Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: HPA

HPA Tech Retreat 2019: An engineer’s perspective

By John Ferder

Each year, I look forward to attending the Hollywood Professional Association’s Tech Retreat, better known as the HPA Tech Retreat. Apart from escaping the New York winter, it gives me new perspectives, a chance to exchange ideas with friends and colleagues and explore the latest technical and creative information. As a broadcast engineer, I get a renewed sense of excitement and purpose.

Also, as secretary/treasurer of SMPTE, the Board of Governors meetings as well as the Strategy Day held each year before the Tech Retreat energize me. This year, we invited a group of younger professionals to tell us what SMPTE could do to attract them to SMPTE and HPA, and what they needed from us as experienced professionals.

Their enthusiasm and honesty were refreshing and encouraging. We learned that while we have been trying to reach out to them, they have been looking for us to invite them into the Society. They have been looking for mentors and industry leaders to engage them one-on-one and introduce them to SMPTE and how it can be of value to them.

Presentations and Hot Topics
While it is true that the Hollywood motion picture community is behind producing this Tech Retreat, it is by no means limited to the film industry. There was plenty of content and information for those of us on the broadcast side to learn and incorporate into our workflows and future planning, including a presentation on the successor to SMPTE timecode. Peter Symes, formerly director of standards for SMPTE and a SMPTE Fellow, presented an update on the TLX Project and the development of what is to be SMPTE Standard ST2120, the Extensible Time Label.

This suite of standards will be built on the work already done in ST2059, which describes the use of the IEEE1588 Precision Time Protocol to synchronize video equipment over an IP network. This Extensible Time Label will succeed, not replace ST12, which is the analog timecode that we have used with great success for 50 years. As production moves increasingly toward using IP networks, this work will produce a digital time labeling system that will be as universal as ST12 timecode has been. Symes invited audience members to join the 32NF80 Technology Committee, which is developing and drafting the standard.

Phil Squyres

What were the hot topics this year? HDR, Wide Color Gamut, AI/machine learning, IMF and next-generation workflows had a large number of presentations. While this may seem to be the “same old, same old,” the amount of both technical and practical information presented this year was a real eye-opener to many of us.

Phil Squyres gave a talk on next generation versus broadcast production workflows that revealed that the amount of time and storage needed to complete a program episode for OTT distribution versus broadcast is 2.2X or greater. This echoed the observations of an earlier panel of colorists and post specialists for Netflix feature films, one of whom stated that instead of planning to complete post production two weeks prior to release, plan on completing five to six weeks prior in order to allow for the extra work needed for the extra QC of both HDR and SDR releases.

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
Perhaps the most surprising presentation for me was given by Rival Theory, a company that generates AI personas based on real people’s memories, behaviors and mannerisms. They detailed the process by which they are creating a persona of Tony Robbins, famous motivational speaker and investor in Rival Theory. Robbins intends to have a life-like persona created to help people with life coaching and continue his mission to end suffering throughout the world, even after he dies. In addition to the demonstration of the multi-camera storing and rendering of his face while talking and displaying many emotions, they showed how Robbins’ speech was saved and synthesized for the persona. A rendering of the completed persona was presented and was very impressive.

Many presentations focused on applications of AI and machine learning in existing production and post workflows. I appreciated that a number of the presenters stressed that their solutions were meant not to replace the human element in these workflows, but to instead apply AI/ML to the redundant and tedious tasks, not the creative ones. Jason Brahms of Video Gorillas brought that point home in his presentation on “AI Film Restoration at 12 Million Frames per Second,” as did Tim Converse of Adobe in “Leveraging AI in Post Production.”

Broadcasters panel

Panels and Roundtables
Matthew Goldman of MediaKind chaired the annual Broadcasters Panel, which included Del Parks (Sinclair), Dave Siegler (Cox Media Group), Skip Pizzi (NAB) and Richard Friedel (Fox). They discussed the further development and implementation of the ATSC 3.0 broadcast standard, including the Pearl Consortium initiative in Phoenix and other locations, the outlook for ATSC 3.0 tuner chips in future television receivers and the applications of the standard beyond over-the-air broadcasting, with an emphasis on data-casting services.

All of the members of the panel are strong proponents of the implementation of the ATSC 3.0 standard, and more broadcasters are joining the evolution toward implementing it. I would have appreciated including on the panel someone of similar stature who is not quite so gung-ho on the standard to discuss some of the challenges and difficulties not addressed so that we could get a balanced presentation. For example, there is no government mandate nor sponsorship for the move to ATSC 3.0 as there was for the move to ATSC 1.0, so what really motivates broadcasters to make this move? Have the effects of the broadcast spectrum re-packing on available bandwidth negatively affected the ability of broadcasters in all markets to accommodate both ATSC 3.0 and ATSC 1.0 channels?

I really enjoyed “Adapting to a COTS Hardware World,” moderated by Stan Moote of the IABM. Paul Stechly, president of Applied Electronics, noted that more and more end users are building their own in-house solutions, assisted by manufacturers moving away from proprietary applications to open APIs. Another insight panelists shared was that COTS no longer applies to data hubs and switches only. Today, that term can be extended to desktop computers and consumer televisions and video displays as well. More and more, production and post suites are incorporating these into their workflows and environments to test their finished productions on the equipment on which their audience would be viewing them.

Breakfast roundtables

Breakfast Roundtables, which were held on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday mornings, are among my conference “must attends.” Over breakfast, manufacturers and industry experts are given a table to present a topic for discussion by all the participants. The exchange of ideas and approaches benefits everyone at the tables and is a great wake-up exercise leading into the presentations. My favorite, and one of the most popular of the Tech Retreat, is on Friday when S. Merrill Weiss of the Merrill Weiss Group, as he has for many years, presents us with a list of about 12 topics to discuss. This year, his co-host was Karl Paulsen, CTO of Diversified Systems, and the conversations were lively indeed. Some of the topics we discussed were the costs of building a facility based on ST2110, the future of coaxial cable in the broadcast plant, security in modern IP networks and PTP, and the many issues in the evolution from ATSC 1.0 to ATSC 3.0.

