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Category Archives: production

Killing Eve EP Sally Woodward Gentle talks Season 3

By Iain Blair

Killing Eve is more than just one of the most addictive spy thrillers on TV. It’s also a dark comedy, a workplace drama and a globe-trotting actioner that tells the story of two women engaged in an epic game of cat-and-mouse — Eve, head of a secret MI6 unit (Sandra Oh), and Villanelle (Jodie Comer), a beautiful, (and strangly likeable) psychopathic assassin she’s been tasked to track down.

Sally Woodward Gentle

The award-winning show continues the story of the two women when it returns for its third season on April 26 on both BBC America and AMC. Season 3 sees Eve back in action after having survived being shot by Villanelle in the Season 2 finale. Eve is now in Rome and her current MI6 status is in flux after being manipulated by Carolyn (Fiona Shaw).

Continuing the show’s tradition of passing the baton to a new female writing voice, for Season 3 Suzanne Heathcote serves as lead writer and executive producer, joining executive producers Sally Woodward Gentle, Phoebe Waller-Bridge (who was brought on by Gentle as head writer for season one), Lee Morris, Gina Mingacci, Damon Thomas, Jeff Melvoin and Sandra Oh. Killing Eve is produced by Sid Gentle Films and is distributed by Endeavor Content.

I recently spoke with EP Sally Woodward Gentle — the BAFTA-winning and Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated EP of the dramas Any Human Heart and The Durrells in Corfu — about making the show (based on the books of Luke Jennings), the Emmys and her love of post.

What can you tell us about Season 3 without giving too much away?
It’s a much more emotional season. We move Eve and Villanelle’s relationship on, and we get to see more of what Villanelle is really about. At the same time, Eve is really tested.  And we bring in lots of new characters, which is very exciting, and Carolyn and Konstantin (Eve’s handler, played by Kim Bodnia) have got huge roles to play.

The appeal of two women leads seems obvious now, but were there doubts at first having them play traditional male roles when you first optioned the Luke Jennings novellas?
Not really. In fact, it didn’t even cross my mind. I just felt that people really enjoy having a female assassin, and that it would be great to have another woman chase her.  And I didn’t feel that the idea was wildly original. It just felt right, but I knew there were other female assassin shows out there, and I didn’t want people to go, “Oh, there’s La Femme Nikita.” I did feel it was time to do something more bold with it.

Is that how you decided to involve Phoebe Waller-Bridge?
Exactly. I’d read Fleabag and we’d had a meeting, and I just loved her attitude. Back then, she’d only done Fleabag and written some very clever comedy. I loved the idea of putting Luke’s novellas together with her attitude, joie de vivre and love of TV and what it could do. It didn’t feel like, “Wow, this will be earth-shatteringly different!” It just felt like something really interesting to do. Just do it and see what comes out.

You’ve executive produced all three seasons. What are the main challenges of this show?
To keep it feeling really fresh each year, and to not repeat stuff you’ve done. To examine new, different areas of emotional relationships, and to put people under different types of stress. The other big challenge is we have to turn it around from start to finish in just one year. We have to write all the scripts, shoot them, post them and get them out there in that time. It’s really hard work, both physically and mentally, but a lot of our team’s been here since the start. They love it, and that really helps, and everyone wants to push it a bit harder every season, so we embrace all new ideas.

Is it true that when Sandra Oh was first approached, she didn’t quite believe she was being cast as Eve?
Yeah, she hadn’t pictured herself in the role, but she’s brilliant.

What do Sandra and Jodie bring to the mix?
They bring so much. We were still finishing scripts for Season 1 as we shot, so you can’t help but feed back their input into the scripts, and the characters really have so much of the actors’ DNA. They just know them so well and how they’d respond.

You always use great locations. Where did you shoot Season 3?
In Spain, Romania, the UK. We get around!

Where do you post?
All at Molinaire in London. We do everything from the edit to the grade, and we do all the sound at Hackenbacker, which is part of Molinaire.

Do you like the post process?
I love it, and really enjoy it. We have a great post supervisor, Kate Stannard, who’s been on the show since the start. The great thing about post is that you get to rewrite all the raw material and be really creative with it.

Talk about editing. You have several editors, I assume because of the time factor. How does that work?
We have a great team of editors, including Dan Crinnion, who’s been on the show since the start, and an Italian editor Simone Nesti who does the assembly and who’s also been with us since the start. As soon as a director has finished shooting, we get right in there with the editor who does that block.  We shoot in blocks of two episodes,and each block has its own editor and assistants. It’s not a huge team considering the amount of work.

The show is a real genre mash-up – thriller, comedy, action, emotional drama. How do you handle all the shifting tones?
That’s the big editing challenge, and the thing we were most concerned about in Season 1  — that Eve’s and Villanelle’s two stories were too disparate to be knitted together properly. But once you start to get a feel for what the show is, and what works and what doesn’t, it flows more easily. For me, if it gets too broad and it doesn’t feel truthful, that’s not good. But then it’s also a big piece of entertainment, so you can be really wild with it. We’re not saving lives, and there’s no massive message. We just want to be truthful about human behavior and be very entertaining.

There’s obviously a lot of attention also paid to the sound and the music.
Thanks for noticing. We have a great production sound team. Nigel Heath is our rerecording mixer, and our aim is to not have the dialogue too clean and out front. We like to keep a lot of texture in the background and make it feel quite immersive. Then in terms of the music, composer David Holmes is quite bold in his choices. That’s very tricky as we try hard not to be too genre and obvious with the cues, so they don’t just reinforce the visuals and what you should feel. So at a very dark moment the score might be quite celebratory and glorious. We’re constantly trying to flip it.

What about the DI?
It’s incredibly important, and our colorist Gareth Spensley has worked on it since season 1 so he knows the show really well, and he works very closely with our DP Julian Court who’s done most of the episodes since the start. Sometimes we have to shoot out of sequence, at different times of year, so you have to match all that. We try to find locations that feel fresh and exciting, and then we try hard not to over-stylize the look, and keep all the skin tones as natural and real as possible, and then enhance the beauty of the rest of it. At the very start of the show, we thought of pushing the look to get a more ‘noir’ look, but it just didn’t feel right, so we just leant more into the pleasure of the visuals.

How important are the Emmys to a show like this?
Hugely important, for both the show and the actors. I think it’s given us far more visibility.

I heard you already got picked up for Season 4. How far along are you with it?
We’re already writing and nearly have the whole season arc worked out, and we’ll start shooting it at the end of September. Of course, it all depends on what happens with the Covid-19 crisis, but that’s the plan.

Will you do more seasons?
I can see us going on as long as we keep refreshing it and move their relationship along. Then we have all these new characters we’ve created who’ll be there in Season 4 and beyond, so there’s plenty to explore.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

COVID-19: How our industry is stepping up

We’ve been using this space to talk about how companies are discounting products and helping the community with remote workflows, but before that update, we wanted to mention something that isn’t work-related.

Many of you know postPerspective contributor and online video editor Brady Betzel from his great reviews and tips pieces. During this crisis, he is helping his wife, Stephenie, make masks for her sister (a nurse) and colleagues working at St. John’s Regional Medical Center in Oxnard, California, in addition to anyone else who works on the “front lines.” She’s sewn over 100 masks so far and is not stopping. Creativity and sewing is not new to her. Her day job is also creating. You can check out her work on Facebook and Instagram.

I’m sure there are many of you doing similar things. Please share your stories. We need some good news during times like these.

Now let’s talk about what some companies are doing.

Object Matrix 
Object Matrix co-founder Nick Pearce has another LinkedIn dispatch, this time launching Good News Friday, where folks from around the globe check in with good news!  You can also watch it on YouTube. Pearce and crew are also offering video tips for surviving working from home. The videos, hosted by Pearce, are here.

Conductor
Conductor is waiving charges for orchestrating renders in the cloud. Updated pricing is reflected in the cost calculator on Conductor’s Pricing page. These changes will last at least through May 2020. To help expedite any transition needs, the Conductor team will be on call for virtual render wrangling of cloud submissions, from debugging scenes and scripts to optimizing settings for cost, turnaround time, etc. If you need this option, then email support@conductortech.com.

Conductor is working with partners to set up online training sessions to help studios quickly adopt cloud strategies and workflows. The company will send out further notifications as the sessions are formalized. Conductor staff is also available for one-on-one studio sessions as needed for those with specific pipeline considerations.

Conductor’s president and CEO Mac Moore said this: “The sudden onset of this pandemic has put a tremendous strain on our industry, completely changing the way studios need to operate virtually overnight. Given Conductor was built on the ‘work from anywhere’ premise, I felt it our responsibility to help studios to the greatest extent possible during this critical time.”

Symply
Symply is providing as many remote workers in the industry as possible with a free 90-day license to SymplyConveyor, its secure, high-speed transfer and sync software. Symply techs will be available to install SymplyConveyor remotely on any PC, Mac or Linux workstation pair or server and workstation.

The no-obligation offer is available at gosymply.com. Users sign up, and as long as they are in the industry and have a need, Symply techs will install the software. The number of free 90-day licenses is limited only by Symply’s ability to install them given its limited resources.

Foundry
Foundry has reset its trial database so that users can access a new 30-day trial for all products regardless of the date of their last trial. The company continues to offer unlimited non-commercial use of Nuke and Mari. On the educational side, students who are unable to access school facilities can get a year of free access to Nuke, Modo, Mari and Katana.

They have also announced virtual events, including:

• Foundry LiveStream – a series of talks around projects, pipelines and tools.
• Foundry Webinars – A 30 to 40-minute technical deep dive into Foundry products, workflows and third-party tools.
• Foundry Skill-Ups – A 30-minute guide to improving your skills as a compositor/lighter/texture artist to get to that next level in your career.
• Foundry Sessions – Special conversations with our customers sharing insights, tips and tricks.
• Foundry Workflow Wednesdays –10-minute weekly videos posted on social media showing tips and tricks with Nuke from our experts.

Alibi Music Library
Alibi Music Library is offering free whitelisted licensing of its Alibi Music and Sound FX catalogs to freelancers, agencies and production companies needing to create or update their demo reels during this challenging time.

Those who would like to take advantage of this opportunity can choose Demo Reel 2020 Gratis from the shopping cart feature on Alibi’s website next to any desired track(s). For more info, click here.

2C Creative
Caleb & Calder Sloan’s Awesome Foundation, the charity of 2C Creative founders Chris Sloan and Carla Kaufman Sloan, is running a campaign that will match individual donations (up to $250 each) to charities supporting first responders, organizations and those affected by COVID-19. 2C is a creative agency & production company serving the TV/streaming business with promos, brand integrations, trailers, upfront presentations and other campaigns. So far, the organization’s “COVID-19 Has Met Its Match” campaign has raised more than $50,000. While the initial deadline date for people to participate was April 6, this has now been extended to April 13. To participate, please visit ccawesomefoundation.org for a list of charities already vetted by the foundation or choose your own. Then, simply email a copy of your donation receipt to: cncawesomefoundation@gmail.com and they will match it!

Red Giant 
For the filmmaking education community, Red Giant is offering Red Giant Complete — the full set of tools including Trapcode Suite, Magic Bullet Suite, Universe, VFX Suite and Shooter Suite — free for students or faculty members of a university, college or high school. Instead of buying separate suites or choosing which tools best suits one’s educational needs or budget, students and teachers can get every tool Red Giant makes completely free of charge. All that’s required is a simple verification.

How to get a free Red Giant Complete license if you are a student, teacher or faculty member:
1. Use school or organization ID or any proof of current employment or enrollment for verification. More information on academic verification is available here.
2. Send your academic verification to academic@redgiant.com.
3. Wait for approval via email before purchasing.
4. Once you get approval, go to the Red Giant Complete Product Page and “buy” your free version. You will only be able to buy the free version if you have been pre-approved.

The free education subscription will last 180 days. When that time period ends, users will need to reverify their academic status to renew their free subscription.

Flanders Scientific
Remote collaboration and review benefits greatly from having the same type of display calibrated the same way in both locations. To help facilitate such workflow consistency, FSI is launching a limited time buy one, get one for $1,000 off special on its most popular monitor, the DM240.

Nvidia
For those pros needing to power graphics workloads without local hardware, cloud providers, such as Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud, offer Nvidia Quadro Virtual Workstation instances to support remote, graphics-intensive work quickly without the need for any on-prem infrastructure. End-users only need a connected laptop or thin client, as the virtual workstations support the same Nvidia Quadro drivers and features as the physical Quadro GPUs used by pro artists and designers in local workstations.

Additionally, last week, Nvidia has expanded its free virtual GPU software evaluation to 500 licenses for 90 days to help companies support their remote workers with their existing GPU infrastructure. Nvidia vGPU software licenses — including Quadro Virtual Workstation — enable GPU-accelerated virtualization so that content creators, designers, engineers and others can continue their work. More details are available here.  Nvidia has also posted a separate blog on virtual GPUs to help admins who are working to support remote employees

Harman
Harman is offering a free e-learning program called Learning Sessions in conjunction with Harman Pro University.

The Learning Sessions and the Live Workshop Series provide a range of free on-demand and instructor-led webinars hosted by experts from around the world. The Industry Expert workshops feature tips and tricks from front of house engineers, lighting designers, technicians and other industry experts, while the Harman Expert workshops feature in-depth product and solution webinars by Harman product specialists.

• April 7—Lighting for Churches: Live and Video with Lucas Jameson and Chris Pyron
• April 9—Audio Challenges in Esports with Cameron O’Neill
• April 15—Special Martin Lighting Product Launch with Markus Klüesener
• April 16—Lighting Programming Workshop with Susan Rose
• April 23—Performance Manager: Beginner to Expert with Nowell Helms

Apple
Apple is offering free 90-day trials of Final Cut Pro X and Logic Pro X apps for all in order to help those working from home and looking for something new to master, as well as for students who are already using the tools in school but don’t have the apps on their home computers.

Avid
For its part, Avid is offering free temp licenses for remote users of the company’s creative tools. Commercial customers can get a free 90-day license for each registered user of Media Composer | Ultimate, Pro Tools, Pro Tools | Ultimate and Sibelius | Ultimate. For students whose school campuses are closed, any student of an Avid-based learning institution that uses Media Composer, Pro Tools or Sibelius can receive a free 90-day license for the same products.

Aris
Aris, a full-service production and post house based in Los Angeles, is partnering with ThinkLA to offer free online editing classes for those who want to sharpen their skills while staying close to home during this worldwide crisis. The series will be taught by Aris EP/founder Greg Bassenian, who is also an award-winning writer and director. He has also edited numerous projects for clients including Coca-Cola, Chevy and Zappos.

Previous Update News

Logic
mLogic is offering a 15% discount on its mTape Thunderbolt 3 LTO-7 and LTO-8 solutions The discount applies to orders placed on the mTape website through April 20th. Use discount code mLogicpostPerspective15%.

Xytech
Xytech has launched “Xytech After Dark,” a podcast focusing on trends in the media and broadcasting industries. The first two episodes are now available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcasting platforms.

Xytech’s Greg Dolan says the podcast “is not a forum to sell, but instead to talk about why create the functionality in MediaPulse and the types of things happening in our industry.”

Hosted by Xytech’s Gregg Sandheinrich, the podcast will feature Xytech staff, along with special guests. The first two episodes cover topics including the recent HPA Tech Retreat (featuring HPA president Seth Hallen), as well as the cancellation of the NAB Show, the value of trade shows and the effects of COVID-19 on the industry.

Adobe
Adobe shared a guide to best practices for working from home. It’s meant to support creators and filmmakers who might be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide here.

Adobe’s principal Creative Cloud evangelist, Jason Levine, hosted a live stream — Video Workflows With Team Projects that focus on remote workflows.

Additionally, Karl Soule, Senior Technical Business Development Manager, hosed a stream focusing on Remote video workflows and collaboration in the enterprise. If you sign up on this page, you can see his presentation.

Streambox
Streambox has introduced a pay-as-you-go software plan for video professionals who use its Chroma 4K, Chroma UHD, Chroma HD and Chroma X streaming encoder/decoder hardware. Since the software has been “decoupled” from the hardware platform, those who own the hardware can rent the software on a monthly basis, pause the subscription between projects and reinstate it as needed. By renting software for a fixed period, creatives can take on jobs without having to pay outright for technology that might have been impractical

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage .capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

AMD 2.1

Words of wisdom from editor Jesse Averna, ACE

We are all living in a world we’ve never had to navigate before. People’s jobs are in flux, others are working from home, and anxiety is a regular part of our lives. Through all the chaos, Jesse Averna has been a calming voice on social media, so postPerspective reached out to ask him to address our readership directly.

Jesse, who was co-founder of the popular Twitter chat and Facebook group @PostChat, works at Disney Animation Studio and is a member of the American Cinema Editors.


Hey,

How are you doing? This isn’t an ad. I’m not going to sell you anything or try to convince you of anything. I just want to take the opportunity to check in. Like many of you, I’m a post professional (an editor) currently working from home. If we don’t look out for each other, who will? Please know that it’s okay not to be okay right now. I have to be honest, I’m exhausted. I’m just endlessly reading news and searching for new news and reading posts about news I’ve already read and searching again for news I might have missed …

I want to remind you of a couple things that I think might bring some peace, if you let me. I fear it’s about to get much darker and much scarier, so we need to anchor ourselves to some hope.

You are valuable. The world is literally different because you are here. You have intrinsic value, and that will never change. No matter what. You are thought about and loved, despite whatever the voice in your head says. I’m sure your first reaction to reading that is to blow it off, but try to own it. Even for just a moment. It’s true.

You don’t deserve what’s going on, but let it bring some peace that the whole world is going through it together. You might be isolated, but you’re not alone. We are forced to look out for one another by looking out for ourselves. It’s interesting; I feel so separate and vulnerable, but the truth is that the whole planet is feeling and reacting to this as one. We are in sync, whether we know it or not — and that’s encouraging to me. We ALL want to be well and be safe, and we want our neighbors to be well also. We have a rare moment of feeling like a people, like a planet.

If you are feeling anxious, do me a favor tonight. Go outside and look at the stars. Set a timer for five minutes. No entertainment or phone or anything else. Just five minutes. Reset. Feel yourself on a cosmic scale. Small. A blink of an eye. But so, so valuable.

And please give yourself a break. A sanity check. If you need help, please reach out. If you need to nest, do it. You need to tune out, do it. Take care of yourself. This is an unprecedented moment. It’s okay not to be okay. Once you can, though, see who you can help. This complete shift of reality has made me think about legacy. This is a unique legacy-building moment. That student who reached out to you on LinkedIn asking for advice? You now have time to reply. That nonprofit you thought about volunteering your talents to? Now’s your chance. Even just to make the connection. Who can you help? Check in on? You don’t need any excuse in our current state to reach out.

I know I’m just some rando you’re reading on the internet, but I believe you are going to make it through this. You are wonderful. Do everything you can to be safe. The world needs you. It’s a better place because you are here. You know things, have ideas to share and will make things that none of the rest of us do or have.

Hang in there, my friends, and let me know if you have any thoughts, encouragements or tips for staying sane during this time. I’ll try to compile them into another article to share.

Jesse
@dr0id


Jesse Averna  — pictured on his way to donate masks — is a five-time Emmy-winning ACE editor living in LA and working in the animation feature world. 


Finishing artist Tim Nagle discuses work on indie film Miss Juneteenth

Lucky Post Flame artist Tim Nagle has a long list of projects under his belt, including collaborations with David Lowery — providing Flame work on the short film Pioneer as well as finishing and VFX work to Lowery’s motion picture A Ghost Story. He is equally at home working on spots, such as campaigns for AT&T, Hershey’s, The Home Depot, Jeep, McDonald’s and Ram..

Nagle began his formal career on the audio side of the business, working as engineer for Solid State Logic, where he collaborated with clients including Fox, Warner Bros., Skywalker, EA Games and ABC.

Tim Nagle

We reached out to Nagle about his and Lucky Post’s work on the feature film Miss Juneteenth, which premiered at Sundance and was recently honored by SXSW 2020 as the winner of the Louis Black Lone Star award.

Miss Juneteenth was directed (and written) by Channing Godfrey Peoples — her first feature-length film. It focuses on a woman from the south — a bona fide beauty queen once crowned Miss Juneteenth, a title commemorating the day slavery was abolished in Texas. The film follows her journey as she tries to hold onto her elegance while striving to survive. She looks for ways to thrive despite her own shortcomings as she marches, step by step, toward self-realization.

How did the film come to you?
We have an ongoing relationship with Sailor Bear, the film’s producing team of David Lowery, Toby Halbrooks and James Johnston. We’ve collaborated with them on multiple projects, including The Old Man & The Gun, directed by Lowery.

What were you tasked to do?
We were asked to provide dailies transcoding, additional editorial, VFX, color and finishing and ultimately delivery to distribution.

How often did you talk to director Channing Godfrey Peoples?
Channing was in the studio, working side by side with our creatives, including colorist Neil Anderson and me, to get the project completed for the Sundance deadline. It was a massive team effort, and we felt privileged to help Channing with her debut feature.

Without spoilers, what most inspires you about the film?
There’s so much to appreciate in the film — it’s a love letter to Texas, for one. It’s directed by a woman, has a single mother at its center and is a celebration of black culture. The LA Times called it one of the best films to come out of Sundance 2020.

Once you knew the film was premiering at Sundance, what was left to complete and in what amount of time?
This was by far the tightest turnaround we have ever experienced. Everything came down to the wire, sound being the last element. It’s one of the advantages of having a variety of talent and services under one roof — the creative collaboration was immediate, intense and really made possible by our shorthand and proximity.

How important do you think it is for post houses to be diversified in terms of the work they do?
I think diversification is important not only for business purposes but also to keep the artists creatively inspired. Lucky Post’s ongoing commitment to support independent film, both financially and creatively, is an integrated part of our business along with brand-supported work and advertising. Increasingly, as you see greater crossover of these worlds, it just seems like a natural evolution for the business to have fewer silos.

What does it mean to you as a company to have work at Sundance? What kinds of impact do you see — business, morale and otherwise?
Having a project that we put our hands on accepted into Sundance was such an honor. It is unclear what the immediate and direct business impacts might be, but for morale, this is often where the immediate value is clear. The excitement and inspiration we all get from projects like this just naturally makes how we do business better.

What software and hardware did you use?
On this project we started with Assimilate Scratch for dailies creation. Editorial was done in Adobe Premiere. Color was Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve, and finishing was done in Autodesk Flame.

What is a piece of advice that you’d give to filmmakers when considering the post phase of their films?
We love being involved as early as possible — certainly not to get in anyone’s way,  but to be in the background supporting the director’s creative vision. I’d say get with a post company that can assist in setting looks and establishing a workflow. With a little bit of foresight, this will create the efficiency you need to deliver in what always ends up being a tight deadline with the utmost quality.


COVID-19: NAB talks plans, more companies offer support, info about remote work

Last Friday, NAB’s president/CEO, Gordon Smith, issued a statement saying that rather than rescheduling the NAB Show for later this year, NAB would be unveiling a new digital offering called NAB Show Express, and enhancing NAB Show New York later this year. Here is part of what he said.

“First, we are exploring a number of ways to bring the industry together online, both in the short and long term. We know from many years of serving the community with face-to-face events, that connectivity is vital to the health and success of the industry. That’s why we are excited to announce NAB Show Express, targeted to launch in April 2020. This digital experience will provide a conduit for our exhibitors to share product information, announcements and demos, as well as deliver educational content from the original selection of programming slated for the live show in Las Vegas, and create opportunities for the community to interact virtually — all of which adds up to something that brings the NAB Show community together in a new way.

“Second, we will be enhancing NAB Show New York with new programs, partners, and experiences. We have already had numerous conversations with show partners about expanding their participation and have heard from numerous exhibitors interested in enhancing their presence at this fall’s show. NAB Show New York represents the best opportunity for companies to announce and showcase their latest innovations and comes at a perfect time for the industry to gather face-to-face to restart, refocus, and reengage as we move forward together.”

A number of companies are releasing updates and offering discounts and tips for working remotely. Here is a bit of news from some of those companies, and we will add more companies to this list as the news comes in, so watch this space.

mLogic
mLogic is offering a 15% discount on its mTape Thunderbolt 3 LTO-7 and LTO-8 solutions The discount applies to orders placed on the mTape website through April 20th. Use discount code mLogicpostPerspective15%.

Xytech
Xytech has launched “Xytech After Dark,” a podcast focusing on trends in the media and broadcasting industries. The first two episodes are now available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcasting platforms.

Xytech’s Greg Dolan says the podcast “is not a forum to sell, but instead to talk about why create the functionality in MediaPulse and the types of things happening in our industry.”

Hosted by Xytech’s Gregg Sandheinrich, the podcast will feature Xytech staff, along with special guests. The first two episodes cover topics including the recent HPA Tech Retreat (featuring HPA president Seth Hallen), as well as the cancellation of the NAB Show, the value of trade shows and the effects of COVID-19 on the industry.

Nvidia
Nvidia is expanding its free virtual GPU software evaluation to 500 licenses for 90 days to help companies support their remote workers with their existing GPU infrastructure. Nvidia vGPU software licenses — including Quadro Virtual Workstation — enable GPU-accelerated virtualization so that content creators, designers, engineers and others can continue their work. More details are available here.  Nvidia has also posted a separate blog on virtual GPUs to help admins who are working to support remote employees

Object Matrix 
Object Matrix is offering video tips for surviving working from home. The videos, hosted by co-founder Nicholas Pearce, are here.

Adobe
Adobe shared a guide to best practices for working from home. It’s meant to support creators and filmmakers who might be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide here.

Adobe’s principal Creative Cloud evangelist, Jason Levine, hosted a live stream — Video Workflows With Team Projects ±that focus on remote workflows.

Additionally, Karl Soule, Senior Technical Business Development Manager, hosed a stream focusing on Remote video workflows and collaboration in the enterprise. If you sign up on this page, you can see his presentation.

Streambox
Streambox has introduced a pay-as-you-go software plan for video professionals who use its Chroma 4K, Chroma UHD, Chroma HD and Chroma X streaming encoder/decoder hardware. Since the software has been “decoupled” from the hardware platform, those who own the hardware can rent the software on a monthly basis, pause the subscription between projects and reinstate it as needed. By renting software for a fixed period, creatives can take on jobs without having to pay outright for technology that might have been impractical.

And last week’s offerings as well

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Frame.io

Main Image: Courtesy of Adobe


Quick Chat: Scholar’s Will Johnson and William Campbell

By Randi Altman

In celebrating its 10th anniversary, animation and design company Gentleman Scholar has relaunched as Scholar and has put a new emphasis on its live-action work. Started by directors/partners William Campbell and Will Johnson in Los Angeles, the company has grown over the years and now boasts a New York City location as well.

Recent Scholar projects include the animated Timberland Legends Club spot, the live-action and animated Porsche Pop Star and the live-action Acura TLX.

