Category Archives: post production

Color for Television Series

By Karen Maierhofer

Several years ago I was lucky enough to see Van Gogh’s original The Starry Night oil on canvas at a museum and was awestruck by how rich and vibrant it really was. I had fallen in love with the painting years before after seeing reproductions/reprints, which paled in comparison to the original’s striking colors and beauty. No matter how well done, the reproductions could never duplicate the colors and richness of the original masterpiece.

Just as in the art world, stories told via television are transformed through the use of color. Color grading and color correction help establish a signature look for a series, though that can, and often does, change from one episode to another — or from one scene to another — based on the mood the DP and director want to portray.

Here we delve into this part of the post process and follow a trio of colorists as they set the tone for three very different television series.

Black-ish
Black-ish is an ABC series about a successful African-American couple raising their five children in an affluent, predominantly white neighborhood. Dre, an advertising executive, is proud of his heritage but fears that culture is lost when it comes to his kids.

There is no struggle, however, when it comes to color grading the show, a job that has fallen to colorist Phil Azenzer from The Foundation in Burbank starting with this past season (Season 4).

The show is shot using an Arri Alexa camera. The dailies are then produced by the show’s in-house editor. The files, including the assembly master, are sent to Azenzer, who uses the raw camera files for his color grading, which is done using Blackmagic’s Resolve.

Azenzer starts a scene by rolling into the establishing shot and sets the look there because “you can see all light sources and their color temperatures,” he says. “I get a feel for the composition of the shot and the gradation of shadow to light. I see what light each of the actors is standing in or walking through, and then know how to balance the surrounding coverage.”

In his opinion, networks, for the most part, like their half-hour comedies to be well lit, more chromatic, with less shadow and contrast than an average one-hour drama, in order to create a more inviting, light feel (less somber). “And Black-ish is no different, although because of the subject matter, I think of Black-ish as more of a ‘dramedy,’ and there are scenes where we go for a more dramatic feel,” Azenzer explains.

Black-ish’s main characters are African-American, and the actors’ skin tones vary. “Black-ish creator Kenya Barris is very particular about the black skin tones of the actors, which can be challenging because some tones are more absorbent and others more reflective,” says Azenzer. “You have to have a great balance so everyone’s skin tone feels natural and falls where it’s supposed to.”

Phil Azenzer

Azenzer notes that the makeup department does an excellent job, so he doesn’t have to struggle as much with pulling out the bounce coming off the actors’ skin as a result of their chromatic clothes. He also credits DP Rob Sweeney (with whom he has worked on Six Feet Under and Entourage) with “a beautiful job of lighting that makes my life easier in that regard.”

While color grading the series, Azenzer avoids any yellow in skin tones, per Barris’s direction. “He likes the skin tones to look more natural, more like what they actually are,” he says. “So, basically, the directive was to veer away from yellow and keep it neutral to cool.”

While the colorist follows that direction in most scenes, he also considers the time of day the scene takes place when coloring. “So, if the call is for the shot to be warm, I let it go warm, but more so for the environment than the skin tones,” explains Azenzer.

Most of the show is shot on set, with few outdoor sequences. However, the scenes move around the house (kitchen, living room, bedrooms) as well as at the ad agency where Dre works. “I have some preferred settings that I can usually use as a starting point because of the [general] consistency of the show’s lighting. So, I might ripple through a scene and then just tighten it up from there,” says Azenzer. But my preference as a colorist is not to take shortcuts. I don’t like to plug something in from another episode because I don’t know if, in fact, the lighting is exactly the same. Therefore, I always start from scratch to get a feel for what was shot.”

For instance, shots that take place in Dre’s office play out at various points in the day, so that lighting changes more often.

The office setting contains overhead lighting directly above the conference table, like one would find in a typical conference room. It’s a diffused lighting that is more intense directly over the table and diminishes in intensity as it feathers out over the actors, so the actors are often moving in and out of varying intensities of light on that set. “It’s a matter of finding the right balance so they don’t get washed out and they don’t get [too much shadow] when they are sitting back from the table,” explains Azenzer. “That’s probably the most challenging location for me.”

Alas, things changed somewhat during the last few episodes of the season. Dre and his wife, Rainbow, hit a rough patch in their marriage and separate. Dre moves into a sleek, ultra-modern house in the canyon, with two-story ceilings and 20-foot-tall floor-to-ceiling windows — resulting in a new location for Azenzer. “It was filled with natural light, so the image was a little flat in those scenes and awash with light and a cool aura,” he describes. Azenzer adjusted for this by “putting in extra contrast, double saturation nodes, and keying certain colors to create more color separation, which helps create overall separation and depth of field. It was a fun episode.”

In the prior episode, the show toggles back and forth from flashbacks of Bow and Dre from happier times in their marriage to present day. Azenzer describes the flashbacks as saturated with extremely high contrast, “pushing the boundaries of what would be acceptable.” When the scene switched to present day, instead of the typical look, it was shot with the movie Blue Valentine in mind, as the characters discussed separating and possibly divorcing.

“Those scenes were shot and color corrected with a very cool, desaturated look. I would latch onto maybe one thing in the shot and pop color back into that. So, it would be almost grayish blue, and if there was a Granny Smith apple on the counter, I grabbed that and popped it, made it chromatic,” explains Azenzer. “And Dre’s red sweatshirt, which was desaturated and cool along with the rest of the scene, I went back in there and keyed that and popped the red back in. It was one of the more creative episodes we did.”

When Azenzer first took over coloring the show, “everybody was involved,” he says. “I had a relationship with Rob Sweeney, but I was new to Kenya, the post team, and Tom Ragazzo, co-producer, so it was very collaborative at the beginning to nail the look they were going for, what Kenya wanted. Now we are at the point so when I finish an episode, I give Rob a heads-up and he’ll come over that day or whenever he can and bring lunch, and I play it back for him.”

It’s not as if the episodes are without change, though Azenzer estimates that 85 percent of the time Sweeney says, “‘Beautiful job,’ and is out the door.” When there are changes, they usually involve something nominal on just a shot or two. “We are never off-base to where we need to redo a scene. It’s usually something subjective, where he might ask me to add a Power Window to create a little shadow in a corner or create a light source that isn’t there.”

Azenzer enjoys working on Black-ish, particularly because of the close relationship he has with those working on the show. “They are all awesome, and we get along really well and collaborate well,” he says. Indeed, he has forged bonds with this new family of sorts on both a professional and personal level, and recently began working on Grown-ish, a spin-off of Black-ish that follows the family’s eldest daughter after she moves away to attend college.