As usual, a few people were trying to fit in at or around the table, as it is always full. We didn’t address every topic, and we had to cut the discussions short or risk missing the first presentation of the day.

Final Thoughts
The HPA Tech Retreat’s presentations, panels and discussion forums are a continuing tool in my professional development. Attending this year reaffirmed and amplified my belief that this event is one that should be on each broadcasters’ and content creators’ calendar. The presentations showed that the line between the motion picture and television communities is further blurring and that the techniques embraced by the one community are also of benefit to the other.

The HPA Tech Retreat is still small enough for engaging conversations with speakers and industry professionals, sharing their industry, technical, and creative insights, issues and findings.


John Ferder is the principal engineer at John Ferder Engineer, currently Secretary/Treasurer of SMPTE, an SMPTE Fellow, and a member of IEEE. Contact him at john@johnferderengineer.com.

HPA releases 2019 Tech Retreat program, includes eSports

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has set its schedule for the 2019 HPA Tech Retreat, set for February 11-15. The Tech Retreat, which is celebrating its 25th year, takes place over the course of a week at the JW Marriott Resort & Spa in Palm Desert, California.

The HPA Tech Retreat spans five days of sessions, technology demonstrations and events. During this week, important aspects of production, broadcast, post, distribution and related M&E trends are explored. One of the key differentiators of the Tech Retreat is its strict adherence to a non-commercial focus: marketing-oriented presentations are prohibited except at breakfast roundtables.

“Once again, we’ve received many more submissions than we could use,” says Mark Schubin, the Program Maestro of the HPA Tech Retreat. “To say this year’s were ‘compelling’ is an understatement. We could have programmed a few more days. Rejecting terrific submissions is always the hardest thing we have to do. I’m really looking forward to learning the latest on HDR, using artificial intelligence to restore old movies and machine learning to deal with grunt work, the Academy’s new software foundation, location-based entertainment with altered reality and much more.”

This year’s program is as follows:

Monday February 11: TR-X
eSports: Dropping the Mic on Center Stage
Separate registration required
A half day of targeted panels, speakers and interaction, TR-X will focus on the rapidly growing arena of eSports, with a keynote from Yvette Martinez, CEO – North America of eSports organizer and production company ESL North America.
Tuesday February 12: Supersession
Next-Gen Workflows and Infrastructure: From the Set to the Consumer

Tuesday February 12: Supersession
Next-Gen Workflows and Infrastructure: From the Set to the Consumer

Wednesday February 13: Main Program Highlights
• Mark Schubin’s Technology Year in Review
• Washington Update (Jim Burger, Thompson Coburn LLP)
The highly anticipated review of legislation and its impact on our business from a leading Washington attorney.

• Deep Fakes (Moderated by Debra Kaufman, ETCentric; Panelists Marc Zorn, HBO; Ed Grogan, Department of Defense; Alex Zhukov, Video Gorillas)
It might seem nice to be able to use actors long dead, but the concept of “fake news” takes a terrifying new turn with deepfakes, the term that Wikipedia describes as a portmanteau of “deep learning” and “fake.” Although people have been manipulating images for centuries – long before the creation of Adobe Photoshop – the new AI-powered tools allow the creation of very convincing fake audio and video.

• The Netflix Media Database (Rohit Puri, Netflix)
An optimized user interface, meaningful personalized recommendations, efficient streaming and a high-quality catalog of content are the principal factors that define theNetflix end-user experience. A myriad of business workflows of varying complexities come together to realize this experience. Under the covers, they use computationally expensive computer vision, audio processing and natural language-processing based media analysis algorithms. These algorithms generate temporally and spatially dynamic metadata that is shared across the various use cases. The Netflix Media DataBase (NMDB) is a multi-tenant, data system that is used to persist this deeply technical metadata about various media assets at Netflix and that enables querying the same at scale. The “shared nothing” distributed database architecture allows NMDB to store large amounts of media timeline data, thus forming the backbone for various Netflix media processing systems.

• AI Film Restoration at 12 Million Frames per Second (Alex Zhukov, Video Gorillas)

• Is More Media Made for Subways Than for TV and Cinema? (and does it Make More $$$?) (Andy Quested, BBC)

• Broadcasters Panel (Moderator: Matthew Goldman, MediaKind)

• CES Review (Peter Putman, ROAM Consulting)
Pete Putman traveled to Las Vegas to see what’s new in the world of consumer electronics and returns to share his insights with the HPA Tech Retreat audience.

• 8K: Whoa! How’d We Get There So Quickly (Peter Putman, ROAM Consulting)

• Issues with HDR Home Video Deliverables for Features (Josh Pines, Technicolor)

• HDR “Mini” Session
• HDR Intro: Seth Hallen, Pixelogic
• Ambient Light Compensation for HDR Presentation: Don Eklund, Sony Pictures Entertainment
• HDR in Anime: Haruka Miyagawa, Netflix
• Pushing the Limits of Motion Appearance in HDR: Richard Miller, Pixelworks
• Downstream Image Presentation Management for Consumer Displays:
• Moderator: Michael Chambliss, International Cinematographers Guild
• Michael Keegan, Netflix
• Annie Chang, UHD Alliance
• Steven Poster, ASC, International Cinematographers Guild
• Toshi Ogura, Sony

• Solid Cinema Screens with Front Sound: Do They Work? (Julien Berry, Delair Studios)
Direct-view displays bring high image quality in the cinema but suffer from low pixel fill factor that can lead to heavy moiré and aliasing patterns. Cinema projectors have a much better fill factor which avoids most of those issues even though some moiré effect can be produced due to the screen perforations needed for the audio. With the advent of high contrast, EDR and soon HDR image quality in cinema, screen perforations impact the perceived brightness and contrast from the same image, though the effect has never been quantified since some perforations had always been needed for cinema audio. With the advent of high-quality cinema audio system, it is possible to quantify this effect.