Considering their new name change and website rebrand, we decided to reach out to “The Wills” to find out more about Scholar’s work philosophy and what this change means to the company.

Audi Q3

Why did you decide to rename and relaunch as Scholar?
Will Johnson: After 10 years it felt like a good time to redefine how the world views us. Not as only as a one-stop shop that can handle all of your design and animation needs, but also a live-action and storytelling powerhouse.

Will Campbell: The new name evokes cleanliness and sophistication and better represents how we have evolved. Gentleman Scholar was fun, quirky and playful. We’re still all of those things, but we feel like we’ve also become more cinematic, more polished and better collaborators that understand production more clearly… which allows us to navigate the industry better as a whole.

Even when it comes to live action and carrying our film into post, we can assess solutions on-set quicker and more fluidly, understanding the restrictions or additions we can take with us into the software. Scholar has changed immensely over the past 10 years. We have grown up and become smarter, faster and better. The rebrand is a window to who we have already become and who we plan to be.

How is the business different, and what’s stayed the same?
Johnson: It’s more refined. We’ve learned a lot about how to conduct ourselves in a competitive art world — the positive ways that we approach each project and allowing the stress of the job to kick us in the ass but not let it guide the decisions we make. It’s also about being patient with our team as well as our own decision-making.

Creativity is a process, and “turning it on” every day isn’t always easy. Understanding that not every idea you have is a great idea and how to be comfortable with your creative self is important. To trust in the “why” you are making something versus the “what” that you make. And that’s reflected in the new company name and our new website design. It’s the same us. The same wild bunch of creative explorers intent on pushing the boundaries of design and live action. We are just more certain of who we are and the stories we tell, and therefore more inclusive in our path to get there.

Acura

Campbell: We now have a decade’s worth of work to back up our thoughts and collaborations. This is enormous when you need to show how capable you are, not just in the standard we hold ourselves to visually, but in the quality and sophistication of our evolving storytelling. We have fine-tuned our production processes, enabling the pipelines of our edit, animation, CG and composite teams to more easily embrace the techniques and tools we use to craft the stories we want to tell… so we can be more decisive with the concepts we put on the table. From the software to the hardware, we are more refined.

Can you talk about how the industry has changed over the past 10 years?
Johnson: It’s more spread out than it’s ever been. There is more content that reaches more eyes in more places. From social to OOH to broadcast, the need to pull everyone together and create something that speaks to everyone all at once feels like it’s stronger and more apparent than before. And we’ve seen it all at this point, from vertical campaigns to entirely experiential ones. The era of “do more with less” is here.

Campbell: For us, we were very young when we opened Scholar. We were in our 20s, and everything was a fire drill and we thrived off the chaos. We have learned to harness the inspiration that comes with chaos and channel it into focused, productive creation.

Have you embraced working in the cloud — storage, rendering, review and approval, etc. — and if so, in what way?
Johnson: Yes. We know it’s a fast-paced world and in the climate of things, generally the globe is embracing a cloud-based way of thinking. Luckily, we have an amazing team of technologists so we can tap into our home-base server from anywhere at any time. From rendering to storage to reviews and approvals — it keeps us all united, focused and organized when we’re moving a million miles a minute in any different direction.

Campbell: Scholar has been testing the technology as it is getting better and cheaper, but we are always balancing convenience versus security, and those swing on a job-by-job basis. We’ve written tools to take advantage of storage and rendering resources on both coasts and use Aspera to facilitate file syncing between each office.

Can you talk about the tools you use for your work?
Johnson: The tangible ones are the usual suspects. Adobe’s Creative Suite and 3D tools like Autodesk Maya, Maxon Cinema 4D, Foundry Nuke and all of the animation and time-based ones, like Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer. But my favorite tools tend to be the brains and skills of our team… the words on paper and the channeling of art and thought into something tactile. As creators, we lust to make things, and seeing that circuit board of craft and making is something amazing to watch.

Campbell: Scholar has always been a mixed-media studio. We love getting our hands dirty with new software or cameras. We fundamentally want to do what’s right for the job and not rest inside our comfort zone. Thinking about what style is right for a client, not “how do I make my style fit,” is just how we are wired. The tool is always a means to an end. My favorite jobs are the ones where the technique is invisible, and it’s all about the experience.

We are operating in an entirely new world these days with the coronavirus and working remotely. How are you guys embracing the change?
Campbell: With an office on each coast, we have already had to learn to work as a team remotely. The years of unifying groups from a distance and finding ways for technology to bring artists closer together has set the stage for us right now. We have transitioned our workforce to 100% remote. It’s early days yet, but everyone is in good spirits, and we feel as connected as ever, although I do miss our lunch table.

Johnson: We’re definitely thankful for the staff and talent that we surround ourselves with and how they’ve handled their work-from-home routines. The check-ins, the mind melds and the daily (hourly) hangouts have helped. We’re using the change in the world as an opportunity to showcase our adaptability — how we can scale up and down even in the remote world — as a way to continue to grow our relationships and push the creative boundaries.

As people who find it hard to simply sit still, we’ve changed how we approach and talk about a project as each script comes in. The conversations about techniques are important — how we look at animation with a live-action lens, how 2D can become 3D, or vice versa. We’re more easily adaptable and change purely out of the need to discover what’s new.

Main Image: (L-R) Will Johnson and Will Campbell


Colorist Chat: Framestore LA senior colorist Beau Leon

Veteran colorist Beau Leon recently worked with director Spike Jonze on a Beastie Boys documentary and a spot for cannabis retailer MedMen.

What’s your title and company?
I’m senior colorist at LA’s Framestore

Spike Jonze’s MedMen

What kind of services does Framestore offer?
Framestore is a multi-Oscar-winning creative studio founded over 30 years ago, and the services offered have evolved considerably over the decades. We work across film, television, advertising, music videos, cinematic data visualization, VR, AR, XR, theme park rides… the list is endless and continues to change as new platforms emerge.

As a colorist, what would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Despite creative direction or the equipment used to shoot something, whether it be for film or TV, people might not factor in how much color or tone can dictate the impact a story has on its audience. As a colorist, my role often involves acting as a mediator of sorts between various creative stakeholders to ensure everyone is on the same page about what we’re trying to convey, as it can translate differently through color.

Are you sometimes asked to do more than just color on projects?
Earlier in my career, the process was more collaborative with DPs and directors who would bring color in at the beginning of a project. Now, particularly when it comes to commercials with tighter deadlines and turnarounds, many of those conversations happen during pre-production without grading factored in until later in the pipeline.

Rihanna’s Needed Me

Building strong relationships and working on multiple projects with DPs or directors always allows for more trust and creative control on my end. Some of the best examples I’ve seen of this are on music video projects, like Rihanna’s Needed Me, which I graded here at Framestore for a DP I’d grown up in the industry with. That gave me the opportunity to push the creative boundaries.

What system do you work on?
FilmLight Baselight

You recently worked on the new Beastie Boys documentary, Beastie Boys Story. Can you talk a bit about what you did and any challenges relating to deadlines?
I’ve been privileged to work with Spike Jonze on a number of projects throughout my career, so going into Beastie Boys Story, we already had a strong dialogue. He’s a very collaborative director and respectful of everyone’s craft and expertise, which can be surprisingly rare within our industry.

Spike Jonze’s Beatie Boys Story

The unique thing about this project was that, with so much old footage being used, it needed to be mastered in HDR as well as reworked for IMAX. And with Spike being so open to different ideas, the hardest part was deciding which direction to choose. Whether you’re a hardcore Beastie Boys fan or not, the documentary is well worth watching once it will air on AppleTV+ in April.

Any suggestions for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
As an audience, our eyes have evolved a great deal over the last few decades. I would argue that most of what we see on TV and film today is extremely oversaturated compared to what we’d experience in our real environment. I think it speaks to how we treat consumers and anticipate what we think they want — colorful, bright and eye-catching. When it’s appropriate, I try to challenge clients to think outside those new norms.

How do you prefer to work with the DP or director?
Whether it’s working with a DP or director, the more involved I can be early on in the conversation, the more seamless the process becomes during post production and ultimately leads to a better end result. In my experience, this type of access is more common when working on music videos.

Most one-off commercial projects see us dealing with an agency more often than the director, but an exception to the rule that comes to mind is on another occasion when I had the chance to collaborate on a project with Spike Jonze for the first ever brand campaign for cannabis retailer MedMen called The New Normal. He placed an important emphasis on grading and was very open to my recommendations and vision.

How do you like getting feedback in terms of the look?
A conversation is always the best way to receive feedback versus a written interpretation of imagery, which tends to become very personal. An example might be when a client wants to create the feeling of a warm climate in a particular scene. Some might interpret that as adding more warm color tones, when in fact, if you think about some of the hottest places you’ve ever visited, the sun shines so fiercely that it casts a bright white hue.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
That’s an easy answer — to me, it’s all about the amazing people you meet in this industry and the creative collaboration that happens as a result. So many of my colleagues over the years have become great friends.

Any least favorites?
There isn’t much that I don’t love about my job, but I have witnessed a change over the years in the way that our industry has begun to undervalue relationships, which I think is a shame.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would be an art teacher. It combines my passion for color and visual inspiration with a forum for sharing knowledge and fostering creativity.

How early did you know this would be your path?
In my early 20s, I started working on dailies (think The Dukes of Hazzard, The Karate Kid, Fantasy Island) at a place in The Valley that had a telecine machine that transferred at a frame rate faster than anywhere else in LA at the time. It was there that I started coloring (without technically realizing that was the job I was doing, or that it was even a profession).

Soon after, I received a call from a company called 525 asking me to join them. They worked on all of the top music videos during the prime “I Want My MTV” era, and after working on music videos as a side hustle at night, I knew that’s where I wanted to be. When I first walked into the building, I was struck by how much more advanced their technology was and immediately felt out of my depth. Luckily, someone saw something in me before I recognized it within myself. I worked on everything from R.E.M.’s “Losing My Religion” to TLC’s “Waterfalls” and The Smashing Pumpkins’ “Tonight, Tonight.” I found such joy in collaborating with some of the most creative and spirited directors in the business, many of whom were inspiring artists, designers and photographers in their spare time.

Where do you find inspiration?
I’m lucky to live in a city like LA with such a rich artistic scene, so I make a point to attend as many gallery openings and exhibitions as I can. Some of my favorite spaces are the Annenberg Space for Photography, the Hammer Museum and Hauser & Wirth. On the weekends I also stop by Arcana bookstore in Culver City, where they source rare books on art and design.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
I think I would be completely fine if I had to survive without technology.

This industry comes with tight deadlines. How do you de-stress from it all?
After a long day, cooking helps me decompress and express my creativity through a different outlet. I never miss a trip to my local farmer’s market, which also helps to keep me inspired. And when I’m not looking at other people’s art, I’m painting my own abstract pieces at my home studio.


Review: Digital Anarchy’s Transcriptive 2.0

By Barry Goch

Not long ago, I had the opportunity to go behind the scenes at Warner Bros. to cover the UHD HDR remastering of The Wizard of Oz. I had recorded audio of the entire experience so I could get accurate quotes from all involved — about an hour of audio. I then uploaded the audio file to Rev.com and waited. And waited. And waited. A few days later they came back and said they couldn’t do it. I was perplexed! I checked the audio file, and I could clearly hear the voices of the different speakers, but they couldn’t make it work.

That’s when my editor, Randi Altman, suggested Digital Anarchy’s Transcriptive, and it saved the day. What is Transcriptive? It’s an automated, intelligent transcription plugin for Adobe Premiere editors designed to automatically transcribe video using multiple speech and natural language processing engines with accuracy.

Well, not only did Transcriptive work, it worked super-fast, and it’s affordable and simple to use … once everything is set up. I spent a lot of time watching Transcriptive’s YouTube videos and then had to create two accounts for the two different AI transcription portals that they use. After a couple of hours of figuring and setup, I was finally good to go.

Digital Anarchy has lots of videos on YouTube about setting up the program. Here is a link to the overview video and a link to 2.0 new features. After getting everything set up, it took less than five minutes from start to finish to transcribe a one-minute video. That includes the coolest part: automatically linking the transcript to the video clip with word-for-word accuracy.

Transcriptive extension

Step by Step
Import video clip into Premiere, select the clips, and open the Transcriptive Extension.

Tell Transcriptive if you want to use an existing transcript or create a new transcription.

Then choose the AI that you want to transcribe your clip. You see the cost upfront, so no surprises.

Launch app

I picked the Speechmatics AI:

Choosing AI

Once you press continue, Media Encoder launches.

Media Encoder making FLAC file automatically.

And Media Encoder automatically makes a FLAC file and uploads it to the transcription engine you picked.

One minute later, no joke, I had a finished transcription linked word-accurately to my source video clip.

Final Thoughts
The only downside to this is that the transcription isn’t 100% accurate. For example, it heard Lake Tahoe as “Lake Thomas” and my son’s name, Oliver, as “over.”

Final transcription

This lack of accuracy is not a deal breaker for me, especially since I would have been totally out of luck without it on The Wizard of Oz article, which you can read here. For me, the speed and ease of use more than compensates for the lack of accuracy. And, as AI’s get better, the accuracy will only improve.

And on February 27, Digital Anarchy released Transcriptive V.2.0.3, which is compatible with Adobe Premiere v14.0.2. The update also includes a new prepaid option that can lower the cost of transcription to $2.40 per hour of footage. Transcriptive’s tight integration with Premiere makes it a must-have for working with transcripts when cutting long- and short-form projects.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation as well as a UCLA Extension Instructor, Post Production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya


Seagate’s new IronWolf 510 M.2 NVMe SSD

Seagate Technology has beefed up its high-performance solutions for multi-user NAS environments by adding to its IronWolf SSD product line. IronWolf 510 is an M.2 NVMe SSD with caching speeds of up to 3GB/s for NVMe-compatible systems and is designed for creative pros and businesses that need 24/7 multi-user storage that is cache-enabled.

The IronWolf 510 SSD meets NAS manufacturer requirements of one drive write per day (DWPD), allowing multi-user NAS environments to do more with their data with lasting performance. According to Seagate, IronWolf 510 SSD is reliable with 1.8 million hours mean time between failures (MTBF) in a PCIe form factor, two years of Rescue Data Recovery Services, and a five-year limited warranty. IronWolf Health Management helps analyze drive health and will soon be available on compatible NAS systems.

“We are the first to provide a purpose-built M.2 NVMe for NAS that not only goes beyond SATA performance metrics but also provides three times the endurance when compared to the competition. This meets the required endurance spec of one DWPD which our NAS partners expect for their customers,” says Matt Rutledge, senior VP, devices. “Because of such high endurance, our customers are getting a tough SSD for small business and creative professional NAS environments.”

The IronWolf 510 SSD PCIe Gen3 x4, NVMe 1.3 is available in 240GB ($119.99), 480GB ($169.99), 960GB ($319.99) and 1.92TB ($539.99) capacities and is compatible with leading NAS vendors.

Review: Litra Pro’s Premium 3 Point Lighting Bundle

By Brady Betzel

With LED lights showing up everywhere these days, it’s not always easy to find the balance between affordability, power output and size. I have previously reviewed itty bitty-LED lights like the Litra Torch, which for its size is amazing. Litra has now expanded its LED offerings, adding the Litra Pro and the Litra Studio.

Litra Studio ($650) is at the top of the Litra mountain with not only varying color temperatures — from 2,000 to 10,000 kelvin with adjustable green/magenta settings — but also RGBWW (RGB + cool white + warm white), CCT (kelvin adjustments), HSL (hue + saturation + lightness), color gel presets, flash effects and more.

But for today’s review, I am wanted to focus on the Litra Pro LED, which comes to the Premium 3 Point Lighting Bundle, complete with light stands, lights, soft boxes, and carrying case. I had reached out to Litra about reviewing this bundle because I am tired of having to lug around big clunky lights for quick interviews or smaller setup product shots. And to be honest, it was right before I was heading to Sundance to shoot some interviews for postPerspective, I and didn’t want to check a bag at the airport. (Check out my interviews with editors at Sundance here.)

For the trip, I wanted to bring lights, a Blackmagic 6K Pocket cinema camera, my Canon L series zoom lens, a small tripod and some hard drives all stuffed into my backpack. I knew I’d be in the snow, so I needed lights that could potentially withstand all types of precipitation. Also, I would be throwing these lights around, so I needed them to be durable. The Litra Pro lights fit the bill. They measure 2.75in x 2in x 1.2in  — smaller than a phone, weigh 6oz and have upwards of a 10-hour battery life if set to 5% power. Each Litra Pro costs just under $220 but can be purchased in different bundle assortments. Individually, each Litra Pro comes with a rubberized diffuser, USB-A to Micro-USB charging cable (very short, maybe 3-4inches in length), DSLR mount (to be mounted in a hot/cold shoe), GoPro mount and a little zipper bag.

I wish Litra would package not only the GoPro mount to ¼”-20 but also the female ¼”-20 to GoPro mount adapter to be mounted to something like a tripod. If you don’t already them them, you’d need to purchase the GoPro mounts. Alternatively, it would be nice to have a mini-ball head mount like they sell on the site separately.

I was sent the Litra Pro Premium 3 Point Lighting Bundle. This essentially gives you everything you need for a standard three-point lighting setup — key light, fill light and back light. In addition, you get three light stands with carrying bags, three soft boxes, a customizable foam-insert carrying case and the standard accessories. This package retails for $779.95, which is a pretty good discount. If bought separately, the package would add up to about $820 not including the light stands, which aren’t available on Litra site and cost around $26 for two on Amazon. That means with the bundle you are essentially getting a free carrying case and light stands. The carrying case fits most of the products, except for the light stands. I had some trouble fitting all of the soft boxes along with the original accessories into the carrying case, but with a little force, I got it zipped up.

Do Specs Live Up to Output?
The Litra Pro lights are amazing lights packed into a small package, but with a kind of expensive price tag — Think of the saying, “Better, faster, cheaper: Pick two because you can’t have all three.” They have a CRI (Color Rendering Index) of greater than 95, which on the surface means they will show accurate colors. They can output up to 1200 lumens (increasing from 0-100% in 5% increments) either by app or on the light itself; have a 70-degree beam angle; can be adjusted from 3000k to 6000k color temperature in 100k increments; and have zero flicker, no matter the shutter speed (a.k.a. shutter angle). The top OLED screen displays battery info, Bluetooth connection info, kelvin temperature and brightness values.

One of my two favorite features of the Litra Pro lights are the rugged exterior and the impact they can withstand, based on MIL-STD-810 testing. The Litra Pros can withstand a lot of punishment, typically more than any filmmaker will dish out. For me, I need lights that can be in a pocket, a backpack, or mounted on a lighting stand in the rain, and these lights will withstand all of the elements.

They stood up to my practical production abuse: dropping, water, snow, rain, general throwing around in my backpack on an airplane, and my three sons — all under 10 — throwing them around. In fact, they are waterproofed up to 30 meters (90 feet).

My second favorite feature is the ability to control color temperature and brightness among a group of lights simultaneously or individually through the Litra app. When purchasing the 3 Point Lighting Bundle, this makes a lot of sense. Controlling all of the lights from one app simultaneously can allow you to watch your output image on the camera without moving around the room adjusting each light.

When I first started writing this review, the Litra app was one of the most important factors. When I was at Sundance, I needed to change lighting temperatures or brightness levels without leaving my interview position. I wasn’t able to bring an external monitor, so I only had the monitor on the back of the BMPCC6K camera to judge my lighting decisions. But with the updated Litra app, I was able to quickly add the three Litra Pro lights into a group and adjust the temperature and brightness easily. I tested the app on both Android and iOS devices, and as of mid-February, they both worked.

There can be a little lag when adjusting the brightness and temperature of the lights in a group, but they quickly catch up. The Litra app also has “CTO” (Color Temperature Orange) common preset temperatures of Daylight 5600, ⅛ CTO 4900K, ¼ CTO 4500K, ½ CTO 3800K and ¾ CTO 3200K to quickly jump to the more common color temperatures. If those don’t work, you can also set your favorites. An interesting function is to flash the lights — you can set a brightness minimum/maximum, color temperature and strobe per second in Hz.

When shooting product and interview photography or videography, I like to use diffusion. As I mentioned earlier, the light comes with a rubberized diffusion cover that sits right on the camera. But if you need a little more distance between the light and your diffusion to draw out the softness of the light, the Litra 3 Point Lighting Bundle includes soft boxes that snap together and snap onto the Litra Pro. At first, I was a little thrown off by the soft boxes because you have to build them and break them down if you want to travel with them — I guess I was hoping for more of a collapsible setup. But they come with a padded, zippered pouch for transport, and they lay very flat when broken down. They actually work pretty well when snapped together and are pretty durable. The soft boxes are indispensable for interviews. Without the soft boxes, it is hard to get an even light; add the rubberized diffusion and you will almost get there, but the soft boxes really spread the light nicely.

Over Christmas, I helped out at an event for a pediatric cancer-based foundation called The Bumblebee Foundation, which supports families with kids going through pediatric cancer treatments. They needed someone to take pictures, so I grabbed my camera and mounted one of the Litra Pro lights with a soft box onto the hot shoe of my Canon 5D Mark II with the included mount. The Litra Pro was easy to use, and it didn’t startle people like a flash might. It was a really key item to have in that environment.

I also do some product photography/videography for my wife, who sews and makes hair bows, tutus and more. I needed to light a few Girl Scout Cookie hair bows she had made, so I mounted two of the lights using the lighting stands and soft boxes and just stood one of the Litra Pros behind the products. You can see the video here.

What was interesting is that I wanted more light vertically, and because the Litra Pros have 2-¼”-20 mounts (one on the bottom and one on the side), I could quickly mount the lights vertically. I never really realized how helpful mounting the Litra Pros vertically would be until I actually needed it. At the same time, I had left the lights on at 60-80% power, and after a few minutes, I felt the heat the Litra Pros can put out. It isn’t quite burning, but the Litra Pros do get hot to the touch if left on for a while… just something to keep in mind.

Summing Up
From the military-grade-feeling exterior aluminum construction to the CRI color accuracy, the Litra Pro lights are truly amazing. Whether you use them to light interviews at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival (like I did), add one to a GoPro shoot to take the load off of the sensor with a high ISO, or use them to light product photography, the Litra Pro 3 Point Lighting Bundle is worth your money. They can fit into your pocket and withstand being dropped on the ground or in water.

All in all, this is a great bundle. The Litra Pros are not cheap, but the peace of mind you get knowing they will still work if you drop them or get them wet is worth every penny. When flying to Sundance, I had no fear throwing them around. I was setting up the lighting for my interviews and noticed a water ring on the table from a glass of water. I didn’t think twice and put the Litra Pro right in the water. In fact, when I was shooting some videos for this review, I put the Litra Pros in a vase of water. At first I was nervous, but then I went for it, and they worked flawlessly.

If you are looking for super-compact lighting that is bright enough to use outdoors, light interviews indoors, film underwater, and even double as photography lighting, the Litra Pros are for you. If you are like me and need to do a lot of product videography and interview lighting quickly, the Litra Pro Premium 3 Point Lighting Bundle is where you should look.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producer’s Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Goldcrest Post’s Jay Tilin has passed away

Jay Tilin, head of production at New York’s Goldcrest Post, passed away last month after a long illness. For 40 years, Tilin worked in the industry as an editor, visual effects artist and executive. His many notable credits include the Netflix series Marco Polo and the HBO series Treme and True Detective.

“Jay was in integral part of New York’s post production community and one of the top conform artists in the world,” said Goldcrest Post managing director Domenic Rom. “He was beloved by our staff and clients as an admired colleague and valued friend. We offer our heartfelt condolences to his family and all who knew him.”

Tilin began his career in 1980 as an editor with Devlin Productions. He also spent many years at The Tape House, Technicolor, Riot and Deluxe, all in New York. He was an early adopter of many now standard post technologies, from the advent of HD video in the 1990s through more recent implementations of 4K and HDR finishing.

His credits also include the HBO series Boardwalk Empire, the Sundance Channel series Hap and Leonard, the PBS documentary The National Parks and the Merchant Ivory feature City of Your Final Destination. He also contributed to numerous commercials and broadcast promos. A native New Yorker, Tilin earned a degree in broadcasting from SUNY Oswego.

Tilin is survived by his wife Betsy, his children Kelsey and Sam, his mother Sonya and his sister Felice (Trudy).

Quick Chat: Editing Leap Day short for Stella Artois

By Randi Altman

To celebrate February 29, otherwise known as Leap Day, beer-maker Stella Artois released a short film featuring real people who discover their time together is valuable in ways they didn’t expect. The short was conceived by VaynerMedia, directed by Division7s Kris Belman and cut by Union partner/editor Sloane Klevin. Union also supplied Flame work on the piece.

The film begins with the words, ”There is a crisis sweeping the nation” set on a black screen. Then we see different women standing on the street talking about how easy it is to cancel plans. “You’re just one text away,” says one. “When it’s really cold outside and I don’t want to go out, I use my dog excuse,” says another. That’s when the viewer is told, through text on the screen, that Stella Artois has set out to right this wrong “by showing them the value of their time together.”

The scene changes from the street to a restaurant where friends are reunited for a meal and a goblet of Stella after not seeing each other for a while. When the check comes the confused diners ask about their checks, as an employee explains, that the menu lists prices in minutes, and that Leap Day is a gift of 24 hours and that people should take advantage of that by “uncancelling plans.”

Prior to February 29, Stella encouraged people to #UnCancel plans and catch up with friends over a beer… paid for by the brand. Using the Stella Leap Day Fund — a $366,000 bank of beer reserved exclusively for those who spend time together (there are 366 days in a Leap Year) — people were able to claim as much as a 24-pack when sharing the film using #UnCancelPromo and tagging someone they would like to catch up with.

Editor Sloane Klevin

For the film short, the diners were captured with hidden cameras. Union editor Klevin, who used an Avid Media Composer 2018.12.03 with EditShare storage, was tasked with finding a story in their candid conversations. We reached out to her to find out more about the project and her process.

How early did you get involved in this project, and what kind of input did you have?
I knew I was probably getting the job about a week before they shot. I had no creative input into the shoot; that really only happens when I’m editing a feature.

What was your process like?
This was an incredibly fast turnaround. They shot on a Wednesday night, and it was finished and online the following Wednesday morning at 12am.

I thought about truncating my usual process in order to make the schedule, but when I saw their shooting breakdown for how they planned to shoot it all in one evening, I knew there wouldn’t be a ton of footage. Knowing this, I could treat the project the way I approach most unscripted longform branded content.

My assistant, Ryan Stacom, transcoded and loaded the footage into the Avid overnight, then grouped the four hidden cameras with the sound from the hidden microphones — and, brilliantly, production had time-of-day timecode on everything. The only thing that was tricky was when two tables were being filmed at once. Those takes had to be separated.

