Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: post production

Quantum offers new F-Series NVMe storage arrays

During the NAB show, Quantum introduced its new F-Series NVMe storage arrays designed for performance, availability and reliability. Using non-volatile memory express (NVMe) Flash drives for ultra-fast reads and writes, the series supports massive parallel processing and is intended for studio editing, rendering and other performance-intensive workloads using large unstructured datasets.

Incorporating the latest Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) networking technology, the F-Series provides direct access between workstations and the NVMe storage devices, resulting in predictable and fast network performance. By combining these hardware features with the new Quantum Cloud Storage Platform and the StorNext file system, the F-Series offers end-to-end storage capabilities for post houses, broadcasters and others working in rich media environments, such as visual effects rendering.

The first product in the F-Series is the Quantum F2000, a 2U dual-node server with two hot-swappable compute canisters and up to 24 dual-ported NVMe drives. Each compute canister can access all 24 NVMe drives and includes processing power, memory and connectivity specifically designed for high performance and availability.

The F-Series is based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform, a software-defined block storage stack tuned specifically for video and video-like data. The platform eliminates data services unrelated to video while enhancing data protection, offering networking flexibility and providing block interfaces.

According to Quantum, the F-Series is as much as five times faster than traditional Flash storage/networking, delivering extremely low latency and hundreds of thousands of IOPs per chassis. The series allows users to reduce infrastructure costs by moving from Fiber Channel to Ethernet IP-based infrastructures. Additionally, users leveraging a large number of HDDs or SSDs to meet their performance requirements can gain back racks of data center space.

The F-Series is the first product line based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform.

Facilis Launches Hub shared storage line

Facilis Technology rolled out its new Hub Shared Storage line for media production workflows during the NAB show. Facilis Hub includes new hardware and an integrated disk-caching system for cloud and LTO backup and archive designed to provide block-level virtualization and multi-connectivity performance.

“Hub Shared Storage is an all-new product based on our Hub Server that launched in 2017. It’s the answer to our customers’ requests for a more compact server chassis, lower-cost hybrid (SSD and HDD) options and integrated cloud and LTO archive features,” says Jim McKenna, VP of sales and marketing at Facilis. “We deliver all of this with new, more powerful hardware, new drive capacity options and a new look to both the system and software interface.”

The Facilis shared storage network allows both block-mode Fibre Channel and Ethernet connectivity simultaneously with the ability to connect through either method with the same permissions, user accounts and desktop appearance. This expands user access, connection resiliency and network permissions. The system can be configured as a direct-attached drive or segmented into various-sized volumes that carry individual permissions for read and write access.

Facilis Object Cloud
Object Cloud is an integrated disk-caching system for cloud and LTO backup and archive that includes up to 100TB of cloud storage for an annual fee. The Facilis Virtual Volume can display cloud, tape and spinning disk data in the same directory structure on the client desktop.

“A big problem for our customers is managing multiple interfaces for the various locations of their data. With Object Cloud, files in multiple locations reside in the same directory structure and are tracked by our FastTracker asset tracking in the same database as any active media asset,” says McKenna. “Object Cloud uses Object Storage technology to virtualize a Facilis volume with cloud and LTO locations. This gives access to files that exist entirely on disk, in the Cloud or on LTO, or even partially on disk and partially in the cloud.”

Every Facilis Hub Shared Storage server comes with unlimited seats in the Facilis FastTracker asset tracking application. The Object Cloud Software and Storage package is available for most Facilis servers running version 7.2 or higher.

Arraiy 4.11.19

Atomos’ new Shogun 7: HDR monitor, recorder, switcher

The new Atomos Shogun 7 is a seven-inch HDR monitor, recorder and switcher that offers an all-new 1500-nit, daylight-viewable, 1920×1200 panel with a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio and 15+ stops of dynamic range displayed. It also offers ProRes RAW recording and realtime Dolby Vision output. Shogun 7 will be available in June 2019, priced at $1,499.

The Atomos screen uses a combination of advanced LED and LCD technologies which together offer deeper, better blacks the company says rivals OLED screens, “but with the much higher brightness and vivid color performance of top-end LCDs.”

A new 360-zone backlight is combined with this new screen technology and controlled by the Dynamic AtomHDR engine to show millions of shades of brightness and color. It allows Shogun 7 to display 15+ stops of real dynamic range on-screen. The panel, says Atomos, is also incredibly accurate, with ultra-wide color and 105% of DCI-P3 covered, allowing for the same on-screen dynamic range, palette of colors and shades that your camera sensor sees.