The 100
Dan Judy, senior colorist at DigitalFilm Tree (DFT) in Hollywood, has been working on The CW’s The 100 starting with the pilot in 2014, and since then has helped evolve it into a gritty-looking show. “It started off with more of an Eden-type environment and has progressed into a much grittier, less friendly and dangerous place to live,” he says.

The 100 is a post-apocalyptic science-fiction drama that centers on a group of juvenile offenders from aboard a failing space station who are sent to Earth following a nuclear apocalypse there nearly a century earlier. Their mission: to determine whether the devastated planet is habitable. But, soon they encounter clans of humans who have survived the destruction.

“We have geographical locations that have a particular look to them, such as Polis (the capitol of the coalition),” says Judy of the environment set atop rolling hills lush with vegetation. “In this past season, we have the Eden environment — where after the planet incurs all this devastation, the group finds an oasis of thriving foliage and animated life. Then, gradually, we started backing off the prettiness of Eden and making it less colorful, a little more contrasty, a little harsher.”

The series is shot in Vancouver by DP Michael Blundell. The dailies are handled by Bling Digital’s Vancouver facility, which applies color with the dailies cut. As an episode is cut, Bling then ships drives containing the camera master media and the edit decision list to DFT, which assembles the show with a clip-based approach, using the full-resolution camera masters as its base source.

“We aren’t doing a transcode of the media. We actually work directly, 100 percent of the time, from the client camera master,” says Judy, noting this approach eliminates the possibility of errors, such as dropouts or digital hits that can result from transcoding. “It also gives me handles on either end of a shot if it was trimmed.”

Dan Judy

Vancouver-based Blundell sets the palette, but he conveys his ideas and concepts to Tim Scanlan, director and supervising producer on the show, with whom Judy has a longstanding relationship — they worked together years before on Smallville. “Then Tim and I will sit down and spot the show, setting looks for the scenes, and after the spotting session, I will fill in the gaps to give it a consistent look,” says Judy. Although Scanlan is in nearby Santa Monica, due to LA’s traffic, he and Hollywood-based Judy collaborate remotely, to save valuable time.

“I can remote into [Scanlan’s] system and color correct with him in full resolution and in realtime,” explains Judy. “I can play back the reference file with the dailies color on it, and I can split-screen that with him in realtime if he wants to reference the dailies color for that particular scene.”

For coloring the show, Judy uses Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, which is also used to conform the series. Using Resolve’s Project Management tools, the editors and colorists “can all work on the project and contribute to it live, in realtime, simultaneously,” Judy points out. “So, I can be color correcting at the same time the editor is building the show, and getting all of his updates in mere seconds.”

Scanlan uses a remote Resolve system with a monitor that is calibrated to Judy’s, “so what he is seeing on his end is an exact replica of what I’m seeing in my room,” Judy says.

One scene in The 100 that stands out for Judy occurs early in the episode during the premiere of Season 5, which finds Clarke Griffin, one of the prisoners, trapped in a wasteland. He explains: “We had several different evolutions of what that look was going to be. I gave them a few designs, and they gave me some notes. Before the show was cut, they gave me little snippets of scenes to look at, and I did test looks. They came back and decided to go with one of those test looks at first, and then as the show progressed, we decided, collaboratively, to redesign the look of the scene and go with more of a sepia tone.”

Much of The 100 is filmed outdoors, and as everyone knows, nature does not always cooperate during shoots. “They deal with a lot of different weather conditions in Vancouver, unlike LA. They’ll get rain in the middle of a scene. Suddenly, clouds appear, and you have shadows that didn’t exist before. So, when that’s the only footage you have, you need to make it all blend together,” explains Judy. “Another challenge is making these amazing-looking sets look more natural by shadowing off the edges of the frame with power windows and darkening parts of the frame so it looks like the natural environment.”

Judy points to the character Becca’s abandoned lab — an elaborate set from last year’s season — as a scene that stands out for him. “It was an amazing set, and in wide shots, we would shape that picture with power windows and use color levels and desaturation to darken it, and then color levels and saturation to brighten up other areas,” he says. “This would make the room look more cavernous than it was, even though it was large to begin with, to give it more scope and vastness. It also made the room look dramatic yet inviting at the same time.”

All in all, Judy describes The 100 as a very edgy, dramatic show. “There’s a lot going on. It’s not your standard television fare. It’s very creative,” he says. “Tim and I did a lot of color design on Smallville, and we’re carrying on that tradition in The 100. It’s more feature-esque, more theatrical, than most television shows. We add grain on the picture to give it texture; it’s almost imperceptible, but it gives a slightly different feel than other shows. It’s nice to be part of something where I’m not just copying color for a standardized, formulaic show. This series gives me the opportunity to be creative, which is awesome.”

Dear White People
Sometimes color grading decisions are fairly standard on television shows. Black and white, so to speak. Not so for the Netflix series Dear White People, a comedy-drama spin-off from the 2014 film of the same name, which follows students of color at a predominantly white Ivy League college as they navigate various forms of discrimination — racial and otherwise.

Helping achieve the desired look for the series fell to senior colorist Scott Gregory from NBCUniversal StudioPost. Starting with Season 1, day one, “the show’s creator, Justin Simien, DP Jeffrey Waldron, executive producer Yvette Lee Bowser and I huddled in my bay and experimented with different ‘overall’ looks for the show,” notes Gregory.

Simien then settled on the “feel” that is present throughout most of the series. Once he had locked a base look, the group then discussed how to use color to facilitate the storytelling. “We created looks for title cards, flashbacks, historical footage, locations and even specific characters,” Gregory says.

Using stills he had saved during those creative meetings as a guide, he then color corrects each show. Once the show is ready for review, the executive producers and DP provide notes — during the same session if schedules permit, or separately, as is often the case. If any of the creatives cannot be present, stills and color review files are uploaded for review via the Internet.

According to Gregory, his workflow starts after he receives a pre-conformed 4:4:4 MXF video assembled master (VAM) and an EDL supplied by online editor Ian Lamb. Gregory then performs a process pass on the VAM using Resolve, whereby he re-renders the VAM, applying grain and two Digital Film Tools (DFT) optical filters. This gives the Red camera footage a more weathered, filmic look. This processing, however, is not applied to the full-frame television show inserts to better separate them from the visual palette created for the show by Simien, Bowser and DPs Waldron and Topher Osborn.

Scott Gregory

Once the VAM is processed, Gregory creates a timeline using the EDL, the processed VAM, and the temp audio, applies a one-light correction to all of the shots, and gets to work. As the color progresses, he drops in the visual effects, cleaned shots, composited elements, and some titles as they are delivered. Once the show is locked for color and VFX approval, he renders out a 3840×2160 UHD final 4:4:4 MXF color-timed master, which then goes back to the online editor for titling and delivery.

