Category Archives: post production

Boxx adds new Apexx S-class workstations with 9th-gen Intel processors

Boxx Technologies is offering a new line of Apexx S-class workstations featuring the company’s flagship Apexx S3. Purpose-built for 3D design, CAD and motion media workflows requiring CPU frequencies suitable for lightly threaded apps, the compact Apexx S3 now features a 9th-generation, eight-core Intel Core i7 or i9 processor (professionally overclocked to 5.1GHz) to support more heavily threaded applications as well.

Designed to optimize Autodesk tools, Adobe Creative Cloud, Maxon Cinema 4D and other applications, the overclocked and liquid-cooled Apexx S3 sustains its 5.1GHz frequency across all cores. With increased storage and upgradability, as well as multiple Nvidia Quadro or AMD Radeon Pro graphics cards, S3 is also ideal for light GPU compute or virtual reality.

New to the S-class line is Apexx Enigma S3. Built to accelerate professional 3D applications, Enigma S3 is also configurable with 9th-generation, eight-core Intel Core i7/i9 processors overclocked to 5.1GHz and up to three professional GPUs, making it suitable for workflows that include significant GPU rendering or GPU compute work.

The compact Apexx S3 and Enigma S3 are joined by the Apexx S1. The S1 also features an overclocked, eight-core Intel Core i7 for 3D content creation, CAD design and motion media. With its ultra-compact chassis, the S1 is a good solution for limited desktop space, an open environment or workflows where a graphics card is used primarily for display.

Rounding out the S-class family is the Apexx S4, a rack-mount system designed for heavy rendering or GPU compute.

Technicolor welcomes colorists Trent Johnson and Andrew Francis

Technicolor in Los Angeles will be beefing up its color department in January with the addition of colorists Andrew Francis and Trent Johnson.

Francis joins Technicolor after spending the last three years building the digital intermediate department of Sixteen19 in New York. With recent credits that include Second Act, Night School, Hereditary and Girls Trip. Francis is a trained fine artist who has established a strong reputation of integrating the bleeding edge of technology in support of the craft of color.

Johnson, a Technicolor alumnus, returns after stints as a digital colorist at MTI, Deluxe and Sony Colorworks. His recent credits include horror hits Slender Man and The Possession of Hannah Grace, as well as comedies Overboard and Ted 2.

Johnson will be using FilmLight and Resolve for his work, while Francis will toggle between Resolve, BaseLight and Lustre, depending on the project.

Francis and Johnson join Technicolor LA’s roster, which includes Pankaj Bajpai, Tony Dustin, Doug Delaney, Jason Fabbro, recent HPA award-winner Maxine Gervais, Michael Hatzer, Roy Vasich, Tim Vincent, Sparkle and others.

Main Image: Trent Johnson and Andrew Francis

DigitalGlue 12.3

Rohde & Schwarz’s storage system R&S SpycerNode shipping

First shown at IBC 2018, Rohde & Schwarz’s new media storage system, R&S SpycerNode, is now available for purchase. This new storage system uses High Performance Computing (HPC), a term that refers to the system’s performance, scalability and redundancy. HPC is a combination of hardware, file system and RAID approach. HPC employs redundancy using software RAID technologies called erasure coding in combination with declustering to increase performance and reduce rebuild times. Also, system scalability is almost infinite and expansion is possible during operation.

According to Rohde & Schwarz, in creating this new storage system, their engineers looked at many of the key issues that impact on media storage systems within high-performance video editing environments — from annoying maintenance requirements, such as defraging, to much more serious system failures, including dying disk drives.

R&S SpycerNode features Rohde & Schwarz‘s device manager web application that makes it much easier to set up and use Rohde & Schwarz solutions in an integrated fashion. Device manager helps to reduce setup times and simplifies maintenance and service due to its intuitive web-based UI-operated through a single client.

To ensure data security, Rohde & Schwarz has introduced data protection systems based on erasure coding and declustering within the R&S SpycerNode. Erasure coding means that a data block is always written including parity.

