Category Archives: New Hire

Mark Thorely joins Mill Film Australia as MD

Mill Film in Australia, a Technicolor VFX studio, has named Mark Thorley as managing director.Hi appointment comes in the wake of the February launch of Mill Film in Adelaide, Australia.

Thorley brings with him more than 15 years of executive experience, working at such studios as Lucas Film, Singapore, where he oversaw studio operations and production strategies. Prior to that, Thorley spent nine years at Animal Logic, at both their Los Angeles and Sydney locations, as head of production. He also held senior positions at Screen Queensland and Omnicom.

Throughout his career, Thorley has received credits on numerous blockbuster feature films, including Kong: Skull Island, Rogue One, Jurassic World and Avengers: Age of Ultron. Thorley will drive all aspects of VFX production, client relations and business development for Australia, reporting into the global head of Mill Film, Lauren McCallum.

Luke Morrison joins Electronic Theatre Collective as head of color

Electric Theatre Collective has added Luke Morrison to its London of office as head of color. He will lead a team that already includes Jason Wallis, Lewis Crossfield, Kaitlyn Battistelli, Ruth Wardell, Mathieu Caplanne and Tim Smith.

During his decade-plus career, Morrison has won multiple AICE Awards, including a win in the Color Grading: Over 90 Seconds category for his 2018 Canadian Olympic Committee “Be Olympic” spot directed by Ian Pons Jewell.

Morrison joins Electric Theatre Collective from The Mill, where he spent the past few years setting up the color department at their Chicago office. While there, he led their color team and nurtured up-and-coming talent.

When asked what excited him about joining Electric, Luke had this to say: “Working with and nurturing talent is something that I’m really passionate about, so seeing how Electric holds this as one of their core values is exciting. The opportunity to add my experience and help shape the company whilst building upon their impressive work is inspiring. Having known and worked with many Electric members in the past, I’m looking forward to working alongside them again.”

To date Luke has worked with brands the like of Jeep, Mercedes-Benz, Beats and, most recently, Dollar Shave Club. He has graded for directors such as Wally Pfister, Pete Riski and Mark Romanek.

DG 7.9.18

Sim Post NY expands audio offerings, adds five new staffers

Sim Post in New York is in growth mode. They recently expanded their audio for TV and film services and boosted their post team with five new hires. Following the recent addition of a DI theater to its New York location, Sim is building three audio suites, a voiceover room and support space for the expanded audio capabilities.

Primetime Emmy award-winner Sue Pelino joins Sim as a senior re-recording mixer. Over Pelino’s career, she has been nominated for 10 Primetime Emmy Awards, most recently winning her third Emmy in 2017 for Outstanding Sound Mixing for her work on the 2017 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony (HBO). Project highlights that include performance series such as VH1 Sessions at West 54th, Tony Bennett: An American Classic, Alicia Keys — Unplugged, Tupac: Resurrection and Elton John: The Red Piano.

Dan Ricci also joins the Sim audio department as a re-recording mixer. A graduate of the Berklee College of Music, his prior work experience includes time at Sony Music and credits include Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee and the Grammy-nominated Jerry Before Seinfeld Netflix special. Ricci has worked extensively with Dolby Atmos and immersive technologies involved in VR content creation.

Ryan Schumer completes Sim New York’s audio department as an assistant audio engineer. Schumer has a bachelor’s degree from Five Towns College on Long Island in Jazz Commercial Music with a concentration in audio recording technology.

Stephanie Pacchiano joins Sim as a finishing producer, following a 10-year stint at Broadway Video where she provided finishing and delivery services for a robust roster of clients. Highlights include Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Atlanta, Portlandia, Documentary Now! and delivering Saturday Night Live to over 25 domestic and international platforms.

Kassie Caffiero joins Sim as VP, business development, east coast sales. She brings with her over 25 years of post experience. A graduate of Queens College with a degree in communication arts, Caffiero began her post career in the mid 1980s and found herself working on the CBS TV series. Caffiero’s experience managing the scheduling, operations and sales departments at major post facilities led her to the role of VP of post production at Sony Music Studios in New York City for 10 years. This was followed by a stint at Creative Group in New York for five years and most recently Broadway Video, also in New York, for six years.

Sim Post is a division of Sim, provides end-to-end solutions for TV and feature film production and post production in LA, Vancouver, Toronto, New York and Atlanta.