The Simon Says transcription software was used to transcribe the short pre and post interviews we had, and Ryan put markers from the transcripts on those clips so I could jump straight to a keyword or line I was searching for during the edit process. I watched all the verité footage myself and put markers on anything I thought was usable in the spot, typing into the markers what was said.

How did you choose the footage you needed?
Sometimes the people had conversations that were neither here nor there, because they had no idea they were being filmed, so I skipped that stuff. Also, I didn’t know if the transcription software would be accurate with so much background noise from the restaurant on the hidden table microphones, so markering myself seemed the best option. I used yellow markers for lines I really liked, and red for stuff I thought we might want to be able to find and audition, but those wasn’t necessarily my selects. That way I could open the markers tool, and read through my yellow selects at a glance.

Once I’d seen everything, I did a music search of Asche & Spencer’s incredibly intuitive, searchable music library website, downloaded my favorite tracks and started editing.  Because of the fast turnaround, the agency was nice enough to send an outline for how they hoped the material might be edited. I explored their road map, which was super helpful, but went with my gut on how to deviate. They gave me two days to edit, which meant I could post for the director first and get his thoughts.

Then I spent the weekend playing with the agency and trying other options. The client saw the cut and gave notes on both days I was with the agency, then we spent Monday and Tuesday color correcting (thanks to Mike Howell at Color Collective), reworking the music track, mixing (with Chris Afzal at Wave Studios), conforming, subtitling.

That was a crazy fast turnaround.
Considering how fast the turnaround was, it went incredibly smoothly. I attribute that to the manageable amount of footage, fantastic casting that got us really great reactions from all the people they filmed, and the amount of communication my producer at Union and the agency producer had in advance.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

 

Krista Liney directs Ghost-inspired promo for ABC’s The Bachelor

Remember the Ghost-inspired promo for ABC’s The Bachelor, which first aired during the 92nd Academy Awards telecast? ABC Entertainment Marketing developed the concept and wrote the script, which features current Bachelor lead Peter Weber in a send-up of the iconic pottery scene in Ghost between Demi Moore and Patrick Swayze. It even includes the Righteous Brothers song, Unchained Melody, which played over that scene in the film.

ABC Entertainment Marketing tapped Canyon Road Films to produce and Krista Liney to direct. Liney captured Peter taking off his shirt, sitting down at the pottery wheel and “getting messy” — a metaphor for how messy his journey to love has been. As he starts to mold the clay, he is joined by one set of hands, then another and another. As the clay collapses, Whoopi Goldberg appears to say, “Peter, you in danger, boy” – a take-off of the line she delivers to Moore’s character in the film.

This marks Liney’s first shoot as a newly signed director coming on board at Canyon Road Films, a Los Angeles-based creative production company that specializes in television promos and entertainment content.

Liney has a perspective from the side of the client and the production house, having previously served as a marketing executive on the network side. “With promos, I aim to create pieces that will cut through the clutter and command attention,” she explains. “For me, it’s all about how I can best build the anticipation and excitement within the viewer.”

The piece was shot on an ARRI Alexa Mini with Primes and Optimo lenses. ABC finished the spot in-house.

Other credits include EP Lara Wickes and DP Eric Schmidt.

Behind the Title: Dell Blue lead editor Jason Uson

This veteran editor started his career at LA’s Rock Paper Scissors, where he spent four years learning the craft from editors such as Bee Ottinger and Angus Wall. After freelancing at Lost Planet, Spot Welders and Nomad, he held staff positions at Cosmo Street, Harpo Films and Beast Editorial before opening Foundation Editorial his own post boutique in Austin.

NAME: Jason Uson

COMPANY: Austin, Texas-based Dell Blue

Can you describe what Dell Blue does?
Dell Blue is the in-house agency for Dell Technologies.

What’s your job Title?
Senior Lead Creative Editor

What does that entail?
Outside of the projects that I am editing personally, there are multiple campaigns happening simultaneously at all times. I oversee all of them and have my eyes on every edit, fostering and mentoring our junior editors and producers to help them grow in their careers.

I’ve helped establish and maintain the process regarding our workflow and post pipeline. I also work closely with our entire team of creatives, producers, project managers and vendors from the beginning of each project and follow it through from production to post. This enables us to execute the best possible workflow and outcome for every project.

To add another layer to my role, I am also directing spots for Dell when the project is right.

Alienware

That’s a lot! What else would surprise people about what falls under that title?
The number of hours that go into making sure the job gets done and is the best it can be. Editing is a process that takes time. Creating something of value that means something is an art no matter how big or small the job might be. You have to have pride in every aspect of the process. It shows when you don’t.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
I have two favorites. The first is the people. I know that sounds cliché, but it’s true. The team here at Dell is truly something special. We are family. We work together. Play together. Happy Hour together. Respect, support and genuinely care for one another. But, ultimately, we care about the work. We are all aligned to create the best work possible. I am grateful to be surrounded by such a talented and amazing group of humans.

The second, which is equally important to me, is the process of organizing my project, watching all the footage and pulling selects. I make sure I have what I need and check it off my list. Music, sound effects, VO track, graphics and anything else I need to get started. Then I create my first timeline. A blank, empty timeline. Then I take a deep breath and say to myself, “Here we go.” That’s my favorite.

Do you have a least favorite?
My least favorite part is wrapping a project. I spend so much time with my clients and creatives and we really bond while working on a project together. We end on such a high note of excitement and pride in what we’ve done and then, just like that, it’s over. I realize that sounds a bit dramatic. Not to worry, though, because lucky for me, we all come back together in a few months to work on something new and the excitement starts all over again.

What is your most productive time of day?
This also requires a two-part answer. The first is early morning. This is my time to get things done, uninterrupted. I go upstairs and make a fresh cup of coffee. I open my deck doors. I check and send emails, and get my personal stuff done. This clears out all of my distractions for the day before I jump into my edit bay.

The second part is late at night. I get to replay all of the creative decisions from the day and explore other options. Sometimes, I get lucky and find something I didn’t see before.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
That’s easy. I’d be a chef. I love to cook and experiment with ingredients. And I love to explore and create an amazing dining experience.

I see similarities between editors and chefs. Both aim to create something impactful that elicits an emotional response from the “elements” they are given. For chefs, the ingredients, spices and techniques are creatively brought together to bring a dish to life.

For editors, the “elements” that I am given, in combination with the use of my style, techniques, sound design, graphics and music etc. all give life to a spot.

How early did you know this would be your path?
I had originally moved to Los Angeles with dreams of becoming an actor. Yes, it’s groundbreaking, I know. During that time, I met editor Dana Glauberman (The Mandalorian, Juno, Up in the Air, Thank You for Smoking, Creed II, Ghostbusters: Afterlife). I had lunch with her at the studios one day in Burbank and went on a tour of the backlot. I got to see all the edit bays, film stages, soundstages and machine rooms. To me, this was magic. A total game-changer in an instant.

While I was waiting on that one big role, I got my foot in the door as a PA at editing house Rock Paper Scissors. One night after work, we all went for drinks at a local bar and every commercial on TV were the ones (editors) Angus Wall and Adam Pertofsky had worked on within the last month, and I was blown away. Something clicked.

This entire creative world behind the scenes was captivating to me. I made the decision at that moment to lean in and go for it. I asked the assistant editor the following morning if he would teach me — and I haven’t looked back. So, Dana, Angus and Adam… thank you!

Can you name some of your recent projects?
I edited the latest global campaign for Alienware called Everything Counts, which was directed by Tony Kaye. More recently, I worked on the campaign for Dell’s latest and greatest business PC laptop that launches in March 2020, which was directed by Mac Premo.

Dell business PC

Side note: I highly recommend Googling Mac Premo. His work is amazing.

What project are you most proud of?
There are two projects that stand out for me. The first one is the very first spot I ever cut — a Budweiser ad for director Sam Ketay and the Art Institute of Pasadena. During the edit, I thought, “Wow, I think I can do this.” It went on to win a Clio.

The second is the latest global campaign for Alienware, which I mentioned above. Director Tony Kaye is a genius. Tony and I sat in my edit bay for a week exploring and experimenting. His process is unlike any other director I have worked with. This project was extremely challenging on many levels. I honestly started looking at footage in a very different way. I evolved. I learned. And I strive to continue to grow every day.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Wow, good question. I guess I’ll be that guy and say my phone. It really is a necessity.

Spotify, for sure. I am always listening to music in my car and trying to match artists with projects that are not even in existence yet.

My Bose noise cancelling headphones.

What social media channels do you follow?
I use Facebook and LinkedIn — mainly to stay up to date on what others are doing and to post my own updates every now and then.

I’m on Instagram quite a bit. Outside of the obvious industry-related accounts I follow, here are a few of my random favorites:

@nuts_about_birds
If you love birds as much as I do, this is a good one to follow.

@sergiosanchezart
This guy is incredible. I have been following his work for a long time. If you are looking for a new tattoo, look no further.

@andrewhagarofficial
I was lucky enough to meet Andrew through my friend @chrisprofera and immediately dove into his music. Amazing. Not to mention his dad is Sammy Hagar. Enough said.

@kaleynelson
She’s a talented photographer based in LA. Her concert stills are impressive.

@zuzubee
I love graffiti art and Zuzu is one of the best. Based is Austin, she has created several murals for me. You can see her work all over the city, as well as installations during SXSW and Austin City Limits, on Bud Light cans, and across the US.

Do you listen to music at work? What types?
I do listen to music when I work but only when I’m going through footage and pulling selects. Classical piano is my go-to. It opens my mind and helps me focus and dive into my footage.

Don’t get me wrong, I love music. But if I am jamming to my favorite, Sammy Hagar, I can’t drive…I mean dive… into my footage. So classical piano for me.

How do you de-stress from it all?
This is an understatement, but there are a few things that help me out. Sometimes during the day, I will take a walk around the block. Get a little vitamin D and fresh air. I look around at things other than my screen. This is something (editors) Tom Muldoon and John Murray at Nomad used to do every day. I always wondered why. Now I know. I come back refreshed and with my mind clear and ready for the next challenge.

I also “like” to hit the gym immediately after I leave my edit bay. Headphones on (Sammy Hagar, obviously), stretch it out and jump on the treadmill for 30 minutes.

All that is good and necessary for obvious reasons, but getting back to cooking… I love being in the kitchen. It’s therapy for me. Whether I am chopping and creating in the kitchen or out on the grill, I love it. And my wife appreciates my cooking. Well, I think she does at least.

Photo Credits: Dell PC and Jason Uson images – Chris Profera

Adam Milano joins Hecho Studios from Live Nation

Hecho Studios in LA has named Adam Milano as head of development, a new title at the company. He makes the move from Live Nation where he served as SVP of production. Milano will report directly to Hecho Studios’ president, Briony McCarthy.

In addition to creating and producing content, Hecho has 11 editorial bays, two audio suites, full finishing capabilities with color and picture, and an animation and motion graphics team.

During his time at Live Nation, Milano produced the GLAAD-awarded and Emmy-nominated Believer documentary with Imagine Dragons’ frontman Dan Reynolds. He also worked across Live Nation’s slate of music-driven projects, including The Afterparty, a hip-hop comedy directed by Ian Edelman, which premiered on Netflix in 2018, and Gaga: Five Foot Two.

Milano’s previous posts include SVP of gilm at Simon Cowell’s SYCO Entertainment, where he helped Cowell launch the US division and SYCO’s scripted film/television division. While there, he produced the One Direction movie, This is Us. Milano began his career at Sony Pictures Entertainment, working from 2002-2012 as VP of production.

“Adam is both radically in tune with culture and a consummate experienced creator and producer,” says McCarthy. “As our first head of development, he’ll focus on developing our upcoming slate of reality, pop culture and music content and support our newly formed branded content division.”

Milano will lead the charge in diversifying Hecho’s originals entertainment and branded content productions into more scripted, reality and music-based programming in the context of current culture.

Amazon’s The Expanse Season 4 gets HDR finish

The fourth season of the sci-fi series The Expanse was finished in HDR for the first time streaming via Amazon Prime Video. Deluxe Toronto handled end-to-end post services, including online editorial, sound remixing and color grading. The series was shot on ARRI Alexa Minis.

In preparation for production, cinematographer Jeremy Benning, CSC, shot anamorphic test footage at a quarry that would serve as the filming stand-in for the season’s new alien planet, Ilus. Deluxe Toronto senior colorist Joanne Rourke then worked with Benning, VFX supervisor Bret Culp, showrunner Naren Shankar and series regular Breck Eisner to develop looks that would convey the location’s uninviting and forlorn nature, keeping the overall look desaturated and removing color from the vegetation. Further distinguishing Ilus from other environments, production chose to display scenes on or above Ilus in a 2.39 aspect ratio, while those featuring Earth and Mars remained in a 16:9 format.

“Moving into HDR for Season 4 of our show was something Naren and I have wanted to do for a couple of years,” says Benning. “We did test HDR grading a couple seasons ago with Joanne at Deluxe, but it was not mandated by the broadcaster at the time, so we didn’t move forward. But Naren and I were very excited by those tests and hoped that one day we would go HDR. With Amazon as our new home [after airing on Syfy], HDR was part of their delivery spec, so those tests we had done previously had prepared us for how to think in HDR.

“Watching Season 4 come to life with such new depth, range and the dimension that HDR provides was like seeing our world with new eyes,” continues Benning. “It became even more immersive. I am very much looking forward to doing Season 5, which we are shooting now, in HDR with Joanne.”

Rourke, who has worked on every season of The Expanse, explains, “Jeremy likes to set scene looks on set so everyone becomes married to the look throughout editorial. He is fastidious about sending stills each week, and the intended directive of each scene is clear long before it reaches my suite. This was our first foray into HDR with this show, which was exciting, as it is well suited for the format. Getting that extra bit of detail in the highlights made such a huge visual impact overall. It allowed us to see the comm units, monitors, and plumes on spaceships as intended by the VFX department and accentuate the hologram games.”

After making adjustments and ensuring initial footage was even, Rourke then refined the image by lifting faces and story points and incorporating VFX. This was done with input provided by producer Lewin Webb; Benning; cinematographer Ray Dumas, CSC; Culp or VFX supervisor Robert Crowther.

To manage the show’s high volume of VFX shots, Rourke relied on Deluxe Toronto senior online editor Motassem Younes and assistant editor James Yazbeck to keep everything in meticulous order. (For that they used the Grass Valley Rio online editing and finishing system.) The pair’s work was also essential to Deluxe Toronto re-recording mixers Steve Foster and Kirk Lynds, who have both worked on The Expanse since Season 2. Once ready, scenes were sent in HDR via Streambox to Shankar for review at Alcon Entertainment in Los Angeles.

“Much of the science behind The Expanse is quite accurate thanks to Naren, and that attention to detail makes the show a lot of fun to work on and more engaging for fans,” notes Foster. “Ilus is a bit like the wild west, so the technology of its settlers is partially reflected in communication transmissions. Their comms have a dirty quality, whereas the ship comms are cleaner-sounding and more closely emulate NASA transmissions.”

Adds Lynds, “One of my big challenges for this season was figuring out how to make Ilus seem habitable and sonically interesting without familiar sounds like rustling trees or bird and insect noises. There are also a lot of amazing VFX moments, and we wanted to make sure the sound, visuals and score always came together in a way that was balanced and hit the right emotions story-wise.”

Foster and Lynds worked side by side on the season’s 5.1 surround mix, with Foster focusing on dialogue and music and Lynds on sound effects and design elements. When each had completed his respective passes using Avid ProTools workstations, they came together for the final mix, spending time on fine strokes, ensuring the dialogue was clear, and making adjustments as VFX shots were dropped in. Final mix playbacks were streamed to Deluxe’s Hollywood facility, where Naren could hear adjustments completed in real time.

In addition to color finishing Season 4 in HDR, Rourke also remastered the three previous seasons of The Expanse in HDR, using her work on Season 4 as a guide and finishing with Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 15. Throughout the process, she was mindful to pull out additional detail in highlights without altering the original grade.

“I felt a great responsibility to be faithful to the show for the creators and its fans,” concludes Rourke. “I was excited to revisit the episodes and could appreciate the wonderful performances and visuals all over again.”

Marriage Story director Noah Baumbach

By Iain Blair

Writer/director Noah Baumbach first made a name for himself with The Squid and the Whale, his 2005 semi-autobiographical, bittersweet story about his childhood and his parents’ divorce. It launched his career, scoring him an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

Noah Baumbach

His latest film, Marriage Story, is also about the disintegration of a marriage — and the ugly mechanics of divorce. Detailed and emotionally complex, the film stars Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver as the doomed couple.

In all, Marriage Story scooped up six Oscar nominations — Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Original Screenplay and Best Original Score. Laura Dern walked away with a statue for her supporting role.

The film co-stars Dern, Alan Alda and Ray Liotta. The behind-the-scenes team includes director of photography Robbie Ryan, editor Jennifer Lame and composer Randy Newman.

Just a few days before the Oscars, Baumbach — whose credits also include The Meyerwitz Stories, Frances Ha and Margot at the Wedding — talked to me about making the film and his workflow.

What sort of film did you set out to make?
It’s obviously about a marriage and divorce, but I never really think about a project in specific terms, like a genre or a tone. In the past, I may have started a project thinking it was a comedy but then it morphs into something else. With this, I just tried to tell the story as I initially conceived it, and then as I discovered it along the way. While I didn’t think about tone in any general sense, I became aware as I worked on it that it had all these different tones and genre elements. It had this flexibility, and I just stayed open to all those and followed them.

I heard that you were discussing this with Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson as you wrote the script. Is that true?
Yes, but it wasn’t daily. I’d reached out to both of them before I began writing it, and luckily they were both enthusiastic and wanted to do it, so I had them as an inspiration and guide as I wrote. Periodically, we’d get together and discuss it and I’d show them some pages to keep them in the loop. They were very generous with conversations about their own lives, their characters. My hope was that when I gave them the finished script it would feel both new and familiar.

What did they bring to the roles?
They were so prepared and helped push for the truth in every scene. Their involvement from the very start did influence how I wrote their roles. Nicole has that long monologue and I don’t know if I’d have written it without Scarlett’s input and knowing it was her. Adam singing “Being Alive” came out of some conversations with him. They’re very specific elements that come from knowing them as people.

You reunited with Irish DP Robbie Ryan, who shot The Meyerowitz Stories. Talk about how you collaborated on the look and why you shot on film?
I grew up with film and feel it’s just the right medium for me. We shot The Meyerowitz Stories on Super 16, and we shot this on 35mm, and we had to deal with all these office spaces and white rooms, so we knew there’d be all these variations on white. So there was a lot of discussion about shades and the palette, along with the production and costume designers, and also how we were going to shoot these confined spaces, because it was what the story required.

You shot on location in New York and LA. How tough was the shoot?
It was challenging, but mainly because of the sheer length of many of the scenes. There’s a lot of choreography in them, and some are quite emotional, so everyone had to really be up for the day, every day. There was no taking it easy one day. Every day felt important for the movie.

Where did you do the post?
All in New York. I have an office in the Village where I cut my last two films, and we edited there again. We mixed on the Warner stage, where I’ve mixed most of my movies. We recorded the music and orchestra in LA.

Do you like the post process?
I really love it. It’s the most fun and the most civilized part of the whole process. You go to work and work on the film all day, have dinner and go home. Writing is always a big challenge, as you’re making it up as you go along, and it can be quite agonizing. Shooting can be fun, but it’s also very stressful trying to get everything you need. I love working with the actors and crew, but you need a high level of energy and endurance to get through it. So then post is where you can finally relax, and while problems and challenges always arise, you can take time to solve them. I love editing, the whole rhythm of it, the logic of it.

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Talk about editing with Jennifer Lame. How did that work?
We work so well together, and our process really starts in the script stage. I’ll give her an early draft to get her feedback and, basically, we start editing the script. We’ll go through it and take out anything we know we’re not going to use. Then during the shoot she’ll sometimes come to the set, and we’ll also talk twice a day. We’ll discuss the day’s work before I start, and then at lunch we’ll go over the previous day’s dailies. So by the time we sit down to edit, we’re really in sync about the whole movie. I don’t work off an assembly, so she’ll put together stuff for herself to let me know a scene is working the way we designed it. If there’s a problem, she’ll let me know what we need.

What were the big editing challenges?
Besides the general challenges of getting a scene right, I think for some of the longer ones it was all about finding the right rhythm and pacing. And it was particularly true of this film that the pace of something early on could really affect something later. Then you have to fix the earlier bit first, and sometimes it’s the scene right before. For instance, the scene where Charlie and Nicole have a big argument that turns into a very emotional fight is really informed by the courtroom scene right before it. So we couldn’t get it right until we’d got the courtroom scene right.

A lot of directors do test screenings. Do you?
No, I have people I show it to and get feedback, but I’ve never felt the need for testing.

VFX play a role. What was involved?
The Artery did them. For instance, when Adam cuts his arm we used VFX in addition to the practical effects, and then there’s always cleanup.

Talk about the importance of sound to you as a filmmaker, as it often gets overlooked in this kind of film.
I’m glad you said that because that’s so true, and this doesn’t have obvious sound effects. But the sound design is quite intricate, and Chris Scarabosio (working out of Skywalker Sound), who did Star Wars, did the sound design and mix; he was terrific.

A lot of it was taking the real-world environments in New York and LA and building on that, and maybe taking some sounds out and playing around with all the elements. We spent a lot of time on it, as both the sound and image should be unnoticed in this. If you start thinking, “That’s a cool shot or sound effect,” it takes you out of the movie. Both have to be emotionally correct at all times.

Where did you do the DI and how important is it to you?
We did it at New York’s Harbor Post with colorist Marcy Robinson, who’s done several of my films. It’s very important, but we didn’t do anything too extreme, as there’s not a lot of leeway for changing the look that much. I’m very happy with the look and the way it all turned out.

Congratulations on all the Oscar noms. How important is that for a film like this?
It’s a great honor. We’re all still the kids who grew up watching movies and the Oscars, so it’s a very cool thing. I’m thrilled.

What’s next?
I don’t know. I just started writing, but nothing specific yet.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Director James Mangold on Oscar-nominated Ford v Ferrari

By Iain Blair

Filmmaker James Mangold has been screenwriting, producing and directing for years. He has made films about country legends (Walk the Line), cowboys (3:10 to Yuma), superheroes (Logan) and cops (Cop Land), and has tackled mental illness (Girl Interrupted) as well.

Now he’s turned his attention to race car drivers and Formula 1 with his movie Ford v Ferrari, which has earned Mangold an Oscar nomination for Best Picture. The film also received nods for its editing, sound editing and sound mixing.

James Mangold (beard) on set.

The high-octane drama was inspired by a true-life friendship that forever changed racing history. In 1959, Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon) is on top of the world after winning the most difficult race in all of motorsports, the 24 Hours of Le Mans. But his greatest triumph is followed quickly by a crushing blow — the fearless Texan is told by doctors that a grave heart condition will prevent him from ever racing again.

Endlessly resourceful, Shelby reinvents himself as a car designer and salesman working out of a warehouse space in Venice Beach with a team of engineers and mechanics that includes hot-tempered test driver Ken Miles (Christian Bale). A champion British race car driver and a devoted family man, Miles is brilliant behind the wheel, but he’s also blunt, arrogant and unwilling to compromise.

After Shelby’s vehicles make a strong showing at Le Mans against Italy’s venerable Enzo Ferrari, Ford Motor Company recruits the firebrand visionary to design the ultimate race car, a machine that can beat even Ferrari on the unforgiving French track. Determined to succeed against overwhelming odds, Shelby, Miles and their ragtag crew battle corporate interference, the laws of physics and their own personal demons to develop a revolutionary vehicle that will outshine every competitor. The film culminates in the historic showdown between the US and Italy at the grueling 1966 24 hour Le Mans race.

Mangold’s below-the-line talent, many of whom have collaborated with the director before, includes Academy Award-nominated director of photography Phedon Papamichael; film editors Michael McCusker, ACE, and Andrew Buckland; visual effects supervisor Olivier Dumont; and composers Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders.

L-R: Writer Iain Blair and Director James Mangold

I spoke with Mangold — whose other films include Logan, The Wolverine and Knight and Day — about making the film and his workflow.

You obviously love exploring very different subject matter in every film you make.
Yes, and I do every movie like a sci-fi film — meaning inventing a new world that has its own rules, customs, language, laws of physics and so on, and you need to set it up so the audience understands and they get it all. It’s like being a world-builder, and I feel every film should have that, as you’re entering this new world, whether it’s Walk the Line or The French Connection. And the rules and behavior are different from our own universe, and that’s what makes the story and characters interesting to me.

What sort of film did you set out to make?
Well, given all that, I wanted to make an exciting racing movie about that whole world, but it’s also that it was a moment when racing was free of all things that now turn me off about it. The cars were more beautiful then, and free of all the branding. Today, the cars are littered with all the advertising and trademarks — and it’s all nauseating to me. I don’t even feel like I’m watching a sport anymore.

When this story took place, it was also a time when all the new technology was just exploding. Racing hasn’t changed that much over the past 20 years. It’s just refining and tweaking to get that tiny edge, but back in the ‘60s they were still inventing the modern race car, and discovering aerodynamics and alternate building materials and methods. It was a brand-new world, so there was this great sense of discovery and charm along with all that.

What were the main technical challenges in pulling it all together?
Trying to do what I felt all the other racing movies hadn’t really done — taking the driving out of the CG world and putting it back in the real world, so you could feel the raw power and the romanticism of racing. A lot of that’s down to the particulates in the air, the vibrations of the camera, the way light moves around the drivers — and the reality of behavior when you’re dealing with incredibly powerful machines. So right from the start, I decided we had to build all the race cars; that was a huge challenge right there.

How early on did you start integrating post and all the VFX?
Day one. I wanted to use real cars and shoot the Le Mans and other races in camera rather than using CGI. But this is a period piece, so we did use a lot of CGI for set extensions and all the crowds. We couldn’t afford 50,000 extras, so just the first six rows or so were people in the stands; the rest were digital.

Did you do a lot of previz?

A lot, especially for Le Mans, as it was such a big, three-act sequence with so many moving parts. We used far less for Daytona. We did a few storyboards and then me and my second unit director, Darrin Prescott — who has choreographed car chases and races in such movies as Drive, Deadpool 2, Baby Driver and The Bourne Ultimatum — planned it out using matchbox cars.

I didn’t want that “previzy” feeling. Even when I do a lot of previz, whether it’s a Marvel movie or like this, I always tell my previz team “Don’t put the camera anywhere it can’t go.” One of the things that often happens when you have the ability to make your movie like a cartoon in a laboratory — which is what previz is — is that you start doing a lot of gimmicky shots and flying the camera through keyholes and floating like a drone, because it invites you to do all that crazy shit. It’s all very show-offy as a director — “Look at me!” — and a turnoff to me. It takes me out of the story, and it’s also not built off the subjective experience of your characters.