Thursday, February 14: Main Program Highlights

• A Study Comparing Synthetic Shutter and HFR for Judder Reduction (Ianik Beitzel and Aaron Kuder, ARRI and Stuttgart Media University (HdM))

• Using Drones and Photogrammetry Techniques to Create Detailed (High Resolution) Point Cloud Scenes (Eric Pohl, Singularity Imaging)
Drone aerial photography may be used to create multiple geotagged images that are processed to create a 3D point cloud set of a ground scene. The point cloud may be used for production previsualization or background creation for videogames or VR/AR new-media products.

• Remote and Mobile Production Panel (Moderator: Mark Chiolis, Mobile TV Group; Wolfgang Schram, PRG; Scott Rothenberg, NEP)
With a continuing appetite for content from viewers of all the major networks, as well as niche networks, streaming services, web, eGames/eSports and venue and concert-tour events, the battle is on to make it possible to watch almost every sporting and entertainment event that takes place, all live as it is happening. Key members of the remote and mobile community explore what’s new and what workflows are behind the content production and delivery in today’s fast-paced environments. Expect to hear about new REMI applications, IP workflows, AI, UHD/HDR, eGames, and eSports.

• IMSC 1.1: A Single Subtitle and Caption Format for the Entertainment Chain (Pierre-Anthony Lemieux, Sandflow Consulting (supported by MovieLabs); Dave Kneeland, Fox)
IMSC is a W3C standard for worldwide subtitles/captions, and the result of an international collaboration. The initial version of IMSC (IMSC 1) was published in 2016, and has been widely adopted, including by SMPTE, MPEG, ATSC and DVB. With the recent publication of IMSC 1.1, we now have the opportunity to converge on a single subtitle/caption format across the entire entertainment chain, from authoring to consumer devices. IMSC 1.1 improves on IMSC 1 with support for HDR, advanced Japanese language features, and stereoscopic 3D. Learn about IMSC’s history, capabilities, operational deployment, implementation experience, and roadmap — and how to get involved.

• ACESNext and the Academy Digital Source Master: Extensions, Enhancements and a Standardized Deliverable (Andy Maltz, Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences; Annie Chang, Universal Pictures)

• Mastering for Multiple Display and Surround Brightness Levels Using the Human Perceptual Model to Insure the Original Creative Intent Is Maintained (Bill Feightner, Colorfront)
Maintaining a consistent creative look across today’s many different cinema and home displays can be a big challenge, especially with the wide disparity in possible display brightness and contrast as well as the viewing environments or surrounds. Even if it was possible to have individual creative sessions, maintaining creative consistency would be very difficult at best. By using the knowledge of how the human visual system works, the perceptual model, processing source content to fit a given displays brightness and surround can be automatically applied while maintaining the original creative intent with little to no trimming.

• Cloud: Where Are We Now? (Moderator: Erik Weaver, Western Digital)

• Digitizing Workflow – Leveraging Platforms for Success (Roger Vakharia, Salesforce)
While the business of content creation hasn’t changed much over time, the technology enabling processes around production, digital supply chain and marketing resource management among other areas have become increasingly complex. Enabling an agile, platform-based workflow can help in decreasing time and complexity but cost, scale and business sponsorship are often inhibitors in driving success.

Driving efficiency at scale can be daunting but many media leaders have taken the plunge to drive agility across their business process. Join this discussion to learn best practices, integrations, workflows and techniques that successful companies have used to drive simplicity and rigor around their workflow and business process.

• Leveraging Machine Learning in Image Processing (Rich Welsh, Sundog Media Toolkit)
How to use AI (ML and DL networks) to perform “creative” tasks that are boring and humans spend time doing but don’t want to (working real world examples included)

• Leveraging AI in Post Production: Keeping Up with Growing Demands for More Content (Van Bedient, Adobe)
Expectations for more and more content continue to increase — yet staffing remains the same or only marginally bigger. How can advancements from machine learning help content creators? AI can be an incredible boon to remove repetitive tasks and tedious steps allowing humans to concentrate on the creative; ultimately AI can provide the one currency creatives yearn for more than anything else: Time.

• Deploying Component-Based Workflows: Experiences from the Front Lines (Moderator: Pierre-Anthony Lemieux, Sandflow Consulting (supported by MovieLabs))
The content landscape is shifting, with an ever-expanding essence and metadata repertoire, viewing experiences, global content platforms and automated workflows. Component-based workflows and formats, such as the Interoperable Master Format (IMF) standard, are being deployed to meet the challenges brought by this shift. Come and join us for a first-hand account from those on the front lines.

• Content Rights, Royalties and Revenue Management via Blockchain (Adam Lesh, SingularDTV)
The blockchain entertainment economy: adding transparency, disintermediating the supply chain, and empowering content creators to own, manage and monetize their IP to create sustainable, personal and connected economies. As we all know, rights and revenue (including royalties, residuals, etc.) management is a major pain point for content creators in the entertainment industry.

Friday, February 15: Main Program Highlights

• Beyond SMPTE Time Code: The TLX Project: (Peter Symes)
SMPTE Time Code, ST 12, was developed and standardized in the 1970s to support the emerging field of electronic editing. It has been, and continues to be, a robust standard; its application is almost universal in the media industry, and the standard has found use in other industries. However, ST 12 was developed using criteria and restrictions that are not appropriate today, and it has many shortcomings in today’s environment.

A new project in SMPTE, the Extensible Time Label (TLX) is gaining traction and appears to have the potential to meet a wide range of requirements. TLX is designed to be transport-agnostic and with a modern data structure.

• Blindsided: The Game-Changers We Might Not See Coming (Mark Harrison, Digital Production Partnership)
The world’s number one company for gaming revenue makes as much as Sony and Microsoft combined. It isn’t American or Japanese. Marketeers project that by 2019, video advertising on out-of-home displays will be as important as their spending on TV. Meanwhile, a single US tech giant could buy every franchise of the top five US sports leagues. From its off-shore reserves. And still have $50 billion change.