Atomos and Dolby have teamed up to create Dolby Vision HDR “live” — a tool that allows you to see HDR live on-set and carry your creative intent from the camera through into HDR post. Dolby have optimized their target display HDR processing algorithm which Atomos has running inside the Shogun 7. It brings realtime automatic frame-by-frame analysis of the Log or RAW video and processes it for optimal HDR viewing on a Dolby Vision-capable TV or monitor over HDMI. Connect Shogun 7 to the Dolby Vision TV and AtomOS 10 automatically analyzes the image, queries the TV and applies the right color and brightness profiles for the maximum HDR experience on the display.

Shogun 7 records images up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 or 2kp240 slow motion from compatible cameras, in RAW/Log or HLG/PQ over SDI/HDMI. Footage is stored directly to AtomX SSDmini or approved off-the-shelf SATA SSD drives. There are recording options for Apple ProRes RAW and ProRes, Avid DNx and Adobe CinemaDNG RAW codecs. Shogun 7 has four SDI inputs plus a HDMI 2.0 input, with both 12G-SDI and HDMI 2.0 outputs. It can record ProRes RAW in up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 DCI/UHD and 2kp240 DCI/HD, depending on the camera’s capabilities. Also, 10-bit 4:2:2 ProRes or DNxHR recording is available up to 4Kp60 or 2Kp240. The four SDI inputs enable the connection of most quad-link, dual-link or single-link SDI cinema cameras. Pixels are preserved with data rates of up to 1.8Gb/s.

In terms of audio, Shogun 7 eliminates the need for a separate audio recorder. Users can add 48V stereo mics via an optional balanced XLR breakout cable, or select mic or line input levels, plus record up to 12 channels of 24/96 digital audio from HDMI or SDI. Monitoring selected stereo tracks is via the 3.5mm headphone jack. There are dedicated audio meters, gain controls and adjustments for frame delay.

Shogun 7 features the latest version of the AtomOS 10 touchscreen interface, first seen on the Ninja V.  The new body of Shogun 7 has a Ninja V-like exterior with ARRI anti-rotation mounting points on the top and bottom of the unit to ensure secure mounting.

AtomOS 10 on Shogun 7 has the full range of monitoring tools, including Waveform, Vectorscope, False Color, Zebras, RGB parade, Focus peaking, Pixel-to-pixel magnification, Audio level meters and Blue only for noise analysis.

Shogun 7 can also be used as a portable touchscreen-controlled multi-camera switcher with asynchronous quad-ISO recording. Users can switch up to four 1080p60 SDI streams, record each plus the program output as a separate ISO, then deliver ready-for-edit recordings with marked cut-points in XML metadata straight to your NLE. The current Sumo19 HDR production monitor-recorder will also gain the same functionality in a free firmware update.

There is asynchronous switching, plus use genlock in and out to connect to existing AV infrastructure. Once the recording is over, users can import the XML file into an NLE and the timeline populates with all the edits in place. XLR audio from a separate mixer or audio board is recorded within each ISO, alongside two embedded channels of digital audio from the original source. The program stream always records the analog audio feed as well as a second track that switches between the digital audio inputs to match the switched feed.


SymplyWorkspace: high-speed, multi-user SAN for smaller post houses

Symply has launched SymplyWorkspace, a SAN system that uses Quantum’s StorNext 6 for high-speed collaboration over Thunderbolt 3 for up to eight simultaneous Mac, Windows, or Linux editors, with RAID protection for content safety.

SymplyWorkspace is designed for sharing content in realtime video production. The product features a compact desk-side design geared to smaller post houses, in-house creatives, ad agencies or any creative house needing an affordable high-speed sharing solution.

“With the high adoption rates of Thunderbolt in smaller post houses, with in-house creatives and with other content creators, connecting high-speed shared storage has been a hassle that requires expensive and bulky adapters and rack-mounted, hot and noisy storage, servers and switches,” explains Nick Warburton from Global Distribution, which owns Symply. “SymplyWorkspace allows Thunderbolt 3 clients to just plug into the desk-side system to ingest, edit, finish and deliver without ever moving content locally, even at 4K resolutions, with no adapters or racks needed.”

