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Category Archives: Music Creation

Alibi targets trailer editors with Sorcery music collection

Alibi Music Library has released Sorcery, the newest collection in its recently launched ATX catalog for high-end theatrical trailers and TV series. From epic magical quests and enchanted journeys to fantastic family adventures and whimsical mysteries, Sorcery is a collection of orchestral trailer cues that embody the unique sensibilities of such films designed to create an instant emotional link among viewers. Users can sample the new album here.

René Osmanczyk

ATX’s Sorcery, which features 10 tracks along with numerous stems and alternative mixes, was composed by long-time Alibi partner René Osmanczyk of DosComp, whose goal was to write a family-friendly, adventure-steeped album inspired by the soundtracks to Avatar and the Harry Potter franchise. Each of the 10 tracks has five different mix versions as well as stems for every instrument group so that clients can create their own custom mix versions.

“I wanted melodies that take you on a musical journey through each track, plus the classical trailer build that every cue has,” Osmanczyk explains. “I started composing this album in June, a process that took a bit longer since it was written for full orchestra.”

In terms of tools, he used the Steinberg Cubase 10 DAW and Native Instruments Kontakt 6 as the main sampler. “When it comes to libraries, I used things like Cinematic Studio Strings, Cinematic Studio Solo Strings, Cinematic Studio Brass, Berlin Strings, Orchestral Tools harps, various Hans Zimmer Percussion, Trailer Percussion and also self-crafted hits, etc. … Oceania choir, Berlin Woodwinds and many other things.”

Alibi VP/creative production Sam Wale adds, “What René ultimately delivered will provide trailer editors with some pretty amazing options. I would describe Sorcery as majestic and magical, epic and emotional, haunting and heartwarming.”

Alibi’s music and sound design has been used to promote projects such as the film Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood and the TV series American Horror Story.

Killer Tracks offers label for reality television music

Production music company Killer Tracks has launched In Reality, a new label focused on songs for unscripted television. The new label debuts with 10 albums of original tracks specially created for all reality television genres and spanning an array of musical styles, emotions and scenarios.

The entire catalog is being supervised by Killer Tracks executive producer Ryan Perez-Daple, who has produced more than 300 of the company’s top-performing albums. In Reality’s new releases are available immediately for licensing and sync through the Killer Tracks website. The new label plans to release an additional 20 albums over the remainder of the year.

In Reality was developed to help unscripted television producers meet their music needs with immediate access to high-quality, easily editable songs tailored to lifestyle, competition, true crime, travel, documentary and other show formats. With music being a key part of the reality television experience, In Reality’s songs play to emotions, support plot twists and underscore moments of tension, action and humor. Across the catalog, musical styles include urban/hip-hop, feel-good rock, anthemic indie, promo/trailer, comedic beats and sensitive underscores. The label also offers tracks suitable for promos, trailers and other marketing media.

“Demand for music continues to grow from producers of shows across the reality TV spectrum,” says Perez-Daple. “Producers need a lot of music, and they need it quickly, but they also want music that has a contemporary sound, is well-produced and fits the tone and character of their shows. We’re creating tracks that are fresh, original and versatile, and tailored to production use.”

Ryan Perez-Daple

For In Reality’s initial albums, Perez-Daple drew on Killer Tracks’ deep talent pool of established composers and emerging artists. Contributing artists include Charles “Chizzy” Stephens III, Alex “Juice” Hitchens, Aire Atlantica and Fred Kron, among many others whose resumes include work with chart-topping recording artists, as well as film, television and advertising projects.

“We’re tapping into developing composers and producers, many of whom are working with major labels and whose sensibilities are in line with current trends in popular music,” Perez-Daple says.

In Reality songs are written for seamless audiovisual integration, include numerous edit points, and many come with alternate mixes, stems and musical toolkits.

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EP Sydney Ferleger joins The Music Playground, The Station

The Music Playground and The Station have brought on Sydney Ferleger as executive producer, East Coast. She joins the team after a two years at NYC-based post house Crew Cuts. Prior to that, she was working with the marketing and sales team at global animatic company Animated Storyboards.

The Station is an integrated content production company and post facility focused on delivering top creative outcomes to advertising agencies and brands. The Music Playground employs composers, sound designers, audio post engineers and music supervisors.

Ferleger has worked on traditional advertising projects and branded content all the way to virtual reality. She has led international teams and has worked with many top brands and networks, including PepsiCo, IKEA and A&E.