We all know consumers like OTT video. But that’s the least of it. There are trends in the digital economy that, if looked at globally, could have sudden, and profound, implications for the professional content creation industry. In this eye-widening presentation, Mark Harrison steps outside the western-centric, professional media industry perspective to join the technology, consumer and media dots and ask: what could blindside us if we don’t widen our point of view?

• Interactive Storytelling: Choose What Happens Next (Andy Schuler, Netflix)
Looking to experiment with nonlinear storytelling, Netflix launched its first interactive episodes in 2017. Both in children’s programming, the shows encouraged even the youngest of viewers to touch or click on their screens to control the trajectory of the story (think Choose Your Own Adventure books from the 1980s). How did Netflix overcome some of the more interesting technical challenges of the project (i.e., mastering, encoding, streaming), how was SMPTE IMF used to streamline the process and why are we more formalized mastering practices needed for future projects?

• HPA Engineering Excellence Award Winners (Moderator: Joachim Zell, EFILM, Chair HPA Engineering Excellence Awards; Joe Bogacz, Canon; Paul Saccone, Blackmagic Design; Lance Maurer, Cinnafilm; Michael Flathers, IBM; Dave Norman, Telestream).

Since the HPA launched in 2008, the HPA Awards for Engineering Excellence have honored some of the most groundbreaking, innovative, and impactful technologies. Spend a bit of time with a select group of winners and their contributions to the way we work and the industry at large.

• The Navajo Strategic Digital Plan (John Willkie, Luxio)

• Adapting to a COTS Hardware World (Moderator: Stan Moote, IABM)
Transitioning to off-the-shelf hardware is one of the biggest topics on all sides of the industry, from manufacturers, software and service providers through to system integrators, facilities and users themselves. It’s also incredibly uncomfortable. Post production was an early adopter of specialized workstations (e.g. SGI), and has now embraced a further migration up the stack to COTS hardware and IP networks, whether bare metal, virtualized, hybrid or fully cloud based. As the industry deals with the global acceleration of formats, platforms and workflows, what are the limits of COTS hardware when software innovation is continually testing the limits of general-purpose CPUs, GPUs and network protocols? Covering “hidden” issues in using COTS hardware, from the point of view of users and facility operators as well as manufacturers, services and systems integrators.

• Academy Software Foundation: Enabling Cross-Industry Collaboration for Open Source Projects (David Morin, Academy Software Foundation)
In August 2018, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation launched the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF) to provide a neutral forum for open source software developers in the motion picture and broader media industries to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation and sound. This presentation will explain why the Foundation was formed and how it plans to increase the quality and quantity of open source contributions by lowering the barrier to entry for developing and using open source software across the industry.

Arraiy 4.11.19

2018 HPA Award winners

By Dayna McCallum

The 13th annual Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) Awards took place last week, honoring the accomplishments of industry  artists and engineering teams. The HPA Awards recognize individuals and companies for outstanding contributions made in the creation of feature films, television, commercials and other entertainment content.  

Awards were given to talented individuals and teams working in 12 creative craft categories, including color grading, sound, editing and visual effects for commercials, television and feature film. Victoria Alonso, EVP production of Marvel, was honored with the HPA Charles S. Swartz Award, and special awards were presented for Engineering Excellence.

The winners of the 2018 HPA Awards are:

Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film

WINNER: “Alpha”
Maxine Gervais // Technicolor – Hollywood

Maxine Gervais

“Avengers: Infinity War”Steven J. Scott, Charles Bunnag // Technicolor – Hollywood

“Red Sparrow”
Dave Hussey // Company 3

“The Shape of Water”
Chris Wallace // Deluxe – Toronto

“The Greatest Showman”
Tim Stipan // Company 3

Outstanding Color Grading – Television

WINNER: “The Crown – Paterfamilias”
Asa Shoul // Molinare

“Damnation – Sam Riley’s Body”
Paul Allia // Picture Shop

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – Pilot”
Steven Bodner // Light Iron

“Game of Thrones – Beyond the Wall”
Joe Finley // Sim

“The Crossing – Pilot”
Tony Smith // Picture Shop

                    

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial  

WINNER (TIE): Volkswagen – “Kids’ Dreams”
Adam Scott // The Mill

WINNER (TIE): Zara – “Spring/Summer 2018 Main”
Tim Masick // Company 3

Bottega Veneta – “Spring/Summer 2018 Trailer”
Tim Masick // Company 3

Tile – “Lost Panda”
Tom Poole // Company 3

Audi – “Final Breath”
Sofie Borup // Company 3

 

Outstanding Editing – Feature Film

Sponsored by Blackmagic Design

WINNER: “A Quiet Place”
Christopher Tellefsen, ACE

“Coco”
Steve Bloom

“You Were Never Really Here”
Joe Bini

“Mission: Impossible – Fallout”
Eddie Hamilton, ACE

“Believer”
Demian Fenton

 

Outstanding Editing – Television (30 Minutes and Under)

Sponsored by Blackmagic Design

WINNER: “VICE – After the Fall”
Kelly Kendrick // Vice
     

“The End of the F***ing World –  Episode One”
Mike Jones

“Vida – Episode 6”
JoAnne Yarrow

“Barry – Chapter Eight: Know Your Truth”
Kyle Reiter

“Vice Principals –The Union of the Wizard and The Warrior”
Justin Bourret

 

Outstanding Editing – Television (Over 30 Minutes)

Sponsored by Blackmagic Design

WINNER: “The Defiant Ones – Part 2”
Doug Pray, Lasse Järvi

“Stranger Things – Chapter Nine: The Gate”
Kevin D. Ross, ACE

“Game of Thrones – The Dragon and the Wolf”
Crispin Green

“Westworld – The Passenger”
Anna Hauger, Mako Kamitsuna, MPEG, Andrew Seklir, ACE

“Counterpart – The Crossing”
Dana E. Glauberman, ACE

 

Outstanding Sound – Feature Film

WINNER: “The Shape of Water”
Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern, Nelson Ferreira, Nathan Robitaille // Deluxe – Toronto

“Ant-Man and The Wasp”
Katy Wood, Addison Teague, Juan Peralta, Tom Johnson // Skywalker Sound

“Avengers: Infinity War”
Shannon Mills, Tom Johnson, Juan Peralta, Dan Laurie // Skywalker Sound

“Blade Runner 2049”
Mark Mangini, Ron Bartlett, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill, Mac Ruth // Formosa Group

“Black Panther”
Benjamin A. Burtt, Steve Boeddeker, Brandon Proctor // Skywalker Sound

 

Outstanding Sound – Television

WINNER: “Altered Carbon – Out of The Past”
Brett Hinton, Mark Allen, Owen Granich-Young, Andy King, Keith Rogers // Atomic Sound

“Yellowstone – Daybreak”
Alan Robert Murray, Tim LeBlanc, Dean Zupancic // Warner Bros.