“Blue contaminated and lifted blacks, strong vignettes, film-grain emulation and warm, compressed filmic highlights are characteristics present in most of the show,” says Gregory. “We also created looks for Technicolor two-strip, sepia, black-and-white silent-era damaged print, and even an oversaturated, diffused, psychedelic drug trip scene.”

The looks for the flashback or “historical” sequences, usually somewhere in Act I, were created for the most part in Resolve. Many of these sequences or montages jump through different time periods. “I created a black-and-white damaged film look for the 1800s, Technicolor two-strip for the early 1900s, a faded-emulsion [Kodak] Ektachrome [film] look for the ’70s, and a more straightforward but chromatic look for the ’80s,” says Gregory.

Simien also wanted to use color “themes” for specific characters. This was reflected in not only the scenes that included the featured character for that particular show, but also in the title card at the head of the show. (The title card for each show has a unique color corresponding to the featured character of that episode.)

When coloring the series, Gregory inevitably encounters processing issues. “Using all the filters and VFX plug-ins that I do on this show and being in UHD resolution both eat up a lot of processing power. This slows down the software significantly, no matter what platform or GPUs are being used,” he says. In order to keep things up to speed, he decided to pre-render, or bake in, the grain and some of the filters that were to be used throughout each show.

“I then create a new timeline using the pre-rendered VAM and the EDL, and set a base correction,” Gregory explains. “This workflow frees up the hardware, so I can still get realtime playback, even with multiple color layers, composites and new effects plug-ins.”

Gregory is hardly new to color grading, having a long list of credits, including television series, full-length movies and short films. And while working on Seasons 1 and the recently released Season 2 of Dear White People, he appreciated the collaborative environment. “Justin is obviously very creative and has a discerning eye. I have really enjoyed the collaborative space in which he, Yvette, Jeffrey and Topher like to work,” he says. “Justin likes to experiment and go big. He wants the artists he works with to be a part of the creative process, and I think he believes that in the end, his final product will benefit from it. It makes for good times in the color bay and a show we are all very proud of.”


Karen Maierhofer is a longtime technical writer with more than two decades of experience in segments of the CG and post industries.

Behind the Title: Deluxe Senior Finishing Editor Samantha Uber

NAME: Samantha Uber (@samanthauber)

COMPANY: Deluxe NY

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Deluxe NY is the New York City branch of the classic film lab founded in 1915. Today, we are a huge multimedia international empire for all types of content creation and delivery. My favorite part of working for this company is that we manage to serve our clients in a personalized, boutique environment but with the support of a worldwide network of both technology and ideas.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Finishing Editor

CAN YOU EXPLAIN WHAT YOU DO?
I am a Flame finishing editor/VFX artist, and I come from an Avid online and offline editorial background. I also use Blackmagic Resolve, Adobe Premiere and Apple FCP for their various abilities for different projects. While I always fully finish (conform/online) episodic and film projects in Flame, I also always use a unique mix of those applications listed above for each project to get me to that point in the highest quality and most efficient way possible. I am very interested in the building of the computer I am working on, the specialized scripts to make data organized, the debayer/color science process and, of course, the actual editing and delivery of the project.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
In my job as a finishing editor, I am surprisingly super-involved in dailies, mainly because I know what will make the job easier on the finishing editor if certain metadata is retained and organized in dailies. Seeing how the metadata coming from the dailies process is actually implemented in finishing allows me to have a unique perspective, and I teach dailies techs about this to give them a better understanding of how their work is being used.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Everyone who knows me, knows my favorite thing is a reconform. I love them. They are challenging, like giant Tetris puzzles — my favorite game growing up was Tetris. I love getting in the zone for hours and hours, moving the pieces of the timeline around, relying on the metadata the Flame gives me to do it more efficiently, and sometimes, not even looking at the actual picture until the end.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
For me, my least favorite thing is working on something that doesn’t challenge me. I like to constantly be thinking about ways to process new camera formats and new workflows, and understanding/being involved in the entire online process from start to finish. I love the “hard” jobs… the tough ones to figure out, even if that means I lose quite a bit of sleep (she laughs). There is always a limit to that, of course, but if I’m not involved in research and development on a project, I’m not happy. For this reason, I love working in episodic television the most because I can R&D a workflow and then use it and perfect it over time, all while building a close relationship with my clients and feeling ownership of my show.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’d say mid-afternoon and around 9pm at night. After the morning fires are put out and everything gets going, the middle of the afternoon gets a lot of work done. Also, around 9pm I enjoy working because the formal working day has pretty much ended and I can just zero in on a project and work quietly, without distractions.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I really love restoring antiques, whether it’s furniture or the 100-year-old Victorian home I live in. I am always working with my hands — either at work or at home — building, painting, grooming dogs, veggie-gardening, cooking, sculpting, etc. I appreciate the craftsmanship that went into antique pieces. I feel that type of work is lost in today’s disposable world.

What I do for films as a finishing editor is quite like the restoration work I do at home — taking something and realizing it to its full potential and giving it a new life. For these reasons I think I could possibly be an architect/designer, specializing in the mostly period-accurate restoration of antique homes. I still may end up doing this many years from now.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew very early on that I wanted to be a film editor of some sort. I was 16 yrs old when the film Moulin Rouge came out, and my best friend Michelle and I saw it in the theater. We both knew we wanted to do something technical and creative from that point. She became a computer engineer, and I became a senior finishing editor. I loved the editing and pacing of that film, how it was so much like the music videos I grew up watching, and I wanted to be able to tell a story with VFX and editing. I actually practiced on the Moulin Rouge DVD extras re-editing the scenes on the ISOs of the cameras they provided.

I was 16 when I applied to NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. It was my only choice for college. I initially went for a summer between my junior and senior year of high school and continued after high school for three more years until I graduated. I was working as a freelance editor for students, working at MTV as a junior editor, and teaching Avid editing at NYU during that time — always working!

Moulin Rouge is still my favorite film, and my dream is to work with director Baz Lurhmann one day.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I have worked as senior finishing editor on Paterno, High Maintenance, Girls, Vinyl and Boardwalk Empire for HBO, The Knick for Cinemax, Blue Bloods for CBS, The Americans for FX, Jesus Christ Superstar for NBC and Mr. Robot for USA. I worked on the film All These Small Moments for the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival, as well as the films Beasts of No Nation and Moonrise Kingdom in recent years.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I certainly put on a different workflow hat for the different parts of my job. It actually feels like different jobs sometimes —  painting a visual effect, building a computer, making a finishing workflow, conforming a show, debayering footage, designing a dailies workflow, etc. I think that keeps it interesting; doing something different every day.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The project I am most proud of is The Knick. I was involved in the process of creating the workflow of the show with Steven Soderbergh’s team for one year before it actually began. I believe it was the first show to use the Red Dragon camera at 5K, finishing at UHD. I worked intensely with the Red team to develop the software, color workflow and computer for debayering the footage.