“I’m excited to be here at TMP and The Station,” says Ferleger. “Being able to combine my passion for music with my knowledge of production and post is a new and gratifying challenge. There is a rich creative history here, as they were one of the first integrated post houses to prosper. The team really understands the importance of client services and what it takes to drive successful creative outcomes for ‘all-in’ post.”


Human’s opens new Chicago studio

Human, an audio and music company with offices in New York, Los Angeles and Paris has opened a Chicago studio headed up by veteran composer/producer Justin Hori.

As a composer, Hori’s work has appeared in advertising, film and digital projects. “Justin’s artistic output in the commercial space is prolific,” says Human partner Gareth Williams. “There’s equal parts poise and fun behind his vision for Human Chicago. He’s got a strong kinship and connection to the area, and we couldn’t be happier to have him carve out our footprint there.”

From learning to DJ at age 13 to working Gramaphone Records to studying music theory and composition at Columbia College, Hori’s immersion in the Chicago music scene has always influenced his work. He began his career at com/track and Comma Music, before moving to open Comma’s Los Angeles office. From there, Hori joined Squeak E Clean, where he served as creative director for the past five years. He returned to Chicago in 2016.

Hori is known for producing unexpected yet perfectly spot-on pieces of music for advertising, including his track “Da Diddy Da,” which was used in the four-spot summer 2018 Apple iPad campaign. His work has won top industry honors including D&AD Pencils, The One Show, Clio and AICP Awards and the Cannes Gold Lion for Best Use of Original Music.

Meanwhile, Post Human, the audio post sister company run by award-winning sound designer and engineer Sloan Alexander, continues to build momentum with the addition of a second 5.1 mixing suite in NYC. Plans for similar build-outs in both LA and Chicago are currently underway.

With services ranging from composition, sound design and mixing, Human works in advertising, broadcast, digital and film.


Composer and sound mixer Rob Ballingall joins Sonic Union

NYC-based audio studio Sonic Union has added composer/experiential sound designer/mixer Rob Ballingall to its team. He will be working out of both Sonic Union’s Bryant Park and Union Square locations. Ballingall brings with him experience in music and audio post, with an emphasis on the creation of audio for emerging technology projects, including experiential and VR.

Ballingall recently created audio for an experiential in-theatre commercial for Mercedes-Benz Canada, using Dolby Atmos, D-Box and 4DX technologies. In addition, for National Geographic’s One Strange Rock VR experience, directed by Darren Aronofsky, Ballingall created audio for custom VR headsets designed in the style of astronaut helmets, which contained a pinhole projector to display visuals on the inside of the helmet’s visor.

Formerly at Nylon Studios, Ballingall also composed music on brand campaigns for clients such as Ford, Kellogg’s and Walmart, and provided sound design/engineering on projects for AdCouncil and Resistance Radio for Amazon Studios and The Man in the High Castle, which collectively won multiple Cannes Lion, Clio and One Show awards, as well as garnering two Emmy nominations.

Born in London, Ballingall immigrated to the US eight years ago to seek a job as a mixer, assisting numerous Grammy Award-winning engineers at NYC’s Magic Shop recording studio. Having studied music composition and engineering from high school to college in England, he soon found his niche offering compositional and arranging counterpoints to sound design, mix and audio post for the commercial world. Following stints at other studios, including Nylon Studios in NYC, he transitioned to Sonic Union to service agencies, brands and production companies.


Behind the Title: Composer Vlad Berkhemer

NAME: Los Angeles-based Vlad Berkhemer

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Composer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As a composer, most of my day-to-day activities revolve around reading and dissecting briefs, then translating that into music that’s custom written to picture. All that entails maintaining relationships with music houses and musicians, chatting with producers about direction, receiving and sharing feedback and juggling time zone differences with international relationships.

In addition, there is learning through listening – keeping up to date with soundtracks, trends, and evolving genres.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The speed in which things have to be written, mixed, mastered and delivered, and revised on the fly. That, and the amount of times you end up going back to the drawing board as directions can drastically change last minute, no matter how close you’ve come to executing someone’s vision up to that point. It can be daunting but also rewarding going from unexpected turns to final approval on something everyone feels excited about.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Apple’s Logic Pro, a MacBook Pro, an Apollo interface — and anything that makes noise.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Getting to write in a variety of styles, collaborating with a wide range of vocalists and players. Bringing someone’s vision to life and winning the gig (smiles).

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Last minute cut changes.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
The end of the day, right before you send off a mix knowing you’ve got something solid.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d still aim to be involved with film in one way or another.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I grew up in a family of classical musicians, and I don’t think I ever imagined a path outside of music.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
It’s a mixed bag: the UK series Borderline is a show I’m proud to be a part of (Season 1 is currently available on Netflix).