Based on the Quantum StorNext 6 sharing software, SymplyWorkspace allows users to connect up to eight laptops and workstations to the system and share video files, graphics and other data files instantly with no copying and without concerns for version control or duplicated files. A file server can also be attached to enable re-sharing of content to other users across Ethernet networks.

Symply has also addressed the short cable-length issues commonly cited with Thunderbolt. By using the latest Thunderbolt 3 optical cable technology from Corning, clients can be up to 50 feet away from SymplyWorkspace while maintaining full high-speed collaboration.

The complete SymplyWorkspace solution starts at $10,995 for 24TB of RAID-protected storage and four simultaneous Mac users. Four additional users (up to eight total) can be added at any time. The product is also available in configurations up to 288TB and supporting multiple 4K streams, with any combination of up to eight Mac, Windows or Linux users. It’s available now through worldwide resellers and joins the SymplyUltra line of workflow storage solutions for larger post and broadcast facilities.


Review: Mzed.com’s Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington

By Brady Betzel

I am constantly looking to educate myself, no matter what the source — or subject. Whether I am learning how to make a transition in Adobe After Effects from an eSports editor on YouTube to Warren Eagles teaching color correction in Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve on FXPHD.com, I’m always beefing up my skills. I even learn from bad tutorials — they teach you what not to do!

But when you come across a truly remarkable learning experience, it is only fair to share with the rest of the world. Last year I saw an ad for an MZed.com course called “Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington,” and was immediately interested. These days you can pretty much find any technical tutorial you can dream of on YouTube, but truly professional, higher education-like, theory-based education series are very hard to come by. Even ones you need to pay for aren’t always worth their price of admission, which is a huge let down.

Ollie sharing his wisdom.

Once I gained access to MZed.com I wanted to watch every educational series they had. From lighting techniques with ASC member Shane Hurlbut to the ARRI Amira Camera Primer, there are over 150 hours of education available from industry leaders. However, I found my way to Directing Color…

I am often asked if I think people should go to college or a film school. My answer? If you have the money and time, you should go to college followed by film school (or do both together, if the college offers it). Not only will you learn a craft, but you will most likely spend hundreds of hours studying and visualizing the theory behind it. For example, when someone asks me about the science behind camera lenses, I can confidently answer them thanks to my physics class based on lenses and optics from California Lutheran University (yes, a shameless plug).

In my opinion, a two-, four- or even 10-year education allows me to live in the grey. I am comfortable arguing for both sides of a debate, as well as the options that are in between —  the grey. I feel like my post-high school education really allowed me to recognize and thrive in the nuances of debate. Leaving me to play devil’s advocate maybe a little too much, but also having civil and proactive discussions with others without being demeaning or nasty — something we are actively missing these days. So if living in the grey is for you, I really think a college education supplemented by online or film school education is valuable (assuming you make the decision that the debt is worth it like I did).

However, I know that is not an option for everyone since it can be very expensive — trust me, I know. I am almost done paying off my undergraduate fees while still paying off my graduate ones, which I am still two or three classes away from finishing. That being said, Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington is the only online education series I have seen so far that is on the same level as some of my higher education classes. Not only is the content beautifully shot and color corrected, but Ollie gives confident and accessible lessons on how color can be used to draw the viewer’s attention to multiple parts of the screen.

Ollie Kenchington is a UK-based filmmaker who runs Korro Films. From the trailer of his Directing Color series, you can immediately see the beauty of Ollie’s work and know that you will be in safe hands. (You can read more about his background here.)

The course raises the online education bar and will elevate the audiences idea of professional insight. The first module “Creating a Palette” covers the thoughts behind creating a color palette for a small catering company. You may even want to start with the last Bonus Module “Ox & Origin” to get a look at what Ollie will be creating throughout the seven modules and about an hour and a half of content.

While Ollie goes over “looks,” the beauty of this course is that he goes through his internal thought processes including deciding on palettes based on color theory. He didn’t just choose teal and orange because it looks good, he chooses his color palette based on complementary colors.

Throughout the course Ollie covers some technical knowledge, including calibrating monitors and cameras, white balancing and shooting color charts to avoid having wrong color balance in post. This is so important because if you don’t do these simple steps, your color correction session while be much harder. And wasting time on fixing incorrect color balance takes time away from the fun of color grading. All of this is done through easily digestible modules that range from two to 20 minutes.