Declustering is a part of the data protection approach of HPC setups (formerly known as RAID). It is software based, and in comparison to a traditional RAID setup the spare disk is spread over all other disks and is not a dedicated disk. This will decrease rebuild times and reduce performance impact. Also, there are no limitations with the RAID controller, which results in much higher IOPS (input/output operations per second). Importantly, there is no impact on system performance over time due to declustering.

R&S SpycerNode comes in multiple 2U and 5U chassis designs, which are available with NL-SAS HDD and SAS SSDs in different capacities. An additional 2U24 chassis design is a pure Flash system with main processor units and JBOD units. A main unit is always redundant, equipped with two appliance controllers (AP). Each AP features two 100Gb interfaces, resulting in four 100Gbinterfaces per main unit.

The combination of different chassis systems makes R&S SpycerNode applicable to a very broad range of applications. The 2U system represents a compact, lightweight unit that works well within mobile productions as well as offering a very dense, high-speed storage device for on-premise applications. A larger 5U system offers sophisticated large-scale storage facilities on-premise within broadcast production centers and post facilities.


Storage for Post Studios

By Karen Moltenbrey

The post industry relies heavily on storage solutions, without question. Facilities are jugging a variety of tasks and multiple projects all at once. And deadlines are always looming. Thus, these studios need a storage solution that is fast and reliable. Each studio has different needs and searches to find the right system to fit their particular workflow. Luckily, there are many storage choices for pros to choose from.

For this article, we spoke with two post houses about their storage solutions and why they are a good fit for each of their needs.

Sugar Studios LA
Sugar Studios LA is one-stop shop playground for filmmakers that offers a full range of post production services, including editorial, color, VFX, audio, production and finishing, with each department led by seasoned professionals. Its office suites in the Wiltern Theater Tower, in the center of LA, serve an impressive list of clients, from numerous independent film producers and distributors to Disney, Marvel, Sony, MGM, Universal, Showtime, Netflix, AMC, Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari and others.

Jijo Reed and Sting in one of their post suites.

With so much important data in play at one time, Sugar needs a robust, secure and reliable storage system. However, with diverse offerings come diverse requirements. For its online and color projects, Sugar uses a Symply SAN with 200TB of usable storage. The color workstations are connected via 10Gb Ethernet over Fibre with a 40Gb uplink to the network. For mass storage and offline work, the studio uses a MacOS server acting as a NAS, with 530TB of usable storage connected via a 40Gb network uplink. For Avid offline jobs, the facility has an Avid Nexis Pro with 40TB of storage, and for Avid Pro Tools collaboration, a Facilis TerraBlock with 40TB of usable storage.

“We can collaborate with any and all client stations working on the same or different media and sharing projects across multiple software platforms,” says Jijo Reed, owner/executive producer of Sugar. “No station is limited to what it can do, since every station has access to all media. Centralized storage is so important because not only does it allow collaboration, we always have access to all media and don’t have to fumble through drives. It is also RAID-protected, so we don’t have to be concerned with losing data.”

Prior to employing the centralized storage, Sugar had been using G-Technology’s G-RAID drives, changing over in late 2016. “Once our technical service advisor, Zach Moller, came on board, he began immediately to institute a storage network solution that was tailored to our workflow,” says Reed.

Reed, an award-winning director/producer, founded the company in 2012, using a laptop (running Final Cut Pro 7) and an external hard drive he had purchased on sale at Fry’s. His target base at the time was producers and writers needing sizzle trailers to pitch their projects — at a time when the term “sizzle trailer” was not part of the common vernacular. “I attended festivals to pitch my wares, producing over 15 sizzles the first year,” he says, “and it grew from there.”

Since Reed was creating sizzles for yet-to-be-made features, he was in “pole position” to handle the post for some of these independent films when they got funded. In 2015, he, along with his senior editor, Paul Buhl, turned their focus to feature post work, which was “more lucrative and less exhausting, but mostly, we wanted to tell stories – the whole story.” He rebranded and changed the name of the company from Sizzlepitch to Sugar Studios, and brought on a feature post producer, Chris Harrington. Reed invested heavily in the company, purchasing equipment and acquiring space. Soon, one bay became two, then three and so on. Currently, the company spans three full floors, including the penthouse of the Wiltern Theater Tower.