I also worked closely with colorist Martin Zeichner and Steven’s team to retain the exact onset look of color immediately and efficiently, while also giving them the full latitude of the Red format in the DI. The result was beautiful, and I really enjoyed the show. I felt like the plot of the show — innovation in the surgical field — was being mirrored in the innovation in the actual finishing of the show, which was super awesome!

CAN YOU TALK MORE ABOUT THE TOOLS YOU USE?
For all final finishing, I use Autodesk Flame. I am proficient in nearly all platforms, but to me, nothing is better than the unique timeline in Flame, where layers see each other and tracks do not. This allows you to have many versions of a cut in one timeline, and is ideal for finishing. Also, the VFX capability of the Flame is unparalleled in an editing system, and it allows me to start working on anything in moments at the client’s request. However, Avid will always be my favorite for metadata and database management, and I usually start every project with a peek at the metadata in the Avid, and frequently a full reorganization.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLUGIN?
My favorite and most frequently used plugin is Re:Vision’s Twixtor, for the tons and tons of timewarps I do. This plugin helps me paint less frames than most. Close runners-up are Autodesk’s Autostabilize, which is actually highly customizable, and Furnace’s F-WireRemoval for all sorts of purposes.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT? 
Being a finishing editor means you are the last person to touch the project before it airs, so you are the last stop in everything. For that reason, I am often asked to anything and everything in session — re-mix sound, creatively re-edit, give advice on VFX shots and deliverables, do VFX shots, make masters, QC masters. You name it and I do it in session. I think that’s what the job really entails; being able to give the client what they are looking for at the last possible moment, especially now that they are seeing the final product in high-resolution and color corrected.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I could not live without my iPhone, as it connects me to the outside world as well as my job. It’s like my whole life is on my phone. I could also not live without my Wacom tablet. Finishing an edit is a whole lot easier on a tablet. Also, my super-fast cylinder Mac, outfitted so that every application and high-resolution footage can be processed extremely quickly. I still do wish my Mac was square, however, (she laughs), for more equipment compatibility, but I cannot complain about its high-speed processing ability. Engineering has kindly given me a Mac that I can play on and try new software, often before it is rolled into production throughout the facility. Th is keeps me in the know on new developments in our industry. This computer is totally separate from my super powerful Linux Flame system.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Yes, this is a high-stress job! I feel very responsible for all of the people who have put their hard work into a project to make sure it is shown in its best light and everything is as perfect as possible on often-tight deadlines. After a project leaves my hands it goes to QC, and my final work is what they see and what airs.

Because everything I do is on computers, I try to spend as little time on a computer outside of work as possible. As I mentioned before, I live in a 100-year-old house that I am restoring myself. What is nice is that I feel like I’m using the same part of my brain as I do at my job, however it is usually outdoors and involving physical labor. That is a great de-stressor from working on a computer in a windowless and darkened room all week.

I live far outside the city by the beach, and when I’m home, I’m really home and work seems a world away. I have two beautiful Afghan Hound sister dogs, Ginny and Trill, and a 1974 VW bus named Buddy. I honestly don’t like to rest. I always like to be working on my projects and pushing forward in my life, and I am just your typical Jersey girl at heart.

DG 7.9.18

Sim and the ASC partner on educational events, more

During Cine Gear recently, Sim announced a 30-year sponsorship with the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC). Sim offers end-to-end solutions for creatives in film and television, and the ASC is a nonprofit focusing on the art of cinematography. As part of the relationship, the ASC Clubhouse courtyard will now be renamed Sim Plaza.

Sim and the ASC have worked together frequently on events that educate industry professionals on current technology and its application to their evolving craft. As part of this sponsorship, Sim will expand its involvement with the ASC Master Classes, SimLabs, and conferences and seminars in Hollywood and beyond.

During an official ceremony, a commemorative plaque was unveiled and embedded into the walkway of what is now Sim Plaza in Hollywood. Sim will also host a celebration of the ASC’s 100th anniversary in 2019 at Sim’s Hollywood location.

What else does this partnership entail?
• The two organizations will work together closely over the next 30 years on educational events for the cinematography community. Sim’s sponsorship will help fund society programs and events to educate industry professionals (both practicing and aspiring) on current technology and its application to the evolving craft.
• The ASC Master Class program, SimLabs and other conferences and seminars will continue on over these 30 years with Sim increasing its involvement. Sim is not telling the ASC what kind of initiatives they should be doing, but is rather lending a helping hand to drive visual storytelling forward. For example, they have already hosted ASC Master Class sessions in Toronto and Hollywood, sponsored the annual ASC BBQ for the last couple of years, and founder Rob Sim himself is an ASC associate member.

How will the partnership will increase programming and resources to support the film and television community for the long term?
• It has a large focus on three things: financial resources, programming assistance and facility support.
• It will provide access and training with world-class technology in film and television.
• It will offer training directly from industry leaders in Hollywood and beyond
• It will develop new programs for people who can’t attend ASC Master Class sessions, such as an online experience, which is something ASC and Sim are working on together.
• It will expand SimLabs beyond Hollywood —with the potential to bring it to Vancouver, Atlanta, New York and Toronto with the goal of creating new avenues for people who are associated with the ASC and who know they can call on Sim.
• It will bring volunteers. Sim has many volunteers on ASC committees, including the Motion Imaging Technology Council and its Lens committee.

Main Image: L-R: Sim President/CEO James Haggarty, Sim founder and ASC associate member Rob Sim,ASC events coordinator Patty Armacost and ASC president Kees van Oostrum.


Testing large format camera workflows

By Mike McCarthy

In the last few months, we have seen the release of the Red Monstro, Sony Venice, Arri Alexa LF and Canon C700 FF, all of which have larger or full-frame sensors. Full frame refers to the DSLR terminology, with full frame being equivalent to the entire 35mm film area — the way that it was used horizontally in still cameras. All SLRs used to be full frame with 35mm film, so there was no need for the term until manufacturers started saving money on digital image sensors by making them smaller than 35mm film exposures. Super35mm motion picture cameras on the other hand ran the film vertically, resulting in a smaller exposure area per frame, but this was still much larger than most video imagers until the last decade, with 2/3-inch chips being considered premium imagers. The options have grown a lot since then.

L-R: 1st AC Ben Brady, DP Michael Svitak and Mike McCarthy on the monitor.