“Waco – Operation Showtime”
Craig Mann, Kelly Oxford, Laura Wiest, Karen Vassar Triest, David Brownlow, Beau Borders // Technicolor – Hollywood

“Dark – Secret”
Alexander Würtz, Achim Hofmann, Jorg Elsner, Christian Bichoff // ARRI Media GmbH
Ansgar Frerich // Basis Berlin

“Yellowstone – Kill the Messenger”
Alan Robert Murray, Tim LeBlanc, Dean Zupancic // Warner Bros.


Outstanding Sound – Commercial 

WINNER: OXFAM – “The Heist No One is Talking About”
Neil Johnson // Factory Studios

KIA – “Fueled by Youth”
Nathan Dubin // Margarita Mix

SANE – “Let Me Talk”
Anthony Moore, Jack Hallett // Factory Studios

Monster – “Opportunity Roars”
Tom Jucarone // Sound Lounge

ICRC – “Hope”
Anthony Moore // Factory Studios

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film

WINNER: “Avengers: Infinity War”
Matt Aitken, Charles Tait, Paul Story, Sidney Kombo-Kintombo, Marvyn Young // Weta Digital

“Maze Runner: The Death Cure”
R. Christopher White, Daniel Macarin, Phillip Leonhardt, Paul Ramsden, Jeremy Fort // Weta Digital

“Blade Runner 2049”
Richard Clegg, Axel Akesson, Wesley Chandler, Stefano Carta, Ian Cooke-Grimes // MPC

“Rampage”
Erik Winquist, Benjamin Pickering, Stephen Unterfranz, Thrain Shadbolt, David Clayton // Weta Digital

“Thor: Ragnarok”
Kyle McCulloch, Alexis Wajsbrot, Ben Loch, Harry Bardak // Framestore

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (Under 13 Episodes)

WINNER: “Game of Thrones – Beyond The Wall”
Joe Bauer, Steve Kullback, Ted Rae // HBO
Eric Carney // The Third Floor
David Ramos // El Ranchito

“Altered Carbon – Out of The Past”
Everett Burrell, Tony Meagher, Steve Moncur, Christine Lemon, Paul Jones // DNEG

“Outlander – Eye of The Storm”
Richard Briscoe // Outlander Production
Daniel Norlund, Filip Orrby // Goodbye Kansas
Aladino Debert, Greg Teegarden // Digital Domain

“Black Mirror – Metalhead”
Russell McLean // House of Tomorrow
Michael Bell, Pete Levy, Steven Godfrey, Stafford Lawrence // DNEG

“Westworld – The Passenger”
Jay Worth, Bruce Branit // Deep Water FX
Bobo Skipper // Important Looking Pirates
Kama Moiha // COSA VFX
Mike Enriquez // DNEG

Agents of Shield winners

  

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (Over 13 Episodes)

WINNER: “Agents of SHIELD – Orientation: Part 1”
Mark Kolpack, Sabrina Arnold // Marvel
Kevin Yuille, David Rey, Hnedel Maximore // FuseFX
 

“Supergirl – For Good”
Armen V. Kevorkian, Gevork Babityan, Kris Cabrera, Jerry Chalupnik, Jason Shulman // Encore VFX

“Hawaii Five-O – A’ole e ‘olelo mai ana ke ahi ua ana ia”
Adam Avitabile, Daniel Toomey, Michael Kirylo, Ryan Smolarek, Wayne Hollingsworth // Picture Shop

“Legends of Tomorrow – The Good, The Bad and The Cuddly”
Armen V. Kevorkian, Andranik Taranyan, Jason Shulman, Dan Aprea, Lycee Anaya // Encore VFX

“NCIS: LA – A Line in the Sand/Ninguna Salida”
Dylan Chudzynski, Michael Carter, Joe Suzuki, Jacob Kuhne // DigitalFilm Tree

The following special awards, which were previously announced, were also presented:

HPA Engineering Excellence Award

The winners of the 2018 HPA Award for Engineering Excellence are:

  • Blackmagic Design – DaVinci Resolve 15
    DaVinci Resolve 15, released at NAB this year, offers a major step forward for the post-production workflow, a significant shift in technically and creatively matched toolsets as well as overall efficiency. The platform, designed to provide a full suite of post-production tools, from ingest to delivery, directly integrated in a single ecosystem, includes significant improvements in quality, functionality and time to delivery. Exchange formats, translation and conform can be eliminated, and last-minute change efficiently managed for feature film, episodic TV and short form productions.
  • Canon – Visual and Technical Monitoring of HDR Images
    Canon has seen the need for not only visually seeing HDR images on set, in editorial, and in finishing but also for engineering tools to know exact values of the HDR images and its pixels; compare SDR and HDR images; compare different HDR deliverable systems; out of gamut warnings; and connection to various manufacturers camera metadata. This complete system from Canon ensures that HDR and SDR image creation is easily and accurately be accomplished.

    Cinnafilm’s Lance Maurer

  • Cinnafilm, Inc. – PixelStrings
    PixelStrings is a cloud-based video conversion service focusing on ultimate playback quality for media.  Leveraging the award-winning framerate conversion, retiming, artifact/noise/telecine correction, and transcode technologies from Cinnafilm, this PaaS enables the mass creation of best-possible video versions while leveraging infinite, GPU-enabled cloud compute power.  The platform is a growing hub of other best-of-breed media technologies and is a simple pay-as-you-use toolset available 24/7 though a browser.  PixelStings enables the freedom of a predictable OpEx process.

