finally, Transfer facilitates fast and secure downloads, regardless of unstable internet connections; if there’s a disruption mid-download, Transfer pauses and automatically resumes once reconnected.

“Transfer was originally slated for release later this year, but as a response to the profound shift in the way we’re working and the tools our customers need immediately, we’re releasing it in beta today,” says Emery Wells, cofounder/CEO of Frame.io. (Check out our video interview with him below.)

For secure sharing, enterprise users can now secure Presentation and Review links using login-only access, which means that only specified recipients can view Share Links. Recipients will see a list of everything that’s been shared with them in Frame.io’s new Inbox, which offers a clean and focused view.

Frame.io v3.6 also has Watermark ID, which gives customers the ultimate layer of visible security. When any viewer presses “Play,” Frame.io completes a realtime, on-demand transcode of the video with that viewer’s personal identifying information burned into every frame. A two-hour video starts playing back in less than two seconds.

Offline Mode

Users can now add folders to Review Links, allowing them to easily organize and share assets across teams or projects. Any changes made to folders after they are shared are dynamically updated in the Review Link. This is especially useful for teams that produce episodic content or programming that relies on a library of media. Frame.io also made it faster, easier and more intuitive to organize assets with an improved “Move-to” and “Copy-to” flow.

With this update, Frame.io users will now be able to see all the Presentations they’ve shared and access their settings from one organized list. The display shows folder sizes so users can see at a glance which are the heaviest projects, making it easier to optimize projects and storage.

Frame.io v3.6 consolidates notifications made on the same video within short periods of time, grouping them together into one notification. Users can filter by read or unread, see comment previews and scrub asset thumbnails to easily spot what needs to be reviewed or addressed.

Offline Mode for Frame.io’s iOS apps allows users work from anywhere. They can tap a file to make it available offline, then review and leave comments. As soon as the app comes back online, comments are automatically synced to the project.


Hecho Studios: Mobilizing talent and pipeline to keep working

By Ryan Curtis

When Hecho first learned of the possibility of a shutdown due to COVID-19, we started putting together a game plan to maintain the level of production quality and collaboration that we are all used to, but this time remotely. Working closely with our chief content officer Tom Dunlap, our post production workflow manager Nathan Fleming and senior editor Stevo Chang, we first identified the editors, animators, colorists, Flame artists, footage researchers and other post-related talent who work with us regularly. We then built a standing army of remote talent who were ready to embrace the new normal and get to work.

Ryan Curtis

It was a formidable challenge to get the remote editorial stations up and running. We had a relatively short notice that we were going to have to finalize and enact a WFH game plan in LA. In order to keep productions running smoothly, we teamed with our equipment vendor, VFX Technologies, to give our IT team the ability to remote in and fully outfit each work station with software. They also scheduled a driver to make contact-free drop offs at the homes of our artists. We’ve deployed over 15 iMacs for editorial, animation and finishing needs. We can scale as needed, and only need two to three days’ notice to get a new artist fully set up at home with the appropriate tools. Our remote edit bay workstations are mainly iMac Pros, running the Adobe suite of tools, Maxon Cinema 4D, Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve and Autodesk Flame.

We have outfitted each member of our team with Signiant, which allows for rapid speed file transfers for larger files. If an artist’s home internet is not up to snuff for their project, we have been boosting their internet speeds. To maintain file integrity, we are rolling out the same file structure as you would find on our server, allowing us to archive projects back to the server remotely once delivered. We’ve also designated key people who can access the in-office stations and server virtually, retrieve assets and migrate them to remote teams to refresh existing campaigns.

The need to review during each phase of production has never been stronger. We tested a wide variety of review solutions, and have currently settled on the following:

• For Animation/Design-Based Projects:
Frankie – Export-based interactive reviews
• For Editorial Projects:
Evercast – Live plug and play sessions
Wiredrive (often times paired with Google Hangouts or Zoom)
• For Finishing:
Vimeo Review – Export-based color reviews
Streambox – Live color collaboration (paired with Google Hangouts or Zoom)
Frankie – Export-based interactive reviews
Wiredrive for deliverables (often times paired with Google Hangouts or Zoom)

Our collective of talent remains our contracted veteran Hecho crew, well over 50 people who know our shorthand and in-office workflows and can easily be onboarded to our new remote workflow. If needed to satisfy a specific creative challenge, we bring in new talent and quickly onboard them into the Hecho family.