This marks your fifth collaboration with DP Phedon Papamichael, and I noticed there’s no big swooping camera moves or the beauty shot approach you see in all the car commercials.
Yes, we wanted it to look beautiful, but in a real way. There’s so much technology available now, like gyroscopic setups and arms that let you chase the cars in high-speed vehicles down tracks. You can do so much, so why do you need to do more? I’m conservative that way. My goal isn’t to brand myself through my storytelling tricks.

How tough was the shoot?
It was one of the most fun shoots I’ve ever had, with my regular crew and a great cast. But it was also very grueling, as we were outside a lot, often in 115-degree heat in the desert on blacktop. And locations were big challenges. The original Le Mans course doesn’t exist anymore like it used to be, so we used several locations in Georgia to double for it. We shot the races wide-angle anamorphic with a team of a dozen professional drivers, and with anamorphic you can shoot the cars right up into the lens — just inches away from camera, while they’d be doing 150 mph or 160 mph.

Where did you post?
All on the Fox lot at my offices. We scored at Capitol Records and mixed the score in Malibu at my composer’s home studio. I really love the post, and for me it’s all part of the same process — the same cutting and pasting I do when I’m writing, and even when I’m directing. You’re manipulating all these elements and watching it take form — and particularly in this film, where all the sound design and music and dialogue are all playing off one another and are so key. Take the races. By themselves, they look like nothing. It’s just a car whipping by. The power of it all only happens with the editing.

You had two editors — Michael McCusker and Andrew Buckland. How did that work?
Mike’s been with me for 20 years, so he’s kind of the lead. Mike and Drew take and trade scenes, and they’re good friends so they work closely together. I move back and forth between them, which also gives them each some space. It’s very collaborative. We all want it to look beautiful and elegant and well-designed, but no one’s a slave to any pre-existing ideas about structure or pace. (Check out postPerspective‘s interview with the editing duo here.)

What were the big editing challenges?
It’s a car racing movie with drama, so we had to hit you with adrenalin and then hold you with what’s a fairly procedural and process-oriented film about these guys scaling the corporate wall to get this car built and on the track. Most of that’s dramatic scenes. The flashiest editing is the races, which was a huge, year-long effort. Mike was cutting the previz before we shot a foot, and initially we just had car footage, without the actors, so that was a challenge. It all transformed once we added the actors.

Can you talk about working on the visual effects with Method’s VFX supervisor Olivier Dumont?
He did an incredible job, as no one thinks there are so many. They’re really invisible, and that’s what I love — the film feels 100% analog, but of course it isn’t. It’s impossible to build giant race tracks as they were in the ‘60s. But having real foregrounds really helped. We had very few scenes where actors were wandering around in a green void like on so many movies now. So you’re always anchored in the real world, and then all the set extensions were in softer focus or backlit.

This film really lends itself to sound.
Absolutely, as every car has its own signature sound, and as we cut rapidly from interiors to exteriors, from cars to pits and so on. The perspective aural shifts are exciting, but we also tried to keep it simple and not lose the dramatic identity of the story. We even removed sounds in the mix if they weren’t important, so we could focus on what was important.

Where did you do the DI, and how important is it to you?
At Efilm with Skip Kimball (working on Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve), and it was huge on this, especially dealing with the 24-hour race, the changing light, rain and night scenes, and having to match five different locations was a nightmare. So we worked on all that and the overall look from early on in the edit.

What’s next?
Don’t know. I’ve got two projects I’m working on. We’ll see.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

The 71st NATAS Technology & Engineering Emmy Award winners

The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) has announced the recipients of the 71st Annual Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards. The event will take place in partnership with the National Association of Broadcasters, during the NAB Show on Sunday, April 19 in Las Vegas.

The Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards are awarded to a living individual, a company or a scientific or technical organization for developments and/or standardization involved in engineering technologies that either represent so extensive an improvement on existing methods or are so innovative in nature that they materially have affected television.

A committee of engineers working in television considers technical developments in the industry and determines which, if any, merit an award.

“The Technology & Engineering Emmy Award was the first Emmy Award issued in 1949, and it laid the groundwork for all the other Emmys to come,” says Adam Sharp, CEO/president of NATAS. “We are especially excited to be honoring Yvette Kanouff with our Lifetime Achievement Award in Technology & Engineering.”

Kanouff has held CTO and president roles at various companies in the cable and media industry. Over the years, she has spearheaded transformational technologies, such as video on demand, cloud DVR, digital and on-demand advertising, streaming security and privacy.

And now the Awards recipients:

Pioneering System for Live Performance-Based Animation Using Facial Recognition
– Adobe

HTML5 Development and Deployment of a Full TV Experience on Any Device
– Apple
– Google
– LG
– Microsoft
– Mozilla
– Opera
– Samsung

Pioneering Public Cloud-Based Linear Media Supply Chains
– AWS
– Discovery
– Evertz
– Fox Neo (Walt Disney Television)
– SDVI

Pioneering Development of Large Scale, Cloud Served, Broadcast Quality,
Linear Channel Transmission to Consumers
– Sling TV
– Sony PlayStation Vue
– Zattoo

Early Development of HSM Systems That Created a Pivotal Improvement in Broadcast Workflows
– Dell (Isilon)
– IBM
– Masstech
– Quantum

Pioneering Development and Deployment of Hybrid Fiber Coax Network Architecture
– Cable Labs

Pioneering Development of the CCD Image Sensor
– Bell Labs
– Michael Tompsett

VoCIP (Video over Bonded Cellular Internet)
– Aviwest
– Dejero
– LiveU
– TVU Networks

Ultra-High Sensitivity HDTV Camera
– Canon
– Flovel

Development of Synchronized Multi-Channel Uncompressed Audio Transport Over IP Networks
– ALC NetworX
– Audinate
– Audio Engineering Society
– Kevin Gross
– QSC
– Telos Alliance
– Wheatstone

Emmy statue image courtesy of ATAS/NATAS

DP Chat: The Grudge’s Zachary Galler

By Randi Altman

Being on set is like coming home for New York-based cinematographer Zachary Galler, who as a child would tag along with his father while he directed television and film projects. The younger Galler started in the industry as a lighting technician and quickly worked his way up to shooting various features and series.

His first feature as a cinematographer, The Sleepwalker, premiered at the in 2014 and was later distributed by IFC. His second feature, She’s Lost Control, was awarded the C.I.C.A.E. Award at the Berlin International Film Festival later that year. Other television credits include all eight episodes of Discovery’s scripted series Manhunt: Unabomber, Hulu’s The Act and USA’s Briarpatch (coming in February). He recently completed the feature Nicolas Pesce-directed thriller The Grudge, which stars John Cho and Betty Gilpin and is in theaters now.

Tell us about The Grudge. How early did you get involved in planning, and what direction were you given by the director about the look he wanted?
Nick and I worked together on a movie he directed called Piercing. That was our first collaboration, but we discovered that we had very similar ideas and working styles and we formed a special relationship. Shortly after that project, we started talking about The Grudge, and about a year later we were shooting. We talked a lot about how this movie should feel, and how we could achieve something new and different from something neither of us had done before. We used a lot of look-books and movie references to communicate, so when it came time to shoot we had the visual language down fluently and that allowed us keep each other consistent in execution.

How would you describe the look?
Nick really liked the bleach-bypass look from David Fincher’s Se7en, and I thought about a mix of that and (photographer) Bill Henson. We also knew that we had to differentiate between the different storyline threads in the movie, so we had lots to figure out. One of the threads is darker and looks very yellow, while another is warmer and more classic. Another is slightly more desaturated and darker. We did keep the same bleach-bypass look throughout, but adjusted our color temperature, contrast and saturation accordingly. For a horror movie like this, I really wanted to be able to control where the shadow detail turned into black, because some of our scare scenes relied on that so we made sure to light accordingly, and were able to fine-tune most of that in-camera.

How did you work with the director and colorist to achieve that look?
We worked with FotoKem colorist Kostas Theodosiou (who used Blackmagic Resolve). I was shooting a TV show during the main color pass, so I only got to check in to set looks and approve final color, but Nick and Kostas did a beautiful job. Kostas is a master of contrast control and very tastefully helped us ride that line of where there should be detail and where it should not be detail. He was definitely an important part of the collaboration and helped make the movie better.

Where was it shot and how long was the shoot?
We shot the movie in 35 days in Winnipeg, Canada.

How did you go about choosing the right camera and lenses for this project and why these tools?
Nick decided early on that he wanted to shoot this film anamorphic. Panavision has been an important partner for me on most of my projects, and I knew that I loved their glass. We got a range of different lenses from Panavision Toronto to help us differentiate our storylines — we shot one on T Series, one on Primo anamorphics and one on G Series anamorphics. The Alexa Mini was the camera of choice because of its low light sensitivity and more natural feel.

Now more general questions…

How did you become interested in cinematography?
My father was a director, so I would visit him on set a lot when I was growing up. I didn’t know quite what I wanted to do when I was young but I knew that it was being on set. After dropping out of film school, I got a job working in a lighting rental warehouse and started driving trucks and delivering lights to sets in New York. I had always loved taking pictures as a kid and as I worked more and learned more, I realized that what I wanted to do was be a DP. I was very lucky in that I found some great collaborators early on in my career that both pushed me and allowed me to fail. This is the greatest job in the world.

What inspires you artistically? And how do you simultaneously stay on top of advancing technology that serves your vision?
Artistically, I am inspired by painters, photographers and other DPs. There are so many people doing such amazing work right now. As far as technology is concerned, I’m a bit slow with adopting, as I need to hold something in my hands or see what it does before I adopt it. I have been very lucky to get to work with some great crews, and often a camera assistant, gaffer or key grip will bring something new to the table. I love that type of collaboration.

 

DP Zachary Galler (right) and director Nicolas Pesce on the set of Screen Gems’ The Grudge.

What new technology has changed the way you works?
For some reason, I was resistant to using LUTs for a long time. The Grudge was actually the first time I relied on something that wasn’t close to just plain Rec 709. I always figured that if I could get the 709 feeling good when I got into color I’d be in great shape. Now, I realize how helpful they can be, and that you can push much further. I also think that the Astera LED tubes are amazing. They allow you to do so much so fast and put light in places that would be very hard to do with other traditional lighting units.

What are some of your best practices or rules you try to follow on each job?
I try to be pretty laid back on set, and I can only do that because I’m very picky about who I hire in prep. I try and let people run their departments as much as possible and give them as much information as possible — it’s like cooking, where you try and get the best ingredients and don’t do much to them. I’ve been very lucky to have worked with some great crews over the years.

What’s your go-to gear — things you can’t live without?
I really try and keep an open mind about gear. I don’t feel romantically attached to anything, so that I can make the right choices for each project.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

Directing Olly’s ‘Happy Inside Out’ campaign

How do you express how vitamins make you feel? Well, production company 1stAveMachine partnered with independent creative agency Yard NYC to develop the stylized “Happy Inside Out” campaign for Olly multivitamin gummies to show just that.

Beauty

The directing duo of Erika Zorzi and Matteo Sangalli, known as Mathery, highlighted the brand’s products and benefits by using rich textures, colors and lighting. They shot on an ARRI Alexa Mini. “Our vision was to tell a cohesive narrative, where each story of the supplements spoke the same visual language,” Mathery explains. “We created worlds where everything is possible and sometimes took each product’s concept to the extreme and other times added some romance to it.”

Each spot imagines various benefits of taking Olly products. The side-scrolling Energy, which features a green palette, shows a woman jumping and doing flips through life’s everyday challenges, including through her home to work, doing laundry and going to the movies. Beauty, with its pink color pallete, features another woman “feeling beautiful” while turning the heads of a parliament of owls. Meanwhile, Stress, with its purple/blue palette, features a women tied up in a giant ball of yarn, and as she unspools herself, the things that were tying her up spin away. In the purple-shaded Sleep, a lady lies in bed pulling off layer after layer of sleep masks until she just happily sleeps.

Sleep

The spots were shot with minimal VFX, other than a few greenscreen moments, and the team found itself making decisions on the fly, constantly managing logistics for stunt choreography, animal performances and wardrobe. Jogger Studios provided the VFX using Autodesk Flame for conform, cleanup and composite work. Adobe After Effects was used for all of the end tag animation. Cut+Run edited the campaign.

According to Mathery, “The acrobatic moves and obstacle pieces in the Energy spot were rehearsed on the same day of the shoot. We had to be mindful because the action was physically demanding on the talent. With the Beauty spot, we didn’t have time to prepare with the owls. We had no idea if they would move their heads on command or try to escape and fly around the whole time. For the Stress spot, we experimented with various costume designs and materials until we reached a look that humorously captured the concept.”

The campaign marks Mathery’s second collaboration with Yard NYC and Olly, who brought the directing team into the fold very early on, during the initial stages of the project. This familiarity gave everyone plenty of time to let the ideas breath.

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood director Marielle Heller

By Iain Blair

If you are of a certain age, the red cardigan, the cozy living room and the comfy sneakers can only mean one thing — Mister Rogers! Sony Pictures’ new film, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, is a story of kindness triumphing over cynicism. It stars Tom Hanks and is based on the real-life friendship between Fred Rogers and journalist Tom Junod.

Marielle Heller

In the film, jaded writer Lloyd Vogel (Matthew Rhys), whose character is loosely based on Junod, is assigned a profile of Rogers. Over the course of his assignment, he overcomes his skepticism, learning about empathy, kindness and decency from America’s most beloved neighbor.

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood is helmed by Marielle Heller, who most recently directed the film Can You Ever Forgive Me? and whose feature directorial debut was 2015’s The Diary of a Teenage Girl. Heller has also directed episodes of Amazon’s Transparent and Hulu’s Casual.

Behind the scenes, Heller collaborated with DP Jody Lee Lipes, production designer Jade Healy, editor Anne McCabe, ACE, and composer Nate Heller.

I recently spoke with Heller about making the film, which is generating a lot of Oscar buzz, and her workflow.

What sort of film did you set out to make?
I didn’t want to make a traditional biopic, and part of what I loved about the script was it had this larger framing device — that it’s a big episode of Mister Rogers for adults. That was very clever, but it’s also trying to show who he was deep down and what it was like to be around him, rather than just rattling off facts and checking boxes. I wanted to show Fred in action and his philosophy. He believed in authenticity and truth and listening and forgiveness, and we wanted to embody all that in the filmmaking.

It couldn’t be more timely.
Exactly, and it’s weird since it’s taken eight years to get it made.

Is it true Tom Hanks had turned this down several times before, but you got him in a headlock and persuaded him to do it?
(Laughs) The headlock part is definitely true. He had turned it down several times, but there was no director attached. He’s the type of actor who can’t imagine what a project will be until he knows who’s helming it and what their vision is.

We first met at his grandkid’s birthday party. We became friends, and when I came on board as director, the producers told me, “Tom Hanks was always our dream for playing Mister Rogers, but he’s not interested.” I said, “Well, I could just call him and send him the script,” and then I told Tom I wasn’t interested in doing an imitation or a sketch version, and that I wanted to get to his essence right and the tone right. It would be a tightrope to walk, but if we could pull it off, I felt it would be very moving. A week later he was like, “Okay, I’ll do it.” And everyone was like, “How did you get him to finally agree?” I think they were amazed.

What did he bring to the role?
Maybe people think he just breezed into this — he’s a nice guy, Fred’s a nice guy, so it’s easy. But the truth is, Tom’s an incredibly technically gifted actor and one of the hardest-working ones I’ve ever worked with. He does a huge amount of research, and he came in completely prepared, and he loves to be directed, loves to collaborate and loves to do another take if you need it. He just loves the work.

Any surprises working with him?
I just heard that he’s actually related to Fred, and that’s another weird thing. But he truly had to transform for the role because he’s not like Fred. He had to slow everything down to a much slower pace than is normal for him and find Fred’s deliberate way of listening and his stillness and so on. It was pretty amazing considering how much coffee Tom drinks every day.

What did Matthew Rhys bring to his role?
It’s easy to forget that he’s actually the protagonist and the proxy for all the cynicism and neuroticism that many of us feel and carry around. This is what makes it so hard to buy into a Mister Rogers world and philosophy. But Matthew’s an incredibly complex, emotional person, and you always know how much he’s thinking. He’s always three steps ahead of you, he’s very smart, and he’s not afraid of his own anger and exploring it on screen. I put him through the ringer, as he had to go through this major emotional journey as Lloyd.

How important was the miniature model, which is a key part of the film?
It was a huge undertaking, but also the most fun we had on the movie. I grew up building miniatures and little cities out of clay, so figuring it all out — What’s the bigger concept behind it? How do we make it integrate seamlessly into the story? — fascinated me. We spent months figuring out all the logistics of moving between Fred’s set and home life in Pittsburgh and Lloyd’s gritty, New York environment.

While we shot in Pittsburgh, we had a team of people spend 12 weeks building the detailed models that included the Pittsburgh and Manhattan skylines, the New Jersey suburbs, and Fred’s miniature model neighborhood. I’d visit them once a week to check on progress. Our rule of thumb was we couldn’t do anything that Fred and his team couldn’t do on the “Neighborhood,” and we expanded a bit beyond Fred’s miniatures, but not outside of the realm of possibility. We had very specific shots and scenes all planned out, and we got to film with the miniatures for a whole week, which was a delight. They really help bridge the gap between the two worlds — Mister Rogers’ and Lloyd’s worlds.

I heard you shot with the same cameras the original show used. Can you talk about how you collaborated with DP Jody Lee Lipes, to get the right look?
We tracked down original Ikegami HK-323 cameras, which were used to film the show, and shipped them in from England and brought them to the set in Pittsburgh. That was huge in shooting the show and making it even more authentic. We tried doing it digitally, but it didn’t feel right, and it was Jody who insisted we get the original cameras — and he was so right.

Where did you post?
We did it in New York — the editing at Light Iron, the sound at Harbor and the color at Deluxe.

Do you like the post process?
I do, as it feels like writing. There’s always a bit of a comedown from production for me, which is so fast-paced. You really slow down for post; it feels a bit like screeching to a halt for me, but the plus is you get back to the deep critical thinking needed to rewrite in the edit, and to retell the story with the sound and the DI and so on.

I feel very strongly that the last 10% of post is the most important part of the whole process. It’s so tempting to just give up near the end. You’re tired, you’ve lost all objectivity, but it’s critical you keep going.

Talk about editing with Anne McCabe. What were the big editing challenges?
She wasn’t on the set. We sent dailies to her in New York, and she began assembling while we shot. We have a very close working relationship, so she’d be on the phone immediately if there were any concerns. I think finding the right tone was the biggest challenge, and making it emotionally truthful so that you can engage with it. How are you getting information and when? It’s also playing with audiences’ expectations. You have to get used to seeing Tom Hanks as Mister Rogers, so we decided it had to start really boldly and drop you in the deep end — here you go, get used to it! Editing is everything.

There are quite a few VFX. How did that work?
Obviously, there’s the really big VFX sequence when Lloyd goes into his “fever dreams” and imagines himself shrunk down on the set of the neighborhood and inside the castle. We planned that right from the start and did greenscreen — my first time ever — which I loved. And even the practical miniature sets all needed VFX to integrate them into the story. We also had seasonal stuff, period-correct stuff, cleanup and so on. Phosphene in New York did all the VFX.

Talk about the importance of sound and music.
My composer’s also my brother, and he starts very early on so the music’s always an integral part of post and not just something added at the end. He’s writing while we shoot, and we also had a lot of live music we had to pre-record so we could film it on the day. There’s a lot of singing too, and I wanted it to sound live and not overly produced. So when Tom’s singing live, I wanted to keep that human quality, with all the little mouth sounds and any mistakes. I left all that in purposely. We never used a temp score since I don’t like editing to temp music, and we worked closely with the sound guys at Harbor in integrating all of the music, the singing, the whole sound design.

How important is the DI to you?
Hugely important and we finessed a lot with colorist Sam Daley. When you’re doing a period piece, color is so crucial – that it feels authentic to that world. Jody and Sam have worked together for a long time and they worked very hard on the LUT before we began, and every department was aware of the color palette and how we wanted it to look and feel.

What’s next?
I just started a new company called Defiant By Nature, where I’ll be developing and producing TV projects by other people. As for movies, I’m taking a little break.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Behind the Title: Matter Films president Matt Moore

Part of his job is finding talent and production partners. “We want the most innovative and freshest directors, cinematographers and editors from all over the world.”

NAME: Matt Moore

COMPANY: Phoenix and Los Angeles’ Matter Films
and OH Partners

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Matter Films is a full-service production company that takes projects from script to screen — doing both pre-production and post in addition to producing content. We are joined by our sister company OH Partners, a full-service advertising agency.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
President of Matter Films and CCO of OH Partners,

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m lucky to be the only person in the company who gets to serve on both sides of the fence. Knowing that, I think that working with Matter and OH gives me a unique insight into how to meet our clients’ needs best. My number one job is to push both teams to be as innovative and outside of the box as possible. A lot of people do what we do, so I work on our points of differentiation.

Gila River Hotels and Casinos – Sports Partnership

I spend a lot of time finding talent and production partners. We want the most innovative and freshest directors, cinematographers and editors from all over the world. That talent must push all of our work to be the best. We then pair that partner with the right project and the right client.

The other part of my job is figuring out where the production industry is headed. We launched Matter Films because we saw a change within the production world — many production companies weren’t able to respond quickly enough to the need for social and digital work, so we started a company able to address that need and then some.

My job is to always be selling ideas and proposing different avenues we could pursue with Matter and with OH. I instill trust in our clients by using our work as a proof point that the team we’ve assembled is the right choice to get the job done.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
People assumed when we started Matter Films that we would keep everything in-house and have no outside partners, and that’s just not the case. Matter actually gives us even more resources to find those innovators from across the globe. It allows us to do more.

The variation in budget size that we accept at Matter Films would also surprise people. We’ll take on projects with anywhere from $1,000 to one million-plus budgets. We’ve staffed ourselves in such a way that even small projects can be profitable.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
It sounds so cliché, but I would have to say the people. I’m around people that I genuinely want to see every single day. I love when we all get together for our meetings, because while we do discuss upcoming projects, we also goof off and just hang out. These are the people I go into battle with every single day. I choose to go into the battle with people that I whole-heartedly care about and enjoy being with. It makes life better.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
What’s tough is how fast this business changes. Every day there’s a new conference or event, and just when you think an idea you’ve had is cutting edge and brand new, you realize you have to keep going and push to be more innovative. Just when you get caught up, you’re already behind. The big challenge is how you’re going to constantly step up your game.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m an early morning person. I can get more done if I start before everybody else.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I was actually pre-med for two years in college with the desire to be a surgeon. When I was an undergrad, I got an abysmal grade on one of our exams and the professor pulled me aside and told me that a score that low proved that I truly did not care about learning the material. He allowed me to withdraw from the class to find something I was more passionate about, and that was life changing.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I found out in college. I genuinely just loved making a product that either entertained or educated people. I started in the news business, so every night I would go home after work and people could tell me about the news of the day because of what I’d written, edited and put on TV.

People knew about what was going on because of the stories that we told. I have a great love for telling stories and having others engage with that story. If you’re good at the job, peoples’ lives will be different as a result of what you create.

Barbuda Ocean Club

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We just wrapped a large shoot in Maryland for Live Casino, and a different tourism project for a luxury property in Barbuda. We’re currently developing our work with Virgin, and we have a shoot for a technology company focused on developing autonomous driving and green energy upcoming as well. We’re all over the map with the range of work that we have in the pipeline.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
One of my favorite projects actually took place before Matter Films was officially around, but we had a lot of the same team. We did an environmentally sensitive project for Sedona, Arizona, called Sedona Secret 7. Our campaign told the millions of tourists who arrive there how to find other equally beautiful destinations in and around Sedona instead of just the ones everyone already knew.

It was one of those times when advertising wasn’t about selling something, but about saving something.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone, a pair of AirPods and a laptop. The Matter Films team gave me AirPods for my birthday, so those are extra special!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
My usage on Instagram is off the charts; it’s embarrassing. While I do look at everyone’s vacation photos or what workout they did that day, I also use Instagram as a talent sourcing tool for a lot of work purposes: I follow directors, animation studios and tons of artists that I either get inspiration from or want to work with.

A good percentage of people I follow are creatives that I want to work with at some point. I also reach out to people all the time for potential collaborations.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I love outdoor adventures. Some days I’ll go on a crazy hike here in Arizona or rent a four-wheeler and explore the desert or mountains. I also love just hanging out with my kids — they’re a great age.

postPerspective’s ‘SMPTE 2019 Live’ interview coverage

postPerspective was the official production team for SMPTE during its most recent conference in downtown Los Angeles this year. Taking place once again at the Bonaventure Hotel, the conference featured events and sessions all week. (You can watch those interviews here.)

These sessions ranged from “Machine Learning & AI in Content Creation” to “UHD, HDR, 4K, High Frame Rate” to “Mission Critical: Project Artemis, Imaging from the Moon and Deep Space Imaging.” The latter featured two NASA employees and a live talk with astronauts on the International Space Station. It was very cool.

postPerspective’s coverage was also cool and included many sit-down interviews with those presenting at the show (including former astronaut and One More Orbit director Terry Virts as well as Todd Douglas Miller, the director of the Apollo 11 doc), SMPTE executives and long-standing members of the organization.

In addition to the sessions, manufacturers had the opportunity to show their tools on the exhibit floor, where one of our crews roamed with camera and mic in hand reporting on the newest tech.

Whether you missed the conference or experienced it firsthand, these exclusive interviews will provide a ton of information about SMPTE, standards, and the future of our industry, as well as just incredibly smart people talking about the merger of technology and creativity.

Enjoy our coverage!

Production and post boutique Destro opens in LA

Industry veterans Drew Neujahr, Sean McAllen, and Shane McAllen have partnered to form Destro, a live-action and post production boutique based in Los Angeles. Destro has already developed and produced an original documentary series, Seed, which profiles artists and innovators across a range of disciplines. In addition, the team has recently worked on projects for Google, Nintendo and Michelin.

Destro’s primary focus will be producing, directing, and post on live-action projects. However, with the partners’ extensive background in motion and VFX, the team is adept at executing mixed-media pipelines when the occasion calls.

With the launch of original studio projects like Seed, Destro sees an opportunity not only to showcase its own voice but to present a case study to forge symbiotic relationships with brands that have real stories to tell about their teams, products, users, and core values.

“Great ideas don’t always happen at conception,” says Neujahr. “When the weather changes during production or the client rethinks the concept in post, being able to improvise and adjust brings about the best work.”

Neujahr and the McAllen brothers bring a combined 45 years of experience spanning commercial and film production, post production and entertainment branding/marketing.

Neujahr’s experience includes features and marketing as both a producer and a creative. He has directed short films, commercials and the documentary series Western State. As a producer, head of production and executive producer at top motion graphics and visual effects studios in LA, he oversaw spots for Ford, Burger King, Walmart, Nickelodeon, FX and History.