  • IBM Aspera & Telestream – Telestream Vantage with Lightspeed Live Capture
    IBM Aspera and Telestream have developed a game-changing solution for high-speed capture and production of live, broadcast quality video from remote locations for faster production turnaround. The API integration of Aspera’s FASPStream streaming technology with Telestream Vantage and Lightspeed Live enables open-file workflows so production teams can work on live video feeds from remote locations in real time, with dramatically lower costs compared to satellite delivery, fiber or on-location production and more flexible deployment options.

The HPA Engineering Excellence Award is recognized as one of the most important technology honors in the industry, spotlighting companies and individuals who draw upon technical and creative ingenuity to develop breakthrough technologies. Submissions for this peer-judged award may include products or processes and must represent a step forward for its industry beneficiaries. Honorable Mention was awarded to Samsung for Samsung Onyx.

Charles S. Swartz Award

The Charles S. Swartz Award is awarded to a person, group, or company that has made a significant artistic, technological, business or educational impact across diverse aspects of the media industry. The award recognizes broad, impactful and lasting contributions that have advanced and/or provided some unique purpose to the larger media content ecosystem.  This year’s honoree is Victoria Alonso, respected producer and Executive Vice President, Production for Marvel Studios.


The 2018 HPA Awards nominees

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has announced the 2018 nominees for the HPA Awards creative categories. The Awards honor achievement and artistic excellence by individuals and teams who bring stories to life and outstanding content to audiences around the world.

Launched in 2006, the HPA Awards recognize outstanding achievement in editing, sound, visual effects and color grading for work in television, commercials and feature films. The winners of the 13th Annual HPA Awards will be announced at a ceremony on November 15, 2018 at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film

-Avengers: Infinity War

Steven J. Scott, Charles Bunnag // Technicolor – Hollywood

-Red Sparrow

Dave Hussey // Company 3

Shape of Water

–The Shape of Water

Chris Wallace // Deluxe – Toronto

-Alpha

Maxine Gervais // Technicolor – Hollywood

-The Greatest Showman

Tim Stipan // Company 3

 

Outstanding Color Grading – Television

-Damnation – “Sam Riley’s Body”

Paul Allia // Picture Shop

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

-The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Pilot” 

Steven Bodner // Light Iron

-The Crown – “Paterfamilias”

Asa Shoul // Molinare

-Game of Thrones – “Beyond the Wall”

Joe Finley // Sim

-Game of Thrones – “Beyond the Wall”

Joe Finley // Sim

-The Crossing – “Pilot”

Tony Smith // Picture Shop

 

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial

-Bottega Veneta – “Spring/Summer 2018 Trailer”

Tim Masick // Company 3 

-Tile – Lost Panda

Tom Poole // Company 3

-Volkswagen – Kids Dream

Adam Scott // The Mill

-Audi – Final Breath

Sofie Borup // Company 3

-Bottega Veneta – “Spring/Summer 2018 Main”

Tim Masick // Company 3

 

Outstanding Editing – Feature Film

-A Quiet Place

Christopher Tellefsen, ACE

Coco

-Coco

Steve Bloom

-You Were Never Really Here

Joe Bini

-Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Eddie Hamilton, ACE

-Believer

Demian Fenton

 

Outstanding Editing – Television (30 Minutes and Under)

-The End of the F***ing World – Episode One

Mike Jones

-Vida – Episode 6”

JoAnne Yarrow

-Vice – “After the Fall”

Kelly Kendrick // Vice

-Barry – “Chapter Eight: Know Your Truth”

Kyle Reiter

Vice Principals

-Vice Principals – “The Union of the Wizard and The Warrior”

Jeff Seibenick

 

Outstanding Editing – Television (Over 30 Minutes)

-Stranger Things – “Chapter Nine: The Gate”

Kevin D. Ross, ACE

-The Defiant Ones – Part 2

Doug Pray, Lasse Järvi

-Game of Thrones – “The Dragon and the Wolf”

Crispin Green

-Westworld – “The Passenger”

Anna Hauger, Mako Kamitsuna, MPEG, Andrew Seklir, ACE

-Counterpart – “The Crossing”

Dana E. Glauberman, ACE

 

Outstanding Sound – Feature Film

-Ant-Man and The Wasp

Katy Wood, Addison Teague, Juan Peralta, Tom Johnson // Skywalker Sound

-The Shape of Water

Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern, Nelson Ferreira, Nathan Robitaille // Deluxe – Toronto

-Avengers: Infinity War

Shannon Mills, Tom Johnson, Juan Peralta, Dan Laurie // Skywalker Sound

-Blade Runner 2049

Black Panther

Mark Mangini, Ron Bartlett, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill, Mac Ruth // Formosa Group

-Black Panther

Benjamin A. Burtt, Steve Boeddeker, Brandon Proctor // Skywalker Sound

 

Outstanding Sound – Television

-Yellowstone – “Daybreak” 

Allan Murray, Tim LeBlanc, Dean Zupancic // Warner Bros

-Waco – “Operation Showtime”

Craig Mann, Kelly Oxford, Laura Wiest, Karen Vassar Triest, David Brownlow, Beau Borders // Technicolor – Hollywood

-Dark – “Secrets”

Alexander Würtz, Achim Hofmann, Jörg Elsner, Ansgar Frerich, Christian Bischoff  // Basis Berlin

-Yellowstone – “Kill the Messenger” 

Allan Murray, Tim LeBlanc, Dean Zupancic // Warner Bros.