Most of the top-end cinema cameras released over the last few years have advertised their Super35mm sensors as a huge selling point, as that allows use of any existing S35 lens on the camera. These S35 cameras include the Epic, Helium and Gemini from Red, Sony’s F5 and F55, Panasonic’s VaricamLT, Arri’s Alexa and Canon’s C100-500. On the top end, 65mm cameras like the Alexa65 have sensors twice as wide as Super35 cameras, but very limited lens options to cover a sensor that large. Full frame falls somewhere in between and allows, among other things, use of any 35mm still film lenses. In the world of film, this was referred to as Vista Vision, but the first widely used full-frame digital video camera was Canon’s 5D MkII, the first serious HDSLR. That format has suddenly surged in popularity recently, and thanks to this I recently had opportunity to be involved in a test shoot with a number of these new cameras.

Keslow Camera was generous enough to give DP Michael Svitak and myself access to pretty much all their full-frame cameras and lenses for the day in order to test the cameras, workflows and lens options for this new format. We also had the assistance of first AC Ben Brady to help us put all that gear to use, and Mike’s daughter Florendia as our model.

First off was the Red Monstro, which while technically not the full 24mm height of true full frame, uses the same size lenses due to the width of its 17×9 sensor. It offers the highest resolution of the group at 8K. It records compressed RAW to R3D files, as well as options for ProRes and DNxHR up to 4K, all saved to Red mags. Like the rest of the group, smaller portions of the sensor can be used at lower resolution to pair with smaller lenses. The Red Helium sensor has the same resolution but in a much smaller Super35 size, allowing a wider selection of lenses to be used. But larger pixels allow more light sensitivity, with individual pixels up to 5 microns wide on the Monstro and Dragon, compared to Helium’s 3.65-micron pixels.

Next up was Sony’s new Venice camera with a 6K full-frame sensor, allowing 4K S35 recording as well. It records XAVC to SxS cards or compressed RAW in the X-OCN format with the optional ASX-R7 external recorder, which we used. It is worth noting that both full-frame recording and integrated anamorphic support require additional special licenses from Sony, but Keslow provided us with a camera that had all of that functionality enabled. With a 36x24mm 6K sensor, the pixels are 5.9microns, and footage shot at 4K in the S35 mode should be similar to shooting with the F55.

We unexpectedly had the opportunity to shoot on Arri’s new AlexaLF (Large Format) camera. At 4.5K, this had the lowest resolution, but that also means the largest sensor pixels at 8.25microns, which can increase sensitivity. It records ArriRaw or ProRes to Codex XR capture drives with its integrated recorder.

Another other new option is the Canon C700 FF with a 5.9K full-frame sensor recording RAW, ProRes, or XAVC to CFast cards or Codex Drives. That gives it 6-micron pixels, similar to the Sony Venice. But we did not have the opportunity to test that camera this time around, maybe in the future.

One more factor in all of this is the rising popularity of anamorphic lenses. All of these cameras support modes that use the part of the sensor covered by anamorphic lenses and can desqueeze the image for live monitoring and preview. In the digital world, anamorphic essentially cuts your overall resolution in half, until the unlikely event that we start seeing anamorphic projectors or cameras with rectangular sensor pixels. But the prevailing attitude appears to be, “We have lots of extra resolution available so it doesn’t really matter if we lose some to anamorphic conversion.”

Post Production
So what does this mean for post? In theory, sensor size has no direct effect on the recorded files (besides the content of them) but resolution does. But we also have a number of new formats to deal with as well, and then we have to deal with anamorphic images during finishing.

Ever since I got my hands on one of Dell’s new UP3218K monitors with an 8K screen, I have been collecting 8K assets to display on there. When I first started discussing this shoot with DP Michael Svitak, I was primarily interested in getting some more 8K footage to use to test out new 8K monitors, editing systems and software as it got released. I was anticipating getting Red footage, which I knew I could playback and process using my existing software and hardware.

The other cameras and lens options were added as the plan expanded, and by the time we got to Keslow Camera, they had filled a room with lenses and gear for us to test with. I also had a Dell 8K display connected to my ingest system, and the new 4K DreamColor monitor as well. This allowed me to view the recorded footage in the highest resolution possible.

Most editing programs, including Premiere Pro and Resolve, can handle anamorphic footage without issue, but new camera formats can be a bigger challenge. Any RAW file requires info about the sensor pattern in order to debayer it properly, and new compression formats are even more work. Sony’s new compressed RAW format for Venice, called X-OCN, is supported in the newest 12.1 release of Premiere Pro, so I didn’t expect that to be a problem. Its other recording option is XAVC, which should work as well. The Alexa on the other hand uses ArriRaw files, which have been supported in Premiere for years, but each new camera shoots a slightly different “flavor” of the file based on the unique properties of that sensor. Shooting ProRes instead would virtually guarantee compatibility but at the expense of the RAW properties. (Maybe someday ProResRAW will offer the best of both worlds.) The Alexa also has the challenge of recording to Codex drives that can only be offloaded in OS X or Linux.

Once I had all of the files on my system, after using a MacBook Pro to offload the media cards, I tried to bring them into Premiere. The Red files came in just fine but didn’t play back smoothly over 1/4 resolution. They played smoothly in RedCineX with my Red Rocket-X enabled, and they export respectably fast in AME, (a five-minute 8K anamorphic sequence to UHD H.265 in 10 minutes), but for some reason Premiere Pro isn’t able to get smooth playback when using the Red Rocket-X. Next I tried the X-OCN files from the Venice camera, which imported without issue. They played smoothly on my machine but looked like they were locked to half or quarter res, regardless of what settings I used, even in the exports. I am currently working with Adobe to get to the bottom of that because they are able to play back my files at full quality, while all my systems have the same issue. Lastly, I tried to import the Arri files from the AlexaLF, but Adobe doesn’t support that new variation of ArriRaw yet. I would anticipate that will happen soon, since it shouldn’t be too difficult to add that new version to the existing support.

I ended up converting the files I needed to DNxHR in DaVinci Resolve so I could edit them in Premiere, and I put together a short video showing off the various lenses we tested with. Eventually, I need to learn how to use Resolve more efficiently, but the type of work I usually do lends itself to the way Premiere is designed — inter-cutting and nesting sequences with many different resolutions and aspect ratios. Here is a short clip demonstrating some of the lenses we tested with:

This is a web video, so even at UHD it is not meant to be an analysis of the RAW image quality, but instead a demonstration of the field of view and overall feel with various lenses and camera settings. The combination of the larger sensors and the anamorphic lenses leads to an extremely wide field of view. The table was only about 10 feet from the camera, and we can usually see all the way around it. We also discovered that when recording anamorphic on the Alexa LF, we were recording a wider image than was displaying on the monitor output. You can see in the frame grab below that the live display visible on the right side of the image isn’t displaying the full content that got recorded, which is why we didn’t notice that we were recording with the wrong settings with so much vignetting from the lens.

