Category Archives: NAB

NAB Day 2 thoughts: AJA, Sharp, QNAP

By Mike McCarthy

During my second day walking the show floor at NAB, I was able to follow up a bit more on a few technologies that I found intriguing the day before.

AJA released a few new products and updates at the show. Their Kumo SDI switchers now have options supporting 12G SDI, but their Kona cards still do not. The new Kona 1 is a single channel of 3G SDI in and out, presumably to replace the aging Kona LHe since analog is being phased out in many places.

There is also a new Kona HDMI, which just has four dedicated HDMI inputs for streaming and switching. This will probably be a hit with people capturing and streaming competitive video gaming. Besides a bunch of firmware updates to existing products, they are showing off the next step in their partnership with ColorFront in the form of a 1RU HDR image analyzer. This is not a product I need personally, but I know it will have an important role to fill as larger broadcast organizations move into HDR production and workflows.

Sharp had an entire booth dedicated to 8K video technologies and products. They were showing off 8Kp120 playback on what I assume is a prototype system and display. They also had 8K broadcast-style cameras on display in operation, outputting Quad 12G SDI that eventually fed an 8K TV with Quad HDMI. They also had a large curved video wall, composed of eight individual 2Kx5K panels. It obviously had large seams, but it had a more immersive feel that the LED based block walls I see elsewhere.

I was pleasantly surprised to discover that NAS vendor QNAP has released a pair of 10GbE switches, with both SFP+ and RJ45 ports. I was quoted a price under $600, but I am not sure if that was for the eight- or 12-port version. Either way, that is a good deal for users looking to move into 10GbE, with three to 10 clients — two clients can just direct connect. It also supports the new NBASE-T standard that connects at 2.5Gb or 5Gb instead of 10Gb, depending on the cables and NICs involved in the link. It is of course compatible with 1Gb and 100Mb connections as well.

On a related note, the release of 25GbE PCIe NICs allows direct connections between two systems to be much faster, for not much more cost than previous 10GbE options. This is significant for media production workflows, as uncompressed 4K requires slightly more bandwidth than 10GbE provides. I also learned all sorts of things about the relationship between 10GbE and its quad-channel variant 40GbE, which with the newest implementations is 25GbE, allowing 100GbE when four channels are combined.

I didn’t previously know that 40GbE ports and 100GB ports on switches could be broken into four independent connections with just a splitter cable, which offers some very interesting infrastructure design options — especially as facilities move towards IP video workflows, and SDI over IP implementations and products.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

NAB First Thoughts: Fusion in Resolve, ProRes RAW, more

By Mike McCarthy

These are my notes from the first day I spent browsing the NAB Show floor this year in Las Vegas. When I walked into the South Lower Hall, Blackmagic was the first thing I saw. And, as usual, they had a number of new products this year. The headline item is the next version of DaVinci Resolve, which now integrates the functionality of their Fusion visual effects editor within the program. While I have never felt Resolve to be a very intuitive program for my own work, it is a solution I recommend to others who are on a tight budget, as it offers the most functionality for the price, especially in the free version.

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K looks more like a “normal” MFT DSLR camera, although it is clearly designed for video instead of stills. Recording full 4K resolution in RAW or ProRes to SD or CFast cards, it has a mini-XLR input with phantom power and uses the same LP-E6 battery as my Canon DSLR. It uses the same camera software as the Ursa line of devices and includes a copy of Resolve Studio… for $1,300.  If I was going to be shooting more live-action video anytime soon, this might make a decent replacement for my 70D, moving up to 4K and HDR workflows. I am not as familiar with the Panasonic cameras that it is closely competes with in the Micro Four Thirds space.

AMD Radeon

Among other smaller items, Blackmagic’s new UpDownCross HD MiniConverter will be useful outside of broadcast for manipulating HDMI signals from computers or devices that have less control over their outputs. (I am looking at you, Mac users.) For $155, it will help interface with projectors and other video equipment. At $65, the bi-directional MicroConverter will be a cheaper and simpler option for basic SDI support.

