OWC 12.4

Category Archives: monitors

Report: Apple intros 16-inch MacBook Pro, previews new Mac Pro, display

By Pat Birk

At a New York City press event, Apple announced that it will being shipping a new 16-inch MacBook Pro this week. This new offering will feature an updated 16-inch Retina display with a pixel density of 226ppi; 9th-generation Intel processors featuring up to 8 cores and up to 64GB of DDR4 memory; vastly expanded SSDs ranging from 512GB to a whopping 8TB; upgraded discrete AMD Radeon Pro 5000M series graphics; completely redesigned speakers and internal microphones; and an overhauled keyboard dubbed, of course, the “Magic Keyboard.”

The MacBook Pro’s new Magic Keyboard.

These MacBooks also feature a new cooling system, with wider vents and a 35 percent larger heatsink, along with a 100-watt hour battery (which the company stressed is the maximum capacity allowed by the Federal Aviation Administration), contributing to an additional hour of battery life while web browsing or playing back video.

I had the opportunity to do a brief hands-on demo, and for the first time since Apple introduced the Touch Bar to the MacBook Pro, I have found myself wanting a new Mac. The keyboard felt great, offering far more give and far less plastic-y clicks than the divisive Butterfly keyboard. The Mac team has reintroduced a physical escape key, along with an inverted T-style cluster of arrow keys, both features that will be helpful for coders. Apple also previewed its upcoming Mac Pro tower and Pro Display XDR.

Sound Offerings
As an audio guy, I was naturally drawn to the workstation’s sound offerings and was happy when the company dedicated a good portion of the presentation to touting its enhanced speaker and microphone arrays. The six-speaker system features dual-opposed woofer drivers, which offer enhanced bass while canceling out problematic distortion-causing frequencies. When compared side by side with high-end offerings from other manufacturers, the MacBook offered a far more complete sonic experience than the competition, and I believe Apple is right in saying that they’ve achieved an extra half octave of bass range with this revision.

The all-new MacBook Pro features a 16-inch Retina display.

It’s really impressive for a laptop, but I honestly don’t see it replacing a good pair of headphones or a half-decent Bluetooth for most users. I can see it being useful in the occasional pitch meeting, or showing an idea or video to a friend with no other option, but feel it’s more of a nice touch than a major selling point.

The three-microphone array was impressive, as well, and I can see it offering legitimate functionality for working creatives. When A/B’d with competing internal microphones, there was really no comparison. The MacBook’s mics deliver crisp, clean recordings with very little hiss and no noticeable digital artifacting, both of which were clearly present in competing PCs. I could realistically see this working for a small podcast, or on-the-go musicians recording demos. We live in a world where Steve Lacie recorded and produced a beat for Kendrick Lamar on an iPhone. When Apple claims that the signal-to-noise ratio rivals or even surpasses that of digital mics like the Blue Yeti, they may very well be right. However, in an A/B comparison, I found the Blue to have more body and room ambience, while the MacBook sounded a bit thin and sterile.

Demos
The rest of the demo featured creative professionals — coders, animators, colorists and composers — pushing the spec’d out Mac and MacBook Pros to their limits. A coder demonstrated testing a program in realtime on eight emulations of iOS and iPad OS at once.

A video editor demonstrated the new Mac Pro (not the MacBook) running a project with six 8K video sources playing at once through an animation layer, with no rendering at all. We were also treated to a brief Blackmagic Da Vinci Resolve demo on a Pro Display XDR. A VFX artist demonstrated making realtime lighting changes to an animation comprised of eight million polygons on the Mac Pro, again with no need for rendering.

The Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR, the world’s best pro display, will be available in December.

Composers showed us a Logic X session running a track produced for Lizzo by Oak Felder. The song had over 200 tracks, replete with plugins and instruments — Felder was able to accomplish this on an MacBook Pro. Also on the MacBook, they had a session loaded running multiple instances of MIDI instruments using sample libraries from Cinesamples, Spitfire Audio and Orchestral Tools. The result could easily have fooled me into believing it had been recorded with a live orchestra, and the fact that all of these massive, processor intensive sample libraries could operate at the same without making the Mac Pro break a sweat had me floored.

Summing Up
Apple has delivered a very solid upgrade in the new 16-inch MacBook Pro, especially as a replacement for the earlier iterations of the Touch Bar MacBook Pros. They have begun taking orders, with prices starting at $2,399 for the 2.6GHz 6-core model, and $2,799 for the 2.3GHz 8-core model.
As for the new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR, they’re coming in December, but company representatives remained tight-lipped on a release date.


Pat Birk is a musician, sound engineer and post pro at Silver Sound, a boutique sound house based in New York City.