As Reed proudly points out, the studio space features 21 bays and workstations, two screening theaters, including a 25-seat color and mix DI stage with a Barco DP4K projector and Dolby Atmos configuration. “We are fully staffed, all under one roof, with editorial, full audio services, color correction/grading, VFX and a greenscreen cyclorama stage with on-site 4K cameras, grip and lighting,” he details. “But, it’s the people who make this work. Our passion is obvious to our clients.”

While Sugar was growing and expanding, so, too, was its mass storage solution. According to Zach Moller, it started with the NAS due to its low price and fast (10Gb) connection to every client machine. “The Symply SAN solution was needed because we required a high-bandwidth system for online and color playback that used Fibre Channel technology for the low latency and local drive configuration,” he says.

Moreover, the facility wanted flexibility with its SAN solution; it was very expensive to have every machine connected via Fibre Channel, “and frankly, we didn’t need that bandwidth,” Reed says. “Symply allowed us to have client machines choose whether they connected via Fibre Channel or 10Gb. If this wasn’t the case, we would have been in a pickle, having to purchase expansion chassis for every machine to open up additional PCI slots.” (The bulk of the machines at Sugar connect using the pre-existing 10Gb Ethernet over Fibre network, thus negating the need to use another PCI slot on a Fibre Channel card.)

American Dreamer

At Sugar, the camera masters and production audio are loaded directly to the NAS for mass storage. Then, the group archives the camera masters to LTO for deep archival, for an additional backup. During LTO archival, the studio creates the dailies for the offline edit on either Avid Media Composer (where the MXFs are migrated to the Avid Nexis server) or Adobe Premiere (where the ProRes dailies continue to live on the NAS).

When adding visual effects, the artists render to the Symply SAN when preparing for the online, color and finishing.

The studio works with a wide range of codecs, some of which are extremely taxing on the systems. And, the SAN is ideal, especially for the raster image files (EXRs), since each frame has such a high density — and there can be 100,000 frames per folder. “This can only be accomplished with a premium storage solution: our SAN,” Reed says.

When the studio moved to the EXR codec for the VFX on the American Dreamer feature film, for example, its original NAS solution over 10Gb didn’t have enough bandwidth for playback on its systems (1.2GB/sec). Once it upgraded the SAN solution with dual 16Gb Fibre Channel, they were able to play back uncompressed 4K EXR footage without the headache or frustration of stuttering.

“We have created an environment that caters to the creative process with a technical infrastructure that is superfast and solid. Filmmakers love us, and I couldn’t be prouder of my team for making this happen,” says Reed.

Mike Seabrooke

Postal
Established in 2015, Postal is a boutique creative studio that produces motion graphics, visual effects, animation, live action and editorial, with the vision of transcending all mediums — whether it’s short animations for social media or big-budget visual effects for broadcast. “As a studio, we love to experiment with different techniques. We feel strongly that the idea should always come first,” says Mike Seabrooke, producer at New York’s Postal.

To ensure that these ideas make it to the final stage of a project, the company uses a mixture of hard drives, LTO tapes and servers that house the content while the artists are working on projects, as well as for archival purposes. Specifically, the studio employs the EditShare Storage v.7 shared storage platform and EditShare Ark Tape for managing the LTO tape libraries that serve as nearline and offline backup. This is the system setup that Postal deployed initially when it started up a few years ago, and since then Postal has been continuously updating and expanding it based on its growth as a studio.

Let’s face it, hard drives always have the possibility of failing. But, failure is not something that Postal — or any other post house — can afford. That is why the studio keeps two instances per job on archive drives: a master and a backup. “Organized hard drives give us quick access to previous jobs if need be, which sometimes can be quite the lifesaver,” says Seabrooke.

 

Postal’s Nordstrom project.

LTO tapes, meanwhile, are used to back up the facility’s servers running EditShare v7 – which house Postal’s editorial jobs — on the off chance that something happens to that precious piece of hardware. “The recovery process isn’t the fastest, but the system is compact, self-contained and gives us peace of mind in case anything does go wrong,” Seabrooke explains.