AMD was showing off 8K editing in Premiere Pro, the result of an optimization by Adobe that uses the 2TB SSD storage in AMD’s Radeon Pro SSG graphics card to cache rendered frames at full resolution for smooth playback. This change is currently only applicable to one graphics card, so it will be interesting to see if Adobe did this because it expects to see more GPUs with integrated SSDs hit the market in the future.

Sony is showing crystal light emitting diode technology in the form of a massive ZRD video wall of incredible imagery. The clarity and brightness were truly breathtaking, but obviously my camera rendered to the web hardly captures the essence of what they were demonstrating.

Like nearly everyone else at the show, Sony is also pushing HDR in the form of Hybrid Log Gamma, which they are developing into many of their products. They also had an array for their tiny RX0 cameras on display with this backpack rig from Radiant Images.

ProRes RAW
At a higher level, one of the most interesting things I have seen at the show is the release of ProRes RAW. While currently limited to external recorders connected to cameras from Sony, Panasonic and Canon, and only supported in FCP-X, it has the potential to dramatically change future workflows if it becomes more widely supported. Many people confuse RAW image recording with the log gamma look, or other low-contrast visual interpretations, but at its core RAW imaging is a single-channel image format paired with a particular bayer color pattern specific to the sensor it was recorded with.

This decreases the amount of data to store (or compress) and gives access to the “source” before it has been processed to improve visual interpretation — in the form of debayering and adding a gamma curve to reverse engineer the response pattern of the human eye, compared to mechanical light sensors. This provides more flexibility and processing options during post, and reduces the amount of data to store, even before the RAW data is compressed, if at all. There are lots of other compressed RAW formats available; the only thing ProRes actually brings to the picture is widespread acceptance and trust in the compression quality. Existing compressed RAW formats include R3D, CinemaDNG, CineformRAW and Canon CRM files.

None of those caught on as a widespread multi-vendor format, but this ProRes RAW is already supported by systems from three competing camera vendors. And the applications of RAW imaging in producing HDR content make the timing of this release optimal to encourage vendors to support it, as they know their customers are struggling to figure out simpler solutions to HDR production issues.

There is no technical reason that ProRes RAW couldn’t be implemented on future Arri, Red or BMD cameras, which are all currently capable of recording ProRes and RAW data (but not the combination, yet). And since RAW is inherently a playback-only format, (you can’t alter a RAW image without debayering it), I anticipate we will see support in other applications, unless Apple wants to sacrifice the format in an attempt to increase NLE market share.

So it will be interesting to see what other companies and products support the format in the future, and hopefully it will make life easier for people shooting and producing HDR content.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

DG 7.9.18

NAB: AJA intros HDR Image Analyzer, Kona 1, Kona HDMI

AJA Video Systems is exhibiting a tech preview of its new waveform, histogram, vectorscope and Nit level HDR monitoring solution at NAB. The HDR Image Analyzer simplifies monitoring and analysis of 4K/UltraHD/2K/HD, HDR and WCG content in production, post, quality control and mastering. AJA has also announced two new Kona cards, as well as Desktop Software v14.2. Kona HDMI is a PCIe card for multi-channel HD and single-channel 4K HDMI capture for live production, streaming, gaming, VR and post production. Kona1 is a PCIe card for single-channel HD/SD 3G-SDI capture/playback. Desktop Software v14.2 adds support for Kona 1 and Kona HDMI, plus new improvements for AJA Kona, Io and T-TAP products.

HDR Image Analyzer
A waveform, histogram, vectorscope and Nit level HDR monitoring solution, the HDR Image Analyzer combines AJA’s video and audio I/O with HDR analysis tools from Colorfront in a compact 1RU chassis. The HDR Image Analyzer is a flexible solution for monitoring and analyzing HDR formats including Perceptual Quantizer, Hybrid Log Gamma and Rec.2020 for 4K/UltraHD workflows.