We only discovered this after the fact, from this shot, so we didn’t get the opportunity to track down the issue to see if it was the result of a setting in the camera or in the monitor. This is why we test things before a shoot, but we didn’t “test” before our camera test, so these things happen.

We learned a lot from the process, and hopefully some of those lessons are conveyed here. A big thanks to Brad Wilson and the rest of the guys at Keslow Camera for their gear and support of this adventure and, hopefully, it will help people better prepare to shoot and post with this new generation of cameras.

Main Image: DP Michael Svitak


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


ACES adds new companies to Logo Program 

Six new companies have been added to the ACES Logo Program. Membership in the program signals that the companies are committed to implementing ACES into their hardware and software products in conformance with program specifications for consistency and quality. ACES is the global standard for color management, digital image interchange and archiving.

“ACES has given us a solid framework to efficiently solve issues, along with options, to maintain creative control for our productions. It provides much needed transparency, connecting and standardizing the workflows from on-set, dailies, VFX, DI and archival,” says Victoria Alonso, EVP, Physical Production, Marvel Studios. “Standards are important — they help studios protect and monetize our films for years, and they also help create a healthy ecosystem of suppliers and professionals who can reliably work on sophisticated productions because they know the infrastructure beneath them is solid. Standards like ACES give us a common language for applications and pipelines to connect without compromising translations and misunderstandings, and to protect the creative workflow established by filmmakers. We see ACES as an important component in allowing the industry to innovate and work at the highest levels of our craft.”

The new ACES Logo Program partner companies are:
– Color Trix, makers of Color Finale, a color correction add-on to Final Cut Pro X.
– DJI, makers of drones, camera accessories and systems, including the Zenmuse X7, a Super35mm cinema-grade camera.
– In2Core, makers of the QTake video assist system.
– Laser Graphics, makers of film scanning systems: DirectorScanner, Director10K scanner and ScanStation.
– Vision Research, makers of the Phantom line of high-speed cameras.
– WowWow Entertainment, makers of the IS Mini LUT Box.

These six companies join the existing manufacturers of cinema cameras, color correctors, monitors, on-set tools, animation and compositing software who are already part of ACES Product Partners.


Tom Dunlap, Gui Borchert lead Hecho Studios, formerly Hecho En 72

Hecho En 72 has expanded its North American operations to allow for continued growth in both Los Angeles and New York. It will now be known as Hecho Studios under the MDC Partners network of companies. Hecho, is a content development and production company that originally was grown as part of 72andSunny, but is now a separate entity. While they still work closely, and share the same space in New York and LA, they operate independently.

As part of this growth, Tom Dunlap, who was previously chief production officer at 72andSunny, has assumed the position of managing director of the company. He will be responsible for driving all aspects of growth, operations and production.

Hecho Studios will be led creatively by executive creative director, Gui Borchert, who most recently served as group creative director at 72andSunny for the last four years, working on projects for Starbucks, Sonos and the LA Olympic bid.

“In a time where marketing takes any form, how brands make content is just as important as what they make,” says Dunlap. “We have built and are growing Hecho Studios to help brands amplify creative opportunities and modernize production and content creation to maximize quality, efficiency and impact,” says Borchert.

Hecho’s past work includes the production of Sugar Coated, a short documentary featured in 18 film festivals in partnership with 72U, two Emmy nominations for their work on Google — Year in Search, editorial, print and product design for the award-winning LA Original campaign, and the recent short parody film featuring Will Ferrell and Joel McHale for The Hammer Museum at UCLA’s latest exhibition, Stories of Almost Everyone.

Hecho’s production offerings includes building models based on the client’s creative needs. This can range anywhere from a small table-top product shoot to a large scale narrative film and include live-action, photography, stop-motion, time-lapse, narrative, documentary and both short and long form.

Hecho offers full service audio post, specializing in commercial and branded content for broadcast TV, cinema, digital and radio. Their studios are equipped with two Avid S6 mixing consoles and JBL-M2 surround stage (7.1, 5.1) and spatial audio (VR) capabilities. Services include sound design, mixing, field recording, Foley, voice-over/ADR recording, Source-Connect/ISDN and music editorial and licensing.

Hecho’s post offerings include editorial, motion graphics and finishing. Their edit suites integrate all editing platforms, including Adobe Premiere, Avid and Final Cut Pro. Their motion graphics team uses After Effects, Cinema 4D and Maya animations. Hecho has two Flame suites to address requests for clean-up, conform and VFX. They also use Blackmagic Resolve for color grade needs.

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Gui Borchert and Tom Dunlap.


Review: The PNY PrevailPro mobile workstation

By Mike McCarthy

PNY, a company best known in the media and entertainment industry as the manufacturer of Nvidia’s Quadro line of professional graphics cards, is now offering a powerful mobile workstation. While PNY makes a variety of other products, mostly centered around memory and graphics cards, the PrevailPro is their first move into offering complete systems.

Let’s take a look at what’s inside. The PrevailPro is based on Intel’s 7th generation Core i7 7700HQ Quad-Core Hyperthreaded CPU, running at 2.8-3.8GHz. It has an HM175 chipset and 32GB of dual-channel DDR4 RAM. At less than ¾-inch thick and 4.8 pounds, it also has an SD card slot, fingerprint reader, five USB ports, Gigabit Ethernet, Intel 8265 WiFi, and audio I/O. It might not be the lightest 15-inch laptop, but it is one of the most powerful. At 107 cubic inches, it has half the volume of my 17-inch Lenovo P71.

The model I am reviewing is their top option, with a 512GB NVMe SSD, as well as a 2TB HDD for storage. The display is a 15.6-inch UHD panel, driven by the headline feature, a Quadro P4000 GPU in Max-Q configuration. With 1792 CUDA cores, and 8GB of GDDR memory, the GPU retains 80% of the power of the desktop version of the P4000, at 4.4 TFlops. Someone I showed the system to joked that it was a PNY Quadro graphics card with a screen, which isn’t necessarily inaccurate. The Nvidia Pascal-based Quadro P4000 Max-Q GPU is the key unique feature of the product, being the only system I am aware of in its class — 15-inch workstations — with that much graphics horsepower.

