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Category Archives: Inspiration

Words of wisdom from editor Jesse Averna, ACE

We are all living in a world we’ve never had to navigate before. People’s jobs are in flux, others are working from home, and anxiety is a regular part of our lives. Through all the chaos, Jesse Averna has been a calming voice on social media, so postPerspective reached out to ask him to address our readership directly.

Jesse, who was co-founder of the popular Twitter chat and Facebook group @PostChat, works at Disney Animation Studio and is a member of the American Cinema Editors.


Hey,

How are you doing? This isn’t an ad. I’m not going to sell you anything or try to convince you of anything. I just want to take the opportunity to check in. Like many of you, I’m a post professional (an editor) currently working from home. If we don’t look out for each other, who will? Please know that it’s okay not to be okay right now. I have to be honest, I’m exhausted. I’m just endlessly reading news and searching for new news and reading posts about news I’ve already read and searching again for news I might have missed …

I want to remind you of a couple things that I think might bring some peace, if you let me. I fear it’s about to get much darker and much scarier, so we need to anchor ourselves to some hope.

You are valuable. The world is literally different because you are here. You have intrinsic value, and that will never change. No matter what. You are thought about and loved, despite whatever the voice in your head says. I’m sure your first reaction to reading that is to blow it off, but try to own it. Even for just a moment. It’s true.

You don’t deserve what’s going on, but let it bring some peace that the whole world is going through it together. You might be isolated, but you’re not alone. We are forced to look out for one another by looking out for ourselves. It’s interesting; I feel so separate and vulnerable, but the truth is that the whole planet is feeling and reacting to this as one. We are in sync, whether we know it or not — and that’s encouraging to me. We ALL want to be well and be safe, and we want our neighbors to be well also. We have a rare moment of feeling like a people, like a planet.

If you are feeling anxious, do me a favor tonight. Go outside and look at the stars. Set a timer for five minutes. No entertainment or phone or anything else. Just five minutes. Reset. Feel yourself on a cosmic scale. Small. A blink of an eye. But so, so valuable.

And please give yourself a break. A sanity check. If you need help, please reach out. If you need to nest, do it. You need to tune out, do it. Take care of yourself. This is an unprecedented moment. It’s okay not to be okay. Once you can, though, see who you can help. This complete shift of reality has made me think about legacy. This is a unique legacy-building moment. That student who reached out to you on LinkedIn asking for advice? You now have time to reply. That nonprofit you thought about volunteering your talents to? Now’s your chance. Even just to make the connection. Who can you help? Check in on? You don’t need any excuse in our current state to reach out.

I know I’m just some rando you’re reading on the internet, but I believe you are going to make it through this. You are wonderful. Do everything you can to be safe. The world needs you. It’s a better place because you are here. You know things, have ideas to share and will make things that none of the rest of us do or have.

Hang in there, my friends, and let me know if you have any thoughts, encouragements or tips for staying sane during this time. I’ll try to compile them into another article to share.

Jesse
@dr0id


Jesse Averna  — pictured on his way to donate masks — is a five-time Emmy-winning ACE editor living in LA and working in the animation feature world. 

My Top Five Ergonomic Workstation Accessories

By Brady Betzel

Instead of writing up my normal “Top Five Workstation Accessories” column this year, I wanted to take a slightly different route and focus on products that might lessen pain and maybe even improve your creative workflow — whether you are working at a studio or, more likely these days, working from home.

As an editor, I sit in a chair for most of my day, and that is on top of my three- to four-hour round-trip commute to work. As aches and pains build up (I’m 36, and I’m sure it doesn’t just get better), I had to start looking for solutions to alleviate the pain I can see coming in the future. In the past I have mentioned products like the Wacom Intuos Pro Pen tablet, which is great and helped me lessen wrist pain. Or color correction panels such as theLoupedeck, which helps creative workflows but also prevents you from solely using the mouse, also lessening wrist pain.

This year I wanted to look at how the actual setup of a workstation environment that might prevent pain or alleviate it. So get out of your seat and move around a little, take a walk around the block, and when you get back, maybe rethink how your workstation environment could become more conducive to a creativity-inspiring flow.

Autonomous SmartDesk 2 
One of the most useful things in my search for flexibility in the edit bay is the standup desk. Originally, I went to Ikea and found a clearance tabletop in the “dents” section and then found a kitchen island stand that was standing height. It has worked great for over 10 years; the only issue is that it isn’t easily adjustable, and sometimes I need to sit to really get my editing “flow” going.