The modules include Creating a Palette; Perceiving Color; Calibrating Color; Color Management; Deconstructing Color 1 – 3 and the Bonus Module Ox & Origin.

Without giving away the entire content in Ollie’s catalog, my favorite modules in this course are the on-set modules. Maybe because I am not on-set that often, but I found the “thinking out loud” about colors helpful. Knowing why reds represent blood, which raise your heart rate a little bit, is fascinating. He even goes through practical examples of color use in films such as in Whiplash.

In the final “Deconstructing Color” modules, Ollie goes into a color bay (complete with practical candle backlighting) and dives in Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve. He takes this course full circle to show how since he had to rush through a scene he can now go into Resolve and add some lighting to different sides of someone’s face since he took time to set up proper lighting on set, he can focus on other parts of his commercial.

Summing Up
I want to watch every tutorial MZed.com has to offer. From “Philip Bloom’s Cinematic Masterclass” to Ollie’s other course “Mastering Color.” Unfortunately, as of my review, you would have to pay an additional fee to watch the “Mastering Color” series. It seems like an unfortunate trend in online education to charge a fee and then when an extra special class comes up, charge more, but this class will supposedly be released to the standard subscribers in due time.

MZed.com has two subscription models: MZed Pro, which is $299 for one year of streaming the standard courses, and MZed Pro Premium for $399. This includes the standard courses for one year and the ability to choose one “Premium” course.

“Philip Bloom’s Cinematic Master Class” was the Premium course I was signed up for initially, but you you can decide between this one and the “Mastering Color” course. You will not be disappointed regardless of which one you choose. Even their first course “How to Photograph Everyone” is chock full of lighting and positioning instruction that can be applied in many aspects of videography.

I really was impressed with Directing Color with Ollie Kenchington, and if the other course are this good MZed.com will definitely become a permanent bookmark for me.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


FilmLight offers additions to Baselight toolkit

FilmLight will be at NAB showing updates to its Baselight toolkit, including T-Cam v2. This is FilmLight’s new and improved color appearance model, which allows the user to render an image for all formats and device types with confidence of color.

It combines with the Truelight Scene Looks and ARRI Look Library, now implemented within the Baselight software. “T-CAM color handling with the updated Looks toolset produces a cleaner response compared to creative, camera-specific LUTs or film emulations,” says Andrea Chlebak, senior colorist at Deluxe’s Encore in Hollywood. “I know I can push the images for theatrical release in the creative grade and not worry about how that look will translate across the many deliverables.”

FilmLight had added what they call “a new approach to color grading” with the addition of Texture Blend tools, which allow the colorist to apply any color grading operation dependent on image detail. This gives the colorist fine control over the interaction of color and texture.

Other workflow improvements aimed at speeding the process include enhanced cache management; a new client view that displays a live web-based representation of a scene showing current frame and metadata; and multi-directory conform for a faster and more straightforward conform process.

The latest version of Baselight software also includes per-pixel alpha channels, eliminating the need for additional layer mattes when compositing VFX elements. Tight integration with VFX suppliers, including Foundry Nuke and Autodesk, means that new versions of sequences can be automatically detected, with the colorist able to switch quickly between versions within Baselight.


VFX house Rodeo FX acquires Rodeo Production

Visual effects studio Rodeo FX, whose high-profile projects include Dumbo, Aquaman and Bumblebee, has purchased Rodeo Production and added its roster of photographers and directors to its offerings.

The two companies, whose common name is just a coincidence, will continue to operate as distinct entities. Rodeo Production’s 10-year-old Montreal office will continue to manage photo and video production, but will now also offer RodeoFX’s post production services and technical expertise.

In Toronto, Rodeo FX plans to open an Autodesk Flame editing suite in the Rodeo Production’ studio and expand its Toronto roster of photographers and directors with the goal of developing stronger production and post services for clients in the city’s advertising, television and film industries.

“This is a milestone in our already incredible history of growth and expansion,” says Sébastien Moreau, founder/president of Rodeo FX, which has offices in LA and Munich in addition to Montreal.

“I have always worked hard to give our artists the best possible opportunities, and this partnership was the logical next step,” says Rodeo Production’s founder Alexandra Saulnier. “I see this as a fusion of pure creativity and innovative technology. It’s the kind of synergy that Montreal has become famous for; it’s in our DNA.”

Rodeo Production clients include Ikea, Under Armour and Mitsubishi.