A series of Toyota spots really pushed me to explore some genres I don’t get to typically work in.
There was an orchestral spot for Ihop that had a romantic lush orchestral arrangement, which I don’t get to do as often as I’d like, along with a variety of cues for several reality TV shows.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I’ve recently done a co-write with indie artist Jay Som, which was a blast to do.

It was also great to score a Mercedes Benz spot with John Hamm on VO.

Gatorade

I’m particularly proud of a Gatorade project where I was asked to do my own cinematic arrangement of Alicia Keys’ “Girl on Fire.” It was for a short film about Serena Williams and her few-days-old newborn, which felt special to be a part of. I have a few more co-writes lined up with talented singers without any particular pre-determined direction in mind, which is sometimes a much-needed refresher.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Hard drives, my Martin guitar and my AKG 414.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hike! Play drums, catch a show at the Comedy Store, not using the nice blender I just got.


Music house Human hires Carol Dunn as executive producer

LA-based music house Human Worldwide has hired Carol Dunn as executive producer. Dunn joins Human from post house PS260, where she was executive producer in its West Coast office for two years. She will report to Human’s partner and composer Gareth Williams.

In her new role, Dunn will be responsible for developing Human’s business from their LA office and growing its model to expand its brand, as well as helping market Human to current and potential clients. She will also work hand in hand with its sales team, and has an additional role in helping to create the company music as a creative producer.

At PS260, Dunn worked with many agencies and brands, including Omnicom, WPP, American Greetings, NBA, Hyatt, Kia and Instagram. Prior to that, she was EP/head of sales at Squeak E Clean Productions and Amber Music, where she oversaw and directed their national sales force, marketing and new business efforts. She also had roles at the record labels Capitol Records and Interscope Records, co-producing such soundtracks as Baz Lurhmann’s Romeo + Juliet, Boogie Nights and Office Space.

“I’m excited to bring my career experience from film and TV to Human with the intention of extending our focus beyond advertising,” says Dunn. “I joined Human because it was an opportunity to set my heart’s passion back on my musical career path with a company that has all the tools to change the idea of how a music house functions in our industry. After a rewarding stint in post production, I am overjoyed to be back.”

This news comes off the heels of the company’s expansion with its Sonic Branding department, helmed by senior producer Craig Caniglia, which has created work for brands such as Coca-Cola, IKEA, Visa, GE Appliances and Lowe’s. In addition, Human’s post department Post Human — led by chief engineer Sloan Alexander — recently mixed projects for Adidas, Under Armour, Google, Verizon and Stella Artois.


Tips for music sourcing and usage

By Yannick Ireland

1. Music Genre vs. Video Theme
Although there are no restrictions, nor an exact science when choosing a music genre for your video content, there are some reliable genres of music for certain video themes.

For example, you may have a classic cinematic scene of lovers meeting for the first time. These visuals could be well complemented by a more orchestral, classical production, as generally there is a lot of emotive expression in this sort of music.

Another example would be sports video paired with electronic music. The high-adrenaline nature of electronic genres are a match made in heaven for extreme sports content. However, I would like to echo my first sentiment about there being no restriction —you may well choose to use something so unconventional that it creates a shock reaction, which may indeed be the desired effect.

But if you want subconscious acceptance from your viewers that the music really suits your imagery and that they were meant to be together, do some research of successfully similar content and from there you will be able to analyze the genre and attempt to replicate the successful marriage yourself.

2. Instruments for Feelings
Now let’s go a little deeper with the first tip and single out the instruments themselves. Two tracks of the same genre may have completely different instrumentation within their construction, and this could be relevant to your production.

If a filmmaker is working on something cinematic, then pieces of music with an instrumental solo could be invaluable for the feeling you are trying to convey. There have been scholarly articles on this subject with a more psychological investigation for the reasoning behind how certain emotions are triggered by certain instruments… but let’s keep it simple for now. For instance, music box sounds, xylophones and bells have always invoked the feeling of youth or enforced a child-like context in a production, especially as single instruments.

But remember, just because you have decided on a genre for your theme does not mean any good quality track will do. Listen to its makeup and content. Does it fulfill your intention?

3. Keep it Simple
A relatively easy, yet extremely important tip: don’t get an overly congested or epic-sounding track. Going orchestral and epic is fine for a similarly grand moment in your film, but when pairing any audio to video there is always a great danger of drawing the viewer away from the production itself due to overly intrusive music or audio.