The HDR Image Analyzer is the second technology collaboration between AJA and Colorfront, following the integration of Colorfront Engine into AJA’s FS-HDR. Colorfront has exclusively licensed its Colorfront HDR Image Analyzer software to AJA for the HDR Image Analyzer.

Key features include:

— Precise, high-quality UltraHD UI for native-resolution picture display
— Advanced out-of-gamut and out-of-brightness detection with error intolerance
— Support for SDR (Rec.709), ST2084/PQ and HLG analysis
— CIE graph, Vectorscope, Waveform, Histogram
— Out-of-gamut false color mode to easily spot out-of-gamut/out-of-brightness pixels
— Data analyzer with pixel picker
— Up to 4K/UltraHD 60p over 4x 3G-SDI inputs
— SDI auto-signal detection
— File base error logging with timecode
— Display and color processing look up table (LUT) support
— Line mode to focus a region of interest onto a single horizontal or vertical line
— Loop-through output to broadcast monitors
— Still store
— Nit levels and phase metering
— Built-in support for color spaces from ARRI, Canon, Panasonic, RED and Sony

“As 4K/UltraHD, HDR/WCG productions become more common, quality control is key to ensuring a pristine picture for audiences, and our new HDR Image Analyzer gives professionals an affordable and versatile set of tools to monitor and analyze HDR productions from start to finish, allowing them to deliver more engaging visuals for viewers,” says Rashby.

Adds Aron Jazberenyi, managing director of Colorfront, “Colorfront’s comprehensive UHD HDR software toolset optimizes the superlative performance of AJA video and audio I/O hardware, to deliver a powerful new solution for the critical task of HDR quality control.”

HDR Image Analyzer is being demonstrated as a technology preview only at NAB 2018.

Kona HDMI
An HDMI video capture solution, Kona HDMI supports a range of workflows, including live streaming, events, production, broadcast, editorial, VFX, vlogging, video game capture/streaming and more. Kona HDMI is highly flexible, designed for four simultaneous channels of HD capture with popular streaming and switching applications including Telestream Wirecast and vMix.

Additionally, Kona HDMI offers capture of one channel of UltraHD up to 60p over HDMI 2.0, using AJA Control Room software, for file compatibility with most NLE and effects packages. It is also compatible with other popular third-party solutions for live streaming, projection mapping and VR workflows. Developers use the platform to build multi-channel HDMI ingest systems and leverage VL42 compatibility on Linux. Features include: four full-size HDMI ports; the ability to easily switch between one channel of UltraHD or four channels of 2K/HD; and embedded HDMI audio in, up to eight embedded channels per input.

Kona 1
Designed for broadcast, post production and ProAV, as well as OEM developers, Kona 1 is a cost-efficient single-channel 3G-SDI 2K/HD 60p I/O PCIe card. Kona 1 offers serial control and reference/LTC, and features standard application plug-ins, as well as AJA SDK support. Kona 1 supports 3G-SDI capture, monitoring and/or playback with software applications from AJA, Adobe, Avid, Apple, Telestream and more. Kona 1 enables simultaneous monitoring during capture (pass-through) and includes: full-size SDI ports supporting 3G-SDI formats, embedded 16-channel SDI audio in/out, Genlock with reference/ LTC input and RS-422.

Desktop Software v14.2
Desktop Software v14.2 introduces support for Kona HDMI and Kona 1, as well as a new SMPTE ST 2110 IP video mode for Kona IP, with support for AJA Control Room, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, part of the Adobe Creative Cloud, and Avid Media Composer. The free software update also brings 10GigE support for 2K/HD video and audio over IP (uncompressed SMPTE 2022-6/7) to the new Thunderbolt 3-equipped Io IP and Avid DNxIP, as well as additional enhancements to other Kona, Io and T-TAP products, including HDR capture with Io 4K Plus. Io 4K Plus and DNxIV users also benefit from a new feature allowing all eight analog audio channels to be configured for either output, input or a 4-In/4-Out mode for full 7.1 ingest/monitoring, or I/O for stereo plus VO and discrete tracks.