Sean McAllen is a seasoned film and commercial editor who has crafted both short-form and long-form work for Ford, Chevy, Nissan, Toyota, Red Bull, Google and Samsung. He also co-wrote and edited the Emmy-nominated documentary feature Houston We Have a Problem. McAllen got his start co-founding a Tokyo/Los Angeles-based production company, where he directed commercials, broadcast documentaries and entertainment marketing content.

Shane McAllen is a veteran of the film and commercial industry. His feature editing credits include contributions to Iron Man 3 and Captain America: The Winter Soldier. On the commercial side, he has worked on campaigns for BMW, Apple and Nintendo. He is also an accomplished writer, producer and director who has worked on a bevy of projects for Google AR and two product reveals for the Nintendo Switch.

“We all got into this crazy world because we love telling stories,” concludes Sean McAllen. “And we share a mutual respect for each other’s craft. Ultimately, our strength is our approachability. We’re the ones who pick up the phone, answer the emails, make the coffee, and do the work.”

Main Image: (L-R) Sean McAllen, Drew Neujahr, and Shane McAllen

Terminator: Dark Fate director Tim Miller

By Iain Blair

He said he’d be back, and he meant it. Thirty-five years after he first arrived to menace the world in the 1984 classic The Terminator, Arnold Schwarzenegger has returned as the implacable killing machine in Terminator: Dark Fate, the latest installment of the long-running franchise.

And he’s not alone in his return. Terminator: Dark Fate also reunites the film’s producer and co-writer James Cameron with original franchise star Linda Hamilton for the first time in 28 years in a new sequel that picks up where Terminator 2: Judgment Day left off.

When the film begins, more than two decades have passed since Sarah Connor (Hamilton) prevented Judgment Day, changed the future and re-wrote the fate of the human race. Now, Dani Ramos (Natalia Reyes) is living a simple life in Mexico City with her brother (Diego Boneta) and father when a highly advanced and deadly new Terminator — a Rev-9 (Gabriel Luna) — travels back through time to hunt and kill her. Dani’s survival depends on her joining forces with two warriors: Grace (Mackenzie Davis), an enhanced super-soldier from the future, and a battle-hardened Sarah Connor. As the Rev-9 ruthlessly destroys everything and everyone in its path on the hunt for Dani, the three are led to a T-800 (Schwarzenegger) from Sarah’s past that might be their last best hope.

To helm all the on-screen mayhem, black humor and visual effects, Cameron handpicked Tim Miller, whose credits include the global blockbuster Deadpool, one of the highest grossing R-rated films of all time (it grossed close to $800 million). Miller then assembled a close-knit team of collaborators that included director of photography Ken Seng (Deadpool, Project X), editor Julian Clarke (Deadpool, District 9) and visual effects supervisor Eric Barba (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Oblivion).

Tim Miller on set

I recently talked to Miller about making the film, its cutting-edge VFX, the workflow and his love of editing and post.

How daunting was it when James Cameron picked you to direct this?
I think there’s something wrong with me because I don’t really feel fear as normal people do. It just manifests as a sense of responsibility, and with this I knew I’d never measure up to Jim’s movies but felt I could do a good job. Jim was never going to tell this story, and I wanted to see it, so it just became more about the weight of that sense of responsibility, but not in a debilitating way. I felt pretty confident I could carry this off. But later, the big anxiety was not to let down Linda Hamilton. Before I knew her, it wasn’t a thing, but later, once I got to know her I really felt I couldn’t mess it up (laughs).

This is still Cameron’s baby even though he handed over the directing to you. How hands-on was he?
He was busy with Avatar, but he was there for a lot of the early meetings and was very involved with the writing and ideas, which was very helpful thematically. But he wasn’t overbearing on all that. Then later when we shot, he wanted to write a few of the key scenes, which he did, and then in the edit he was in and out, but he never came into my edit room. He’d give notes and let us get on with it.

What sort of film did you set out to make?
A continuation of Sarah’s story. I never felt it was John’s story to me. It was always about a mother’s love for a son, and I felt like there was a real opportunity here. And that that story hadn’t been told — partly because the other sequels never had Linda. Once she wanted to come back, it was always the best possible story. No one else could be her or Arnold’s character.

Any surprises working with them?
Before we shot, people were telling me, “You got to be ready, we can’t mess around. When Arnold walks on set you’d better be rolling!” Sure enough, when he walked on he’d go, “And…” (Laughs) He really likes to joke around. With Linda — and the other actors — it was a love-fest. They’re both such nice, down-to-earth people, and I like a collegial atmosphere. I’m not a screamer. I’m very prepared, and I feel if you just show up on time, you’re already ahead of the game as a director.

What were the main technical challenges in pulling it all together?
They were all different for each big action set piece, and fitting it all into a schedule was tough, as we had a crazy amount of VFX. The C-5 plane sequence was far and away the biggest challenge to do and [SFX supervisor] Neil Corbould and his team designed and constructed all the effects rigs for the movie. The C-5 set was incredible, with two revolving sets, one vertical and one horizontal. It was so big you could put a bus in it, and it was able to rotate 360 degrees and tilt in either direction at the same time.

You just can’t simulate that reality of zero gravity on the actors. And then after we got it all in camera, which took weeks, our VFX guy Eric Barba finished it off. The other big one was the whole underwater scene, where the Humvee falls over the top of a dam and goes underwater as it’s swept down a river. For that, we put the Humvee on a giant scissor lift that could take it all the way under, so the water rushes in and fills it up. It’s really safe to do, but it feels frighteningly realistic for the actors.

This is only my second movie, so I’m still learning, but the advantage is I’m really willing to listen to any advice from the smart people around me on set on how best to do all this stuff.

How early on did you start integrating post and all the VFX?
Right from the start. I use previz a lot, as I come from that environment and I’m very comfortable with it, and that becomes the template for all of production to work from. Sometimes it’s too much of a template and treated like a bible, but I’m like, “Please keep thinking. Is there a better idea?” But it’s great to get everyone on the same page, so very early on you see what’s VFX, what’s live-action only, what’s a combination, and you can really plan your shoot. We did over 45 minutes of previz, along with storyboards. We did tons of postviz. My director’s cut had no blue/green at all. It was all postviz for every shot.

Tim Miller and Linda Hamilton

DP Ken Seng, who did Deadpool with you, shot it. Talk about how you collaborated on the look.
We didn’t really have time to plan shot lists that much since we moved so much and packed so much into every day. A lot of it was just instinctive run-and-gun, as the shoot was pretty grueling. We shot in Madrid and [other parts of] Spain, which doubled for Mexico. Then we did studio work in Budapest. The script was in flux a lot, and Jim wrote a few scenes that came in late, and I was constantly re-writing and tweaking dialogue and adjusting to the locations because there’s the location you think you’ll get and then the one you actually get.

Where did you post?
All at Blur, my company where we did Deadpool. The edit bays weren’t big enough for this though, so we spilled over into another building next door. That became Terminator HQ with the main edit bay and several assistant bays, plus all the VFX and compositing post teams. Blur also helped out with postviz and previz.

Do you like the post process?
I love post! I was an animator and VFX guy first, so it’s very natural to me, and I had a lot of the same team from Deadpool, which was great.

Talk about editing with Julian Clarke who cut Deadpool. How did that work?
It was the same set up. He’d be back here in LA cutting while we shot. He’s so fast; he’d be just one day behind me — I’ve never met anyone who works as hard. Then after the shoot, we’d edit all day and then I’d deal with VFX reviews for hours.

Can you talk about how Adobe Creative Cloud helped the post and VFX teams achieve their creative and technical goals?
I’m a big fan, and that started back on Deadpool as David Fincher was working closely with Adobe to make Premiere something that could beat Avid. We’re good friends — we’re doing our animated Netflix show Love, Death & Robots together — and he was like, “Dude, you gotta use this tool,” so we used it on Deadpool. It was still a little rocky on that one, but overall it was a great experience, and we knew we’d use it on this one. Adobe really helped refine it and the workflow, and it was a huge leap.

What were the big editing challenges?
(Laughs) We just shot too much movie. We had many discussions about cutting one or more of the action scenes, but in the end, we just took out some of the action from all of them, instead of cutting a particular set piece. But it’s tricky cutting stuff and still making it seamless, especially in a very heavily choreographed sequence like the C-5.

VFX plays a big role. How many were there?
Over 2,500 — a huge amount. The VFX on this were so huge it became a bit of a problem, to be honest.

L-R: Writer Iain Blair and director Tim Miller

How did you work with VFX supervisor Eric Barba.
He did a great job and oversaw all the vendors, including ILM, who did most of them. We tried to have them do all the character-based stuff, to keep it in one place, but in the end, we also had Digital Domain, Method, Blur, UPP, Cantina, and some others. We also brought on Jeff White from ILM since it was more than Eric could handle.

Talk about the importance of sound and music.
Tom Holkenborg, who scored Deadpool, did another great job. We also reteamed with sound design and mixer Craig Henighan and we did the mix at Fox. They’re both crucial in a film like this, but I’m the first to admit music’s not my strength. Luckily, Julian Clarke is excellent with that and very focused. He worked hard at pulling it all together. I love sound design and we talked about all the spotting, and Julian managed a lot of that too for me because I was so busy with the VFX.

Where did you do the DI and how important is it to you?
It’s huge, and we did it at Company 3 with Tim Stipan, who did Deadpool. I like to do a lot of reframing, adding camera shake and so on. It has a subtle but important effect on the overall film.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Review: Lenovo Yoga A940 all-in-one workstation

By Brady Betzel

While more and more creators are looking for alternatives to the iMac, iMac Pro and Mac Pro, there are few options with high-quality, built-in monitors: Microsoft Surface Studio, HP Envy, and Dell 7000 are a few. There are even fewer choices if you want touch and pen capabilities. It’s with that need in mind that I decided to review the Lenovo Yoga A940, a 27-inch, UHD, pen- and touch-capable Intel Core i7 computer with an AMD Radeon RX 560 GPU.

While I haven’t done a lot of all-in-one system reviews like the Yoga A940, I have had my eyes on the Microsoft Surface Studio 2 for a long time. The only problem is the hefty price tag of around $3,500. The Lenovo’s most appealing feature — in addition to the tech specs I will go over — is its price point: It’s available from $2,200 and up. (I saw Best Buy selling a similar system to the one I reviewed for around $2,299. The insides of the Yoga and the Surface Studio 2 aren’t that far off from each other either, at least not enough to make up for the $1,300 disparity.)

Here are the parts inside the Lenovo Yoga A940: Intel Core i7-8700 3.2GHz processor (up to 4.6GHz with Turbo Boost), six cores (12 threads) and 12MB cache; 27-inch 4K UHD IPS multitouch 100% Adobe RGB display; 16GB DDR4 2666MHz (SODIMM) memory; 1TB 5400 RPM drive plus 256GB PCIe SSD; AMD Radeon RX 560 4GB graphics processor; 25-degree monitor tilt angle; Dolby Atmos speakers; Dimensions: 25 inches by 18.3 inches by 9.6 inches; Weight: 32.2 pounds; 802.11AC and Bluetooth 4.2 connectivity; side panel inputs: Intel Thunderbolt, USB 3.1, 3-in-1 card reader and audio jack; rear panel inputs: AC-in, RJ45, HDMI and four USB 3.0; Bluetooth active pen (appears to be the Lenovo Active Pen 2); and QI wireless charging technology platform.

Digging In
Right off the bat, I just happened to put my Android Galaxy phone on the odd little flat platform located on the right side of the all-in-one workstation, just under the monitor, and I saw my phone begin to charge wirelessly. QI wireless charging is an amazing little addition to the Yoga; it really comes through in a pinch when I need my phone charged and don’t have the cable or charging dock around.

Other than that nifty feature, why would you choose a Lenovo Yoga A940 over any other all-in-one system? Well, as mentioned, the price point is very attractive, but you are also getting a near-professional-level system in a very tiny footprint — including Thunderbolt 3 and USB connections, HDMI port, network port and SD card reader. While it would be incredible to have an Intel i9 processor inside of the Yoga, the i7 clocks in at 3.2GHz with six cores. Not a beast, but enough to get the job done inside of Adobe Premiere and Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, but maybe with transcoded files instead of Red raw or the like.

The Lenovo Yoga A940 is outfitted with a front-facing Dolby Atmos audio speaker as well as Dolby Vision technology in the IPS display. The audio could use a little more low end, but it is good. The monitor is surprisingly great — the whites are white and the blacks are black; something not everyone can get right. It has 100% Adobe RGB color coverage and is Pantone-validated. The HDR is technically Dolby Vision and looks great at about 350 nits (not the brightest, but it won’t burn your eyes out either). The Lenovo BT active pen works well. I use Wacom tablets and laptop tablets daily, so this pen had a lot to live up to. While I still prefer the Wacom pen, the Lenovo pen, with 4,096 levels of sensitivity, will do just fine. I actually found myself using the touchscreen with my fingers way more than the pen.

One feature that sets the A940 apart from the other all-in-one machines is the USB Content Creation dial. With the little time I had with the system, I only used it to adjust speaker volume when playing Spotify, but in time I can see myself customizing the dials to work in Premiere and Resolve. The dial has good action and resistance. To customize the dial, you can jump into the Lenovo Dial Customization Assistant.

Besides the Intel i7, there is an AMD Radeon RX 560 with 4GB of memory, two 3W and two 5W speakers, 32 GB of DDR4 2666 MHz memory, a 1 TB 5400 RPM hard drive for storage, and a 256GB PCIe SSD. I wish the 1TB drive was also an SSD, but obviously Lenovo has to keep that price point somehow.

Real-World Testing
I use Premiere Pro, After Effects and Resolve all the time and can understand the horsepower of a machine through these apps. Whether editing and/or color correcting, the Lenovo A940 is a good medium ground — it won’t be running much more than 4K Red raw footage in real time without cutting the debayering quality down to half if not one-eighth. This system would make a good “offline” edit system, where you transcode your high-res media to a mezzanine codec like DNxHR or ProRes for your editing and then up-res your footage back to the highest resolution you have. Or, if you are in Resolve, maybe you could use optimized media for 80% of the workflow until you color. You will really want a system with a higher-end GPU if you want to fluidly cut and color in Premiere and Resolve. That being said, you can make it work with some debayer tweaking and/or transcoding.

In my testing I downloaded some footage from Red’s sample library, which you can find here. I also used some BRAW clips to test inside of Resolve, which can be downloaded here. I grabbed 4K, 6K, and 8K Red raw R3D files and the UHD-sized Blackmagic raw (BRAW) files to test with.

Adobe Premiere
Using the same Red clips as above, I created two one-minute-long UHD (3840×2160) sequences. I also clicked “Set to Frame Size” for all the clips. Sequence 1 contained these clips with a simple contrast, brightness and color cast applied. Sequence 2 contained these same clips with the same color correction applied, but also a 110% resize, 100 sharpen and 20 Gaussian Blur. I then exported them to various codecs via Adobe Media Encoder using the OpenCL for processing. Here are my results:

QuickTime (.mov) H.264, No Audio, UHD, 23.98 Maximum Render Quality, 10 Mb/s:
Color Correction Only: 24:07
Color Correction w/ 110% Resize, 100 Sharpen, 20 Gaussian Blur: 26:11
DNxHR HQX 10 bit UHD
Color Correction Only: 25:42
Color Correction w/ 110% Resize, 100 Sharpen, 20 Gaussian Blur: 27:03

ProRes HQ
Color Correction Only: 24:48
Color Correction w/ 110% Resize, 100 Sharpen, 20 Gaussian Blur: 25:34

As you can see, the export time is pretty long. And let me tell you, once the sequence with the Gaussian Blur and Resize kicked in, so did the fans. While it wasn’t like a jet was taking off, the sound of the fans definitely made me and my wife take a glance at the system. It was also throwing some heat out the back. Because of the way Premiere works, it relies heavily on the CPU over GPU. Not that it doesn’t embrace the GPU, but, as you will see later, Resolve takes more advantage of the GPUs. Either way, Premiere really taxed the Lenovo A940 when using 4K, 6K and 8K Red raw files. Playback in real time wasn’t possible except for the 4K files. I probably wouldn’t recommend this system for someone working with lots of higher-than-4K raw files; it seems to be simply too much for it to handle. But if you transcode the files down to ProRes, you will be in business.

Blackmagic Resolve 16 Studio
Resolve seemed to take better advantage of the AMD Radeon RX 560 GPU in combination with the CPU, as well as the onboard Intel GPU. In this test I added in Resolve’s amazing built-in spatial noise reduction, so other than the Red R3D footage, this test and the Premiere test weren’t exactly comparing apples to apples. Overall the export times will be significantly higher (or, in theory, they should be). I also added in some BRAW footage to test for fun, and that footage was way easier to work and color with. Both sequences were UHD (3840×2160) 23.98. I will definitely be looking into working with more BRAW footage. Here are my results:

Playback: 4K realtime playback at half-premium, 6K no realtime playback, 8K no realtime playback

H.264 no audio, UHD, 23.98fps, force sizing and debayering to highest quality
Export 1 (Native Renderer)
Export 2 (AMD Renderer)
Export 3 (Intel QuickSync)

Color Only
Export 1: 3:46
Export 2: 4:35
Export 3: 4:01

Color, 110% Resize, Spatial NR: Enhanced, Medium, 25; Sharpening, Gaussian Blur
Export 1: 36:51
Export 2: 37:21
Export 3: 37:13

BRAW 4K (4608×2592) Playback and Export Tests

Playback: Full-res would play at about 22fps; half-res plays at realtime

H.264 No Audio, UHD, 23.98 fps, Force Sizing and Debayering to highest quality
Color Only
Export 1: 1:26
Export 2: 1:31
Export 3: 1:29
Color, 110% Resize, Spatial NR: Enhanced, Medium, 25; Sharpening, Gaussian Blur
Export 1: 36:30
Export 2: 36:24
Export 3: 36:22

DNxHR 10 bit:
Color Correction Only: 3:42
Color, 110% Resize, Spatial NR: Enhanced, Medium, 25; Sharpening, Gaussian Blur: 39:03

One takeaway from the Resolve exports is that the color-only export was much more efficient than in Premiere, taking just over three or four times realtime for the intensive Red R3D files, and just over one and a half times real time for BRAW.

Summing UpIn the end, the Lenovo A940 is a sleek looking all-in-one touchscreen- and pen-compatible system. While it isn’t jam-packed with the latest high-end AMD GPUs or Intel i9 processors, the A940 is a mid-level system with an incredibly good-looking IPS Dolby Vision monitor with Dolby Atmos speakers. It has some other features — like IR camera, QI wireless charger and USB Dial — that you might not necessarily be looking for but love to find.

The power adapter is like a large laptop power brick, so you will need somewhere to stash that, but overall the monitor has a really nice 25-degree tilt that is comfortable when using just the touchscreen or pen, or when using the wireless keyboard and mouse.

Because the Lenovo A940 starts at just around $2,299 I think it really deserves a look when searching for a new system. If you are working in primarily HD video and/or graphics this is the all-in-one system for you. Check out more at their website.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producer’s Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Bonfire adds Jason Mayo as managing director/partner

Jason Mayo has joined digital production company Bonfire in New York as managing director and partner. Industry veteran Mayo will be working with Bonfire’s new leadership lineup, which includes founder/Flame artist Brendan O’Neil, CD Aron Baxter, executive producer Dave Dimeola and partner Peter Corbett. Bonfire’s offerings include VFX, design, CG, animation, color, finishing and live action.

Mayo comes to Bonfire after several years building Postal, the digital arm of the production company Humble. Prior to that he spent 14 years at Click 3X, where he worked closely with Corbett as his partner. While there he also worked with Dimeola, who cut his teeth at Click as a young designer/compositor. Dimeola later went on to create The Brigade, where he developed the network and technology that now forms the remote, cloud-based backbone referred to as the Bonfire Platform.

Mayo says a number of factors convinced him that Bonfire was the right fit for him. “This really was what I’d been looking for,” he says. “The chance to be part of a creative and innovative operation like Bonfire in an ownership role gets me excited, as it allows me to make a real difference and genuinely effect change. And when you’re working closely with a tight group of people who are focused on a single vision, it’s much easier for that vision to be fully aligned. That’s harder to do in a larger company.”

O’Neil says that having Mayo join as partner/MD is a major move for the company. “Jason’s arrival is the missing link for us at Bonfire,” he says. “While each of us has specific areas to focus on, we needed someone who could both handle the day to day of running the company while keeping an eye on our brand and our mission and introducing our model to new opportunities. And that’s exactly his strong suit.”

For the most part, Mayo’s familiarity with his new partners means he’s arriving with a head start. Indeed, his connection to Dimeola, who built the Bonfire Platform — the company’s proprietary remote talent network, nicknamed the “secret sauce” — continued as Mayo tapped Dimeola’s network for overflow and outsourced work while at Postal. Their relationship, he says, was founded on trust.

“Dave came from the artist side, so I knew the work I’d be getting would be top quality and done right,” Mayo explains. “I never actually questioned how it was done, but now that he’s pulled back the curtain, I was blown away by the capabilities of the Platform and how it dramatically differentiates us.

“What separates our system is that we can go to top-level people around the world but have them working on the Bonfire Platform, which gives us total control over the process,” he continues. “They work on our cloud servers with our licenses and use our cloud rendering. The Platform lets us know everything they’re doing, so it’s much easier to track costs and make sure you’re only paying for the work you actually need. More importantly, it’s a way for us to feel connected – it’s like they’re working in a suite down the hall, except they could be anywhere in the world.”

Mayo stresses that while the cloud-based Platform is a huge advantage for Bonfire, it’s just one part of its profile. “We’re not a company riding on the backs of freelancers,” he points out. “We have great, proven talent in our core team who work directly with clients. What I’ve been telling my longtime client contacts is that Bonfire represents a huge step forward in terms of the services and level of work I can offer them.”

Corbett believes he and Mayo will continue to explore new ways of working now that he’s at Bonfire. “In the 14 years Jason and I built Click 3X, we were constantly innovating across both video and digital, integrating live action, post production, VFX and digital engagements in unique ways,” he observes. “I’m greatly looking forward to continuing on that path with him here.”

Technicolor Post opens in Wales 

Technicolor has opened a new facility in Cardiff, Wales, within Wolf Studios. This expansion of the company’s post production footprint in the UK is a result of the growing demand for more high-quality content across streaming platforms and the need to post these projects, as well as the growth of production in Wales.

The facility is connected to all of Technicolor’s locations worldwide through the Technicolor Production Network, giving creatives easy access and to their projects no matter where they are shooting or posting.

The facility, an extension of Technicolor’s London operations, supports all Welsh productions and features a multi-purpose, state-of-the-art suite as well as space for VFX and front-end services including dailies. Technicolor Wales is working on Bad Wolf Production’s upcoming fantasy epic His Dark Materials, providing picture and sound services for the BBC/HBO show. Technicolor London’s recent credits include The Two Popes, The Souvenir, Chernobyl, Black Mirror, Gentleman Jack and The Spanish Princess.

Within this new Cardiff facility, Technicolor is offering 2K digital cinema projection, FilmLight Baselight color grading, realtime 4K HDR remote review, 4K OLED video monitoring, 5.1/7.1 sound, ADR recording/source connect, Avid Pro Tools sound mixing, dailies processing and Pulse cloud storage.

Bad Wolf Studios in Cardiff offers 125,000 square feet of stage space with five stages. There is flexible office space, as well as auxiliary rooms and costume and props storage. Its within

Behind the Title: C&I Studios founder Joshua Miller

While he might run the company, founder/CEO Joshua Miller is happiest creating. He also says there is no job too small: “Nothing is beneath you.”

NAME: Joshua Otis Miller

COMPANY: C&I Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
C&I Studios is a production company and advertising agency. We are located in New York City, Los Angeles, and Fort Lauderdale.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Founder and CEO

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Well, my job is a little weird. While I own and run the company, my passion has always been filmmaking… since I was four years old. I also run the video and film team at the studio, so my job means a lot of things. One day, I can be shooting on a mountain and the next day writing scripts and concepts, or editing, creating feature films or TV shows or managing post production. Since I’m the CEO, I spend a ton of time bringing in new business and adding technology to the company. Every day feels brand new to me, and that is the best part.

Black Violin

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think the thing that surprises most people is that when I’m on set working, I’m not sitting back drinking a mojito. I’m carrying the tripods and the sandbags and setting up the shots. I’m also the one signing everyone’s checks. One of our core beliefs at our company is “nothing is beneath you,” and that means you can do anything — including cleaning toilets —that helps the company grow, and it requires you to drop your ego. In the creative industry that’s a big deal.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is working with my team. I got so sick of the freelance game — it’s so individualized, and everyone is out for themselves. I wanted to start C&I to work with people consistently, dream together, build together and create together. That is by far better than anything else.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of the job is firing people. That just sucks.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Between 4am and 5am. If you aren’t waking up earlier than everyone else, you aren’t doing it right.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be doing the exact same thing. I could be working at McDonald’s, but I’d be filming with my iPhone or Razer phone and editing. It’s not about the money; you can’t take this thing from me. It’s a part of me, and something I certainly didn’t choose. So, no matter where you put me, this is what will come out. And since Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve is free, this is something I could actually do… I could be working at McDonald’s and shooting for fun on my phone and editing in Resolve’s new cut page, which is magic. That actually sounds awesome. Well, except the McDonald’s part (laughs).

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Again, I don’t feel like I chose it. It’s something that I always felt drawn to. I was interested in cameras since I was very young… tearing apart my parents VHS tapes to see how they worked. I was completely perplexed by the idea that a camera does something and then it goes on this tape, and I see what’s on that tape in this VHS player and on TV. That was something I had to learn and figure out. But the main reason I wanted to really dig into this field is because I remember being in my grandmother’s house watching those VHS tapes with my brothers and my family and everyone is just sitting around, laughing watching old memories. I can’t shake that feeling. People feel warm, vulnerable, close… that is the power you have with a camera and the ability to tell a story. It’s absolutely incredible.

Black Violin

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Right now, I’m working on an incredible music video with Black Violin. We are shooting it in Los Angeles and Miami, and I’m really excited about it.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Probably something I’m most proud of is our latest film Christmas Eve. We just poured everything into that film. It’s just magic. We have done a lot of amazing stuff, but that one is really close to me right now.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Camera, computer, speakers (for music — I can’t live without music). Those three things are a must for me to breathe.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m not really into social media, not a big fan of what it has turned us into (off of my soapbox now), but I do follow a ton of film companies and directors. I love following Shane Hurlbut, Blackmagic Design, SmallHD, Red Digital Cinema and Panavision, to name a view.

YOU MENTIONED LOVING MUSIC. DO YOU LISTEN WHILE YOU WORK?
Music is everything. It’s the oil to my car. Without that, I’m toast. Of course, I don’t listen to music when I’m editing, but when I’m on set I love to listen to music. Love the new Chance record. When I’m writing, it’s always either Bon Iver or Michael Giacchino. I love scores and composers.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
To distress, I love the moments in the studio when the staff and I just sit around and get to laugh and just hang out. I have a beautiful family and two wonderful kids, so when I’m not stressing about work I’m giving horsey-back rides to my son, while my daughter tries to explain TikTok to me.