-Altered Carbon – “Out of The Past” 

Brett Hinton, Mark Allen, Owen Granich-Young, Andy King, Keith Rogers // Atomic Sound

 

Outstanding Sound – Commercial

-OXFAM – The Heist No One is Talking About

Neil Johnson // Factory Studios

-KIA Fueled by Youth

Nathan Dubin // Margarita Mix

-SANE – Let Me Talk

Anthony Moore, Jack Hallett // Factory Studios

-Monster – Opportunity Roars

Tom Jucarone // Sound Lounge

-ICRC – Hope

Anthony Moore // Factory Studios

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film

-Maze Runner: The Death Cure

R. Christopher White, Daniel Macarin, Philip Leonhardt, Paul Ramsden, Jeremy Fort // Weta Digital

-Blade Runner 2049

Richard Clegg, Axel Akesson, Wesley Chandler, Stefano Carta, Ian Cooke-Grimes // MPC

Rampage

-Rampage

Erik Winquist, Benjamin Pickering, Stephen Unterfranz, Thrain Shadbolt, 

David Clayton // Weta Digital

-Thor: Ragnarok

Kyle McCulloch, Alexis Wajsbrot, Ben Loch, Harry Bardak // Framestore

-Avengers: Infinity War

Matt Aitken, David Conley, Charles Tait, Paul Story, Marvyn Young // Weta Digital

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (Under 13 Episodes)

-Altered Carbon – “Out of The Past”

Altered Carbon

Everett Burrell, Tony Meagher, Steve Moncur, Christine Lemon, Paul Jones // DNEG

-Outlander – “Eye of The Storm”

Richard Briscoe // Outlander Production

Daniel Nordlund, Filip Orrby // Goodbye Kansas

Aladino Debert, Greg Teegarden // Digital Domain

-Black Mirror – “Metalhead”

Russel McLean, Michael Bell, Pete Levy, Steven Godfrey, Stafford Lawrence // DNEG

-Game of Thrones – “Beyond The Wall” 

Joe Bauer, Steve Kullback, Ted Rae, Eric Carney // HBO 

David Ramos // El Ranchito

-Westworld – “The Passenger”

Jay Worth, Bruce Branit // Deep Water FX

Bobo Skipper // Important Looking Pirates

Kama Moiha // COSA VFX

Mike Enriquez // DNeg

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (Over 13 Episodes)

-Supergirl – “For Good”

Armen V. Kevorkian, Gevork Babityan, Kris Cabrera, Jerry Chalupnik, Jason Shulman // Encore VFX

-Agents of SHIELD – “Orientation: Part 1” 

Mark Kolpack, Sabrina Arnold // Marvel 

Kevin Yuille, David Rey, Hnedel Maximore // FuseFX

-Hawaii Five-O – “A’ole e ‘olelo mai ana ke ahi ua ana ia”

Adam Avitabile, Daniel Toomey, Michael Kirylo, Ryan Smolarek, Wayne Hollingsworth // Picture Shop

-Legends of Tomorrow – “The Good, The Bad and The Cuddly”

Armen V. Kevorkian, Andranik Taranyan, Jason Shulman, Dan Aprea, Lycee Anaya // Encore VFX

-NCIS: Los Angeles – “A Line in the Sand/Ninguna Salida

Dylan Chudzynski, Michael Carter, Joe Suzuki, Jacob Kuhne // DigitalFilm Tree


HPA Tech Retreat 2019 opens call for proposals

The Hollywood Professional Association has issued the call for proposals for the 2019 HPA Tech Retreat, the annual gathering of professionals from around the world who work at the intersection of technology and content creation. The main conference is determined by the proposals submitted during this process.

The HPA Tech Retreat is comprised of Tech Retreat Extra (TR-X), the Supersession, breakfast roundtables, an Innovation Zone and the main conference.  Also open now are submissions for the breakfast roundtables.

Now in its 24th year, the HPA Tech Retreat will take place February 11-15, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Springs Resort & Spa in Palm Desert, California, near Palm Springs.

The main program presentations are set for Wednesday, February 13 through Friday, February 15. These presentations are strictly reserved for marketing-free content.  Mark Schubin, who has programmed the Tech Retreat since its inception, notes that main program sessions can include a wide range of content. “We are looking for the most interesting, thought provoking, challenging and important ideas, diving into almost anything that is related to moving images and associated sounds. That includes, but is not limited to: alternative content for cinema, AR, broadcast in the age of broadband, content protection, dynamic range, enhanced cinema, frame rate, global mastering, higher immersion, international law, joke generation, kernel control, loss recovery, media management, night vision, optical advances, plug-‘n’-play, queasiness in VR, robo-post, surround imagery, Terabyte thumb drives, UHD II, verification, wilderness production, x-band Internet access, yield strength of lighting trusses and zoological holography.”

It is a far-ranging and creative call to the most innovative thinkers exploring the most interesting ideas and work. He concludes with his annual salvo, “Anything from scene to seen and gear to ear is fair game. So are haptic/tactile, olfactory and gustatory applications.”

Proposals, which are informal in nature and can be as short as a few sentences in length, must be submitted by the would-be presenter. Submitters will be contacted if the topic is of interest. Presentations in the main program are typically 30 minutes long, including set-up and Q&A. The deadline to submit main program proposals is end of day, Friday, October 26, 2018. Submissions should be sent to tvmark@earthlink.net.

Breakfast roundtables take place Wednesday to Friday, beginning at 7:30am. Unlike the main program, moderator-led breakfast roundtables can include marketing information. Schubin comments, “Table moderators are free to teach, preach, inquire, ask, call-to-task, sell or do anything else that keeps conversation flowing for an hour.”

There is no vetting process for breakfast roundtables. All breakfast roundtable moderators must be registered for the retreat, and there is no retreat registration discount conveyed by moderating a breakfast roundtable. Proposals for breakfast roundtables must be submitted by their proposed moderators, and once the maximum number of tables is reached (32 per day) no more can be accepted.

Further details for the 2019 HPA Tech Retreat will be announced in the coming weeks, including TR-X focus, supersession topics and Innovation Zone details, as well as seminars and meetings held in advance of the Tech Retreat.


Marvel’s Victoria Alonso to receive HPA’s Charles S. Swartz Award

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has announced that Victoria Alonso, producer and executive VP of production for Marvel Studios, will receive the organization’s 2018 Charles S. Swartz Award at the HPA Awards on November 15. The HPA Awards recognize creative artistry, innovation and engineering excellence, and the Charles S. Swartz Award honors the recipient’s significant impact across diverse aspects of the industry.