“Speed, compatibility and reliability are key to delivering high-quality video I/O for our customers. Kona HDMI and Kona 1 give video professionals and enthusiasts new options to work more efficiently using their favorite tools, and with the reliability and support AJA products offer,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

Kona HDMI will be available this June for $895, and Kona 1 will be available in May for $595. Both are available for pre-order now. Desktop Software v14.2 will also be available in May, as a free download from AJA’s support page.


CatDV MAM expands support for enterprise workflows

Square Box Systems has introduced several enhancements geared to larger-scale enterprise use of its flagship CatDV media asset management (MAM) solution. These include expanded customization capabilities for tailored MAM workflows, new enhancements for cloud and hybrid installations, and expanded support for micro-services and distributed deployments.

CatDV now can operate seamlessly in hybrid IT environments consisting of both on-premises and cloud-based resources, enabling transparent management and movement of content across NAS, SAN, cloud or object storage tiers.

New customization features include enhanced JavaScript support and an all-new custom user interface toolkit. Both the desktop and web versions of CatDV and the system’s Worker automation engine now support JavaScript, and the user interface toolkit enables customers to build completely new user experiences for every CatDV component. Recent CatDV customizations, built on these APIs, include a document analyzer that can extract text from PDFs, photos, and MS Office documents for indexing by CatDV; and a tool for uploading assets to YouTube.

CatDV’s new cloud/hybrid enhancements include integration with file acceleration tools from Aspera, as well as extended support for AWS S3 archive, such as KMS encryption and Glacier support with configurable expedited restores. CatDV has also built an all-new AWS deployment template with proxy playback from S3. CatDV also now includes support for Backblaze B2 archive and Contigo object storage.

In addition, the latest version of CatDV now supports deployment of server plug-in components on separate servers. Examples include data movers for archive plug-ins such as Black Pearl, S3, Azure, and B2.


EditShare intros software-only Flow MAM, more at NAB

During NAB 2018, EditShare launched a new standalone version of its Flow MAM software, designed for non-EditShare storage environments such as Avid Nexis, Storage DNA and Amazon S3. Flow adds an intelligent media management layer to an existing storage infrastructure that can manage millions of assets across multiple storage tiers in different locations.

EditShare will spotlight the new Flow version as well as a new family of solutions in its QScan Automated Quality Control (AQC) software line, offering cost-effective compliance and delivery check capabilities and integration across production, post and delivery. In addition, EditShare will unveil its new XStream EFS auditing dashboard, aligned with Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) best practices to promote security in media-engineered EFS storage platforms.

The Flow suite of apps helps users manage content and associated metadata from ingest through to archive. At the core of Flow are workflow engines that enable collaboration through ingest, search, review, logging, editing and delivery, and a workflow automation engine for automating tasks such as transcoding and delivery. Flow users are able to review content remotely and also edit content on a timeline with voiceover and effects from anywhere in the world.

Along with over 500 software updates, the latest version of Flow features a redesigned and unified UI across web-based and desktop apps. Flow also has new capabilities for remotely viewing Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere edits in a web browser; range markers for enhanced logging and review capabilities; and new software licensing with a customer portal and license management tools. A new integration with EditShare’s QScan AQC software makes AQC available at any stage of the post workflow.

Flow caters to the increased demand for remote post workflows by enabling full remote access to content, as well as integration with leading NLEs such as Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere. Comments James Richings, EditShare managing director, “We are seeing a huge demand from users to interact and collaborate with each other from different locations. The ability to work from anywhere without incurring the time and cost of physically moving content around is becoming much more desirable. With a simple setup, Flow helps these users track their assets, automate workflows and collaborate from anywhere in the world. We are also introducing a new pay-as-you-go model, making asset management affordable for even the smallest of teams.”