In addition, the studio uses Retrospect backup and restore software for its working projects server. Seabrooke says, “We chose it because it offers a backup service that does not require much oversight.”

When Postal began shopping for a solution for its studio three years ago, reliability was at the top of its list. The facility needed a system it could rely on to back up its data, which would comprise the facility’s entire scope of work. Ease of use was also a concern, as was access. This decision prompted questions such as: Would we have to monitor it constantly? In what timeframe would we be able to access the data? Moreover, cost was yet another factor: Would the solution be effective without breaking our budget?

Postal’s solution indeed enabled them to check off every one of those boxes. “Our projects demand a system that we can count on, with the added benefit of quick retrieval,” Seabrooke says.

Throughout the studio’s production process, the artists are accessing project data on the servers. Then, once they complete the project, the data is transferred to the archival drives for backup. This frees up space on the company servers for new jobs, while providing access to the stored data if needed.

“Storage is so important in our work because it is our work. Starting over on a project is an outcome we cannot allow, so responsible storage is a necessity,” concludes Seabrooke.


Karen Moltenbrey is a long-time VFX and post production writer.


Post house Cinematic Media opens in Mexico City, targets film, TV

Mexico City is now home to Cinematic Media, a full-service post production finishing facility focused on television and cinema content   Located on the lot at Estudios GGM, the facility offers dailies, look development, editorial finishing, color grading and other services, and aims to capitalize on entertainment media production in Mexico and throughout Central and South America.

Scot Evans

In its first project, Cinematic Media provided finishing services for the second season of the Netflix series Ingobernable.

CEO Scot Evans brings more than 25 years of post experience and has managed large-scale post production operations in the United States, Mexico and Canada. His recent posts include executive VP at Technicolor PostWorks in New York, managing director of Technicolor in Vancouver and managing director of Moving Picture Company (MPC) in Mexico City.

“We’re excited about the future for entertainment production in Mexico,” says Evans. “Netflix opened the door and now Amazon is in Mexico. We expect film production to also grow. Through its geographic location, strong infrastructure and cinematic history, Mexico is well-positioned to become a strong producer of content for the world market.”

Cinematic Media has been built from the ground up with a workflow modeled after top-tier facilities in Hollywood and geared toward television and cinema finishing. Engineering design was supervised by John Stevens, whose four decades of post experience includes stints at Cinesite, Efilm, The Post Group, Encore Hollywood, MTI Film and, currently, the Foundation.

Resources include a DI theater with DaVinci Resolve, 4K projection and 7.1 surround sound, four color suites supporting 2K, 4K and HDR, multiple editorial finishing suites, and a Colorfront On-Set Dailies system. The facility also offers look development services to assist productions in creating end-to-end color pipelines, as well as quality control and deliverable services for streaming, broadcast and cinema. Plans to add visual effects services are in the works.

“We can handle six or seven series simultaneously,” says Evans. “There is a lot of redundancy built into our pipeline, making it incredibly efficient and virtually eliminating downtime. A lot of facilities in Hollywood would be envious of what we have here.”

Cinematic Media features high-speed connectivity via the private network Sohonet. It will be employed to share media with studios, producers and distributors around the globe securely and efficiently. It will also be used to facilitate remote collaboration with directors, cinematographers, editors, colorists and other production partners.

Evans cites as a further plus Cinematic Media’s location within Estudios GGM, which has six sound stages, production and editorial office space, grip and lighting resources and more. Producers can take projects from concept to the screen from within the confines of the site. “We can literally walk down a flight of stairs to support a project shooting on one of the stages,” he says. “Proximity is important. We expect many productions to locate their offices and editorial teams here.”

Managing director Arturo Sedano will oversee day-to-day operations. He has supervised post for thousands of hours of television and cinema content on behalf of studios and producers from around the globe, including Netflix, Telemundo, Sony Pictures, Viacom, Lionsgate, HBO, TV Azteca, Grupo Imagen and Fox.

Other key staff includes senior colorist Ana Montaño whose experience as a digital colorist spans facilities in Mexico City, Barcelona, London, Dublin and Rome; producer and post supervisor Cyntia Navarro, previously with Lejana Films and Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (IMCINE). Her credits span episodic television, feature film and documentaries, and include projects for IFC Films, Canal Once, UPI, Discovery Channel, Netflix and Amazon.