Many companies offer standing desk solutions, including manual options like the classic VariDesk desk riser. If you have been in the offline editing game over the past five to 10 years, then you have definitely seen these come and go. But at almost $400, you might as well look for a robotic standing desk. This is where the Autonomous SmartDesk 2 comes into play. Depending on whether you want the Home Office version, which stands between 29.5 inches and 48 inches, or the Business Office version, which stands between 26 inches and 52 inches, you are looking to spend $379 or $479, respectively (with free shipping included).

The SmartDesk 2 desktop itself is made of MDF (medium-density fibreboard) material, which helps to lower the overall cost but is still sturdy and will hold up to 300 pounds. From black to white oak, there are multiple color options that not only help alleviate pains but can also be a conversation piece in the edit bay. I have the Business version in black along with a matching black chair, and I love that it looks clean and modern. The SmartDesk 2 is operated using a front-facing switch plate complete with up, down and four height-level presets. It operates smoothly and, to be honest, impressively. It gives a touch of class to any environment. Setup took about half an hour, and it came with easy-to-follow instructions, screws/washers and tools.

Keep an eye out for my full review of the Autonomous SmartDesk 2 and ErgoChair 2, but for now think about how a standup desk will at least alleviate some of the sitting you do all day while adding some class and conversation to the edit bay.

Autonomous ErgoChair 2 
Along with a standup desk — and more important in, my opinion — is a good chair. Most offline editors and assistant editors work at a company that either values their posture and buys Herman Miller Aeron chairs, or cheaps out and buys the $49 special at Office Depot. I never quite understood the benefit of saving a few bucks on a chair, especially if a company pays for health insurance — because in the end, they will be paying for it. Not everyone likes or can afford the $1,395 Aeron chairs, but there are options that don’t involve ruining your posture.

Along with the Autonomous SmartDesk 2, you should consider buying the ErgoChair 2, which costs $349 — a similar price to other chairs, like the Secretlab Omega series gaming chair that retails for $359. But the ErgoChair 2 has the best of both worlds: an Aeron chair-feeling mesh back and neck support plus a super-comfortable seat cushion with all the adjustments you could want. Even though I have only had the Autonomous products for a few weeks now, I can already feel the difference when working at home. It seems like a small issue in the grand scheme of things, but being comfortable allows my creativity to flow. The chair took under 30 minutes to build and came with easy-to-follow instructions and good tools, just like the SmartDesk 2.

A Footrest
When I first started in the industry, as soon as I began a freelance job, I would look for an old Sony IMX tape packing box. (Yes, the green tapes. Yes, I worked with tape. And yes, I can operate an MSW-2000 tape deck.) Typically, the boxes would be full of tapes because companies bought hundreds and never used them, and they made great footrests! I would line up a couple boxes under my feet, and it made a huge difference for me. Having a footrest relieves lower back pressure that I find hard to relieve any other way.

As I continue my career into my senior years, I finally discovered that there are actual footstools! Not just old boxes. One of my favorites is on Amazon. It is technically an adjustable nursing footstool but works great for use under a desk. And if you have a baby on the way, it’s a two-for-one deal. Either way, check out the “My Brest Friend” on Amazon. It goes for about $25 with free one-day Amazon Prime shipping. Or if you are a woodworker, you might be able to make your own.

GoFit Muscle Hook 
After sitting in an edit bay for multiple hours, multiple days in a row, I really like to stretch and use a massager to un-stuff my back. One of the best massagers I have seen in multiple edit bays is called the GoFit Muscle Hook.

Luckily for us it’s available at almost any Target or on the Target website for about $25. It’s an alien-looking device that can dig deep into your shoulder blades, neck and back. You can use it a few different ways — large hook for middle-of-the-back issues, smaller hook that I like to use on the neck and upper back, and the neck massage on the bar (that one feels a little weird to me).

There are other massage devices similar to the Muscle Hook, but in my opinion the GoFit Muscle Hook is the best. The plastic-composite seems indestructible and almost feels like it could double as a self-defense tool. But it can work out almost any knots you have worked up after a long day. If you don’t buy anything else for self-care, buy the Muscle Hook. You will be glad you did. Anyone who gets one has that look of pain and relief when they use it for the first time.