Flow will be available through worldwide authorized sales partners and distributors by the end of May, with monthly pricing starting at $19 per user.


Atomos at NAB offering ProRes RAW recorders

Atomos is at this year’s NAB showing support for ProRes RAW, a new format from Apple that combines the performance of ProRes with the flexibility of RAW video. The ProRes RAW update will be available free for the Atomos Shogun Inferno and Sumo 19 devices.

Atomos devices are currently the only monitor recorders to offer ProRes RAW, with realtime recording from the sensor output of Panasonic, Sony and Canon cameras.

The new upgrade brings ProRes RAW and ProRes RAW HQ recording, monitoring, playback and tag editing to all owners of an Atomos Shogun Inferno or Sumo19 device. Once installed, it will allow the capture of RAW images in up to 12-bit RGB — direct from many of our industry’s most advanced cameras onto affordable SSD media. ProRes RAW files can be imported directly into Final Cut Pro 10.4.1 for high-performance editing, color grading, and finishing on Mac laptop and desktop systems.
Eight popular cine cameras with a RAW output — including the Panasonic AU-EVA1, Varicam LT, Sony FS5/FS7 and Canon C300mkII/C500 — will be supported with more to follow.

With this ProRes RAW support, filmmakers can work easily with RAW – whether they are shooting episodic TV, commercials, documentaries, indie films or social events.

Shooting ProRes RAW preserves maximum dynamic range, with a 12-bit depth and wide color gamut — essential for HDR finishing. The new format, which is available in two compression levels — ProRes RAW and ProRes RAW HQ — preserves image quality with low data rates and file sizes much smaller than uncompressed RAW.

Atomos recorders through ProRes RAW allow for increased flexibility in captured frame rates and resolutions. Atomos can record ProRes RAW up to 2K at 240 frames a second, or 4K at up to 120 frames per second. Higher resolutions such as 5.7K from the Panasonic AU-EVA1 are also supported.

Atomos’ OS, AtomOS 9, gives users filming tools to allow them to work efficiently and creatively with ProRes RAW in portable devices. Fast connections in and out and advanced HDR screen processing means every pixel is accurately and instantly available for on-set creative playback and review. Pull the SSD out and dock to your Mac over Thunderbolt 3 or USB-C 3.1 for immediate super fast post production.

Download the AtomOS 9 update for Shogun Inferno and Sumo 19 at www.atomos.com/firmware.


AlterMedia rolling out rebuild of its Studio Suite 12 at NAB

At this year’s NAB, AlterMedia is showing Studio Suite 12, a ground-up rebuild of its studio, production and post management application. The rebuilt codebase and streamlined interface have made the application lighter, faster and more intuitive; it functions as a web application and yet still has the ability to be customized easily to adapt to varying workflows.

“We literally started over with a blank slate with this version,” says AlterMedia founder Joel Stoner. “The goal was really to reconsider everything. We took the opportunity to shed tons of old code and tired interface paradigms. That said, we maintained the basic structure and flow so existing users would feel comfortable jumping right in. Although there are countless new features, the biggest is that every user can now access Studio Suite 12 through a browser from anywhere.”

Studio Suite 12 now provides better integration within the Internet ecosystem by connecting with Slack and Twillio (for messaging), as well as Google Calendar, Exchange Calendar, Apple Calendar, IMDB, Google Maps, Ebay, QuickBooks and Xero accounting software and more.


Editor Dylan Tichenor to headline SuperMeet at NAB 2018

For those of you heading out to Las Vegas for NAB 2018, the 17th annual SuperMeet will take place on Tuesday, April 10 at the Rio Hotel. Speaking this year will be Oscar-nominated film editor Dylan Tichenor (There Will be Blood, Zero Dark Thirty). Additionally, there will be presentations from Blackmagic, Adobe, Frame.io, HP/Nvidia, Atomos and filmmaker Bradley Olsen, who will walk the audience through his workflow on Off the Tracks, a documentary about Final Cut Pro X.