Additional staff includes chief technology officer Oliver De Gante, previously with Ollin VFX, where his credits included the hit films Chappie, Her, Tron: Legacy and The Social Network, as well as the Netflix series House of Cards; technical director Gabriel Kerlegand, a workflow specialist and digital imaging technologist with 18 years of experience in cinema and television; and coordinator and senior conform editor Humberto Flores, formerly senior editor at Zenith Adventure Media.


Industry vets launch hybrid studio, Olio Creative

Colorist Marshall Plante, producer Natalie Westerfield and director/creative director Justin Purser founded hybrid studio Olio Creative, which has opened its doors in Venice, California.

Olio features vintage-style décor and an open floor plan and the space is adaptable for freelancers, mobile artists and traveling talent, with two color suites and a suite set up to toggle between editorial and Flame work.

Marshall Plante is a well-known colorist who has built his career at shops such as Digital Magic, Riot, Syndicate and, most recently, at Ntropic where he headed up the color department. His commercial credits include Samsung, Audi, Olay, Nike, Honda, Budweiser, and direct-to-brand projects for Apple and Riot Games. Recently, the Nick Jr. Girls in Charge: Girl Power campaign he graded won an Emmy for Outstanding Daytime Promo Announcement Brand Image Campaign, and the Uber campaign he graded, Rolling With the Champion with Lebron James, won a bronze Cannes Lion.

Marshall’s long-time producer, Natalie Westerfield, has over 10 years of experience producing at companies including The Mill and Ntropic. As executive producer, Westerfield will provide oversight to guide all projects that come through Olio’s pipeline.

The third member of the team is director/creative director Justin Purser. As a director, Purser has worked at production companies A Band Apart and Anonymous Content. He was one of the original creators and directors behind Maker Studios (acquired by Walt Disney Corp.) that pioneered the multi-channel YouTube-centric companies of today.

The three partners will bring an element of experimentation and collaboration to the post production field. “The ability to be chameleons within the industry keeps us open to fresh ideas,” says Pursur. “Our motto is, ‘Try it. If it doesn’t work, pivot.’ And if we thrive in a new way of working, we’re going to share that with everyone. We want to not only make noise for ourselves, but for others in the same business.”


Quick Chat: Westwind Media president Doug Kent

By Dayna McCallum

Doug Kent has joined Westwind Media as president. The move is a homecoming of sorts for the audio post vet, who worked as a sound editor and supervisor at the facility when they opened their doors in 1997 (with Miles O’ Fun). He comes to Westwind after a long-tenured position at Technicolor.

While primarily known as an audio post facility, Burbank-based Westwind has grown into a three-acre campus comprised of 10 buildings, which also house outposts for NBCUniversal and Technicolor, as well as media focused companies Keywords Headquarters and Film Solutions.

We reached out to Kent to find out a little bit more about what is happening over at Westwind, why he made the move and changes he has seen in the industry.

Why was now the right time to make this change, especially after being at one place for so long?
Well, 17 years is a really long time to stay at one place in this day and age! I worked with an amazing team, but Westwind presented a very unique opportunity for me. John Bidasio (managing partner) and Sunder Ramani (president of Westwind Properties) approached me with the role of heading up Westwind and teaming with them in shaping the growth of their media campus. It was literally an offer I couldn’t refuse. Because of the campus size and versatility of the buildings, I have always considered Westwind to have amazing potential to be one of the premier post production boutique destinations in the LA area. I’m very excited to be part of that growth.

You’ve worked at studios and facilities of all sizes in your career. What do you see as the benefit of a boutique facility like Westwind?
After 30 years in the post audio business — which seems crazy to say out loud — moving to a boutique facility allows me more flexibility. It also lets me be personally involved with the delivery of all work to our customers. Because of our relationships with other facilities, we are able to offer services to our customers all over the Los Angeles area. It’s all about drive time on Waze!