Nancy Hacohen joins Tool as managing director, live action

Tool of North America has hired executive producer Nancy Hacohen as managing director of live action. In this position, Hacohen will oversee all aspects of Tool’s live action work and represent the company’s directorial talent. She will also work alongside Dustin Callif, managing partner of innovation, to manage Tool’s day-to-day operations, which range from live action to experiential, VR and AI.

Hacohen joins Tool from Moxie Pictures, where she served as executive producer for the past year. Prior to Moxie, she executive produced for Rock Paper Scissors Entertainment, Hungry Man and House of Usher on campaigns for Apple, Google, Mercedes and Nike.

Hacohen also previously worked with Tool, having served as EP on several projects for the company including the Emmy-nominated Fans of Love for the Ad Council’s Love Has No Labels campaign and the female-empowerment It Was You campaign for the Grammys.

 


Framestore Chicago adds compositing lead Chris Beers

Framestore Chicago has added Chris Beers as compositing lead. He will be working across a variety of clients with the Chicago team, as well as diving into Nuke projects of his own.

Beers attended The Illinois Institute of Art, where he earned a BFA in visual effects and motion graphics. After graduation he honed his skills as a junior motion graphics artist at Leviathan in Chicago, and has since worked on projects of all sizes.

Beers’ career highlights include working as an After Effects artist on an expansive projection mapping project for Brazilian musician Amon Tobin’s ISAM world tour, and as a Nuke compositor for the title sequences on Marvel films Ant-Man, Captain America: Civil War and Doctor Strange. Beers was lead compositor on the series finale of Netflix science-fiction drama Sense8, having worked with the team as a Nuke compositor across both seasons of the show.

“As we recently celebrated our office’s official first year and continue to expand, it’s talent like Chris that makes our studio what it is: a creative hub with a strong sense of community, but the firepower of an integrated, global studio,” says Framestore Chicago’s MD Krystina Wilson.


Eli Rotholz joins Alkemy X as VP of biz dev

Creative content company Alkemy X has added Eli Rotholz as VP of business development,. He will be based in the company’s New York headquarters.

Rotholz brings more than 12 years of sales/business development, strategy and production experience, having begun his career as an independent sales rep for Ziegler/Jakubowicz and Moustache NYC. From there, he worked in his first in-house position at Click3X, where he built and managed a diverse roster of directorial talent, as well as the company’s first integrated production offering focusing on live-action, VFX/design/animation and editorial.

Rotholz then founded Honor Society Films. He later joined Hone Production, a brand-direct-focused production company and consultancy, as director of business development/content EP.

“Very few companies in the industry can boast the strong directorial roster and VFX capabilities as Alkemy X,” says Rotholz. “In addition to the amazing entertainment work that Alkemy does, there’s definitely a trend in high-end ‘package’ productions where one company can do both live-action shoots with their directors, as well as editorial and VFX.”


Quick Chat: Technicolor’s new finishing artist, VP Pankaj Bajpai

By Randi Altman

Veteran colorist Pankaj Bajpai will be joining Technicolor’s Los Angeles studio in August as VP, finishing artist and business development. He comes to Technicolor from his long-tenured position at Encore.

Bajpai’s long list of television credits include House of Cards, Sex in the CityCarnivàle, The Newsroom, True Detective, Justified, Fear the Walking Dead, Genius: Einstein and Picasso, Snowfall and many more. He brings with him a background in both film cinematography and digital post.

Bajpai joins Technicolor’s roster of episodic colorists in Los Angeles who include Sparkle, Tim Vincent, Tony Dustin, Tom Forletta, Roy Vasich and Doug Delaney.

“I’m thrilled to start a new chapter at such a vibrant time in our industry’s landscape,” says Bajpai on joining Technicolor. “With the support of Sherri Potter (Technicolor’s president of worldwide post production), and the team of artists and engineers at Technicolor, I’m excited to continue to push the boundaries of technology and creativity to bring our clients’ vision and passion to all screens, in all formats, for all to enjoy.”

We reached out to Bajpai to find out more:

Why was now the right time to make this change, especially after being at one place for so long?
Consumers’ relationship with content has been disrupted, the entertainment industry has shifted, and as a result the dynamics of post are changing dramatically. Lines are blurring between “feature” and “episodic” content — the quality of the story and the production, the craft, the expectation by all stakeholders, etc. is now almost universally the same for all pieces of content regardless of distribution platform. I believe Technicolor understands this dynamic shift and is supporting the singular demand for stunning content regardless of distribution “genre,” and that made it the right time for me to join.