Quick Chat: Element’s Matthew O’Rourke on Vivian partnership

Recently, Boston-based production and post company Element  launched Element Austin — a partnership with production studio Vivian. Element now represents a select directorial roster out of Austin.

We recently reached out to Element executive producer Matthew O’Rourke, who led the charge to get this partnership off the ground.

Can you talk a bit about your partnership with Vivian? How did that come about, and why was this important for Element to do?
I’ve had a relationship with Vivian’s co-owner, Buttons Pham, for almost 10 years. She was my go-to Texas-based resource while I was an executive producer at MMB working on Toyota. She is incredibly resourceful and a great human being. When I joined Element, she became a valued production service partner for our projects in the south (mostly based out of Texas and Atlanta). Our relationship with Vivian was always important to Element since it expands the production support we can offer for our directors and our clients.

Blue Cross Blue Shield

Expanding on that thought. What does Vivian offer that you guys don’t?
They let us have boots on the ground in Austin. They have a strong reputation there and deep resources to handle all levels of work.

How will this partnership work?
Buttons and her business partner Tim Hoppock have become additional executive producers for Element and lead the Element Austin office.

How does the Boston market differ from Austin?
Austin is a growing, vibrant market with tons of amazingly creative people and companies. Lots of production resources are coming in from Los Angeles, but are also developing locally.

Can you point to any recent jobs that resulted from this partnership?
Vivian has been a production services partner for several years, helping us with campaigns for Blue Cross Blue Shield, Subway and more. Since our launch a few weeks ago, we have entered into discussions with several agencies on upcoming work out of the Austin market.

What trends are you seeing overall for this part of the market?
Creative agencies are looking for reliable resources. Having a physical presence in Austin allows us to better support local clients, but also bring in projects from outside that market and produce efficient, quality work.

Behind the Title: Landia EP/MD Juan Taylor

“My role’s very behind-the-scenes… almost invisible. If everything goes well, which is my job, it’s like I was never there.”

Name: Juan Taylor

Company: Landia

Can you describe your company?
Landia is a production house, but we prefer to think of ourselves as a boutique network. We have offices in Los Angeles, Buenos Aires, Madrid, Barcelona, São Paulo and Mexico. We shoot and collaborate with talented teams around the world.

Devour spot

What’s your job title?
Executive Producer/Managing Partner

What does that entail?
It’s everything and nothing. My role’s very behind-the-scenes… almost invisible. If everything goes well, which is my job, it’s like I was never there. If something doesn’t go well, that’s when the phone starts ringing. It’s like being a conductor at the symphony.

What would surprise people about what falls under that title?
No matter how established you are, a producer must never stop learning. Whenever I have the time, I always try to immerse myself with the latest industry news and trends. How can you expect to innovate if you don’t know what’s already out there?

What have you learned over the years about running a business?
The importance of balance and preparation.

A lot of it must be about trying to keep employees and clients happy. How do you balance that?
The key is to surround yourself with the right people on both ends. As an executive producer, there will be times when there are too many cooks in the kitchen, and your best assets will always be the team members you hand-picked for the job. This little support system will help you handle situations when egos clash during business or artistic decisions.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Ironically, the most difficult one, which is working with different types of personalities. I like discovering and developing talent. For example, we run this platform called The Movement that guides young, emerging visual storytellers under Landia’s banner not only giving them an injection of the industry life, but room to spread their creative wings as well. The more tedious parts of the job — such as putting together timelines, treatments and logistics — also give me joy because I’m converting broad ideas into something tangible and profound.

What’s your least favorite?
The misconception that producers aren’t creative. I’m very much involved with brainstorming, shooting and final cut discussions. And guess what? Most of the problems that come to me need creative solutions.

Canon spot

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I have a wide range of interests and like to think that if I didn’t work in this field I could’ve been an architect, musician, restaurant owner, real estate agent or even urban developer. There are too many to count.

Can you name some recent clients?
We’re really proud of the work we did with Canon this year, as well as the Devour spot we did for Super Bowl LIII.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Although I love my phone, I’m a bit old-school. I don’t have Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and I’m consciously trying to avoid becoming too tech-dependent.

MovieLabs, film studios release ‘future of media creation’ white paper

MovieLabs (Motion Pictures Laboratories), a nonprofit technology research lab that works jointly with member studios Sony, Warner Bros., Disney, Universal and Paramount, has published a new white paper presenting an industry vision for the future of media creation technology by 2030.

The paper, co-authored by MovieLabs and technologists from Hollywood studios, paints a bold picture of future technology and discusses the need for the industry to work together now on innovative new software, hardware and production workflows to support and enable new ways to create content over the next 10 years. The white paper is available today for free download on the MovieLabs website.

The 2030 Vision paper lays out key principles that will form the foundation of this technological future, with examples and a discussion of the broader implications of each. The key principles envision a future in which:

1. All assets are created or ingested straight to the cloud and do not need to move.
2. Applications come to the media.
3. Propagation and distribution of assets is a “publish” function.
4. Archives are deep libraries with access policies matching speed, availability and security to the economics of the cloud.
5. Preservation of digital assets includes the future means to access and edit them.
6. Every individual on a project is identified and verified and their access permissions are efficiently and consistently managed.
7. All media creation happens in a highly secure environment that adapts rapidly to changing threats.
8. Individual media elements are referenced, tracked, interrelated and accessed using a universal linking system.
9. Media workflows are non-destructive and dynamically created using common interfaces, underlying data formats and metadata.
10. Workflows are designed around realtime iteration and feedback.

Rich Berger

“The next 10 years will bring significant opportunities, but there are still major challenges and inherent inefficiencies in our production and distribution workflows that threaten to limit our future ability to innovate,” says Richard Berger, CEO of MovieLabs. “We have been working closely with studio technology leaders and strategizing how to integrate new technologies that empower filmmakers to create ever more compelling content with more speed and efficiency. By laying out these principles publicly, we hope to catalyze an industry dialog and fuel innovation, encouraging companies and organizations to help us deliver on these ideas.”

The publication of the paper will be supported with a panel discussion at the IBC Conference in Amsterdam. The panel, “Hollywood’s Vision for the Future of Production in 2030,” will include senior technology leaders from the five major Hollywood motion picture studios. It will take place on Sunday, September 15 at 2:15pm in the IBC Conference in the Forum room of the RAI. postPerspective’s Randi Altman will moderate the panel made up of Sony’s Bill Baggelaar, Disney’s Shadi Almassizadeh, Universal’s Michael Wise and Paramount’s Anthony Guarino. More details can be found here.

“Sony Pictures Entertainment has a deep appreciation for the role that current and future technologies play in content creation,” says CTO of Sony Pictures Don Eklund. “As a subsidiary of a technology-focused company, we benefit from the power of Sony R&D and Sony’s product groups. The MovieLabs 2030 document represents the contribution of multiple studios to forecast and embrace the impact that cloud, machine learning and a range of hardware and software will have on our industry. We consider this a living document that will evolve over time and provide appreciated insight.”

According to Wise, SVP/CTO at Universal Pictures, “With film production experiencing unprecedented growth, and new innovative forms of storytelling capturing our audiences’ attention, we’re proud to be collaborating across the industry to envision new technological paradigms for our filmmakers so we can efficiently deliver worldwide audiences compelling entertainment.”

For those not familiar with MovieLabs, their stated goal is “to enable member studios to work together to evaluate new technologies and improve quality and security, helping the industry deliver next-generation experiences for consumers, reduce costs and improve efficiency through industry automation, and derive and share the appropriate data necessary to protect and market the creative assets that are the core capital of our industry.”

Digital Arts expands team, adds Nutmeg Creative talent

Digital Arts, an independently owned New York-based post house, has added several former Nutmeg Creative talent and production staff members to its roster — senior producer Lauren Boyle, sound designer/mixers Brian Beatrice and Frank Verderosa, colorist Gary Scarpulla, finishing editor/technical engineer Mark Spano and director of production Brian Donnelly.

“Growth of talent, technology, and services has always been part of the long-term strategy for Digital Arts, and we’re fortunate to welcome some extraordinary new talent to our staff,” says Digital Arts owner Axel Ericson. “Whether it’s long-form content for film and television, or working with today’s leading agencies and brands creating dynamic content, we have the talent and technology to make all of our clients’ work engaging, and our enhanced services bring their creative vision to fruition.”

Brian Donnelly, Lauren Boyle and Mark Spano.

As part of this expansion, Digital Arts will unveil additional infrastructure featuring an ADR stage/mix room. The current facility boasts several state-of-the-art audio suites, a 4K finishing theater/mixing dubstage, four color/finishing suites and expansive editorial and production space, which is spread over four floors.

The former Nutmeg team has hit the ground running working their long-time ad agency, network, animation and film studio clients. Gary Scarpulla worked on color for HBO’s Veep and Los Espookys, while Frank Verderosa has been working with agency Ogilvy on several Ikea campaigns. Beatrice mixed spots for Tom Ford’s cosmetics line.

In addition, Digital Arts’ in-house theater/mixing stage has proven to be a valuable resource for some of the most popular TV productions, including recording recent commentary sessions for the legendary HBO series, Game of Thrones and the final season of Veep.

Especially noteworthy is colorist Ericson’s and finishing editor Mark Spano’s collaboration with Oscar-winning directors Karim Amer and Jehane Noujaim to bring to fruition the Netflix documentary The Great Hack.

Digital Arts also recently expanded its offerings to include production services. The company has already delivered projects for agencies Area 23, FCB Health and TCA.

“Digital Arts’ existing infrastructure was ideally suited to leverage itself into end-to-end production,” Donnelly says. “Now we can deliver from shoot to post.”

Tools employed across post are Avid Pro Tools, D Control ES, S3 for audio post and Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere and Blackmagic Resolve for editing. Color grading is via Resolve.

Main Image: (L-R) Frank Verderosa, Brian Beatrice and Gary Scarpulla

 

Dick Wolf’s television empire: his production and post brain trust

By Iain Blair

The TV landscape is full of scripted police procedurals and true crime dramas these days, but the indisputable and legendary king of that crowded landscape is Emmy-winning creator/producer Dick Wolf, whose name has become synonymous with high-quality drama.

Arthur Forney

Since it burst onto the scene back in 1990, his Law & Order show has spawned six dramas and four international spinoffs, while his “Chicago” franchise gave birth to another four series — the hugely popular Chicago Med, Chicago Fire and Chicago P.D. His Chicago Justice was cancelled after one season.

Then there’s his “FBI” shows, as well as the more documentary-style Cold Justice. If you’ve seen Cold Justice — and you should — you know that this is the real deal, focusing on real crimes. It’s all the more fascinating and addictive because of it.

Produced by Wolf and Magical Elves, the real-life crime series follows veteran prosecutor Kelly Siegler, who gets help from seasoned detectives as they dig into small-town murder cases that have lingered for years without answers or justice for the victims. Together with local law enforcement from across the country, the Cold Justice team has successfully helped bring about 45 arrests and 20 convictions. No case is too cold for Siegler, as the new season delves into new unsolved homicides while also bringing updates to previous cases. No wonder Wolf calls it “doing God’s work.” Cold Justice airs on true crime network Oxygen.

I recently spoke with Emmy-winning Arthur Forney, executive producer of all Wolf Entertainment’s scripted series (he’s also directed many episodes), about posting those shows. I also spoke with Cold Justice showrunner Liz Cook and EP/head of post Scott Patch.

Chicago Fire

Dick Wolf has said that, as head of post, you are “one of the irreplaceable pieces of the Wolf Films hierarchy.” How many shows do you oversee?
Arthur Forney: I oversee all of Wolf Entertainment’s scripted series, including Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Chicago Fire, Chicago P.D., Chicago Med, FBI and FBI: Most Wanted.

Where is all the post done?
Forney: We do it all at NBCUniversal StudioPost in LA.

How involved is Dick Wolf?
Forney: Very involved, and we talk all the time.

How does the post pipeline work?
Forney: All film is shot on location and then sent back to the editing room and streamed into the lab. From there we do all our color corrections, which takes us into downloading it into Avid Media Composer.

What are the biggest challenges of the post process on the shows?
Forney: Delivering high-quality programming with a shortened post schedule.

Chicago Med

What are the editing challenges involved?
Forney: Trying to find the right way of telling the story, finding the right performances, shaping the show and creating intensity that results in high-quality television.

What about VFX? Who does them?
Forney: All of our visual effects are done by Spy Post in Santa Monica. All of the action is enhanced and done by them.

Where do you do the color grading?
Forney: Coloring/grading is all done at NBCUniversal StudioPost.

Now let’s talk to Cook and Patch about Cold Justice:

Liz and Scott, I recently saw the finale to Season 5 of Cold Justice. That was a long season.
Liz Cook: Yes, we did 26 episodes, so it was a lot of very long days and hard work.

It seems that there’s more focus than ever on drug-related cases now.
Cook: I don’t think that was the intention going in, but as we’ve gone on, you can’t help but recognize the huge drug problem in America now. Meth and opioids pop up in a lot of cases, and it’s obviously a crisis, and even if they aren’t the driving force in many cases, they’re definitely part of many.

L-R: Kelly Siegler, Dick Wolf, Scott Patch and Liz Cook. Photo by Evans Vestal Ward

How do you go about finding cases for the show?
Cook: We have a case-finding team, and they get the cases various ways, including cold-calling. We have a team dedicated to that, calling every day, and we get most of them that way. A lot come through agencies and sheriff’s departments that have worked with us before and want to help us again. And we get some from family members and some from hits on the Facebook page we have.

I assume you need to work very closely with local law agencies as you need access to their files?
Cook: Exactly. That’s the first part of the whole puzzle. They have to invite us in. The second part is getting the family involved. I don’t think we’d ever take on a case that the family didn’t want us to do.

What’s involved for you, and do you like being a showrunner?
Cook: It’s a tough job and pretty demanding, but I love it. We go through a lot of steps and stuff to get a case approved, and to get the police and family on board, and then we get the case read by one of our legal readers to evaluate it and see if there’s a possibility that we can solve it. At that point we pitch it to the network, and once they approve it and everyone’s on board, then if there are certain things like DNA and evidence that might need testing, we get all that going, along with ballistics that need researching, and stuff like phone records and so on. And it actually moves really fast – we usually get all these people on board within three weeks.

How long does it take to shoot each show?
Cook: It varies, as each show is different, but around seven or eight days, sometimes longer. We have a case coming up with cadaver dogs, and that stuff will happen before we even get to the location, so it all depends. And some cases will have 40 witnesses, while others might have over 100. So it’s flexible.

Cold Justice

Where do you post, and what’s the schedule like?
Scott Patch: We do it all at the Magical Elves offices here in Hollywood — the editing, sound, color correction. The online editor and colorist is Pepe Serventi, and we have it all on one floor, and it’s really convenient to have all the post in house. The schedule is roughly two months from the raw footage to getting it all locked and ready to air, which is quite a long time.

Dailies come back to us and we do our first initial pass by the story team and editors, and they’ll start whittling all the footage down. So it takes us a couple of weeks to just look at all the footage, as we usually have about 180 hours of it, and it takes a while to turn all that into something the editors can deal with. Then it goes through about three network passes with notes.

What about dealing with all the legal aspects?
Patch: That makes it a different kind of show from most of the others, so we have legal people making sure all the content is fine, and then sometimes we’ll also get notes from local law agencies, as well as internal notes from our own producers. That’s why it takes two months from start to finish.

Cook: We vet it through local law, and they see the cuts before it airs to make sure there are no problems. The biggest priority for us is that we don’t hurt the case at all with our show, so we always check it all with the local D.A. and police. And we don’t sensationalize anything.

Cold Justice

Patch: That’s another big part of editing and post – making sure we keep it authentic. That can be a challenge, but these are real cases with real people being accused of murder.

Cook: Our instinct is to make it dramatic, but you can’t do that. You have to protect the case, which might go to trial.

Talk about editing. You have several editors, I assume because of the time factor. How does that work?
Patch: Some of these cases have been cold for 25 or 30 years, so when the field team gets there, they really stand back and let the cops talk about the case, and we end up with a ton of stuff that you couldn’t fit into the time slot however hard you tried. So we have to decide what needs to be in, what doesn’t.

Cook: On day one, our “war room” day, we meet with the local law and everyone involved in the case, and that’s eight hours of footage right there.

Patch: And that gets cut down to just four or five minutes. We have a pretty small but tight team, with 10 editors who split up the episodes. Once in a while they’ll cross over, but we like to have each team and the producers stay with each episode as long as they can, as it’s so complicated. When you see the finished show, it doesn’t seem that complicated, but there are so many ways you could handle the footage that it really helps for each team to really take ownership of that particular episode.

How involved is Dick Wolf in post?
Cook: He loves the whole post process, and he watches all the cuts and has input.

Patch: He’s very supportive and obviously so experienced, and if we’re having a problem with something, he’ll give notes. And for the most part, the network gives us a lot of flexibility to make the show.

What about VFX on the show?
Patch: We have some, but nothing too fancy, and we use an outside VFX/graphics company, LOM Design. We have a lot of legal documents on the show, and that stuff gets animated, and we’ll also have some 3D crime scene VFX. The only other outside vendor is our composer, Robert ToTeras.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Quick Chat: Bonfire Labs’ Mary Mathaisell

Over the course of nearly 30 years, San Francisco’s Bonfire Labs has embraced change. Over the years, the company evolved from an editorial and post house to a design and creative content studio that leverages the best aspects of the agency and production company models without adhering to either one.

This hybrid model has worked well for product launches for Google, Facebook, Salesforce, Logitech and many others.

The latest change is in the company’s ownership, with the last of the original founders stepping down and a new management partnership taking over — led by executive producer Mary Mathaisell, managing director Jim Bartel and head of strategy and creative Chris Weldon.

We spoke with Mathaisell to get a better sense of Bonfire Labs’ past, present and future.

Can you give us some history of Bonfire Labs? When did you join the company? How/why did you first get into producing?
I’ve been with Bonfire Labs for seven years. I started here as head of production. After being at several large digital agencies working on campaigns and content for brands like Target, Gap, LG and PayPal, I wanted to build something more sustainable than just another campaign and was thrilled that Bonfire was interested in growing into a full-service creative company with integrated production.

Prior to working at AKQA and Publicis, I worked in VFX and production as well as design for products and interfaces, but my primary focus and love has always been commercial production.

The studio has evolved from a traditional post studio to creative strategy and content company. What were the factors that drove those changes?
Bonfire Labs has always been smart about staying small and strategic about the kind of work and clients to focus on. We have been able to change based on both the kind of work we want to be doing and what the market needs. With a giant need for content, especially video content, we have decided to staff and service clients as experts across all the phases of creative development and production and finishing. Instead of going to an agency and a production company and post houses, our clients can work directly with us on everything from concept to finishing.

Silicon Valley is clearly a big client base for you. What are they generally coming to you for? Are the content needs in high tech different from other business sectors?
Our clients usually have a new product, feature or brand that they want the world to know about. We work on product launches, brand awareness campaigns, product education, event content and social content. Most of our work is for technology companies, but every company these days has a technology component. I would say that speed to market is one key differentiator for our clients. We are often building stories as we are in production, so we get a lot done with our clients through creative collaboration and by not following the traditional rules of an agency or a production company.

Any specific trends that you’re seeing recently from your clients? New areas that Bonfire is looking to explore, either new markets for your talents or technology you’re looking to explore further?
Rapid brand prototyping is a new service we are offering to much excitement. Because we have experience across so many technology brands and work closely with our clients, we can develop a language and brand voice faster than most traditional agencies. Technology brands are evolving so quickly that we often start working on content creation before a brand has defined itself or transitioned to its next phase. Rapid brand prototyping allows brands to test content and grow the brand simultaneously.

Blade Shadow

Can you talk about some projects that you have done recently that challenged you and the team?
We rolled out a launch film for a new start-up client called Blade Shadow. We are working with Salesforce to develop trailblazer stories and anthem films for its .org branch, which focuses on NGOs, education and philanthropy.

The company is undergoing a transition with some of the original partners. Can you talk about that a bit as well?
The original founders have passed the torch to the group of people who have been managing and producing the work over the past five to 15 years. We have six new owners, three managing partners and three associate partners. Jim Bartel is the managing director; Chris Weldon is the head of strategy and creative, and I’m the executive producer in charge of content development and production. The three of us make up the management team.

The three of us make up the management team. Sheila Smith (head of production) Robbie Proctor (head of editorial) and Phil Spitler (creative technology lead) are associate partners as they contribute to and lead so much of our work and process and have been part of the company for over 10 years each.

 

Envoi’s end-to-end cloud solution for data migration, post 

Envoi has launched a cloud-based data, migration and post production workflow solution at the AWS M&E Symposium on June 18  in Los Angeles. Enabled by Cantemo and Teradici PCoIP technology, Envoi is offering this as a media “production-to-payment” platform.

Envoi is a cloud-based content management, distribution and monetization platform, giving broadcasters and video content providers a complete secure end-to-end video management and distribution system. Available on Amazon Web Services (AWS) Marketplace, Envoi is designed to provide simple and efficient data migration to the cloud and between services in the workflow.

Thanks to a partnership with Cantemo, Envoi has been integrated with Cantemo’s media asset management solution, Cantemo Portal and its cloud video management hub, Cantemo Iconik. Iconik makes it easy to collaborate on media, regardless of geographic location. Advanced Artificial Intelligence simplifies content discovery by improving metadata collection. By combining Envoi with Cantemo Portal, media companies of virtually all sizes can now monetize their video libraries within 48 hours.

Envoi also enables post in the cloud with the integration of Iconik with Teradici-enabled workstations on AWS. These workstations are configured to support a wide range of editing and post production tools. By supporting the entire post process on AWS, Envoi says it is providing a solution that increases the security, performance and collaboration potential within the creative process. Delivering the solution through AWS Marketplace simplifies procurement, delivery and deployment for Envoi’s customers.

 

Phil Kubel named director of HPA

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has appointed Phil Kubel as the organization’s director. He will be the Burbank-based presence of the HPA management team, managing the organization’s day-to-day business as well as supporting strategic planning, membership development and program development.

After his graduation from USC, Kubel worked in a number of production-related positions. In 2003 he became one of the founding members of HRTV, a national television network that featured equestrian and horse racing content. Kubel was instrumental in the design, engineering and production build of the studios and broadcast facility at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, California. He went on to oversee day-to-day operations of all digital media, production and technology initiatives at HRTV, including creating the subscription-based HRTV.com.

In addition to Kubel’s technical portfolio, he served as VP of post production for HRTV and was the creative force behind the documentary series Inside Information, which earned 10 Emmy wins.

In 2015, Kubel was named VP/EP for a new digital media initiative for The Stronach Group. Under Stronach Digital, he oversaw the launch of XBTV, which is now an industry-leading multi-media horse racing product that provides insight and analysis for wagering customers.

“It’s an exciting time to be joining HPA,” notes Kubel. “We have a rare opportunity to use our accumulated knowledge and relationships to support industry growth by connecting the players and leading the conversation. I look forward to continuing the vision of HPA and developing it as a world-class resource for production professionals.”

He will report to HPA’s executive director, Barbara Lange.

Cutters Studios promotes Heather Richardson, Patrick Casey

Cutters Studios has promoted Heather Richardson to executive producer and Patrick Casey to head of production. Richardson’s oversight will expand into managing and recruiting talent, and in maintaining and building the company’s client base. Casey will focus on optimizing workflows, project management and bidding processes.

Richardson joined Cutters in 2015, after working as a producer for visual effects studio A52 in LA and for editorial company Cosmo Street in both LA and New York for more than 10 years. On behalf of Cutters, she has produced Super Bowl spots for Lifewtr, Nintendo and WeatherTech, and campaigns including Capital One, FCA North America (Fiat, Dodge Ram, and Jeep), Gatorade, Google, McDonald’s and Modelo.

“I’ve been fortunate to have worked with some excellent executive producers during my career, and I’m honored and excited for the opportunity to expand the scope of my role on behalf of Cutters Studios, and alongside Patrick Casey,” says Richardson. “Patrick’s kindness and thoughtfulness in addition to his intelligence and experience are priceless.”

In addition to leading Cutters editors, Casey produced the groundbreaking Always “#LikeAGirl” campaign, Budweiser’s Harry Caray’s Last Call and Whirlpool’s “Care Counts” campaign that won top Cannes Lions, Clio, Effie and Adweek Project Isaac Awards.

Atomos’ new Shogun 7: HDR monitor, recorder, switcher

The new Atomos Shogun 7 is a seven-inch HDR monitor, recorder and switcher that offers an all-new 1500-nit, daylight-viewable, 1920×1200 panel with a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio and 15+ stops of dynamic range displayed. It also offers ProRes RAW recording and realtime Dolby Vision output. Shogun 7 will be available in June 2019, priced at $1,499.

The Atomos screen uses a combination of advanced LED and LCD technologies which together offer deeper, better blacks the company says rivals OLED screens, “but with the much higher brightness and vivid color performance of top-end LCDs.”

A new 360-zone backlight is combined with this new screen technology and controlled by the Dynamic AtomHDR engine to show millions of shades of brightness and color. It allows Shogun 7 to display 15+ stops of real dynamic range on-screen. The panel, says Atomos, is also incredibly accurate, with ultra-wide color and 105% of DCI-P3 covered, allowing for the same on-screen dynamic range, palette of colors and shades that your camera sensor sees.

Atomos and Dolby have teamed up to create Dolby Vision HDR “live” — a tool that allows you to see HDR live on-set and carry your creative intent from the camera through into HDR post. Dolby have optimized their target display HDR processing algorithm which Atomos has running inside the Shogun 7. It brings realtime automatic frame-by-frame analysis of the Log or RAW video and processes it for optimal HDR viewing on a Dolby Vision-capable TV or monitor over HDMI. Connect Shogun 7 to the Dolby Vision TV and AtomOS 10 automatically analyzes the image, queries the TV and applies the right color and brightness profiles for the maximum HDR experience on the display.

Shogun 7 records images up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 or 2kp240 slow motion from compatible cameras, in RAW/Log or HLG/PQ over SDI/HDMI. Footage is stored directly to AtomX SSDmini or approved off-the-shelf SATA SSD drives. There are recording options for Apple ProRes RAW and ProRes, Avid DNx and Adobe CinemaDNG RAW codecs. Shogun 7 has four SDI inputs plus a HDMI 2.0 input, with both 12G-SDI and HDMI 2.0 outputs. It can record ProRes RAW in up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 DCI/UHD and 2kp240 DCI/HD, depending on the camera’s capabilities. Also, 10-bit 4:2:2 ProRes or DNxHR recording is available up to 4Kp60 or 2Kp240. The four SDI inputs enable the connection of most quad-link, dual-link or single-link SDI cinema cameras. Pixels are preserved with data rates of up to 1.8Gb/s.