What does your new position at Westwind involve?
The size of our business allows me to actively participate with every service we offer, from business development to capital expenditures, while also working with our management team’s growth strategy for the campus. Our value proposition, as a nimble post audio provider, focuses on our high-quality brick and motor facility, while we continue to expand our editorial and mix talent working with many of the best mix facilities and sound designers in the LA area. Luckily, I now get to have a hand in all of it.

Westwind recently renovated two stages. Did Dolby Atmos certification drive that decision?
Netflix, Apple and Amazon all use Atmos materials for their original programming. It was time to move forward. These immersive technologies have changed the way filmmakers shape the overall experience for the consumer. These new object-based technologies enhance our ability to embellish and manipulate the soundscape of each production, creating a visceral experience for the audience that is more exciting and dynamic.

How to Get Away With Murder

Can you talk specifically about the gear you are using on the stages?
Currently, Westwind runs entirely on a Dante network design. We have four dub stages, including both of the Atmos stages, outfitted with Dante interfaces. The signal path from our Avid Pro Tools source machines — all the way to the speakers — is entirely in Dante and the BSS Blu link network. The monitor switching and stage are controlled through custom made panels designed in Harman’s Audio Architect. The Dante network allows us to route signals with complete flexibility across our network.

What about some of the projects you are currently working on?
We provide post sound services to the team at ShondaLand for all their productions, including Grey’s Anatomy, which is now in its 15th year, Station 19, How to Get Away With Murder and For the People. We are also involved in the streaming content market, working on titles for Amazon, YouTube Red and Netflix.

Looking forward, what changes in technology and the industry do you see having the most impact on audio post?
The role of post production sound has greatly increased as technology has advanced.  We have become an active part of the filmmaking process and have developed closer partnerships with the executive producers, showrunners and creative executives. Delivering great soundscapes to these filmmakers has become more critical as technology advances and audiences become more sophisticated.

The Atmos system creates an immersive audio experience for the listener and has become a foundation for future technology. The Atmos master contains all of the uncompressed audio and panning metadata, and can be updated by re-encoding whenever a new process is released. With streaming speeds becoming faster and storage becoming more easily available, home viewers will most likely soon be experiencing Atmos technology in their living room.

What haven’t I asked that is important?
Relationships are the most important part of any business and my favorite part of being in post production sound. I truly value my connections and deep friendships with film executives and studio owners all over the Los Angeles area, not to mention the incredible artists I’ve had the great pleasure of working with and claiming as friends. The technology is amazing, but the people are what make being in this business fulfilling and engaging.

We are in a remarkable time in film, but really an amazing time in what we still call “television.” There is growth and expansion and foundational change in every aspect of this industry. Being at Westwind gives me the flexibility and opportunity to be part of that change and to keep growing.


AI for M&E: Should you take the leap?

By Nick Gold

In Hollywood, the promise of artificial intelligence is all the rage. Who wouldn’t want a technology that adds the magic of AI to smarter computers for an instant solution to tedious, time-intensive problems? With artificial intelligence, anyone with abundant rich media assets can easily churn out more revenue or cut costs, while simplifying operations … or so we’re told.

If you attended IBC, you probably already heard the pitch: “It’s an ‘easy’ button that’s simple to add to the workflow and foolproof to operate, turning your massive amounts of uncategorized footage into metadata.”

But should you take the leap? Before you sign on the dotted line, take a closer look at the technology behind AI and what it can — and can’t — do for you.

First, it’s important to understand the bigger picture of artificial intelligence in today’s marketplace. Taking unstructured data and generating relevant metadata from it is something that other industries have been doing for some time. In fact, many of the tools we embrace today started off in other industries. But unlike banking, finance or healthcare, our industry prioritizes creativity, which is why we have always shied away from tools that automate. The idea that we can rely on the same technology as a hedge fund manager just doesn’t sit well with many people in our industry, and for good reason.

Nick Gold talks AI for a UCLA Annex panel.

In the media and entertainment industry, we’re looking for various types of metadata that could include a transcript of spoken words, important events within a period of time or information about the production (e.g., people, location, props), and currently there’s no single machine-learning algorithm that will solve for all these types of metadata parameters. For that reason, the best starting point is to define your problems and identify which machine learning tools may be able to solve them. Expecting to parse reams of untagged, uncategorized and unstructured media data is unrealistic until you know what you’re looking for.