Blackmagic Resolve designers Paul Saccone, Mary Plummer, Peter Chamberlain and Rohit Gupta will answer all questions on all things DaVinci Resolve, Fusion or Fairlight Audio.

Adobe Premiere Pro product manager Patrick Palmer will reveal new features in Adobe video solutions for their editing, color, graphics and audio editing workflows.

Frame.io CEO Emery Wells will preview the next generation of its collaboration and workflow tool, which will be released this summer.

Atomos’ Jeromy Young will talk about some of their new partners. He says, “It involves software and camera makers alike.”

As always, the evening will round out with the SuperMeet’s ”World Famous Raffle,” where the total value of prizes has now reached over $101,000. Part of that total includes a Blackmagic Advanced Control Panel, worth $29,995.

Doors will open at 4:30pm with the SuperMeet Vendor Showcase, which features 23 software and hardware developers. Those attending can enjoy a few cocktails and mingle with industry peers.

To purchase tickets, and for complete daily updates on the SuperMeet, including agenda updates, directions, transportation options and a current list of raffle prizes, visit the SuperMeet website.


NAB: Adobe’s spring updates for Creative Cloud

By Brady Betzel

Adobe has had a tradition of releasing Creative Cloud updates prior to NAB, and this year is no different. The company has been focused on improving existing workflows and adding new features, some based on Adobe’s Sensei technology, as well as improved VR enhancements.

In this release, Adobe has announced a handful of Premiere Pro CC updates. While I personally don’t think that they are game changing, many users will appreciate the direction Adobe is going. If you are color correcting, Adobe has added the Shot Match function that allows you to match color between two shots. Powered by Adobe’s Sensei technology, Shot Match analyzes one image and tries to apply the same look to another image. Included in this update is the long-requested split screen to compare before and after color corrections.

Motion graphic templates have been improved with new adjustments like 2D position, rotation and scale. Automatic audio ducking has been included in this release as well. You can find this feature in the Essential Sound panel, and once applied it will essentially dip the music in your scene based on dialogue waveforms that you identify.

Still inside of Adobe Premiere Pro CC, but also applicable in After Effects, is Adobe’s enhanced Immersive Environment. This update is for people who use VR headsets to edit and or process VFX. Team Project workflows have been updated with better version tracking and indicators of who is using bins and sequences in realtime.

New Timecode Panel
Overall, while these updates are helpful, none are barn burners, the thing that does have me excited is the new Timecode Panel — it’s the biggest new update to the Premiere Pro CC app. For years now, editors have been clamoring for more than just one timecode view. You can view sequence timecodes, source media timecodes from the clips on the different video layers in your timeline, and you can even view the same sequence timecode in a different frame rate (great for editing those 23.98 shows to a 29.97/59.94 clock!). And one of my unexpected favorites is the clip name in the timecode window.

I was testing this feature in a pre-release version of Premiere Pro, and it was a little wonky. First, I couldn’t dock the timecode window. While I could add lines and access the different menus, my changes wouldn’t apply to the row I had selected. In addition, I could only right click and try to change the first row of contents, but it would choose a random row to change. I am assuming the final release has this all fixed. If it the wonkiness gets flushed out, this is a phenomenal (and necessary) addition to Premiere Pro.

Codecs, Master Property, Puppet Tool, more
There have been some compatible codec updates, specifically Raw Sony X-OCN (Venice), Canon Cinema Raw Light (C200) and Red IPP2.

After Effects CC has also been updated with Master Property controls. Adobe said it best during their announcement: “Add layer properties, such as position, color or text, in the Essential Graphics panel and control them in the parent composition’s timeline. Use Master Property to push individual values to all versions of the composition or pull selected changes back to the master.”

The Puppet Tool has been given some love with a new Advanced Puppet Engine, giving access to improving mesh and starch workflows to animate static objects. Beyond updates to Add Grain, Remove Grain and Match Grain effects, making them multi-threaded, enhanced disk caching and project management improvements have been added.