In terms of how we deal with approvals, it depends on the team and the project. If you have a dedicated team to a project it can be even more efficient than working in the office. Overcommunication is key, and transparency with feedback and workflows is paramount to a successful project. However, in many cases, efficiencies can be lost and projects currently move about 20 percent slower than if we were in the office. To combat this, some teams have structured a little differently as it can be hard to wrangle busy individuals with fast deadlines remotely. So having approved backup approvers on board has been immensely helpful to keep projects moving along on time. And without clients in the bay, we lean even more on our post producers to funnel all questions and feedback from clients, ensuring clear back and forth with artists.

NFL #stayhomestaystrong

Challenges Solved
Aside from the lack of in-person interaction and the efficiencies of quick catch ups in the hall or in the bay, the biggest challenge has been home internet speeds. This affects everything else that’s involved with a WFH set up. In some cases we had to actually upgrade current ISP contracts in order to reach an acceptable baseline for getting work done: streaming reviews, file sharing, etc.

The other challenge was quickly testing/evaluating new tools and then getting everybody up to speed on how to use them. Evercast was probably the trickiest new product because it involves live streaming from an editor’s machine (using Adobe Premiere) while multiple “reviewers” watch them work in real time. As you can imagine, there are many factors that can affect live streaming: CPU of the streaming computer, bitrate you’re streaming, etc. Luckily, once we had gone through a couple setups and reviews (trial and error) things got much easier. Also the team at Evercast (thanks Brad, Tyrel, and Robert!) were great in helping us figure out some of the issues we ran into early on.

Our First WFH Projects
For our first COVID-19 response project, we worked with agency 72andSunny and the NFL to share the uplifting message #Stayhomestaystrong. Behind the scenes, our post team produced a complete offline to online workflow in record time and went from brief to live in six days while everyone transitioned to working entirely remotely. #Stayhomestaystrong also helped bring in $35 million in donations toward COVID relief groups. Credits include editors Amanda Tuttle, Andrew Leggett, assistant editors: Max Pankow, Stephen Shirk, animator Lawrence Wyatt, Flame artists Rachel Moorer, Gurvand Tanneau and Paul Song and post producer Song Cho.

Stay INspired

Another project we worked with 72andSunny on was COVID-19 response ad, Pinterest Stay INspired, involving heavy motion graphics and a large number of assets, which ranged from stock photos, raw video files from remote shoots and licensed UGC assets. The designers, motion graphics artists, writers and clients used a Google Slides deck to link thumbnail images directly to the stock photo or UGC asset. Notes were sent directly to their emails via tags in the comments section of the slides.

Our team shared storyboards, frequently jumped on video conference calls and even sent recorded hand gestures to indicate the kind of motion graphic movement they were looking for. Credits for this one include editor/motion designer: Stevo Chang, motion designer Sierra Hunkins, associate editor Josh Copeland and post producer Cho, once again.

What We Learned
WFH reinforced the need for the utmost transparency in team structures and the need for super-clear communication. Each and every member of our team has needed to embrace the change and take on new challenges and responsibilities. What worked before in office, doesn’t necessarily work in a remote situation.

The shutdown also forced us to discover new technologies, like Evercast, and we likely wouldn’t have signed up for Signiant for a while. Moving forward, these tools have both been great additions to what we can offer our clients. These new technologies also open up future opportunities for us to work with clients we didn’t have access to before (out of state and overseas). We can do live remote sessions without the client having to physically be in a bay which is a game changer.


Ryan Curtis is head of post production at two-time Emmy-nominated Hecho Studios, part of MDC’s Constellation collective of companies.


Facilis updates storage, MAM offerings for remote workflows

Targeting those who are working remotely, Facilis has released of v.8 of its Hub shared storage system, v.3.5 of its FastTracker media asset management software as well as Object Cloud updates. Facilis has made these available immediately and free of charge for any eligible existing user with a current software support contract.