Foam Roller
Another item that I just started using was a foam roller. You can find them anywhere for the most part, but I found one on Amazon for $13.95 plus free Amazon Prime one-day shipping. It’s also available on the manufacturer’s website for about $23. Simply, it’s a high-density foam cylinder that you roll on top of. It sounds a little silly, but once you get one, you will really wonder how you lived without one. I purchased an 18-inch version, but they range from 12 inches to 36 inches. And if you have three young sons at home, they can double as fat lightsabers (but they hurt, so keep an eye out).

Summing Up
In the end, there are so many ways to try keeping a flexible editing lifestyle, from kettlebells to stand-up desks. I’ve found that just getting over the mental hurdle of not wanting to move is the biggest catalyst. There are so many great tech accessories for workstations, but we hardly mention ones that can keep our bodies moving and our creativity flowing. Hopefully, some of these ergonomic accessories for your workstation will spark an idea to move around and get your blood flowing.

For some workout inspiration, Onnit has some great free workouts featuring weird stuff like maces, steel clubs and sandbags, but also kettlebells. The site also has nutritional advice. For foam roller stretches, I would check out the same Onnit Academy site.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producers Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

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Jesse Averna: A veteran editor shares some wisdom

You work hard in a tough industry in challenging times. It can be easy to get bogged down with the expectations you’ve set for yourself and your career. If you’re in need of a dose of perspective and positivity, then take a moment to step away from your timeline, grab a coffee and meditate on a series of recent tweets by LA-based editor Jesse Averna (@dr0id).While they might not be strictly post production tweets, per say, it’s nice to hear some encouragement from a fellow post pro.

Caricature of Jesse Averna:  by Kevin Deters.

Averna is an editing veteran who has five Emmy Award wins with two additional nominations — all for his work on Sesame Street. You can currently find him working away at Walt Disney Animation Studios in Burbank, where he’s been awarded an Annie nomination for his most recent work on Ralph Breaks the Internet. Many of you might know him as one of the founders of the Twitter group #postchat.

Every so often he will Tweet out words of wisdom, hope and inspiration. We wanted to share those with you.

Passion:
If you have a passion for something, pursue it. We only get to do this life once. I’m just an idiot kid from Albuquerque who’s doing my dreams. Please go for it. You can get there. Believe in yourself. Work hard. Be kind. Ask for help.

You’re not wasting your time:
It all counts. Everything you have worked on will educate your next project and work ethic. Don’t get down if you aren’t working on the type of material you want to be working on at the moment. Squeeze everything you can out of it. Take it with you to the next gig. It all counts.

Good news:
Here’s some good news — it doesn’t matter what you think you should have accomplished by now. You’re not competing with anyone else. Your timetable doesn’t matter. It doesn’t even matter how many times you’ve failed. YOU MATTER. You are valuable regardless of your accomplishments.

A high tide raises all boats:
The only way to survive this industry is to support your friends, cheer them on, celebrate their victories, mourn their losses, help when asked. Give when you can.

You’ve already made it:
Look at what you’ve achieved. What you’ve overcome. Where you are now. Sure, you are looking at the road ahead and where you feel that you need to be. But, for today, be proud of what you’ve done.

Jesse

Be the change:
We’ll spend our whole lives being judged by others and ourselves. The issues and the problems. But there are wonderful, unique, powerful aspects to you. Know your weaknesses, but also know that you can change lives. You can impact the world around you. Your kindness can do that.

Know your value:
Value. If you don’t value your worth, you can’t expect others to. You are valuable. And I’m not talking about money. You’re worth more than that.

Your uniqueness:
You are the only YOU in this world. That’s a big deal. Let’s not waste it measuring ourselves to other people. You’ll never be them, only yourself.

Take a deep breath:
It seems important right now, but it’s most likely not as important as you think it is.

No matter how you feel tonight, there’s always tomorrow. Feelings pass. You are more valuable than you know. Today does not define you.

Perspective:
You are valuable. You are loved. You are missed. You are important. You are thought about.

Kindness:
There is no “them.” Only “us.” And we need to love our way through this moment in history. People need you. People need help, kindness, love, advice, mentoring, an ear to listen, a shoulder to cry on. You are important and NEEDED right now.

If you’d like to hear Averna’s professional advice and some additional encouragement, check out our last article with him.


Jesse Averna tweets from a personal account and in no way speaks for or represents the companies he works for.