In terms of audio, Shogun 7 eliminates the need for a separate audio recorder. Users can add 48V stereo mics via an optional balanced XLR breakout cable, or select mic or line input levels, plus record up to 12 channels of 24/96 digital audio from HDMI or SDI. Monitoring selected stereo tracks is via the 3.5mm headphone jack. There are dedicated audio meters, gain controls and adjustments for frame delay.

Shogun 7 features the latest version of the AtomOS 10 touchscreen interface, first seen on the Ninja V.  The new body of Shogun 7 has a Ninja V-like exterior with ARRI anti-rotation mounting points on the top and bottom of the unit to ensure secure mounting.

AtomOS 10 on Shogun 7 has the full range of monitoring tools, including Waveform, Vectorscope, False Color, Zebras, RGB parade, Focus peaking, Pixel-to-pixel magnification, Audio level meters and Blue only for noise analysis.

Shogun 7 can also be used as a portable touchscreen-controlled multi-camera switcher with asynchronous quad-ISO recording. Users can switch up to four 1080p60 SDI streams, record each plus the program output as a separate ISO, then deliver ready-for-edit recordings with marked cut-points in XML metadata straight to your NLE. The current Sumo19 HDR production monitor-recorder will also gain the same functionality in a free firmware update.

There is asynchronous switching, plus use genlock in and out to connect to existing AV infrastructure. Once the recording is over, users can import the XML file into an NLE and the timeline populates with all the edits in place. XLR audio from a separate mixer or audio board is recorded within each ISO, alongside two embedded channels of digital audio from the original source. The program stream always records the analog audio feed as well as a second track that switches between the digital audio inputs to match the switched feed.

Review: Mzed.com’s Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington

By Brady Betzel

I am constantly looking to educate myself, no matter what the source — or subject. Whether I am learning how to make a transition in Adobe After Effects from an eSports editor on YouTube to Warren Eagles teaching color correction in Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve on FXPHD.com, I’m always beefing up my skills. I even learn from bad tutorials — they teach you what not to do!

But when you come across a truly remarkable learning experience, it is only fair to share with the rest of the world. Last year I saw an ad for an MZed.com course called “Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington,” and was immediately interested. These days you can pretty much find any technical tutorial you can dream of on YouTube, but truly professional, higher education-like, theory-based education series are very hard to come by. Even ones you need to pay for aren’t always worth their price of admission, which is a huge let down.

Ollie sharing his wisdom.

Once I gained access to MZed.com I wanted to watch every educational series they had. From lighting techniques with ASC member Shane Hurlbut to the ARRI Amira Camera Primer, there are over 150 hours of education available from industry leaders. However, I found my way to Directing Color…

I am often asked if I think people should go to college or a film school. My answer? If you have the money and time, you should go to college followed by film school (or do both together, if the college offers it). Not only will you learn a craft, but you will most likely spend hundreds of hours studying and visualizing the theory behind it. For example, when someone asks me about the science behind camera lenses, I can confidently answer them thanks to my physics class based on lenses and optics from California Lutheran University (yes, a shameless plug).

In my opinion, a two-, four- or even 10-year education allows me to live in the grey. I am comfortable arguing for both sides of a debate, as well as the options that are in between —  the grey. I feel like my post-high school education really allowed me to recognize and thrive in the nuances of debate. Leaving me to play devil’s advocate maybe a little too much, but also having civil and proactive discussions with others without being demeaning or nasty — something we are actively missing these days. So if living in the grey is for you, I really think a college education supplemented by online or film school education is valuable (assuming you make the decision that the debt is worth it like I did).

However, I know that is not an option for everyone since it can be very expensive — trust me, I know. I am almost done paying off my undergraduate fees while still paying off my graduate ones, which I am still two or three classes away from finishing. That being said, Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington is the only online education series I have seen so far that is on the same level as some of my higher education classes. Not only is the content beautifully shot and color corrected, but Ollie gives confident and accessible lessons on how color can be used to draw the viewer’s attention to multiple parts of the screen.

Ollie Kenchington is a UK-based filmmaker who runs Korro Films. From the trailer of his Directing Color series, you can immediately see the beauty of Ollie’s work and know that you will be in safe hands. (You can read more about his background here.)

The course raises the online education bar and will elevate the audiences idea of professional insight. The first module “Creating a Palette” covers the thoughts behind creating a color palette for a small catering company. You may even want to start with the last Bonus Module “Ox & Origin” to get a look at what Ollie will be creating throughout the seven modules and about an hour and a half of content.

While Ollie goes over “looks,” the beauty of this course is that he goes through his internal thought processes including deciding on palettes based on color theory. He didn’t just choose teal and orange because it looks good, he chooses his color palette based on complementary colors.

Throughout the course Ollie covers some technical knowledge, including calibrating monitors and cameras, white balancing and shooting color charts to avoid having wrong color balance in post. This is so important because if you don’t do these simple steps, your color correction session while be much harder. And wasting time on fixing incorrect color balance takes time away from the fun of color grading. All of this is done through easily digestible modules that range from two to 20 minutes.

The modules include Creating a Palette; Perceiving Color; Calibrating Color; Color Management; Deconstructing Color 1 – 3 and the Bonus Module Ox & Origin.

Without giving away the entire content in Ollie’s catalog, my favorite modules in this course are the on-set modules. Maybe because I am not on-set that often, but I found the “thinking out loud” about colors helpful. Knowing why reds represent blood, which raise your heart rate a little bit, is fascinating. He even goes through practical examples of color use in films such as in Whiplash.

In the final “Deconstructing Color” modules, Ollie goes into a color bay (complete with practical candle backlighting) and dives in Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve. He takes this course full circle to show how since he had to rush through a scene he can now go into Resolve and add some lighting to different sides of someone’s face since he took time to set up proper lighting on set, he can focus on other parts of his commercial.

Summing Up
I want to watch every tutorial MZed.com has to offer. From “Philip Bloom’s Cinematic Masterclass” to Ollie’s other course “Mastering Color.” Unfortunately, as of my review, you would have to pay an additional fee to watch the “Mastering Color” series. It seems like an unfortunate trend in online education to charge a fee and then when an extra special class comes up, charge more, but this class will supposedly be released to the standard subscribers in due time.

MZed.com has two subscription models: MZed Pro, which is $299 for one year of streaming the standard courses, and MZed Pro Premium for $399. This includes the standard courses for one year and the ability to choose one “Premium” course.

“Philip Bloom’s Cinematic Master Class” was the Premium course I was signed up for initially, but you you can decide between this one and the “Mastering Color” course. You will not be disappointed regardless of which one you choose. Even their first course “How to Photograph Everyone” is chock full of lighting and positioning instruction that can be applied in many aspects of videography.

I really was impressed with Directing Color with Ollie Kenchington, and if the other course are this good MZed.com will definitely become a permanent bookmark for me.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

VFX house Rodeo FX acquires Rodeo Production

Visual effects studio Rodeo FX, whose high-profile projects include Dumbo, Aquaman and Bumblebee, has purchased Rodeo Production and added its roster of photographers and directors to its offerings.

The two companies, whose common name is just a coincidence, will continue to operate as distinct entities. Rodeo Production’s 10-year-old Montreal office will continue to manage photo and video production, but will now also offer RodeoFX’s post production services and technical expertise.

In Toronto, Rodeo FX plans to open an Autodesk Flame editing suite in the Rodeo Production’ studio and expand its Toronto roster of photographers and directors with the goal of developing stronger production and post services for clients in the city’s advertising, television and film industries.

“This is a milestone in our already incredible history of growth and expansion,” says Sébastien Moreau, founder/president of Rodeo FX, which has offices in LA and Munich in addition to Montreal.

“I have always worked hard to give our artists the best possible opportunities, and this partnership was the logical next step,” says Rodeo Production’s founder Alexandra Saulnier. “I see this as a fusion of pure creativity and innovative technology. It’s the kind of synergy that Montreal has become famous for; it’s in our DNA.”

Rodeo Production clients include Ikea, Under Armour and Mitsubishi.

Shooting, posting New Republic’s Indie film, Sister Aimee

After a successful premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, New Republic Studios’ Sister Aimee screened at this month’s SXSW. The movie tells the story of an infamous American evangelist of the 1920s, Sister Aimee Semple McPherson, who gets caught up in her lover’s dreams of Mexico and finds herself on a road trip toward the border.

Sister Aimee shot at the newly renovated New Republic Studios near Austin, Texas, over two and a half weeks. “Their crew used our 2,400-square-foot Little Bear soundstage, our 3,000-square-foot Lone Wolf soundstage, our bullpen office space and numerous exterior locations in our backlot,” reports New Republic Studios president Mindy Raymond, adding that the Sister Aimee production also had access to two screening rooms with 5.1 surround sound, HDMI hookups to 4K monitors and theater-style leather chairs to watch dailies. The film also hit the road, shooting in the New Mexico desert.

L-R: Directors Samantha Buck, Marie Schlingmann at SXSW. Credit: Harrison Funk

Co-written and co-directed by Samantha Buck and Marie Schlingmann, the movie takes some creative license with the story of Aimee. “We don’t look for factual truth in Aimee’s journey,” they explain. “Instead we look for a more timeless truth that says something about female ambition, the female quest for immortality and, most of all, the struggle for women to control their own narratives. It becomes a story about storytelling itself.”

The film, shot by cinematographer Carlos Valdes-Lora at 3.2K ProRes 4444 XQ on an Arri Alexa Mini, was posted at Dallas and Austin-based Charlieuniformtango.

We reached out to the DP and the post team to find out more.

Carlos, why did you choose the package of the Alexa and Cooke Mini S4 Primes?
Carlos Valdes-Lora: In early conversations with the directors, we all agreed that we didn’t want Sister Aimee to feel like a traditional period movie. We didn’t want to use softening filters or vintage lenses. We aimed instead for clear images, deep focus and a rich color palette that remains grounded in the real world. We felt that this would lend the story a greater sense of immediacy and draw the viewer closer to the characters. Following that same thinking, we worked very extensively with the 25mm and 32mm, especially in closeups and medium closeups, emphasizing accessibility.

The Cooke Mini S4s are a beautiful and affordable set (relative to our other options.) We like the way they give deep dimensionality and warmth to faces, and how they create a slightly lower contrast image compared to the other modern lenses we looked at. They quickly became the right choice for us, striking the right balance between quality, size and value.

The Cookes paired with the Alexa Mini gave us a lightweight camera system with a very contained footprint, and we needed to stay fast and lean due to our compressed shooting schedule and often tight shooting quarters. The Chapman Cobra dolly was a big help in that regard as well.

What was the workflow to post like?
Charlieuniformtango producers Bettina Barrow, Katherine Harper, David Hartstein: Post took place primarily between Charlieuniformtango’s Dallas and Austin offices. Post strategizing started months before the shoot, and active post truly began when production began in July 2018.

Tango’s Evan Linton handled dailies brought in from the shoot, working alongside editor Katie Ennis out of Tango’s Austin studio, to begin assembling a rough cut as shooting continued. Ennis continued to cut at the studio through August with directors Schlingmann and Buck.

Editorial then moved back to the directors’ home state of New York to finish the cut for Sundance. (Editor Ennis, who four-walled out of Tango Austin for the first part of post, went to  New York with the directors, working out of a rented space.)

VFX and audio work started early at Tango, with continuously updated timelines coming from editorial, working to have certain locked shots also finished for the Sundance submission, while saving much of the cleanup and other CG heavy shots for the final picture lock.

Tango audio engineer Nick Patronella also tackled dialogue edit, sound design and mix for the submission out of the Dallas studio.

Can you talk about the VFX?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: The cut was locked in late November, and the heavy lifting really began. With delivery looming, Tango’s Flame artists Allen Robbins, Joey Waldrip, David Hannah, David Laird, Artie Peña and Zack Smith divided effects shots, which ranged from environmental cleanup, period-specific cleanup, beauty work such as de-aging, crowd simulation, CG sign creation and more. 3D

(L-R) Tango’s Artie Peña, Connor Adams, Allen Robbins in one of the studio’s Flame suites.

Artist Connor Adams used Houdini, Mixamo and Maya to create CG elements and crowds, with final comps being done in Nuke and sent to Flame for final color. Over 120 VFX shots were handled in total and Flame was the go-to for effects. Color and much of the effects happened simultaneously. It was a nice workflow as the project didn’t have major VFX needs that would have impacted color.

What about the color grade?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: Directors Buck and Schlingmann and DP Valdes-Lora worked with Tango colorist Allen Robbins to craft the final look of the film — with the color grade also done in Flame. The trio had prepped shooting for a Kodachrome-style look, especially for the exteriors, but really overall. They found important reference in selections of Robert Capa photographs.

Buck, Schlingmann and Valdes-Lora responded mostly to Kodachrome’s treatment of blues, browns, tans, greens and reds (while staying true to skin tone), but also to their gamma values, not being afraid of deep shadows and contrast wherever appropriate. Valdes-Lora wanted to avoid lighting/exposing to a custom LUT on set that would reflect this kind of Kodachrome look, in case they wanted to change course during the process. With the help of Tango, however, they discovered that by dialing back the Capa look it grounded the film a little more and made the characters “feel” more accessible. The roots of the inspiration remained in the image but a little more naturalism, a little more softness, served the story better.

Because of that they monitored on set with Alexa 709, which he thought exposing for would still provide enough room. Production designer Jonathan Rudak (another regular collaborator with the directors) was on the same page during prep (in terms of reflecting this Capa color style), and the practical team did what they could to make sure the set elements complemented this approach.

What about the audio post?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: With the effects and color almost complete, the team headed to Skywalker Ranch for a week of final dialogue edit, mix, sound design and Foley, led by Skywalker’s Danielle Dupre, Kim Foscato and E. Larry Oatfield. The team also was able to simultaneously approve color sections in Skywalker’s Stag Theater allowing for an ultra-efficient schedule. With final mix in hand, the film was mastered just after Christmas so that DCP production could begin.

Since a portion of the film was musical, how complex was the audio mix?
Skywalker sound mixer Dupre: The musical number was definitely one of the most challenging but rewarding scenes to design and mix. It was such a strong creative idea that played so deeply into the main character. The challenge was in striking a balance between tying it into the realism of the film while also leaning into the grandiosity of the musical to really sell the idea.

It was really fun to play with a combination of production dialogue and studio recordings to see how we could make it work. It was also really rewarding to create a soundscape that starts off minimally and simply and transitions to Broadway scale almost undetectably — one of the many exciting parts to working with creative and talented filmmakers.

What was the biggest challenge in post?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: Finishing a film in five to six weeks during the holidays was no easy feat. Luckily, we were able to have our directors hands-on for all final color, VFX and mix. Collaborating in the same room is always the best when you have no time to spare. We had a schedule where each day was accounted for — and we stuck to it almost down to the hour.

 

BlacKkKlansman director Spike Lee

By Iain Blair

Spike Lee has been on a roll recently. Last time we sat down for a talk, he’d just finished Chi-Raq, an impassioned rap reworking of Aristophanes’ “Lysistrata,” which was set against a backdrop of Chicago gang violence. Since then, he’s directed various TV, documentary and video projects. And now his latest film BlacKkKlansman has been nominated for a host of Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Film Editing,  Best Original Score and Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Adam Driver).

Set in the early 1970s, the unlikely-but-true story details the exploits of Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), the first African-American detective to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. Determined to make a name for himself, Stallworth sets out on a dangerous mission: infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan. The young detective soon recruits a more seasoned colleague, Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver), into the undercover investigation. Together, they team up to take down the extremist hate group as the organization aims to sanitize its violent rhetoric to appeal to the mainstream. The film also stars Topher Grace as David Duke.

Behind the scenes, Lee reteamed with co-writer Kevin Willmott, longtime editor Barry Alexander Brown and composer Terence Blanchard, along with up-and-coming DP Chayse Irvin. I spoke with the always-entertaining Lee, who first burst onto the scene back in 1986 with She’s Gotta Have It, about making the film, his workflow and the Oscars.

Is it true Jordan Peele turned you onto this story?
Yeah, he called me out of the blue and gave me possibly the greatest six-word pitch in film history — “Black man infiltrates Ku Klux Klan.” I couldn’t resist it, not with that pitch.

Didn’t you think, “Wait, this is all too unbelievable, too Hollywood?”
Well, my first question was, “Is this actually true? Or is it a Dave Chappelle skit?” Jordan assured me it’s a true story and that Ron wrote a book about it. He sent me a script, and that’s where we began, but Kevin Willmott and I then totally rewrote it so we could include all the stuff like Charlottesville at the end.

Iain Blair and Spike Lee

Did you immediately decide to juxtapose the story’s period racial hatred with all the ripped-from-the-headlines news footage?
Pretty much, as the Charlottesville rally happened August 11, 2017 and we didn’t start shooting this until mid-September, so we could include all that. And then there was the terrible synagogue massacre, and all the pipe bombs. Hate crimes are really skyrocketing under this president.

Fair to say, it’s not just a film about America, though, but about what’s happening everywhere — the rise of neo-Nazism, racism, xenophobia and so on in Europe and other places?
I’m so glad you said that, as I’ve had to correct several people who want to just focus on America, as if this is just happening here. No, no, no! Look at the recent presidential elections in Brazil. This guy — oh my God! This is a global phenomenon, and the common denominator is fear. You fire up your base with fear tactics, and pinpoint your enemy — the bogeyman, the scapegoat — and today that is immigrants.

What were the main challenges in pulling it all together?
Any time you do a film, it’s so hard and challenging. I’ve been doing this for decades now, and it ain’t getting any easier. You have to tell the story the best way you can, given the time and money you have, and it has to be a team effort. I had a great team with me, and any time you do a period piece you have added challenges to get it looking right.

You assembled a great cast. What did John David Washington and Adam Driver bring to the main roles?
They brought the weight, the hammer! They had to do their thing and bring their characters head-to-head, so it’s like a great heavyweight fight, with neither one backing down. It’s like Inside Man with Denzel and Clive Owen.

It’s the first time you’ve worked with the Canadian DP Chayse Irvin, who mainly shot shorts before this. Can you talk about how you collaborated with him?
He’s young and innovative, and he shot a lot of Beyonce’s Lemonade long-form video. What we wanted to do was shoot on film, not digital. I talked about all the ‘70s films I grew up with, like French Connection and Dog Day Afternoon. So that was the look I was after. It had to match the period, but not be too nostalgic. While we wanted to make a period film, I also wanted it to feel and look contemporary, and really connect that era with the world we live in now. He really nailed it. Then my great editor, Barry Alexander Brown, came up with all the split-screen stuff, which is also very ‘70s and really captured that era.

How tough was the shoot?
Every shoot’s tough. It’s part of the job. But I love shooting, and we used a mix of practical locations and sets in Brooklyn and other places that doubled for Colorado Springs.

Where did you post?
Same as always, in Brooklyn, at my 40 Acres and a Mule office.

Do you like the post process?
I love it, because post is when you finally sit down and actually make your film. It’s a lot more relaxing than the shoot — and a lot of it is just me and the editor and the Avid. You’re shaping and molding it and finding your way, cutting and adding stuff, flopping scenes, and it never really follows the shooting script. It becomes its own thing in post.

Talk about editing with Barry Alexander Brown, the Brit who’s cut so many of your films. What were the big editing challenges?
The big one was finding the right balance between the humor and the very serious subject matter. They’re two very different tones, and then the humor comes from the premise, which is absurd in itself. It’s organic to the characters and the situations.

Talk about the importance of sound and music, and Terence Blanchard’s spare score that blends funk with classical.
He’s done a lot of my films, and has never been nominated for an Oscar — and he should have been. He’s a truly great composer, trumpeter and bandleader, and a big part of what I do in post. I try to give him some pointers that aren’t restrictive, and then let him do his thing. I always put as much as emphasis on sound and music as I do on the acting, editing and cinematography. It’s hugely important, and once we have the score, we have a film.

I had a great sound team. Phil Stockton, who began with me back on School Daze, was the sound designer. David Boulton, Mike Russo and Howard London did the ADR mix, and my longtime mixer Tommy Fleischman was on it. We did it all at C5 in New York. We spent a long time on the mix, building it all up.

Where did you do the DI and how important is it to you?
At Company 3 with colorist Tom Poole, who’s so good. It’s very important but I’m in and out, as I know Tom and the DP are going to get the look I want.

Spike Lee on set.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
Here’s the thing. You try to do the best you can, and I can’t predict what the reaction will be. I made the film I wanted to make, and then I put it out in the world. It’s all about timing. This was made at the right time and was made with a lot of urgency. It’s a crazy world and it’s getting crazier by the minute.

How important are industry awards and nomination to you? 
They’re very important in that they bring more attention, more awareness to a film like this. One of the blessings from the strong critical response to this has been a resurgence in looking at my earlier films again, some of which may have been overlooked, like Bamboozled and Summer of Sam.

Do you see progress in Hollywood in terms of diversity and inclusion?
There’s been movement, maybe not as fast as I’d like, but it’s slowly happening, so that’s good.

What’s next?
We just finished the second season of She’s Gotta Have It for Netflix, and I have some movie things cooking. I’m pretty busy.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

VFX editor Warren Mazutinec on life, work and Altered Carbon

By Jeremy Presner

Long-time assistant editor Warren Mazutinec’s love for filming began when he saw Star Wars as an eight-year-old in a small town in Edmonton, Alberta. Unlike many other Lucas-heads, however, this one got to live out his dream grinding away in cutting rooms from Vancouver to LA working with some of the biggest editors in the galaxy.

We met back in 1998 when he assisted me on the editing of the Martin Sheen “classic” Voyage of Terror. We remain friends to this day. One of Warren’s more recent projects was Netflix’s VFX-heavy Altered Carbon, which got a lot of love from critics and audiences alike.

My old friend, who is now based in Vancouver, has an interesting story to tell, moving from assistant editor to VFX editor working on films like Underworld 4, Tomorrowland, Elysium and Chappie, so I threw some questions at him. Enjoy!

Warren Mazutinec

How did you get into the business?
I always wanted to work in the entertainment industry, but that was hard to find in Alberta. No film school-type programs were even offered, so I took the closest thing at a local college: audiovisual communications. While there, I studied photography, audio and video, but nothing like actual filmmaking. After that I attended Vancouver Film School. After film school, and with the help of some good friends, I got an opportunity to be a trainee at Shavick Entertainment.

What was it like working at a “film factory” that cranked out five to six pictures a year?
It was fun, but the product ultimately became intolerable. Movies for nine-year-olds can only be so interesting… especially low-budget ones.

What do your parents think of your career option?
Being from Alberta, everyone thought it wasn’t a real job — just a Hollywood dream. It took some convincing; my dad still tells me to look for work between gigs.

How did you learn Avid? Were you self-taught?
I was handed the manual by a post supervisor on day one. I never read it. I just asked questions and played around on any machine available. So I did have a lot of help, but I also went into work during my free time and on weekends to sit and learn what I needed to do.

Over the years I’ve been lucky enough to have cool people to work with and to learn with and from. I did six movies before I had an email address, more before I even owned a computer.

As media strayed away from film into digital, how did your role change in the cutting room? How did you refine your techniques with a changing workflow?
My first non-film movie was Underworld 4. It was shot with a Red One camera. I pretty much lied and said I knew how to deal with it. There was no difference really; just had to say goodbye to lab rolls, Keykode, etc. It was also a 3D stereo project, so that was a pickle, but not too hard to figure out.

How did you figure out the 3D stereo post?
It was basically learning to do everything twice. During production we really only played back in 3D for the novelty. I think most shows are 3D-ified in post. I’m not sure though, I’ve only done the one.

Do you think VR/AR will be something you work with in the future?
Yes, I want to be involved in VR at some point. It’s going to be big. Even just doing sound design would be cool. I think it’s the next step, and I want in.

Who are some of your favorite filmmakers?
David Lynch is my number one, by far. I love his work in all forms. A real treasure tor sure. David Fincher is great too. Scorsese, Christopher Nolan. There are so many great filmmakers working right now.

Is post in your world constantly changing, or have things more or less leveled off?
Both. But usually someone has dailies figured out, so Avid is pretty much the same. We cut in DNx115 or DnX36, so nothing like 4K-type stuff. Conform at the end is always fun, but there are tests we do at the start to figure it all out. We are rarely treading in new water.

What was it like transitioning to VFX editor? What tools did you need to learn to do that role?
FileMaker. And Jesus, son, I didn’t learn it. It’s a tough beast but it can do a lot. I managed to wrangle it to do what I was asked for, but it’s a hugely powerful piece of software. I picked up a few things on Tomorrowland and went from there.

I like the pace of the VFX editor. It’s different than assisting and is a nice change. I’d like to do more of it. I’d like to learn and use After Effects more. On the film I was VFX editor for, I was able to just use the Avid, as it wasn’t that complex. Mostly set extensions, etc.

How many VFX shot revisions would a typical shot go through on Elysium?
On Elysium, the shot version numbers got quite high, but part of that would be internal versioning by the vendor. Director Neil Blomkamp is a VFX guy himself, so he was pretty involved and knew what he wanted. The robots kept looking cooler and cooler as the show went on. Same for Chappie. That robot was almost perfect, but it took a while to get there.

You’ve worked with a vast array of editors, from, including Walter Murch, Lee Smith, Julian Clarke, Nancy Richardson and Bill Steinkamp. Can you talk about that, and have any of them let you cut material?
I’ll assemble scenes if asked to, just to help the editor out so he isn’t starting from scratch. If I get bored, I start cutting scenes as well. On Altered Carbon, when Julian (Clark) was busy with Episodes 2 and 3, I’d try to at least string together a scene or two for Episode 8. Not fine-cutting, mind you, just laying out the framework.

Walter asked a lot of us — the workload was massive. Lee Smith didn’t ask for much. Everyone asks for scene cards that they never use, ha!

Walter hadn’t worked on the Avid for five years or so prior to Tomorrowland, so there was a lot of him walking out of his room asking, “How do I?” It was funny because a lot of the time I knew what he was asking, but I had to actually do it on my machine because it’s so second nature.

What is Walter Murch like in the cutting room? Was learning his organizational process something you carried over into future cutting rooms?
I was a bit intimidated prior to meeting him. He’s awesome though. We got along great and worked well together. There was Walter, a VFX editor and four assistants. We all shared in the process. Of course, Walter’s workflow is unlike any other so it was a huge adjustment, but within a few weeks we were a well-oiled machine.

I’d come in at 6:30am to get dailies sorted and would usually finish around lunch. Then we’d screen in our theater and make notes, all of us. I really enjoyed screening the dailies that way. Then he would go into his room and do his thing. I really wish all films followed his workflow. As tough as it is, it all makes sense and nothing gets lost.