Music is supposed to aid and complement your production, not draw you away from it. So even if the track sounds amazing and full at first listen, be aware of its potential to ultimately be detrimental overall.

4. Does the Track Change With Your Content?
Video productions generally change throughout their linear journey, and maybe your music should too. The obvious example of this would be the audio and video both reaching a crescendo together at the production’s conclusion.

In music, there is not always the formula of starting at “A” and finishing at “B,” because modern electronic and instrumental productions have very different middle eights or bridges. The fact that the music may switch up somewhere within the middle may be ideal for your video’s timeline, so perhaps you want to break the mold and change the vibe or content somewhere in the middle of the project. Certain tracks could help you do that seamlessly.

I would like just to suggest you think past the ideal genre and instrumentation, and that you really think about how the track is executed and if it is the best option for your production. The right music can enhance a video project more than anticipated and filmmakers should really get the most out of their audio.

5. Get a Second Opinion
Even working under certain guidelines and being prompted to think a certain way when sourcing music, it is always worth getting a second opinion to see if your experiences with the music are shared. Odds are that with a little extra time, you will find something much better than you may have done choosing something that sounded “good enough.” But never devalue a quick opinion check with your peers.

So, What’s Next?
Now that you know what to consider when browsing music and what potential
attributes to look for (and what to avoid), the next question is, “Where do you get your audio?”

So let’s say you have an ideal, familiar track in your head that would perfectly suit your production. The problem is maybe that’s a famous artist’s track that would cost thousands of dollars to license. So that’s a non-starter. But don’t you fret. Fortunately, there are now affordable and quality alternatives thanks to royalty free music libraries — essentially stock music.

Video editors, filmmakers and content creators of all kinds can visit these libraries to not only buy the track they need, but also get an automated license provided to them immediately with the purchase. There is no contacting artists or record labels, no complications on royalty split or composition and recording terms – it’s simple and consolidated.

The good news is there are plenty of these libraries around, but do your due diligence – and make sure the audio is high-quality and the pricing structure is simple.

High-quality music is incredibly important for all creative video productions. Now it is abundantly available and, not at extreme costs.


Yannick Ireland (@ArtisoundYan) is a musician, music producer and founder of Artisound, which is based in London.


Behind the Title: Butter Music and Sound’s Chip Herter

NAME: Chip Herter

COMPANY: NYC’s Butter Music+Sound/Haystack Music

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Butter creates custom music compositions for advertising/film/TV. Haystack Music is the internal music catalog from Butter, featuring works from our composers, emerging artists and indie labels.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director of Creative Sync Services

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The role was designed to be a catch-all for all things creative music licensing. This includes music supervision (curating music for projects from the music industry at large, by way of record labels and publishers) and creative direction from our own Haystack Music library.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Rights management is an understated aspect of the role. The ability to immediately know who key players are in the ownership of a song, so that we can estimate costs for using a song on behalf of our clients and license a track with ease.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
The best tool in my toolbox is the team that supports me every day.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I have a keen interest in putting the spotlight on new and emerging music. Be it a new piece written by one of our composers or an emerging act that I want to introduce to a larger audience.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Losing work to anyone else. It is a natural part of the job, but I can’t help getting personally invested in every project I work on. So the loss feels real, but in turn I always learn something from it.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Morning, for sure. Coffee and music? Yes, please!

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Most likely working for a PR agency. I love to write, and I am good at it (so I’m told).

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I was a late bloomer. I was 26 when I took my first internship as a music producer at Crispin Porter+Bogusky. From my first day on the job, I knew this was my higher calling. Anyone who geeks-out to the language in a music license like me is destined to do this for a living.

Lexus Innovations

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We recently worked on a campaign for Lexus with Team One USA called Innovations that was particularly great and the response to the music was very positive. Recently, we also worked on projects for Levi’s, Nescafé, Starbucks and Keurig… coffee likes us, I guess!

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I was fortunate to work with Wieden+Kennedy on their Coca-Cola Super Bowl ad in 2015. I placed a song from the band Hundred Waters, who have gone on to do remarkable things since. The spot carried a very positive message about anti-bullying, and it was great to work on something with such social awareness.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
WiFi, Bluetooth and Spotify.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I don’t take for granted that my favorite pastime — going to concerts — is a fringe benefit of the job. When I am not listening to music, I am almost always listening to a podcast or a standup comedian. I also enjoy acting like a child with my two-year-old son as much as I can. I learn a lot from him about not taking myself too seriously.