Hub v.8 includes:
• Bandwidth Priority delivers full throughput to all workstations during normal operation but prioritizes workstations to maintain greater throughput when the server enters a high-load condition. This priority setting is dynamic and can affect client performance within seconds of applying.
• SSD and HDD tiering offers dedicated speed for projects needing SSD-level performance, while maintaining a perpetual HDD-based mirror.
• Software-defined Multi-disk Parity can be enabled for up to four drive failures per drive group, on a virtual volume-basis. This allows owners of aging systems to better protect their assets from data loss due to drive failure.

Facilis FastTracker MAM software features file movement profiles, duplicate file reporting and a secure directory browse interface. FastTracker can now flush and pre-fetch files and folders from cloud and LTO locations through the Object Cloud feature, while reporting the status of archived media. With proxy encoding of indexed assets to an Object Cloud location, FastTracker offers compressed versions of facility media to editors working in the field.

According to the company’s COO, Shane Rodbourn, this release represents over two years of development .

Updated: Product makers offer support to cope with COVID-19 disruption

This is a weird time for our industry and the world. The best we can do is try to keep working and stay safe. For our part, postPerspective will continue to report industry news and tell stories about workflows, artists and tools, in addition to running pieces about how pros are working remotely… and keeping sane.

In fact, if you have a story about how you are working remotely and keeping on keeping on, please share it with us (info@postPerspective.com). Even though we can’t see each other face to face right now, keeping a sense of community has never been more important.

A number of companies are releasing updates, offering discounts, and even making their remote services free for a limited time in order to help everyone keep working through this pandemic. Here is a bit of news from some of those companies, and we will add more companies to this list as the news comes in, so watch this space.

mLogic
mLogic is offering a 15% discount on its mTape Thunderbolt 3 LTO-7 and LTO-8 solutions The discount applies to orders placed on the mTape website through April 20th. Use discount code mLogicpostPerspective15%.

Xytech
Xytech has launched “Xytech After Dark,” a podcast focusing on trends in the media and broadcasting industries. The first two episodes are now available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcasting platforms.

Xytech’s Greg Dolan says the podcast “is not a forum to sell, but instead to talk about why create the functionality in MediaPulse and the types of things happening in our industry.”

Hosted by Xytech’s Gregg Sandheinrich, the podcast will feature Xytech staff, along with special guests. The first two episodes cover topics including the recent HPA Tech Retreat (featuring HPA president Seth Hallen), as well as the cancellation of the NAB Show, the value of trade shows and the effects of COVID-19 on the industry.

Nvidia
Nvidia is expanding its free virtual GPU software evaluation to 500 licenses for 90 days to help companies support their remote workers with their existing GPU infrastructure. Nvidia vGPU software licenses — including Quadro Virtual Workstation — enable GPU-accelerated virtualization so that content creators, designers, engineers and others can continue their work. More details are available here.  Nvidia has also posted a separate blog on virtual GPUs to help admins who are working to support remote employees

Object Matrix 
Object Matrix is offering video tips for surviving working from home. The videos, hosted by co-founder Nicholas Pearce, are here.

Adobe
Adobe shared a guide to best practices for working from home. It’s meant to support creators and filmmakers who might be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide here.

Adobe’s principal Creative Cloud evangelist, Jason Levine, hosted a live stream — Video Workflows With Team Projects ±that focus on remote workflows.

Additionally, Karl Soule, Senior Technical Business Development Manager, hosed a stream focusing on Remote video workflows and collaboration in the enterprise. If you sign up on this page, you can see his presentation.

Streambox
Streambox has introduced a pay-as-you-go software plan for video professionals who use its Chroma 4K, Chroma UHD, Chroma HD and Chroma X streaming encoder/decoder hardware. Since the software has been “decoupled” from the hardware platform, those who own the hardware can rent the software on a monthly basis, pause the subscription between projects and reinstate it as needed. By renting software for a fixed period, creatives can take on jobs without having to pay outright for technology that might have been impractical.

And last week’s offerings as well

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Adobe

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Adobe
Adobe has shared a guide to best practices for working from home, created in support of creators and filmmakers who may be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide below and here.

Adobe’s Jason Levine and Karl Soule will also be hosting two livestreams this week that focus on remote workflows, in the hopes of offering helpful tips during this uncertain time – details are below.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Frame.io