Display Connectivity
This top-end PrevailPro system is ProVR certified by Nvidia and comes with a full complement of ports, offering more display options than any other system its size. It can drive three external 4K displays plus its attached UHD panel, an 8K monitor at 60Hz or anything in between. I originally requested to review this unit when it was announced last fall because I was working on a number of Barco Escape three-screen cinema projects. The system’s set of display outputs would allow me to natively drive the three TVs or projectors required for live editing and playback at a theater, without having to lug my full-sized workstation to the site. This is less of an issue now that the Escape format has been discontinued, but there are many other applications that involve multi-screen content creation, usually related to advertising as opposed to cinema.

I had also been looking for a more portable device to drive my 8K monitor — I wanted to do some on-set tests, reviewing footage from 8K cameras, without dragging my 50-pound workstation around with me — even my 17-inch P71 didn’t support it. Its DisplayPort connection is limited to Version 1.2, due to being attached to the Intel side of the hybrid graphics system. Dell’s Precision mobile workstations can drive their 8K display at 30Hz, but none of the other major manufacturers have implemented DisplayPort 1.3, favoring the power savings of using Intel’s 1.2 port in the chipset. The PrevailPro by comparison has dual mini-DisplayPort 01.3 ports, connected directly to the Nvidia GPU, which can be used together to drive an 8K monitor at 60Hz for the ultimate high-res viewing experience. It also has an HDMI 2.0 port supporting 4Kp60 with HDCP to connect your 4K TV.

It can connect three external displays, or a fourth with MST if you turn off the integrated panel. The one feature that is missing is Thunderbolt, which may be related to the DisplayPort issue. (Thunderbolt 3 was officially limited to DisplayPort 1.2) This doesn’t affect me personally, and USB 3.1 has much of the same functionality, but it will be an issue for many users in the M&E space — it limits its flexibility.

User Experience
The integrated display is a UHD LCD panel with a matte finish. It seems middle of the line. There is nothing wrong with it, and it appears to be accurate, but it doesn’t really pop the way some nicer displays do, possibly due to the blacks not being as dark as they could be.

The audio performance is not too impressive either. The speaker located at the top of the keyboard aren’t very loud, even at maximum volume, and they occasionally crackle a bit. This is probably the system’s most serious deficiency, although a decent pair of headphones can improve that experience significantly. The keyboard is well laid out, and felt natural to use, and the trackpad worked great for me. Switching between laptops frequently, I sometimes have difficulty adjusting to changes in the function and arrow key positioning, but everything was where my fingers expected them to be.

Performance wise, I am not comparing it to other 15-inch laptops, because I don’t have any to test it against, and that is not the point of this article. The users who need this kind of performance have previously been limited to 17-inch systems, and this one might allow them to lighten their load — more portable without sacrificing much performance. I will be comparing it to my 17-inch and 13-inch laptops, for context, as well as my 20-core Dell workstation.

Storage Performance
First off, with synthetic benchmarks, the SSD reports 1400MB/s write and 2000MB/s read performance, but the write is throttled to half of that over sustained periods. This is slower than some new SSDs, but probably sufficient because without Thunderbolt there is no way to feed the system data any faster than that. (USB 3.1 tops out around 800MB/s in the real world.)

The read speed allowed me to playback 6K DPX files in Adobe Premiere, and that is nothing to scoff at. The HDD tops out at 125MB/s as should be expected for a 2.5-inch SATA drive, so it will perform just like any other system. The spinning disk seems out of place in a device like this, where a second M.2 slot would have allowed the same capacity, at higher speeds, with size and power savings.

Here are its Cinebench scores, compared to my other systems:
System OpenGL CPU
PNY PrevailPro (P4000) 109.94 738
Lenovo P71 (P5000) 153.34 859
Dell 7910 Desktop (P6000) 179.98 3060Aorus X3 Plus (GF870) 47.00 520

The P4000 is a VR-certified solution, so I hooked up my Lenovo Explorer HMD and tried editing some 360 video in Premiere Pro 12.1. Everything works as expected, and I was able to get my GoPro Fusion footage to play back 3Kp60 at full resolution, and 5Kp30 at half resolution. Playing back exported clips in WMR worked in full resolution, even at 5K.

8K Playback
One of the unique features of this system is its support for an 8K display. Now, that makes for an awfully nice UI monitor, but most people buying it to drive an 8K display will probably want to view 8K content on it. To that end, 8K playback was one of the first things I tested. Within Premiere, DNxHR-LB files were the only ones I could get to play without dropping frames at full resolution, and even then only when they were scope aspect ratio. The fewer pixels to process due to the letterboxing works in its favor. All of the other options wouldn’t playback at full resolution, which defeats the purpose of an 8K display. The Windows 10 media player did playback 8K HEVC files at full resolution without issue, due to the hardware decoder on the Quadro GPU, which explicitly supports 8K playback. So that is probably the best way to experience 8K media on a system like this.

Now obviously 8K is pushing our luck with a laptop in the first place. My 6K Red files play back at quarter res, and most of my other 4K and 6K test assets play smoothly. I rendered a complex 5K comp in Adobe After Effects, and at 28 minutes, it was four minutes slower than my larger 17-inch system, and twice as fast as my 13-inch gaming notebook. Encoding a 10-minute file in DCP-O-Matic took 47 minutes in 2K, and 189 minutes in 4K, which is 15% slower than my 17-inch laptop.

Conclusion
The new 15-inch PrevailPro is not as fast as my huge 17-inch P71, as to be expected, but it is close in most tests, and many users would never notice the difference. It supports 8K monitors and takes up half the space in my bag. It blows my 13-inch gaming notebook out of the water and does many media tasks just as fast as my desktop workstation. It seems like an ideal choice for a power user who needs strong graphics performance but doesn’t want to lug around a 17-inch monster of a system.

The steps to improve it would be the addition of Thunderbolt support, better speakers, and an upgrade to Intel’s new 8th Gen CPUs. If I was still working on multi-screen theatrical projects, this would be the perfect system for taking my projects with me — same if I was working in VR more. I believe the configuration I tested has an MSRP of $4,500, but I find it online for around $4100. So it is clearly not the cheap option, but it is one of the most powerful 15-inch laptops available, especially if your processing needs are GPU intense. It is a well-balanced solution, for demanding users who need performance, but want to limit size and weight.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


Chimney opens in New York City, hires team of post vets

Chimney, an independent content company specializing in film, television, spots and digital media, has opened a new facility in New York City. For over 20 years, the group has been producing and posting campaigns for brands, such as Ikea, Audi, H&M, Chanel, Nike, HP, UBS and more. Chimney was also the post partner for the feature films Chappaquiddick, Her, Atomic Blonde and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

With this New York opening, Chimney now with 14 offices worldwide. Founded in Stockholm in 1995, they opened their first US studio in Los Angeles last year. In addition to Stockholm, New York and LA, Chimney also has facilities in Singapore, Copenhagen, Berlin and Sydney among other cities. For a full location list click here.