Raising money and awareness for childhood cancer via doc short

Pablove One Another is a documentary short film produced by Riverstreet and directed by the company’s co-founders Tracy Pion and Michael Blum. The film explores Pablove’s Shutterbug program for children undergoing cancer treatment and its connection to the cancer research work that Pablove funds.

Blum and Pion spoke with us about the project, including the release of its title track “Spark” and the importance of giving back.

How did you become involved in the project?
Pion: We have known Pablove’s founders Jo Ann Thrailkill and Jeff Castelaz, for almost 11 years. Our sons were dear friends and classmates in preschool. When Jeff and Jo Ann lost their son Pablo to cancer eight years ago they set out to start a foundation named Pablove in his honor. We’ve been committed to helping Pablove whenever we can along the way by doing PSAs and other short films and TV spots in order to help raise awareness for the organization’s mission, including the Shutterbugs program and research funding.

Michael Blum, Mady and Tracy Pion.

What was the initial goal of the documentary?
Blum: The goal was always about awareness and fundraising. It first debuted at the annual Pablove Foundation gala fundraiser and helped raise over $500,000 in an hour. It continues to live online and hopefully it inspires people to connect with Pablove and support its amazing programs.

Beyond the amazing cause, why was this project a good fit for Riverstreet?
Pion: At the core of what we do — campaigns, commercials, interstitials, network specials — is emotionally-driven storytelling. We do development, scripting, design, animation, live-action production, editorial and completion for a variety of brands and networks and when possible we try to apply this advertising and production expertise to philanthropic causes. Our collaboration with Pablove came out of a deeply personal connection, but above and beyond that, we think that our industry has an obligation to use our resources to help raise awareness. Why not use our power of persuasion for the betterment of others?

How did you decide on the approach and the interweaving of stories?
Blum: The film tells the Pablove story from three experiences: a young girl who is being treated for cancer who is part of Pablove’s Shutterbug photography program; an instructor with Shutterbugs who is a cancer survivor; and a researcher whose innovation is supported in part by Pablove’s grants. We thought it was important to tell the human impact of the work of the Pablove Foundation through different vantage points to reflect the scope of what they do. We worked with a fundraising expert (Benevon) who advised Pablove and Riverstreet on how to design the film from a high-impact standpoint.

What were some unexpected or unique moments in the production of the film?
Pion: Well, for us it was a couple of things. Firstly, the power of the kids’ photos really caught us, especially those by Mady, who we were featuring. When she pulled out her “Light the End of the Tunnel” image we were doubly struck by the simple power of the image and its obvious meaning for her, and, as filmmakers, we knew we had our ending. We were also grateful of how sensitive our crew was with the Mady and Miles. Everyone was working for hardly any money and yet they didn’t want to be anywhere else. It was a moment of gratitude for the amazing crews that we have gathered together over the years.

What were some of the editing challenges to the above?
Pion: We had several hours of footage, and some very emotional interviews with our subjects, so it was a real but familiar challenge: how to pick the most salient footage and how to weave the threads together and how to capture the emotion.

What was the documentary edited on?
Pion: We use Avid Media Composer on an ISIS server.

How did the song come to be?
Blum: While working on the film, we were looking for a music track that would effectively unite these interweaving stories. We heard a girl singing on our daughter’s phone — a classmate — and thought, wouldn’t it be great to have a young teenager’s voice on a spot that is a for and about children. The Bird & The Bee’s “Spark,” paired with the luminous voice of Gracie Abrams, perfectly carries through the message of the Foundation’s impact on the lives of children through creativity and research funding. Written by Inara George and Greg Kurstin, the music production was handled by composer/producer Rob Cairns, who has worked with Riverstreet on numerous projects.

Pion: At the fundraiser, people were buzzing about the song, trying to Shazam it. We loved the song, and thought it was amazing for the film, but this reaction made us stop and consider, “Is there something more we can do with it to help Pablove?” Fortunately, everyone who worked on it felt the same way, and agreed to release the track with proceeds going to Pablove Foundation.

Deb Oh joins Nylon Studios from Y&R

Music and sound boutique Nylon Studios, which has offices in NYC and Sydney, has added Deb Oh as senior producer. A classically trained musician, Oh has almost a decade of experience in the commercial music space, working as a music supervisor and producer on both the agency and studio sides.

She comes to Nylon from Y&R, where she spent two years working as a music producer for Dell, Xerox, Special Olympics, Activia and Optum, among others. Outside of the studio, Oh has continued to pursue music, regularly writing and performing with her band Deb Oh & The Cavaliers and serving as music supervisor for the iTunes podcast series, “Limetown.”