How do you divide your time between your colorist duties and your biz dev duties?
I believe that the role of the colorist is no longer a singular duty. It is my responsibility to be the center of collaboration across the post process — from a client perspective, a craft perspective and a workflow perspective. We no longer live in a silo’d industry with clear hand-offs. I must understand the demands that 4K, HDR and beyond have on workflows, the craft and the ever-tightening delivery deadlines.

I believe in being the catalyst for collaboration across the post process, uniting the technology and artistry to serve our clients’ visions. It’s not about wearing one hat at a time. It’s about taking my role as both artists and client ambassador seriously, ultimately ensuring that the experience is as flawless as possible, and the picture is stunning.

You are an artist first, but what do you get from doing the other parts as well?
We no longer work within independent processes. Being that center of collaboration that I referenced earlier influences my approach to color finishing as much as my role as an artist helps to bring perspective to the technology and operational demands of projects these days.

How does your background in cinematography inform you color work?
My work will always be informed by my clients, but my background in cinematography allows us to speak the same language — the language of lens and light, the language of photography. I find it is a very easy way of communicating visual ideas and gets us on the same page much faster. For instance, when a DP shares with me that they will be using a particular set of lenses and filters in combination with specific gels and lights, I’m able to visualize their creative intent quickly. Instinctively, we know what that image needs to be from the start without talking about it too much. Establishing such trust on demanding episodic shooting and finishing schedules is critical to stay true to my clients’ creative ideas.

Understanding and respecting the nuances of a cinematographer’s work in this way goes far in my ability to create a successful color finishing process in the end.

The world of color is thriving right now. How has the art changed since you started?
Art at its essence will always be about creative people seeing something come to life from within their own unique perspective. What has changed is the fact that the tools we now have at our disposal allow me as a finishing artist to create all new approaches to my craft. I can go deeper into an image and its color space now; it’s freeing and exciting because it allows for collaboration with cinematographers and directors on a continually deeper level.

What is the most exciting thing going on in color right now? HDR? Something else?
It really feels like the golden age of content across all platforms. Consumers’ expectations are understandably high across any type of content consumed in any environment or any screen. I think everyone involved on a show feels that and feels the excitement and continues to raise the bar for the quality of the storytelling, the craft and the overall consumer engagement. To be a contributor work, which is now easily seen globally, is very exciting.

Has the new technology changed the way you work or is your creative process essentially the same?
Technology will continue to change, workflows will be impacted and, as an industry, we’ll always be looking to challenge what is possible. My creative process continues to be influenced by the innovative tools that I get to explore.

For instance, it’s vital for me to understand an array of new digital cameras and the distinctive images they are capable of producing. I frequently use my toolset for creative options that can be deployed right within those cameras. To be able to help customize images non-destructively from the beginning of the shoot and to collaborate with directors and cinematographers to aid storytelling with a unique visual style all the way to the finish, is hugely satisfying. For innovation in the creative process today, the sky is the limit.


Director Natalia Leite joins Humble’s roster

Bi-coastal production studio Humble has signed director Natalia Leite to its roster. Humble is Leite’s commercial representation, but she brings her rich experience as a writer and director for features, indie films and Vice documentaries.

Her MFA, a psychological thriller about rape crimes at a university, premiered at SXSW 2017 and was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize. She also worked on Every Woman, a Vice documentary about traditionally female-held jobs that are often looked down upon. It garnered over 12 million views.

Leite believes in weaving social commentary into her work, especially when it comes to female empowerment.

Her first work with Humble included two docu-style brand films for Vans Off the Wall brand titled Girls Skate India, and Vision Walk, which featured young women building a community and encouraging others to seek and live their passions. Girls Skate India was shortlisted for the 2018 AICP Awards and the AICP Next Awards.

Leite also teamed up with agency Sid Lee to direct a new campaign for The North Face, Move Mountains, that highlights the inspiring stories of female creators, athletes, educators and innovators who are moving mountains in their fields.

“For me, joining Humble was a perfect marriage,” says Leite. “Humble is a collaborative and supportive team that has embraced my passion and personal directing style. There, I will be able to continue telling stories about causes I care about, while branching out more into branded content work.”

Most recently, Leite wrote and directed a short film for a Condé Nast series on LGBT perspectives, which premiered during Pride Week in New York in June. Leite’s project, Kiki and the Mxfits, follows one trans girl whose high school popularity skyrockets when she rebels and uses the girl’s bathroom.


Colorist Arianna Shining Star joins Apache

Santa Monica-based color and finishing boutique Apache has added colorist Arianna Shining Star to its roster at this Santa Monica color and finishing boutique. She is the studio’s first woman colorist.