Dell intros new 4K monitors for creators

Dell Technologies is offering a new 4K monitor developed with creatives in mind. The Dell UltraSharp 27 4K PremierColor (UP2720Q) is a 27-inch 4K monitor with built-in colorimeter and Thunderbolt 3 for content creators who require color-critical performance and a fast connection to any dock or PC.

Creatives get optimal color performance by calibrating the UltraSharp 27 4K PremierColor monitor with the built-in colorimeter, and they can save time by scheduling automated color checks and calibrations with the Dell Calibration Assistant. This monitor works seamlessly with CalMan software (sold separately) to perform a variety of tasks, including calibrations with the built-in or an external colorimeter. An included shading hood snaps firmly to the monitor via magnets to reduce unwanted glare and reflections.

The UltraSharp 27 4K PremierColor monitor shows images in accurate color and sharp detail with 3840×2160 Ultra HD 4K resolution and a high pixel density of 163ppi. It features a high contrast ratio of 1,300:1. Each monitor is factory-calibrated for accurate color right out of the box. Plus, it supports a wide color coverage that includes 100% Adobe RGB, 80% BT.2020 and 98% DCI-P3.

Thunderbolt 3 offers speeds of up to 40Gbps, creating one compact port for a fast connection to devices. With Thunderbolt 3, users can connect a laptop to the monitor and charge up to 90W from a single cable while simultaneously transferring video and data signals. They can also daisy-chain up to two 4K monitors with Thunderbolt 3 for greater multitasking capabilities.

OWC 12.4

Review: Dell UltraSharp 27 4K InfinityEdge monitor

By Sophia Kyriacou

The Dell UltraSharp U2718Q monitor did not disappoint. Getting started requires minimal effort. You are up and running in no time — from taking it out of the box to switching it on. The stand, the standard Dell mount, is simple to assemble and intuitive, so you barely need to look at any instructions. But if you do, there is a step-by-step guide to help you set up within minutes.

The monitor comes in a well-designed package, which ensures it gets to you safely and securely. The Dell stand is easily adjustable without fuss and remains in place to your liking, with a swivel of 45 degrees to the left or right, a 90-degree pivot clockwise and counter clockwise, and a maximum height of 130mm. This adjustability means it will certainly meet all your comfort and workflow needs, with the pivot being incredibly useful when working in portrait formats.

The InfinityEdge display not only makes the screen look attractive but, more importantly, gives you extra surface area. When working with more than one monitor, having the ultra-thin edge makes the viewing experience less of a distraction, especially when monitors are butted up together. For me, the InfinityEdge is what makes it … in addition to the image quality and resolution, of course!

The Dell UltraSharp U2718Q has a flicker-free screen, making it comfortable on the eyes. It also has 3480×2160 pixels and boasts a color depth of 1.07 billion colors. The anti-glare coating works very well and meets all the needs of work environments with multiple and varied lighting conditions.

There are several connectors to choose from: one DP (v 1.2), one mDP (v 1.2), one HDMI (v 2.0), one USB 3.0 port (upstream), four USB 3.0 ports (including two USB 3.0 BC 1.2) with charging capability at 2A (max), and an audio line out. You are certainly not going to be short of inputs. I found the on-screen navigation incredibly easy to use. The overall casing design is minimal and subtle, with tones of black and dark silver. With the addition of the InfinityEdge, this monitor looks attractive. There is also a matching keyboard and mouse available.

Summing Up
Personally, I like to set my main monitor at a comfortable distance, with the second monitor butted up to my left at an angle of -35 degrees. Being left-handed, this setup works for me ergonomically, keeping my browser, timeline and editing window on that side, so I’m free to focus on the larger-scale composition in front of me.

The two Dell UltraSharp U2718Q monitors I use are great, as they give me the breathing space to focus on creating without having to constantly move windows around, breaking my flow. And thanks to InfinityEdge, the overall experience feels seamless. I have both monitors set up exactly the same so the color matches and retains the same maximum quality perfectly.


Sophia Kyriacou is an award-winning conceptual creative motion designer and animator with over 22 years experience within the broadcast design industry. She’s splits her time between working at the BBC in London and taking on freelance jobs. She is a full voting member at BAFTA and is currently working on a script for a 3D animated short film. 


Apple intros long-awaited new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR

By Barry Goch

The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC19) kicked off on Monday with a keynote from Apple CEO Tim Cook, where he announced the eagerly awaited new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR.

Tim Cook’s keynote

In recent years, many working in M&E felt as if Apple had moved away from supporting creative pros in this industry. There was the fumbled rollout of FCPX and then the “trash can” MacPro with its limited upgrade path. Well, our patience has finally paid off and our faith in Apple restored. This week Apple delivered products beyond expectation.