“Launching in New York is a benchmark long in the making, and the ultimate expression of our philosophy of ‘boutique-thinking with global power,’” says Henric Larsson, Chimney founder and COO. “Having a meaningful presence in all of the world’s economic centers with diverse cultural perspectives means we can create and execute at the highest level in partnership with our clients.”

The New York opening supports Chimney’s mission to connect its global talent and resources, effectively operating as a 24-hour, full-service content partner to brand, entertainment and agency clients, no matter where they are in the world.

Chimney has signed on several industry vets to spearhead the New York office. Leading the US presence is CEO North America Marcelo Gandola. His previous roles include COO at Harbor Picture Company; EVP at Hogarth; SVP of creative services at Deluxe Entertainment Services Group; and VP of operations at Company 3.

Colorist and director Lez Rudge serves as Chimney’s head of color North America. He is a former partner and senior colorist at Nice Shoes in New York. He has worked alongside Spike Lee and Darren Aronofsky, and on major brand campaigns for Maybelline, Revlon, NHL, Jeep, Humira, Spectrum and Budweiser.

Managing director Ed Rilli will spearhead the day-to-day logistics of the New York office. As the former head of production of Nice Shoes, his resume includes producing major campaigns for such brands as NFL, Ford, Jagermeister and Chase.

Sam O’Hare, chief creative officer and lead VFX artist, will oversee the VFX team. Bringing experience in live-action directing, VFX supervision, still photography and architecture, O’Hare’s interdisciplinary background makes him well suited for photorealistic CGI production.

In addition, Chimney has brought on cinematographer and colorist Vincent Taylor, who joins from MPC Shanghai, where he worked with brands such as Coca-Cola, Porsche, New Balance, Airbnb, BMW, Nike and L’Oréal.

The 6,000-square-foot office will feature Blackmagic Resolve color rooms, Autodesk Flame suites and a VFX bullpen, as well as multiple edit rooms, a DI theater and a Dolby Atmos mix stage through a joint venture with Gigantic Studios.

Main Image: (L-R) Ed Rilli, Sam O’Hare, Marcelo Gandola and Lez Rudge.


Pace Pictures opens large audio post and finishing studio in Hollywood

Pace Pictures has opened a new sound and picture finishing facility in Hollywood. The 20,000-square-foot site offers editorial finishing, color grading, visual effects, titling, sound editorial and sound mixing services. Key resources include a 20-seat 4K color grading theater, two additional HDR color grading suites and 10 editorial finishing suites. It also features a Dolby Atmos mix stage designed by three-time Academy Award-winning re-recording mixer Michael Minkler, who is a partner in the company’s sound division.

The new independently-owned facility is located within IgnitedSpaces, a co-working site whose 45,000 square feet span three floors along Hollywood Boulevard. IgnitedSpaces targets media and entertainment professionals and creatives with executive offices, editorial suites, conference rooms and hospitality-driven office services. Pace Pictures has formed a strategic partnership with IgnitedSpaces to provide film and television productions service packages encompassing the entire production lifecycle.

“We’re offering a turnkey solution where everything is on-demand,” says Pace Pictures founder Heath Ryan. “A producer can start out at IgnitedSpaces with a single desk and add offices as the production grows. When they move into post production, they can use our facilities to manage their media and finish their projects. When the production is over, their footprint shrinks, overnight.”

Pace Pictures is currently providing sound services for the upcoming Universal Pictures release Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again. It is also handling post work for a VR concert film from this year’s Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.

Completed projects include the independent features Silver Lake, Flower and The Resurrection of Gavin Stone, the TV series iZombie, VR Concerts for the band Coldplay, Austin City Limits and Lollapalooza, and a Mariah Carey music video related to Sony Pictures’ animated feature Star.

Technical features of the new facility include three DaVinci Resolve Studio color grading suites with professional color consoles, a Barco 4K HDR digital cinema projector in the finishing theater, and dual Avid Pro Tools S6 consoles in the Dolby Atmos mix stage, which also includes four Pro Tools HDX systems. The site features facilities for sound design, ADR and voiceover recording, title design and insert shooting. Onsite media management includes a robust SAN network, as well as LTO7 archiving and dailies services, and cold storage.

Ryan is an editor who has operated Pace Pictures as an editorial service for more than 15 years. His many credits include the films Woody Woodpecker, Veronica Mars, The Little Rascals, Lawless Range and The Lookalike, as well as numerous concert films, music clips, television specials and virtual reality productions. He has also served as a producer on projects for Hallmark, Mariah Carey, Queen Latifah and others. Originally from Australia, he began his career with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Ryan notes that the goal of the new venture is to break from the traditional facility model and provide producers with flexible solutions tailored to their budgets and creative needs. “Clients do not have to use our talent; they can bring in their own colorists, editors and mixers,” he says. “We can be a small part of the production, or we can be the backbone.”

DigitalGlue’s Creative.Space intros all-Flash 1RU OPMS storage

Creative.Space, a division of DigitalGlue that provides on-premise managed storage (OPMS) as a service for production and post companies as well as broadcast networks, has added the Breathless system to its offerings. The product will make its debut at Cine Gear in LA next month.

The Breathless Next Generation Small Form Factor (NGSFF) media storage system offers 36 front-serviceable NVMe SSD bays in 1RU. It is designed for 4K, 6K and 8K uncompressed workflows using JPEG2000, DPX and multi-channel OpenEXR. There are 4TB of NVMe SSDs currently available, but a 16TB version will be available in later this year, allowing 576TB of Flash storage to fit in 1RU. Breathless performs 10 million random read IOPS (Input/Output Operations per Second) of storage performance (up to 475,000 per drive).

Each of the 36 NGSFF SSD bays connects to the motherboard directly over PCIe to deliver maximum potential performance. With dual Intel Skylake-SP CPUs and 24 DDR4 DIMMs of memory, this system is perfect for I/O intensive local workloads, not just for high-end VFX, but also realtime analytics, database and OTT content delivery servers.

Breathless’ OPMS features 24/7 monitoring, technical support and next-day repairs for an all-inclusive, affordable fixed monthly rate of $2,495.00, based on a three-year contract (16TB of SSD).

Breathless is the second Creative.Space system to launch, joining Auteur, which offers 120TB RAW capacity across 12 drives in a 24-bay 4 RU chassis. Every system is custom-built to address each client’s needs. Entry level systems are designed for small to medium workgroups using compressed 4K, 6K and 8K workflows and can scale for 4K uncompressed workflows (including 4K OpenEXR) and large multi-user environments.

DigitalGlue, an equipment, integration and software development provider, also designs and implements turnkey solutions for content creation, post and distribution.