Star’s commercial work includes spots and branded shorts for Apple, Nike, Porsche, Budweiser, Tommy Hilfiger, Spotify and Coca-Cola. Her music video credits include the MTV VMA-nominated videos Wild Thoughts for Rihanna and Justin Bieber’s visual album for Purpose. Her longform work includes newly released Netflix feature film Ibiza, a comedy co-produced by Adam McKay and Will Ferrell’s Gary Sanchez Productions.

After studying Cinematic Arts and Psychology at USC, Shining Star cut her teeth at Company 3 as an assistant colorist. She then worked as a Baselight specialist for FilmLight before joining Paramount Pictures, where she remastered feature films in HDR. She was then brought on as colorist at Velem to spearhead the post production department of Milk Studios.

“Arianna worked with us before, and we’ve always had our eye on her,” says managing partner LaRue Anderson. “She’s super-talented and a true go-getter who’s amassed an awesome body of work in a relatively short time.”

With Northern California roots, Arianna’s distinctive middle name (she goes by her first and middle names professionally) comes from her parents, who met at a Grateful Dead concert during a performance of the Jerry Garcia classic song, “Shining Star.” Something of a next-gen Dead Head herself, she admits to having seen the current iteration of the band over 30 times.

Her background and interest in psychology is clear as she explains what attracts her most to color grading: “It has the ability to elevate not only production value and overall aesthetic, but can help guide the viewers’ emotional journey through the piece,” Star says.  “I love the opportunity to put the finishing touches on a piece, too. After countless people have poured their heart and soul into crafting a film, it’s an immense privilege to have the last creative touch.”

On adding the first woman colorist to the Apache roster, Anderson says it’s a testament to Star’s creative skills that she’s flourished in what’s largely a male-dominated category of post production. “There’s a lack of role models for women coming up in the creative ranks of color and visual effects,” she explains. “Women have to work hard to get on the playing field. Arianna is not only on the field, she owns the field. She’s established herself as a specialist who DPs and directors lean on for creative collaboration.”

“I want to be seen for the quality of my work and nothing else,” she says. “What makes me unique as a colorist is not my gender, but my aesthetic and approach to collaboration — my style runs the gamut from big and bold to soft and subtle.”

She cites her work on Ibiza as an example of this versatility. “Comedies typically play it safe with color, but from day one we sought to do something different and color outside the lines,” she says. “Director Alex Richanbach and cinematographer Danny Modor set me up with an incredibly diverse palette that allowed us to go bold and use color to further enhance the three different worlds seen in the film: New York, Barcelona and Ibiza. Narrative work really allows you to take your viewer on a journey with the color grade.”

At Apache, Star says she’s found a home where she can continue to learn the craft. “They’re true veterans who know the ins and outs of this wild industry and are incredible leaders,” she says of Anderson and her partners, Shane Reed and Steve Rodriguez. “And their three key core tenets drew me. One, we’re a creatively driven company. Two, we’re consistently re-evaluating the playbook and figuring out what works and what we can improve. And three, we truly operate like a family and support one another. We’ve got a crew of talented artists, and it’s a privilege to work alongside them.”

Rachel Matchett brought on to lead Technicolor Visual Effects

Technicolor has hired on Rachel Matchett to head the post production group’s newly formed VFX brand, Technicolor Visual Effects. Working side-by-side within the same facilities where post services are offered, Technicolor Visual Effects is expanding to a global offering with an integrated pipeline. Technicolor is growing its namesake VFX team apart from the company’s other visual effects brands: MPC, The Mill, Mr. X and Mikros.

A full-service creative VFX house with local studios in Los Angeles, Toronto and London, Technicolor Visual Effects’ recent credits include the feature films Avengers: Infinity Wars, Black Panther, Paddington 2, and episodic series such as This is Us, Anne With an E and Black Mirror.

Matchett joins Technicolor from her long-tenured position at MPC Film. Her background at MPC London includes nearly a decade of senior management positions at the studio. She most recently served as MPC London’s global head of production. In that role, her divisions at MPC Film oversaw and carried out visual effects on a number of films each year, including director Jon Favreau’s Academy Award-winning The Jungle Book and the critically acclaimed Blade Runner 2049.

“Technicolor Visual Effects is emerging from its position as one of the industry’s best-kept secrets. While continuing to support clients who do color finishing with us, we are excited to work with storytellers from script to screen,” says Matchett. “Having been at the heart of MPC Film’s rapid growth over the past decade, I feel that there is a great opportunity for Technicolor’s future role in VFX to forge a new path within the industry.”