Xytech’s 2019 version: new UI, ability to personalize MediaPulse

Xytech, which makes facility management software for M&E, will launch the 2019 version of its MediaPulse facility management software system at NAB in Vegas.

The MediaPulse Sky UI has an entirely new user interface, allowing for a faster, cleaner and more modern look. The UI now includes a responsive design appropriate for use in all browsers and on all devices. This responsive design features performance improvements, including Xytech’s new Limitless Scrolling for instant search results regardless of the size of the result set.

A key part of the 2019 version update includes personalizing the MediaPulse experience for each user. “This update addresses a big shift in the marketplace, expanding our technology to foster automation through all users in our clients’ ecosystem,” says CEO Greg Dolan. “With the 2019 version of MediaPulse, every participant in an organization now has a personalized MediaPulse, allowing us to deliver the appropriate experience for each user tailored for their given role.”

In addition to the user experience upgrade, OpenID is supported through Sky, and the entire platform has now moved to a 64-bit architecture. Automated IMF distribution functionality, European Working Time Directive support, transmission module updates, in addition to hundreds of other new features, are now available.

The 2019 version of MediaPulse will be available in June 2019.


Frame.io intros 10 new features for video collaboration

Frame.io, which makes a video review and collaboration platform, has introduced 10 new features that will improve how media professionals collaborate on video, from initial upload to final delivery. Top user-requested features now available in Frame.io include a new reel player presentation format, @mentions and support for multi-page PDFs.

Here are some details:
– Multi-page PDFs: Users can now collaborate on scripts and storyboards just like on video. Entire video projects from the initial brief to the final deliverable, can now live in Frame.io.
– Enhanced version management: Users now have more control over how they manage versions. They can reorder or remove versions in one place.
– Private comments: For teams who routinely create a separate review link for internal teams to gather feedback they don’t want clients to see. Internal team conversations can be separated from client conversations, all within the same project.
– @mentions: Users can tag anyone on a project to quickly grab their attention when it’s needed most. Anytime someone is @mentioned, they’ll receive a notification creating streamlined communication.
– Reel player: Drop all assets into a filmstrip format for easy viewing, complete with built-in autoplay
– Archival storage (beta): Users can now free up more account storage by archiving projects. Original files will be archived but low-res preview files stay online and searchable. Users can still comment, compare and share Frame.io archived projects. Originals can be restored within a few hours.
– Updated review pages (beta): Frame.io review pages now include a simpler interface that makes it easier for clients to leave feedback with no login required.
– Redesigned iPhone app: Frame.io’s iOS app has a design update. Users will see a cleaner,  improved app interface.
– Short links: No more long and clunky URLs for clients and collaborators. New shareable URLs will use a f.io shortlink, making sharing them significantly more user-friendly.
– Account switching: For those users with multiple accounts, Frame.io now offers a simple way to navigate between them on Frame.io.

Red Ranger all-in-one camera system now available

Red Digital Cinema has made its new Red Ranger all-in-one camera system available to select Red authorized rental houses. Ranger includes Red’s cinematic full-frame 8K sensor Monstro in an all-in-one camera system, featuring three SDI outputs (two mirrored and one independent) allowing two different looks to be output simultaneously; wide-input voltage (11.5V to 32V); 24V and 12V power outs (two of each); one 12V P-Tap port; integrated 5-pin XLR stereo audio input (Line/Mic/+48V Selectable); as well as genlock, timecode, USB and control.

Ranger is capable of handling heavy-duty power sources and boasts a larger fan for quieter and more efficient temperature management. The system is currently shipping in a gold mount configuration, with a v-lock option available next month.

Ranger captures 8K RedCode RAW up to 60fps full-format, as well as Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHR formats at 4K up to 30fps and 2K up to 120fps. It can simultaneously record RedCode RAW plus Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD or DNxHR at up to 300MB/s write speeds.

To enable an end-to-end color management and post workflow, Red’s enhanced image processing pipeline (IPP2) is also included in the system.

Ranger ships complete, including:
• Production top handle
• PL mount with supporting shims
• Two 15mm LWS rod brackets
• Red Pro Touch 7.0-inch LCD with 9-inch arm and LCD/EVF cable
• LCD/EVF adaptor A and LCD/EVF adaptor D
• 24V AC power adaptor with 3-pin 24V XLR power cable
• Compatible Hex and Torx tools