This post pro, for one, is very happy that Apple is back making serious hardware for creative professionals. The tight integration of hardware and software, along with Apple’s build quality, makes its products unique in the market. There is confidence and freedom using Macs that creatives love, and the tower footprint is back!

The computer itself is a more than worthy successor to the original Mac Pro tower design. It’s the complete opposite concept of the current trash-can-shaped Mac Pro, with its closed design and limited upgradeability. The new Mac Pro’s motherboard is connected to a stainless steel space frame offering 360-degree access to the internals, which include 12 memory slots with up to 1.5TB of RAM capacity and eight PCI slots, which is the most ever in a Mac — more than the venerable 9600 Power Mac. The innovative graphics architecture in the new Mac Pro is an expansion module, or MPX module, which allows the installation of two graphic cards tied together through the Infinity Fabric link. This allows for data transfers up to five times faster between the GPUs on the PCIe bus.

Also new is the Apple Afterburner hardware accelerator card, which is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware card for accelerating ProRes and ProRes RAW workflows. Afterburner supports playback of up to three streams of 8K ProRes RAW or up to 12 streams of 4K ProRes RAW. The FPGA allows new instruction to be installed on the chipset, giving the MacPro Afterburner card a wealth of possibilities for future updates.

Plays Well With Others
Across the street from the San Jose Convention Center, where the keynote was held, Apple set up “The Studio” in the historic San Jose Civic. The venue was divided into areas of creative specialization: video, photography, music production, 3D and AR. It was really great to see complete workflows and to be able to interface with Apple creative pros. Oh, and Apple has announced support from third-party developers, such as Blackmagic, Avid, Adobe, Maxon’s Cinema 4D, Foundry, Red, Epic Games, Unity, Pixar and more.

Metal is Apple’s replacement for OpenCL/GL. It’s a low level language for interfacing with GPUs. Working closely with AMD, the new Mac Pro will use native Metal rendering for Resolve, OToy Octane, Maxon Cinema 4D and Red.

Blackmagic’s Grant Perry and Barry Goch at The Studio.

DaVinci Resolve is a color correction and online editing software for high-end film and television work. “It was the first professional software to adopt Metal and now, with the new Mac Pro and Afterburner, we’re seeing full-quality 8K performance in realtime with color correction and effects, something we could never dream of doing before,” explains Blackmagic CEO Grant Petty. “DaVinci Resolve running on the new Mac Pro is the fastest way to edit, grade and finish movies and TV shows.”

According to Avid’s director of product management for audio, Francois Quereuil, “Avid’s Pro Tools team is blown away by the unprecedented processing power of the new Mac Pro, and thanks to its internal expansion capabilities, up to six Pro Tools HDX cards can be installed within the system — a first for Avid’s flagship audio workstation. We’re now able to deliver never-before-seen performance and capabilities for audio production in a single system and deliver a platform that professional users in music and post have been eagerly awaiting.”

“Apple continues to innovate for video professionals,” reports Adobe’s VP of digital video and audio, Steven Warner. “With the power offered by the new Mac Pro, editors will be able to work with 8K without the need for any proxy workflows in a future release of Premiere Pro.”

And from Apple? Expect versions of FCPX and Logic to be available with release of the new MacPro and rest assured they will fully use the new hardware.

The Cost
The price for a Mac Pro with an eight-core Xeon W processor, 32GB of RAM, an AMD Radeon Pro 580X GPU and a 256GB SSD is $5999. The price for the fully loaded version with the 28-core Xeon processor, Afterburner, two MDX modules with four AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo graphics cards and 4TB of SSD internal storage will come in around $20,000, give or take. It will be available this fall.

Pro Display XDR
The new Pro Display XDR is amazing. I was invited into a calibrated viewing environment that also housed Dell, Eizo, Sony BVM-X300 and Sony-X310 HDR monitors. We were shown the typical extreme bright and colorful animal footage for monitor demos. Personally, I would have preferred to have seen more shots of people from a TV show or feature and not the usual extreme footage used to show off how bright the monitor could get.

For example, it would have been cool to see the Jony Ive video — which plays on the Apple site and describes the offerings of the MacPro and the monitor — talking about the design of the product on the monitor.

Anyway, the big hang-up with the monitor is the stand. The price tag of $1,000 for a monitor stand is a lot compared to the price of the monitor itself. When the price of the stand was announced during the keynote, there was a loud gasp, which unfortunately dampened the excitement and momentum of the new releases. It too will be available in the fall.

Display Specs
This Retina 6K 32-inch (diagonal) display offers 6016×3384 pixels (20.4 million pixels) at 218 pixels per inch. The sustained brightness is 1000-nits sustained (full screen) with 1600 nits peak and a contrast ratio of one million to one. It works in P3 wide color gamut with 10-bit depth for 1.073 billion colors. Available reference modes include HDR video (P3-ST 2084), Digital Cinema (P3-DCI), Digital Cinema (P3-D65) and HDTV video (BT.709-BT.1886). Supported HDR formats are HLG, HDR 10 and Dolby Vision.