What works for M&E?
AI has become pretty good at solving some specific problems for our industry. Speech-to-text is one of them. With AI, extracting data from a generally accurate transcription offers an automated solution that saves time. However, it’s important to note that AI tools still have limitations. An AI tool, known as “sentiment analysis,” could theoretically look for the emotional undertones described in spoken word, but it first requires another tool to generate a transcript for analysis.

But no matter how good the algorithms are, they won’t give you the qualitative data that a human observer would provide, such as the emotions expressed through body language. They won’t tell you the facial expressions of the people being spoken to, or the tone of voice, pacing and volume level of the speaker, or what is conveyed by a sarcastic tone or a wry expression. There are sentiment analysis engines that try to do this, but breaking down the components ensures the parameters you need will be addressed and solved.

Another task at which machine learning has progressed significantly is logo recognition. Certain engines are good at finding, for example, all the images with a Coke logo in 10,000 hours of video. That’s impressive and quite useful, but it’s another story if you want to also find footage of two people drinking what are clearly Coke-shaped bottles where the logo is obscured. That’s because machine-learning engines tend to have a narrow focus, which goes back to the need to define very specifically what you hope to get from it.

There are a bevy of algorithms and engines out there. If you license a service that will find a specific logo, then you haven’t solved your problem for finding objects that represent the product as well. Even with the right engine, you’ve got to think about how this information fits in your pipeline, and there are a lot of workflow questions to be explored.

Let’s say you’ve generated speech-to-text with audio media, but have you figured out how someone can search the results? There are several options. Sometimes vendors have their own front end for searching. Others may offer an export option from one engine into a MAM that you either already have on-premise or plan to purchase. There are also vendors that don’t provide machine learning themselves but act as a third-party service organizing the engines.

It’s important to remember that none of these AI solutions are accurate all the time. You might get a nudity detection filter, for example, but these vendors rely on probabilistic results. If having one nude image slip through is a huge problem for your company, then machine learning alone isn’t the right solution for you. It’s important to understand whether occasional inaccuracies will be acceptable or deal breakers for your company. Testing samples of your core content in different scenarios for which you need to solve becomes another crucial step. And many vendors are happy to test footage in their systems.

Although machine learning is still in its nascent stages, there is a lot of interest in learning how to make it work in the media workflow. It can do some magical things, but it’s not a magic “easy” button (yet, anyway). Exploring the options and understanding in detail what you need goes hand-in-hand with finding the right solution to integrate with your workflow.


Nick Gold is lead technologist for Baltimore’s Chesapeake Systems, which specializes in M&E workflows and solutions for the creation, distribution and preservation of content. Active in both SMPTE and the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA), Gold speaks on a range of topics. He also co-hosts the Workflow Show Podcast.
 


Behind the Title: Pace Pictures owner Heath Ryan

NAME: Heath Ryan

COMPANY: Pace Pictures (@PacePictures)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a dailies-to-delivery post house, including audio mixing.

Pace’s Dolby Atmos stage.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Owner and editor.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As owner, I need to make sure everyone is happy.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Psychology. I deal with a lot of producers, directors and artists that all have their own wants and needs. Sometimes what that entails is not strictly post production but managing personalities.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Editing. My company grew out of my love for editing. It’s the final draft of any film. In the over 30 years I have been editing, the power of what an editor can do has only grown.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Chasing unpaid invoices. It’s part of the job, but it’s not fun.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Late, late in the evening when there are no other people around and you can get some real work done.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Not by design but through sheer single mindedness, I have no other skill set but film production. My sense of direction is so bad that armed with a GPS super computer in my phone even Uber driver is not an option.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I started making films in the single digit years. I won a few awards for my first short film in my teens and never looked back. I’m lucky to have found this passion early.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
This year I edited the reboot to Daddy Daycare called Grand-Daddy Daycare (2019) for Universal. I got to work with director Ron Oliver and actor Danny Trejo, and it meant a lot to me. It deals with what we do with our elders as time creeps up on us all. Sadly, we lost Ron’s mom while we were editing the film so it took on extra special meaning to us both.