A lifelong musician, Oh grew up learning classical piano and singing at a very early age. She began writing and performing her own music in high school and kept up her musical endeavors while studying Political Science at NYU. Following graduation, she made the leap to follow her passion for music full time, landing as a client service coordinator at Headroom. She was then promoted to music supervisor. After five years with the audio shop, she made the leap to the agency side to broaden her skillset and glean perspective into the landscape of vendors, labels and publishers in the commercial music industry.

 

‘Demo Love’ and how to avoid its trap

By Jonathan Hecht

“Demo Love” can be a painful trap to fall into. It can happen to any kind of production, but it can easily be avoided.

What is demo love? Let’s say you’ve made a promotional video, and you put a piece of music on it. You’re refining your rough cut, and you keep using the same track. Repeat exposure to this singular musical option has drilled into your brain the belief that your video can’t exist without this song, but beware! You may feel like you’ve crossed the finish line, but if you move on to the final cut before confirming the song’s availability, you risk compromising the integrity of your creative vision.

Aside from your artistic attachment to the music, maybe you’ve editorially joined your imagery so completely to your “hero” track that if you don’t get it, you’ll need to detach mentally and materially. If you’re paying for freelancers or any hired guns, you stand to add time and money.

Demo love often originates innocently when a director scripts a song into the treatment or plays it on set. Or when an editor, working unsupervised, edits footage based on the direction they’ve received and uses a famous song (without thinking about what it would cost) in an effort to make a big or favorable impression.

What can you do to avoid the trap?
Start thinking about music as early as when you’re concepting. The musical inspiration doesn’t need to be perfect; it can be temp, but you want to have a blueprint for the music direction. Pro-tip: prepare a shortlist of options.

Bring a music supervisor in before the rough cut, and let him/her start putting vetted options on the table for you and your editor. Then together you can dial into the directions that cast the right tone for the work, and then mine those directions for the songs that connect the best with the characters and story. You can set yourself up for musical success through this discovery process.

Offer the music supervisor as much information as possible. They’ll need the budget, and it’s a good idea to give them treatments, visual/musical references and input from any and all sides, so they can be well informed about the parameters of the project.

Right now I’m working with a client who wants an iconic song for a branded film and smartly called me before they went to shoot. They said: “We want this specific song. It’s important to the concept. How much will the rights cost?” Because they did that, we were able to navigate toward their desired outcome together from day one. It was as simple as calling me and asking the question.

So, build music supervision into your process and your budget. Don’t risk getting creatively or literally stuck on any track you don’t know you can license. Have an idea of what you want, and seek help from someone who knows the ins and outs. Then you can refine your vision for the music together and unleash an expert on navigating the clearance process.

Jonathan Hecht is the founder of Venn Arts, a music supervision company. His experience comes from both the music and marketing industries with a portfolio that includes work for integrated broadcast/digital campaigns, branded content, VR/AR, feature-length and narrative films and more.

Nylon Studios ups composer Zac Colwell to CD

Music and sound boutique Nylon Studios has promoted composer Zac Colwell to creative director of music at their NYC studio. Colwell joined Nylon in 2015 and will become the studio’s first creative director to meet the increased scope of creative projects out of the music and sound shop in the US market.

Colwell is a multi-instrumentalist who has toured the world with numerous groups, including Big Data, Sondre Lerche, Kishi Bashi and others. He has composed original tracks for such top brands as Aetna, M.A.C, Zac Posen, Honey Nut Cheerios and Unicef. As creative director, Colwell will oversee all creative output from the NYC studio, encompassing original compositions, sound design, spatial audio, mix and music licensing. Nylon also has a studio in Sydney.

“Not only is [Zac] an incredibly talented musician, but he also has a deep understanding of how music can enhance pictures to communicate to their most effective and engaging degree,” notes global executive producer Hamish Macdonald.

Colwell, an Austin native, grew up in a musical family, playing drums, piano, guitar, saxophone and flute. A classically-trained jazz composer, he continues to perform and compose outside of Nylon. In addition to his commercial compositions, he is the drummer and producer of Chappo, sings his own songs with Fancy Colors, produces artists of all different genres, and most recently toured with Bleachers.

Killer Tracks launches production music label for promos, trailers and more

Killer Tracks, an online resource offering pre-cleared music, has started a new label, called Icon, featuring music for movie trailers, television promos, advertising, sports, games and other media.