I have seen photos with the colored boxes and triangles on the wall. What does all that mean, and how often was that board updated?
Ha. That’s Walter’s own version of scene cards. It makes way better sense. The colors and shapes mean a particular thing — the longer the card the longer the scene. He did all that himself, said it helps him see the picture. I would peek into his room and watch him do this. He seemed so happy doing it, like a little kid.

Do you always add descriptions and metadata to your shots in Avid Media Composer?
We add everything possible. Usually there is a codebook the studios want, so we generate that with FileMaker on almost all the bigger shows. Walter’s is the same just way bigger and better. It made the VFX database look like a toy.

What is your workflow for managing/organizing footage?
A lot of times you have to follow someone else’s procedure, but if left to my own devices I try to make it the simplest it can be so anyone can figure out what was done.

How do you organize your timeline?
It’s specific to the editor, but I like to use as many audio tracks as possible and as few video tracks as possible, but when it’s a VFX-heavy show, that isn’t possible due to stacking various shot versions.

What did you learn from Lee Smith and Julian Clarke?
Lee Smith is a suuuuuper nice guy. He always had great stories from past films and he’s a very good editor. I’m glad he got the Oscar for Dunkirk, he’s done a lot of great work.

Julian is also great to work with. I’ve worked with him on Elysium, Chappie and Altered Carbon. He likes to cut with a lot of sound, so it’s fun to work with him. I love cutting sound, and on Altered Carbon we had over 60 tracks. It was a alternating stereo setup and we used all the tracks possible.

Altered Carbon

It was such a fun world to create sound for. Everything that could make a sound we put in. We also invented signature sounds for the tech we hoped they’d use in the final. And they did for some things.

Was that a 5.1 temp mix?? Have you ever done one?
No. I want to do a 5.1 Avid mix. Looks fun.

What was the schedule like on Altered Carbon? How was that different than some of the features you’ve worked on?
It was six-day weeks and 12 hours a day. Usually one week per month I’d trade off with the 2nd assistant and she’d let me have an actual weekend. It was a bit of a grind. I worked on Episodes 2, 3 and 8, and the schedules for those were tight, but somehow we got through it all. We had a great team up here for Vancouver’s editorial. They were also cutting in LA as well. It was pretty much non-stop editing the whole way through.

How involved was Netflix in terms of the notes process? Were you working with the same editors on the episodes you assisted?
Yes, all episodes were with Julian. First it went through Skydance notes, then Netflix. Skydance usually had more as they were the first to see the cuts. There were many versions for sure.

What was it like working with Neil Blomkamp?
It was awesome. He makes cool films, and it’s great to see footage like that. I love shooting guns, explosions, swords and swearing. I beat him in ping-pong once. I danced around in victory and he demanded we play again. I retired. One of the best environments I’ve ever worked in. Elysium was my favorite gig.

What’s the largest your crew has gotten in post?
Usually one or two editors, up to four assistants, a PA, a post super — so eight or nine, depending.

Do you prefer working with a large team or do you like smaller films?
I like the larger team. It can all be pretty overwhelming and having others there to help out, the easier it can be to get through. The more the merrier!

Altered Carbon

How do you handle long-ass-days?
Long days aren’t bad when you have something to do. On Altered Carbon I kept a skateboard in my car for those times. I just skated around the studio waiting for a text. Recently I purchased a One-Wheel (skateboard with 1 wheel) and plan to use it to commute to work as much as possible.

How do you navigate the politics of a cutting room?
Politics can be tricky. I usually try to keep out of things unless I’m asked, but I do like to have a sit down or a discussion of what’s going on privately with the editor or post super. I like to be aware of what’s coming, so the rest of us are ready.

Do you prefer features to TV?
It doesn’t matter anymore because the good filmmakers work in both mediums. It used to be that features were one thing and TV was another, with less complex stories. Now that’s different and at times it’s the opposite. Features usually pay more though, but again that’s changing. I still think features are where it’s at, but that’s just vanity talking.

Sometimes your project posts in Vancouver but moves to LA for finishing. Why? Does it ever come back?
Mostly I think it’s because that’s where the director/producers/studio lives. After it’s shot everyone just goes back home. Home is usually LA or NY. I wish they’d stay here.

How long do you think you’ll continue being an AE? Until you retire? What age do you think that’ll be?
No idea; I just want to keep working on projects that excite me.

Would you ever want to be an editor or do you think you’d like to pivot to VFX, or are you happy where you are?
I only hope to keep learning and doing more. I like the VFX editing, I like assisting and I like being creative. As far as cutting goes, I’d like to get on a cool series as a junior editor or at least start doing a few scenes to get better. I just want to keep advancing, I’d love to do some VR stuff.

What’s next for you project wise?
I’m on a Disney Show called Timmy Failure. I can’t say anything more at this point.

What advice do you have for other assistant editors trying to come up?
It’s going to take a lot longer than you think to become good at the job. Being the only assistant does not make you a qualified first assistant. It took me 10 years to get there. Also you never stop learning, so always be open to another approach. Everyone does things differently. With Murch on Tomorrowland, it was a whole new way of doing things that I had never seen before, so it was interesting to learn, although it was very intimidating at the start.


Jeremy Presner is an Emmy-nominated film and television editor residing in New York City. Twenty years ago, Warren was AE on his first film. Since then he has cut such diverse projects as Carrie, Stargate Atlantis, Love & Hip Hop and Breaking Amish.

Review: iOgrapher Multi Case for mobile filmmaking

By Brady Betzel

Thanks to the amazing iPhone X, Google Pixel and Samsung Galaxy, almost everyone has a high-end video camera on their person at all times and this is helping to spur on mobile filmmaking and vlogging.

From YouTube to Instagram to movies like Unsane (Steven Soderbergh) or Tangerine (Sean Baker) — and regardless of whether you think a $35,000 camera setup tells a story better than a $1,000 cell phone (looking at you Apple Phone XS Max) — mobile filmmaking is here to stay and will only get better.

iOgrapher’s latest release is the iOgrapher Multi Case, a compact mobile filmmaking mounting solution that works with today’s most popular phones. iOgrapher has typically created solutions that were tied to the mobile device being used for filmmaking, such as an iPhone, the latest Samsung Galaxy phones, iPads or even action cameras like a GoPro Hero 7 Black.

With the new iOgrapher Multi Case you can fit any mobile device that measures more than 5 ½” x 2 ¼” and less than 6 ½” by 3 ⅜”. Unfortunately, you won’t be fitting an iPad or a GoPro in the iOgrapher Multi Case, but don’t fret! iOgrapher makes rigs for those as well. On the top of the Multi Case are two cold shoe mounts for lights, microphones or any other device, like a GoPro. To mount things with ¼” 20 screw mounts in the cold shoes you will need to find a cold shoe to ¼” 20 adapter, which is available on iOgrapher’s accessory page. You can also find these at Monoprice or Amazon for real cheap.

And if you are looking to order more mounts you may want to order some extra cold shoe adapters that can be mounted on the handles of the iOgrapher Multi Case in the additional ¼” 20 screw mounts. The mounts on the handles are great for adding in additional lighting or microphones. I’ve even found that if you are going to be doing some behind-the-scenes filming or need another angle for your shooting, a small camera like a GoPro can be easily mounted and angled. With all this mounting you should assume that you are going to be using the iOgrapher on a sturdy tripod. Just for fun, I mounted the iOgrapher Multi Case onto a GoPro 3-Way Grip, which can also be used as a light tripod. It wasn’t exactly stable but it worked. I wouldn’t suggest using it for more than an emergency shooting situation though.

On the flip side (all pun intended), the iOgrapher can be solidly mounted vertically with the ¼” 20 screw mounts on the handles. With Instagram making headway with vertical video in their Instagram Stories, iOgrapher took that idea and built that into their Multi Case, further cementing grumbling from the old folks who just don’t get vertical video.

Testing
I tried out both a Samsung Galaxy s8+ as well as an iPhone 7+ with their cases on inside of the iOgrapher Multi Case. Both fit. The iPhone 7+ was stretching the boundaries of the Multi Case, but it did fit and worked well. The way the phones are inserted into the Multi Case is by a spring-loaded bottom piece. From the left or top side, if you are shooting vertically, you push the bottom of the mobile device into the corner covered slots of the iOgrapher Multi Case until the top or the left side can be secured under the left or top side of the Multi Case. It’s really easy.

I was initially concerned with the spring loading of the case; I wasn’t sure if the springs would be resilient enough to handle the constant pulling in and out of the phones, but the springs are high quality and held up beautifully. I even tried inserting my mobile phones tons of times and didn’t notice any issues with the springs or my phones.

Take care when inserting your phone into the Multi Case if you have a protective shield on the screen of your device. If you aren’t extra careful it can pull or snag on the cover — especially with the tight fit of a case. Just pay attention and there will be nothing to worry about. The simple beauty of the iOgrapher is that with a wider grip of your filmmaking device, you have a larger area to distribute any shaking coming from your hands, essentially helping stabilize your filmmaking without the need for a full-fledged gimbal.

If you accidentally drop your iOgrapher you may get a scratch, but for the most part they are built sturdy and can withstand punishment, whether it’s from your four year old or from weather. If you want to get a little fancy, you can buy affordable lights like the Litra Torch (check out my review) to attach to the cold shoe mounts, or even a Rode microphone (don’t forget the TRS to TRRS adapter if you are plugging into an iPhone), and you are off and running.

Summing Up
I have been really intrigued with iOgrapher’s products since day one. They are an affordable and sturdy way to jump into filmmaking using cameras everyone carries with them every day: their phones.

Whether you are a high school student looking to get steady and professional mobile video, or a journalist looking for a quick way to make the most of your shots with just a phone, light, mic and tripod mount, the iOgrapher Multi Case will unlock your mobile filmmaking potential.

The iOgrapher Multi Case is a very durable protective case for your mobile filmmaking devices that is a steal at $79.99. If you are a parent that is looking for an inexpensive way to try and tease your child’s interest in video take a look at www.iographer.com and grab a few accessories like a Manfrotto light and Rode VideoMicro to add some subtle lighting and pick up the best quality audio.

Make sure to check out Dave Basulto’s — the creator of iOgrapher — demo of the iOgrapher Multi Case, including trying out the fit of different phones.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Catching up with Aquaman director James Wan

By Iain Blair

Director James Wan has become one of the biggest names in Hollywood thanks to the $1.5 billion-grossing Fast & Furious 7, as well as the Saw, Conjuring and Insidious films — three of the most successful horror franchises of the last decade.

Now the Malaysian-born, Australian-raised Wan, who also writes and produces, has taken on the challenge of bringing Aquaman and Atlantis to life. The origin story of half-surface dweller, half-Atlantean Arthur Curry stars Jason Momoa in the title role. Amber Heard plays Mera, a fierce warrior and Aquaman’s ally throughout his journey.

James Wan and Iain Blair

Additional cast includes Willem Dafoe as Vulko, council to the Atlantean throne; Patrick Wilson as Orm, the present King of Atlantis; Dolph Lundgren as Nereus, King of the Atlantean tribe Xebel; Yahya Abdul-Mateen II as the revenge-seeking Manta; and Nicole Kidman as Arthur’s mom, Atlanna.

Wan’s team behind the scenes included such collaborators as Oscar-nominated director of photography Don Burgess (Forrest Gump), his five-time editor Kirk Morri (The Conjuring), production designer Bill Brzeski (Iron Man 3), visual effects supervisor Kelvin McIlwain (Furious 7) and composer Rupert Gregson-Williams (Wonder Woman).

I spoke with the director about making the film, dealing with all the effects, and his workflow.

Aquaman is definitely not your usual superhero. What was the appeal of doing it? 
I didn’t grow up with Aquaman, but I grew up with other comic books, and I always was well aware of him as he’s iconic. A big part of the appeal for me was he’d never really been done before — not on the big screen and not really on TV. He’s never had the spotlight before. The other big clincher was this gave me the opportunity to do a world-creation film, to build a unique world we’ve never seen before. I loved the idea of creating this big fantasy world underwater.

What sort of film did you set out to make?
Something that was really faithful and respectful to the source material, as I loved the world of the comic book once I dove in. I realized how amazing this world is and how interesting Aquaman is. He’s bi-racial, half-Atlantean, half-human, and he feels he doesn’t really fit in anywhere at the start of the film. But by the end, he realizes he’s the best of both worlds and he embraces that. I loved that. I also loved the fact it takes place in the ocean so I could bring in issues like the environment and how we treat the sea, so I felt it had a lot of very cool things going for it — quite apart from all the great visuals I could picture.

Obviously, you never got the Jim Cameron post-Titanic memo — never, ever shoot in water.
(Laughs) I know, but to do this we unfortunately had to get really wet as over 2/3rds of the film is set underwater. The crazy irony of all this is when people are underwater they don’t look wet. It’s only when you come out of the sea or pool that you’re glossy and dripping.

We did a lot of R&D early on, and decided that shooting underwater looking wet wasn’t the right look anyway, plus they’re superhuman and are able to move in water really fast, like fish, so we adopted the dry-for-wet technique. We used a lot of special rigs for the actors, along with bluescreen, and then combined all that with a ton of VFX for the hair and costumes. Hair is always a big problem underwater, as like clothing it behaves very differently, so we had to do a huge amount of work in post in those areas.

How early on did you start integrating post and all the VFX?
It’s that kind of movie where you have to start post and all the VFX almost before you start production. We did so much prep, just designing all the worlds and figuring out how they’d look, and how the actors would interact with them. We hired an army of very talented concept artists, and I worked very closely with my production designer Bill Brzeski, my DP Don Burgess and my visual effects supervisor Kelvin McIlwain. We went to work on creating the whole look and trying to figure out what we could shoot practically with the actors and stunt guys and what had to be done with VFX. And the VFX were crucial in dealing with the actors, too. If a body didn’t quite look right, they’d just replace them completely, and the only thing we’d keep was the face.

It almost sounds like making an animated film.
You’re right, as over 90% of it was VFX. I joke about it being an animated movie, but it’s not really a joke. It’s no different from, say, a Pixar movie.

Did you do a lot of previs?
A lot, with people like Third Floor, Day For Nite, Halon, Proof and others. We did a lot of storyboards too, as they are quicker if you want to change a camera angle, or whatever, on the fly. Then I’d hand them off to the previs guys and they’d build on those.

What were the main technical challenges in pulling it all together on the shoot?
We shot most of it Down Under, near Brisbane. We used all nine of Village Roadshow Studios’ soundstages, including the new Stage 9, as we had over 50 sets, including the Atlantis Throne Room and Coliseum. The hardest thing in terms of shooting it was just putting all the actors in the rigs for the dry-for-wet sequences; they’re very cumbersome and awkward, and the actors are also in these really outrageous costumes, and it can be quite painful at times for them. So you can’t have them up there too long. That was hard. Then we used a lot of newish technology, like virtual production, for scenes where the actors are, say, riding creatures underwater.

We’d have it hooked up to the cameras so you could frame a shot and actually see the whole environment and the creature the actor is supposed to be on — even though it’s just the actors and bluescreen and the creature is not there. And I could show the actors — look, you’re actually riding a giant shark — and also tell the camera operator to pan left or right. So it was invaluable in letting me adjust performance and camera setups as we shot, and all the actors got an idea of what they were doing and how the VFX would be added later in post. Designing the film was so much fun, but executing it was a pain.

The film was edited by Kirk Morri, who cut Furious 7, and worked with you on the Insidious and The Conjuring films. How did that work?
He wasn’t on set but he’d visit now and again, especially when we were shooting something crazy and it would be cool to actually see it. Then we’d send dailies and he’d start assembling, as we had so much bluescreen and VFX stuff to deal with. I’d hop in for an hour or so at the end of each day’s shoot to go over things as I’m very hands on — so much so that I can drive editors crazy, but Kirk puts up with all that.

I like to get a pretty solid cut from the start. I don’t do rough assemblies. I like to jump straight into the real cut, and that was so important on this because every shot is a VFX shot. So the sooner you can lock the shot, the better, and then the VFX teams can start their work. If you keep changing the cut, then you’ll never get your VFX shots done in time. So we’d put the scene together, then pass it to previs, so you don’t just have actors floating in a bluescreen, but they’re in Atlantis or wherever.

Where did you do the post?
We did most of it back in LA on the Warner lot.

Do you like the post process?
I absolutely love it, and it’s very important to my filmmaking style. For a start, I can never give up editing and tweaking all the VFX shots. They have to pull it away from me, and I’d say that my love of all the elements of the post process — editing, sound design, VFX, music — comes from my career in suspense movies. Getting all the pieces of post right is so crucial to the end result and success of any film. This post was creatively so much fun, but it was long and hard and exhausting.

James Wan

All the VFX must have been a huge challenge.
(Laughs) Yes, as there’s over 2,500 VFX shots and we had everyone working on it — ILM, Scanline, Base, Method, MPC, Weta, Rodeo, Digital Domain, Luma — anyone who had a computer! Every shot had some VFX, even the bar scene where Arthur’s with his dad. That was a set, but the environment outside the window was all VFX.

What was the hardest VFX sequence to do?
The answer is, the whole movie. The trench sequence was hard, but Scanline did a great job. Anything underwater was tough, and then the big final battle was super-difficult, and ILM did all that.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
For the most part, but like most directors, I’m never fully satisfied.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

DevinSuperTramp: The making of a YouTube filmmaker

Devin Graham, aka DevinSuperTramp, made the unlikely journey from BYU dropout to a viral YouTube sensation who has over five million followers. After leaving school, Graham went to Hawaii to work on a documentary. The project soon ran out of money and he was stuck on the island… feeling very much a dropout and a failure. He started making fun videos with his friends to pass the time, and DevinSuperTramp was born. Now he travels, filming his view of the world, taking on daring adventures to get his next shot, and risking life and limb.

Shooting while snowboarding behind a trackhoe with a bunch of friends for a new video.

We recently had the chance to sit down with Graham to hear firsthand what lessons he’s learned along his journey, and how he’s developed into the filmmaker he is today.

Why extreme adventure content?
I grew up in the outdoors — always hiking and camping with my dad, and snowboarding. I’ve always been intrigued by pushing human limits. One thing I love about the extreme thing is that everyone we work with is the best at what they do. Like, we had the world’s best scooter riders. I love working with people who devote their entire lives to this one skillset. You get to see that passion come through. To me, it’s super inspiring to show off their talents to the world.

How did you get DevinSuperTramp off the ground? Pun intended.
I’ve made movies ever since I can remember. I was a little kid shooting Legos and stop-motion with my siblings. In high school, I took photography classes, and after I saw the movie Jurassic Park, I was like, “I want to make movies for a living. I want to do the next Jurassic Park.” So, I went to film school. Actually, I got rejected from the film program the first time I applied, which made me volunteer for every film thing going on at the college — craft service, carrying lights, whatever I could do. One day, my roommate was like, “YouTube is going to be the next big thing for videos. You should get on that.”

And you did.
Well, I started making videos just kind of for fun, not expecting anything to happen. But it blew up. Eight years later, it’s become the YouTube channel we have now, with five million subscribers. And we get to travel around the world creating content that we love creating.

Working on a promo video for Recoil – all the effects were done practically.

And you got to bring it full circle when you worked with Universal on promoting Fallen Kingdom.
I did! That was so fun and exciting. But yeah, I was always making content. I didn’t wait ‘til after I graduated. I was constantly looking for opportunities and networking with people from the film program. I think that was a big part of (succeeding at that time), just looking for every opportunity to milk it for everything I could.

In the early days, how did you promote your work?
I was creating all my stuff on YouTube, which, at that time, had hardly any solid, quality content. There was a lot of content, but it was mostly shot on whatever smartphone people had, or it was just people blogging. There wasn’t really anything cinematic, so right away our stuff stood out. One of the first videos I ever posted ended up getting like a million views right away, and people all around the world started contacting me, saying, “Hey, Devin, I’d love for you to shoot a commercial for us.” I had these big opportunities right from the start, just by creating content with my friends and putting it out on YouTube.

Where did you get the money for equipment?
In the beginning, I didn’t even own a camera. I just borrowed some from friends. We didn’t have any fancy stuff. I was using a Canon 5D Mark II and the Canon T2i, which are fairly cheap cameras compared to what we’re using now. But I was just creating the best content I could with the resources I had, and I was able to build a company from that.

If you had to start from scratch today, do you think you could do it again?
I definitely think it’s 100 percent doable, but I would have to play the game differently. Even now we are having to play the game differently than we did six months ago. Social media is hard because it’s constantly evolving. The algorithms keep changing.

Filming in Iceland for an upcoming documentary.

What are you doing today that’s different from before?
One thing is just using trends and popular things that are going on. For example, a year and a half ago, Pokémon Go was very popular, so we did a video on Pokémon and it got 20 million views within a couple weeks. We have to be very smart about what content we put out — not just putting out content to put out content.

One thing that’s always stayed true since the beginning is consistent content. When we don’t put out a video weekly, it actually hurts our content being seen. The famous people on YouTube now are the ones putting out daily content. For what we’re doing, that’s impossible, so we’ve sort of shifted platforms from YouTube, which was our bread and butter. Facebook is where we push our main content now, because Facebook doesn’t favor daily content. It just favors good-quality content.

Teens will be the first to say that grown-ups struggle with knowing what’s cool. How do you chase after topics likely to blow up?
A big one is going on YouTube and seeing what videos are trending. Also, if you go to Google Trends, it shows you the top things that were searched that day, that week, that month. So, it’s being on top of that. Or, maybe, Taylor Swift is coming out with a new album; we know that’s going to be really popular. Just staying current with all that stuff. You can also use Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get an idea of what people are really excited about.

Can you tell us about some of the equipment you use, and the demands that your workflow puts on your storage needs?
We shoot so much content. We own two Red 8K cameras that we film everything with, and we’re shooting daily for the most part. On an average week, we’re shooting about eight terabytes, and then backing that up — so 16 terabytes a week. Obviously, we need a lot of storage, and we need storage that we can access quickly. We’re not putting it on tape. We need to pull stuff up right there and start editing on it right away.

So, we need the biggest drives that are as fast as possible. That’s why we use G-Tech’s 96TB G-Speed Shuttle XL towers. We have around 10 of those, and we’ve been shooting with those for the last three to four years. We needed something super reliable. Some of these shoots involve forking out a lot of money. I can’t take a hard drive and just hope it doesn’t fail. I need something that never fails on me — like ever. It’s just not worth taking that risk. I need a drive I can completely trust and is also super-fast.

What’s the one piece of advice that you wish somebody had given you when you were starting out?
In my early days, I didn’t have much of a budget, so I would never back up any of my footage. I was working on two really important projects and had them all on one drive. My roommate knocked that drive off the table, and I lost all that footage. It wasn’t backed up. I only had little bits and pieces still saved on the card — enough to release it, but a lot of people wanted to buy the stock footage and I didn’t have most of the original content. I lost out on a huge opportunity.

Today, we back up every single thing we do, no matter how big or how small it is. So, if I could do my early days over again, even if I didn’t have all the money to fund it, I’d figure out a way to have backup drives. That was something I had to learn the hard way.

NAB NY: A DP’s perspective

By Barbie Leung

At this year’s NAB New York show, my third, I was able to wander the aisles in search of tools that fit into my world of cinematography. Here are just a few things that caught my eye…

Blackmagic, which had large booth at the entrance to the hall, was giving demos of its Resolve 15, among other tools. Panasonic also had a strong presence mid-floor, with an emphasis on the EVA-1 cameras. As usual, B&H attracted a lot of attention, as did Arri, which brought a couple of Arri Trinity rigs to demo.

During the HDR Video Essentials session, colorist Juan Salvo of TheColourSpace, talked about the emerging HDR 10+ standard proposed by Samsung and Amazon Video. Also mentioned was the trend of consumer displays getting brighter every year and that impact on content creation and content grading. Salvo pointed out the affordability of LG’s C7 OLEDs (about 700 Nits) for use as client monitors, while Flanders Scientific (which had a booth at the show) remains the expensive standard for grading. It was interesting to note that LG, while being the show’s Official Display Partner, was conspicuously absent from the floor.

Many of the panels and presentations unsurprisingly focused on content monetization — how to monetize faster and cheaper. Amazon Web Service’s stage sessions emphasized various AWS Elemental technologies, including automating the creation of video highlight clips for content like sports videos using facial recognition algorithms to generate closed captioning, and improving the streaming experience onboard airplanes. The latter will ultimately make content delivery a streamlined enough process for airlines that it would enable advertisers to enter this currently untapped space.

Editor Janis Vogel, a board member of the Blue Collar Post Collective, spoke at the #galsngear “Making Waves” panel, and noted the progression toward remote work in her field. She highlighted the fact that DaVinci Resolve, which had already made it possible for color work to be done remotely, is now also making it possible for editors to collaborate remotely. The ability to work remotely gives professionals the choice to work outside of the expensive-to-live-in major markets, which is highly desirable given that producers are trying to make more and more content while keeping budgets low.

Speaking at the same panel, director of photography/camera operator Selene Richholt spoke to the fact that crews are being monetized with content producers either asking production and post pros to provide standard service at substandard rates, or more services without paying more.

On a more exciting note, she cited recent 9×16 projects that she has shot with the camera mounted vertically (as opposed to shooting 16×9 and cropping in) in order to take full advantage of lens properties. She looks forward to the trend of more projects that can mix aspects ratios and push aesthetics.

Well, that’s it for this year. I’m already looking forward to next year.

 


Barbie Leung is a New York-based cinematographer and camera operator working in film, music video and branded content. Her work has played Sundance, the Tribeca Film Festival, Outfest and Newfest. She is also the DCP mastering technician at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Telestream’s Wirecast now integrated in BoxCast platform

BoxCast has completed the integration of Telestream Wirecast with its BoxCast platform. Telestream Wirecast is a live video production software for Mac or Windows that helps create high-quality live video webcasts from multiple sources, including webcams and screen shares to using multiple cameras, graphics and media for live events.

As a result of the BoxCast/Wirecast integration, users can now easily stream high-quality video using BoxCast’s advanced, cloud-based platform. With unlimited streaming, viewership and destinations, BoxCast manages the challenging part of live video streaming.

The BoxCast Live Streaming Platform provides Wirecast users access to a number of features, including:
• Single Source Simulcasting
• Ticketed Monetization
• Password Protection
• Video Embedding
• Cloud Transcoding
• Live Support

How does it work? Using BoxCast’s RTMP video ingestion option, users can select BoxCast as a streaming destination from within Wirecast. This allows Wirecast to stream directly to BoxCast. It will use the computer for encoding the video and audio, and it will transmit over RTMP.

The setup can be used with either a single-use RTMP or static RTMP channel. However in both cases, the setup must be done within 10 minutes of a scheduled broadcast.

Another way to stream from Wirecast is to send the Wirecast program output to a secondary HDMI or SDI output that is plugged into the BoxCaster or BoxCaster Pro. The BoxCaster’s hardware encoding relieves your computer of encoding the video and audio in addition to taking advantage of specially-designed communication protocols to optimize your available network connectivity.

BoxCast integration with Telestream Wirecast is available immediately.