Portrait mode

The Cost
The standard glass version is $4,999. The nano-texture anti-glare glass version is $5,999. As mentioned, the Pro Stand is $999 and VESA mount adapter is $199. Both are sold separately and have a Thunderbolt 3 connection only.

Pros and Cons
MacPro Pros: innovative design, expandability
Cons: Lack of Nvidia support, no Afterburner support for other formats beyond ProRes and no optical audio output.

Pro Display XDR Pros: Ability to sustain 1,000 nits, beautiful design and execution.
Cons: Lack of Rec 2020 color space and ACES profile, plus the high cost of the display stand.

Summing Up
The Pro is back for Apple and third-party apps like Avid and Resolve. I really can’t wait to get my hands on the new MacPro and Pro Display XDR and put them through their paces.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation as well as a UCLA Extension Instructor, Post Production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya


Blackmagic intros Teranex Mini SDI to DisplayPort 8K HDR monitor

Blackmagic’s Teranex Mini SDI to DisplayPort 8K HDR, is an advanced 8K monitoring solution that lets you use the new Apple Pro Display XDR as a color-critical reference monitor on set and in post.

With dual on-screen scope overlays, HDR, 33-point 3D LUTs and monitor calibration that’s designed for the pro film and television market, the new Teranex Mini SDI to DisplayPort 8K HDR works with the new generation of monitors, like Apple’s just-announced Pro Display XDR. The Teranex Mini SDI to DisplayPort 8K HDR will be available in October for $1,295.

The Teranex Mini SDI to DisplayPort 8K HDR can use third-party calibration probes to accurately align connected displays for precise color. There are two on-screen scopes that can be selected between WFM, Parade, Vector and Histogram.

The front panel includes controls and a color display for input video, audio meters and the video standard indicator. The rear panel has Quad Link 12G-SDI for HD, Ultra HD and 8K formats. There are two DisplayPort connections for regular computer monitors or USB-C-style DisplayPort monitors, such as the Pro Display XDR. The built-in scaler will ensure the video input standard is scaled to the native resolution of the connected DisplayPort monitor. Customers can even connect both 2SI or Square Division inputs.

Teranex Mini SDI to DisplayPort 8K HDR makes it easy to work in 8K. Users just need only to connect an HDR-compatible DisplayPort monitor to allow HDR SDI monitoring. Static metadata PQ and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) formats in the VPID are handled according to the ST2108-1, ST2084 and the ST425 standards.

Teranex Mini SDI to DisplayPort 8K HDR handles ST425, which defines two new bits in the VPID to indicate transfer characteristic of SDR, HLG or PQ. Plus the ST2108-1 standard defines how to transport HDR static or dynamic metadata over SDI. Plus there is support for ST2082-10 for 12G SDI as well as ST425 for 3G-SDI sources. It also supports both Rec.2020 and Rec.709 colorspaces and 100% of the DCI-P3 format.

Features include:
• Support for HDR via SDI and DisplayPort
• Two built-in scopes live overlaid on the monitor
• Film industry quality 33-point 3D LUTs
• Automatic monitor calibration support using color probes
• Advanced Quad Link 12G-SDI inputs for 8K
• Scales input video to the native monitor resolution
• Includes LCD for monitoring and menu settings
• Utility software included for Mac and Windows
• Supports latest 8K DisplayPort monitors and displays
• Can be used on a desktop or rack mounted


Red intros LCD touch monitor for DSMC2 cameras

Red Digital Cinema has introduced the DSMC2 Touch 7-inch Ultra-Brite LCD monitor to its line of camera accessories. It offers an optically-bonded touchscreen with Gorilla Glass that allows for what the company calls “intuitive ways to navigate menus, adjust camera parameters and review .R3D clips directly out of the camera.”

The monitor offers a brighter high-definition viewing experience for recording and viewing footage on DSMC2 camera systems, even in direct sunlight. A 1920×1200 resolution display panel provides 2,200 nits of brightness to overcome viewing difficulties in bright outdoor environments as well as a high-pixel density (at 323ppi) and a 1200:1 contrast ratio.

The Ultra-Brite display mounts to Red’s DSMC2 Brain or other 1/4-20 mounting surfaces, and provides a LEMO connection to the camera, making it an ideal monitoring option for gimbals, cranes, and cabled remote viewing. Shooters can use a DSMC2 LEMO Adaptor A in conjunction with the Ultra-Brite display for convenient mounting options away from the DSMC2 camera Brain.

Check out a demo of the new monitor, priced at $3,750, here.