Frederik Wiedmann

The initial release includes 16 albums created and produced by award-winning composers Frederik Wiedmann and Joel Goodman, the founders of independent music producer Icon Trailer Music. The collection runs the gamut from orchestral scores to electronica.

After initially focusing on orchestral trailer music, Wiedmann and Goodman have recently been expanding beyond that niche, creatively and conceptually. “We spend a lot of time researching trends and market demands,” says Wiedmann. “We anticipate where the market is headed and are working with edgier and more contemporary styles.”

Joel Goodman

Whenever possible, Icon records with live orchestras, choirs and musicians. It also produces music with editorial in mind, creating tracks with numerous edit points, creating alternate mixes, and providing stems and musical toolkits. “We deliver lots of components that are useful to picture editors,” Goodman notes.

Wiedmann won an Emmy Award for the animated series All Hail King Julien. His credits also include the series Miles from Tomorrowland (Disney) and Green Lantern: The Animated Series (Cartoon Network), as well as the films Justice League: Flashpoint Paradox, Hostel: Part III, Mirrors II and Hellraiser: Revelations.

Goodman has more than 140 film and television credits, including the acclaimed PBS documentary series American Experience, for which he wrote the main theme. He has also scored more than 30 films for HBO, including Saving Pelican #895, for which he won an Emmy Award.

Warner/Chappell intros Color TV, Elbroar music catalogs from Germany

For those of you working in film and television with a need for production music, Warner/Chappell Production Music has added to its offerings with the Color TV and Elbroar catalogs. Color TV is German composer Curt Cress’ nearly 14,000-track collection from Curt Cress Publishing and its sister company F.A.M.E. Recordings Publishing. Color TV and the Elbroar catalog, which is also from Germany, are available for licensing now.

Color TV brings to life a wide range of TV production styles with an initial release that includes nine albums: Panoramic Landscapes; Simply Happy, Quirky & Eccentric; Piano Moods; Chase & Surveillance; Secret Service; Actionism; Drama Cuts; and Crime Scene.

Following the initial release, Warner/Chappell Production Music plans to offer two new compilations from the catalog every two weeks. Color TV is available for licensing worldwide, excluding Italy and France.

“Composers have that unique talent and ability to translate what they’re feeling,” explains Warner/Chappell Production Music president Randy Wachtler. “You can hear emotion in different compositions, and it’s always interesting to hear how creators from countries around the world capture it.  Adding to our mix only adds more perspective and more choice for our clients.”

Cress began his musical career in the 1960s, performing in acts such as Klaus Doldinger’s Passport and his own band Snowball, as well as in Falco and Udo Lindenberg’s band. His solo projects involved work with local and international artists including Freddie Mercury, Tina Turner, Rick Springfield, SAGA, Meat Loaf and Scorpions, as well as releasing his own solo material. He made a name for himself as a composer for popular German films and TV series such as SK Kölsch, HeliCops and The Red Mile.

Elbroar, out of Hamburg, Germany, is a collection ranging from epic to minimal, jazz to techno and drama to fun. The catalog serves creatives in the fields of television, film and advertising, with a strong focus on trailers and daytime TV.

The catalog’s first release, “Epic Fairy Tales,” is an album of orchestral arrangements that set the scene for fantastic stories and epic emotions. Elbroar is available for licensing immediately, worldwide.

Quick Chat: Andy Donahue from Killer Tracks

Many of you are already familiar with 27-year-old Killer Tracks. This online resource offers pre-cleared music for film, television, advertising and interactive media. Their catalog spans many genres and features original works from award-winning composers, artists and producers. Their premium catalog is continuously updated with exclusive recordings and new music updates. They also have a dedicated team of music search specialists and licensing experts to help users find what they need.

We reached out to this industry mainstay’s Andrew Donahue to find out more about their offerings, but also learn about trends going on in this part of the business.

Can you talk about how you’ve seen your segment of the industry change over the years?
Over the past five years, the production music industry has changed tremendously. It’s a much more competitive marketplace. We need to continue to innovate with music and technology, making it easier for our clients to find the perfect track for their projects. One way Killer Tracks is doing this is through our new track customization tool, Score Addiction. It allows you to edit tracks, change track tempo and sync video with the track.

What is it that clients need or are requesting currently?
Clients increasingly want to have options for stems, shorter edits and stings — 30, 15, 8 seconds, or even less. Social media is making shorter edits the norm. Clients are also becoming more reliant on metadata. It’s crucial for data to be immediately accessible and accurate.