My favorite update for After Effects CC is the addition of data-driven graphics. You can drop a CSV or JSON data file and pick-whip data to layer properties to control them. In addition, you can drag and drop data right onto your comp to use the actual numerical value. Data-driven graphics is a definite game changer for After Effects.

Audition
While Adobe Audition is an audio mixing application, it has some updates that will directly help anyone looking to mix their edit in Audition. In the past, to get audio to a mixing program like Audition, Pro Tools or Fairlight you would have to export an AAF (or if you are old like me possibly an OMF). In the latest Audition update you can simply open your Premiere Pro projects directly into Audition, re-link video and audio and begin mixing.

I asked Adobe whether you could go back and forth between Audition and Premiere, but it seems like it is a one-way trip. They must be expecting you to export individual audio stems once done in Audition for final output. In the future, I would love to see back and forth capabilities between apps like Premiere Pro and Audition, much like the Fairlight tab in Blackmagic’s Resolve. There are some other updates like larger tracks and under-the-hood updates which you can find more info about on: https://theblog.adobe.com/creative-cloud/.

Adobe Character Animator has some cool updates like overall character building updates, but I am not too involved with Character Animator so you should definitely read about things like the Trigger Improvements on their blog.

Summing Up
In the end, it is great to see Adobe moving forward on updates to its Creative Cloud video offerings. Data-driven animation inside of After Effects is a game-changer. Shot color matching in Premiere Pro is a nice step toward a professional color correction application. Importing Premiere Pro projects directly into Audition is definitely a workflow improvement.

I do have a wishlist though: I would love for Premiere Pro to concentrate on tried-and-true solutions before adding fancy updates like audio ducking. For example, I often hear people complain about how hard it is to export a QuickTime out of Premiere with either stereo or mono/discrete tracks. You need to set up the sequence correctly from the jump, adjust the pan on the tracks, as well as adjust the audio settings and export settings. Doesn’t sound streamlined to me.

In addition, while shot color matching is great, let’s get an Adobe SpeedGrade-style view tab into Premiere Pro so it works like a professional color correction app… maybe Lumetri Pro? I know if the color correction setup was improved I would be way more apt to stay inside of Premiere Pro to finish something instead of going to an app like Resolve.

Finally, consolidating and transcoding used clips with handles is hit or miss inside of Premiere Pro. Can we get a rock-solid consolidate and transcode feature inside of Premiere Pro? Regardless of some of the few negatives, Premiere Pro is an industry staple and it works very well.

Check out Adobe’s NAB 2018 update video playlist for details on each and every update.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

NextComputing, Z Cam, Assimilate team on turnkey VR studio

NextComputing, Z Cam and Assimilate have teamed up to create a complete turnkey VR studio. Foundation VR Studio is designed to provide all aspects of the immersive production process and help the creatives be more creative.

According to Assimilate CEO Jeff Edson, “Partnering with Z Cam last year was an obvious opportunity to bring together the best of integrated 360 cameras with a seamless workflow for both live and post productions. The key is to continue to move the market from a technology focus to a creative focus. Integrated cameras took the discussions up a level of integration away from the pieces. There have been endless discussions regarding capable platforms for 360; the advantage we have is we work with just about every computer maker as well as the component companies, like CPU and GPU manufacturers. These are companies that are willing to create solutions. Again, this is all about trying to help the market focus on the creative as opposed to debates about the technology, and letting creative people create great experiences and content. Getting the technology out of their way and providing solutions that just work helps with this.”

These companies are offering a few options with their Power VR Studio.

The Foundation VR Studio, which costs $8,999 and is available now includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 6-core Intel core i7-8700K 3.7GHz processor
o Memory: 16GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

Then there is the Power VR Studio, for $10,999, which is also available now. It includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 10-core Intel core i9-7900K 3.3GHz processor
o Memory: 32GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

These companies will be at NAB demoing the systems.