Lawless Range

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Lawless Range and The Producer. I produced and edited both projects with my dear friend and collaborator Sean McGinly. A modern-day Western and a behind-the-scenes of a Hollywood pilot. They were very satisfying projects because there was no one to blame but ourselves.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My Meridian Sound system, the Internet and TV.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes, I love it. I have always set the tone in the edit bay with music. Especially during dailies – I like to put music on, sometimes films scores, to set the mood of what we are making.

Behind the Title: Post supervisor Chloe Blackwell

NAME: Chloe Blackwell

COMPANY: UK-based Click Post Production

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
I provide bespoke post solutions, which include consultancy and development courses for production companies. I’m also currently working on an online TV series full time. More on that later!

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Post Production Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Each job that I take on is quite different, so my role will evolve to suit each company’s needs.

Usually my job starts at the early stages of production, so I will meet with the editorial team to work out what they are looking to achieve visually. From this I can ascertain how their post will work most effectively, and work back from their delivery dates to put an edit and finishing schedule together.

For every shoot I will oversee the rushes being ingested and investigate any technical issues that crop up. Once the post production phase starts, I will be in charge of managing the offline. This includes ensuring editors are aware of deadlines and working with executives and/or directors and producers to ensure smooth running of their show.

This also requires me to liaise with the post house, keeping them informed of production’s requirements and schedules, and trouble shooting any obstacles that inevitably crop up along the way.

I also deal directly with the broadcaster, ensuring delivery requirements are clear, ironing out any technical queries from both sides and ensuring the final masters are delivered in timely manner. This also means that I have to be meticulous about quality control of the final product, as any errors can cause huge delays. As the post supervisor managing the post production budget, efficiently is vital. I keep a constant eye on spending and keep the production team up to date with cost reports.

Alternatively, I also offer my services as a consultant, if all a production needs is some initial support. I’m also in the process of setting up courses for production teams that will help them gain a better understanding of the new 4KHDR world, and how they can work to realistic timing and budgets.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably the amount of decisions I have to make on a daily basis. There are so many different ways of doing things, from converting frame rates, working with archive and creating the workflows for editorial to work with.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I think I have the best job in the world! I am one of the very few people on any production that sees the show from early development, right through to delivery. It’s a very privileged position.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My role can be quite intensive, so there is usually a real lack of downtime.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
As I have quite a long commute, I find that first thing in the morning is my most productive time. From about 6am I have a few hours of uninterrupted work I can do to set my day up to run smoothly.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would have joined the military!

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
As cheesy as it sounds, post production actually found me! I was working for a production company very early in my career, and I was going to be made redundant. Luckily, I was a valued member of the company and was re-drafted into their post production team. At first I thought it was a disaster, however with lots of help, I hit my stride and fell in love with the job.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
For the last three years I have been working on The Grand Tour for Amazon Prime.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
That’s a hard question as I have worked on so many.

But The Grand Tour has been the most technically challenging. It was the first ever 4K HDR factual entertainment show! Coupled with the fact that it was all shot at 23.98 with elements shot as live. It was one of those jobs where you couldn’t really ask people for advice because it just hadn’t been done.

However, I am also really proud of some of the documentaries I have made, including Born to be Different, Power and the Women’s World and VE day.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My coffee machine, my toaster and the Avid Media Composer.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
All of them…I have to! Part of being in post is being aware of all the new technologies, shows and channels/online platforms out there. You have to keep ahead of the times.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes, I love music! I have an eclectic, wide-ranging taste, which means I have a million playlists on Spotify! I love finding new music and playing it for Jess (Jessica Redman, my post production coordinator). We are often shimmying around the office. It keeps the job light, especially during the most demanding days.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I am fortunate enough to be able to take my dog Mouse with me to work. She keeps me sane and keeps me calm, whilst also providing those I work with, with a little joy too!

I am also an obsessive reader, so any down time I get I am often found curled up under a blanket with a good book.

My passion for television really knows no bounds, so I watch TV a lot too! I try to watch at least the first episode of all new TV programs. I rarely get to go to the cinema, but when I do it’s such a treat to watch films on the big screen.