How do you decide what type of music to compose/record next? Do you poll your users? Do research?
Killer Tracks has a production team that understands the needs of our clients. We determine what genres to produce based on download, licensing and search reporting data. We are constantly receiving feedback from clients, our music search specialists and our licensing team, and always maintain awareness for what is happening in pop culture and trends in music, advertising, TV and film.

We try to spot trends before they’re big. We have been willing to stick our necks out to produce something that seems crazy only to have it become a top download — months later it’s suddenly the sound everyone wants. Our aim is to have music ready when a style becomes popular.

How do you find composers/talent?
Our production team has a pool of composers who produce music from every genre. Most new composers come to us through referrals from composers and musicians they currently work with.

What are some questions a client should ask or consider when they are looking for music for their project in order to help the process go smoothly?
When you are conducting a music search, be as specific as possible. If you have a song in mind, that’s great, but descriptive terms (tags) can be even more useful, e.g. “uplifting,” “motivational,” “medium tempo,” “building,” “violin but no guitar,” etc. Clients can also take advantage of our music search team and let them suggest tracks based on a description, reference track or link to a scene.

Any misconceptions about these types of libraries?
Many people think that all libraries sound the same, and that library music isn’t very good, unless it’s custom. Nothing could be further from the truth! We work with artists and composers who create outstanding, original work. We have everything from classic English punk from The Mutants to jazz- and classically-influenced orchestral work from cinematic legend Ennio Morricone. You hear our work everywhere without even realizing it. For example, we provided the theme song for Curb Your Enthusiasm and the soundtrack for Lexus’ “December to Remember” campaign.

You recently introduced Legacy, which was recorded by an 81-piece orchestra. Is something of this scope typical for Killer Tracks?
Legacy is a follow-up to a prior release called Shock and Awe. Currently, there is a lot of demand in the trailer world for tracks with vocals over live orchestra. Legacy is our response. It was recorded live with a full orchestra.

Qwire’s tool for managing scoring, music licensing upped to v.2.0

Qwire, a maker of cloud-based tools for managing scoring and licensing music to picture, has launched QwireMusic 2.0, which expands the collaboration, licensing and cue sheet capabilities of QwireMusic. The tool also features a new and intuitive user interface as well as support for the Windows OS. User feedback played a role in many of the new updates, including marker import of scenes from Avid for post, Excel export functions for all forms and reports and expanded file sharing options.

QwireMusic is a suite of integrated modules that consolidates and streamlines a wide range of tasks and interactions for pros involved with music and picture across all stages of post, as well as music clearance and administration. QwireMusic was created to help facilitate collaboration among picture editors and post producers, music supervisors and clearance, composers, music editors and production studios.

Here are some highlights of the new version:
Presentations — Presentations allow music cues and songs to be shared between music providers (supervisors and composers) and their clients (picture editors, studio music departments, directors and producers. With Presentations, selected music is synced to video, where viewers can independently adjust the balance between music and dialogue, adding comments on each track. The time-saving efficiency of this tool centralizes the music sharing and review process, eliminating the need for the confusing array of QuickTimes, Web links, emails and unsecured FTP sites that sometimes accompany post production.

Real-time licensing status — QwireMusic 2.0 allows music supervisors to easily audition music, generate request letters, and share potential songs with anyone who needs to review them. When the music supervisor receives a quote approval, the picture editor and music editor are notified, and the studio music budget is updated instantly and seamlessly. In addition, problem songs can be instantly flagged. As with the original version of QwireMusic, request letters can be generated and emailed in one step with project-specific letterhead and signatures.

Electronic Cue Sheets — QwireMusic’s “visual cue sheet,” allows users to review all of the information in a cue sheet displayed alongside the final picture lock.  The cue sheet is automatically populated from data already entered in qwireMusic by the composer, music supervisor and music editor. Any errors or missing information are flagged. When the review is complete, a single button submits the cue sheet electronically to ASCAP and BMI.

QwireMusic has been used by music supervisors, composers, picture editors and music editors on over 40 productions in 2016, including Animals (HBO); Casual (Hulu); Fargo (FX); Guilt (Freeform); Harley and the Davidsons (Discovery); How to Get Away With Murder (ABC); Pitch (Fox); Shameless (Showtime); Teen Wolf (MTV); This Is Us (NBC); and Z: The Beginning of Everything (Amazon).

“Having everyone in the know on every cue ever put in a show saves a huge amount of time,” says Patrick Ward, a post producer for the shows Parenthood, The West Wing and Pure Genius. “With QwireMusic I spend about a tenth of the time that I used to disseminating cue information to different places and entities.”