A native of Buenos Aires, Alonso moved to the US at the age of 19. She worked her way up through the industry, beginning as a PA and then working four years at the VFX house Digital Domain. She served as VFX producer on a number of films, including Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven, Tim Burton’s Big Fish, Andrew Adamson’s Shrek and Marvel’s Iron Man. She won the Visual Effects Society (VES) Award for outstanding supporting visual effects/motion picture for Kingdom of Heaven, with two additional shared nominations (best single visual effects, outstanding visual effects/effects-driven motion picture) for Iron Man.

Eventually, she joined Marvel as the company’s EVP of visual effects and post, doubling as co-producer on Iron Man, a role she reprised on Iron Man 2, Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger. In 2011, she advanced to executive producer on the hit The Avengers and has since executive produced Marvel’s Iron Man 3, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Captain America: Civil War, Thor: The Dark World, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, Doctor Strange, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Thor: Ragnarok, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War and most recently, Ant-Man and the Wasp.

She is currently at work on the untitled fourth installment of Avengers and Captain Marvel.

The Charles S. Swartz Award was named after executive Charles Swartz, who had a far ranging creative and technical career, eventually leading the Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California, a leading industry think tank and research center. The Charles S. Swartz Award is awarded at the discretion of the HPA Awards Committee and the HPA Board of Directors, and is not given annually.


HPA Engineering Excellence winners: BMD, Canon, Cinnafilm, IBM Aspera & Telestream

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) Awards Committee has announced the winners of the 2018 HPA Engineering Excellence Award. Winners were determined at a blue ribbon judging session held at IMAX on June 16. The awards will be given out on November 15 at the 13th annual HPA Awards gala at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

The Engineering Excellence Award was created to spotlight and reward companies and individuals providing services to the professional media content industry for their outstanding technical and creative ingenuity in media, content production, finishing, distribution and archiving. The HPA Awards launched in 2005 to recognize creative artistry, innovation and engineering excellence in the professional media content industry.

Joachim Zell, chair of the HPA Awards Engineering Committee says, “Once again, the Engineering Excellence judging sessions brought us outstanding presentations from a variety of companies at work in different parts of the media and entertainment ecosystem. The presenters are representative of the amazing work that great companies and brilliant individuals are bringing to the marketplace. The judges had a strong field of excellent technologies to evaluate, and the results were extremely close. Based on the effort, talent and time from the presenters and the enthusiasm of the judges, it is clear that the HPA Engineering Excellence award is meaningful to our industry, and I want to personally thank our presenters and our intrepid judges. Congratulations to the winners and to the entrants for truly impressive work.”

The winners of the 2018 HPA Award for Engineering Excellence are:

Blackmagic Design – DaVinci Resolve 15
DaVinci Resolve 15, released at NAB this year, offers a major step forward for the post production workflow, a significant shift in technically and creatively matched toolsets as well as overall efficiency. The platform, designed to provide a full suite of post tools, from ingest to delivery, directly integrated in a single ecosystem, includes significant improvements in quality, functionality and time to delivery. Exchange formats, translation and conform can be eliminated, and last-minute change efficiently managed for feature film, episodic TV and short form productions.

“We’re honored to be selected by the Hollywood Professional Association for one of this year’s Engineering Excellence Awards,” says BMD US president Dan May. “Blackmagic Design’s focus has always been to help provide the most innovative tools to the entertainment industry, and being recognized by the HPA for our newest advancements in DaVinci Resolve 15 helps us feel that we are on the right path. We want to thank the judging committee as well as HPA as a whole for its dedication to all advancements in technical and creative ingenuity. Congratulations also go out to all the winners this year. We are in amazing company.”

Canon – Visual and Technical Monitoring of HDR Images
Canon has seen the need for not only visually seeing HDR images on set, in editorial and in finishing but also for engineering tools to know exact values of the HDR images and their pixels; compare SDR and HDR images; compare different HDR deliverable systems; out-of-gamut warnings; and connection to various manufacturers camera metadata.

This complete system from Canon ensures that HDR and SDR image creation is easily and accurately accomplished.

“Canon is thrilled to be among those recognized by the Hollywood Professional Association with an Engineering Excellence Award. The built-in HDR toolkit that now comes standard in our 4K reference displays is a leap forward in creating and monitoring HDR content,” says Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon USA.

Cinnafilm – PixelStrings
PixelStrings is a cloud-based video conversion service focusing on ultimate playback quality for media. Leveraging the award-winning framerate conversion, retiming, artifact/noise/telecine correction and transcode technologies from Cinnafilm, this PaaS enables the mass creation of best-possible video versions while leveraging infinite, GPU-enabled cloud compute power. The platform is a growing hub of other best-of-breed media technologies and is a simple pay-as-you-use toolset available 24/7 though a browser. PixelStings enables the freedom of a predictable OpEx process.

“Winning the HPA Engineering Award is such an amazing honor for us,” says CEO Lance Maurer. “The Cinnafilm team has created something truly special with PixelStrings — when respected peers recognize the impact an endeavor like this represents to our industry, it is really quite special.”

IBM Aspera & Telestream – Telestream Vantage With Lightspeed Live Capture Powered by Aspera
IBM Aspera and Telestream have developed a game-changing solution for high-speed capture and production of live, broadcast-quality video from remote locations for faster production turnaround. The API integration of Aspera’s FASPStream streaming technology with Telestream Vantage and Lightspeed Live enables open-file workflows so production teams can work on live video feeds from remote locations in real time, with dramatically lower costs compared to satellite delivery, fiber or on-location production and more flexible deployment options.

“Winning the HPA Engineering Excellence award is a fantastic recognition of the remarkable contributions from many individuals at both Telestream and Aspera,” says Telestream CEO Scott Puopolo. “The original concept was literally drawn on the back of a napkin at NAB 2017 by Telestream’s Dave Norman and Aspera’s Mike Flathers. One year later, it’s the backbone of Fox Sports’ FIFA World Cup post production workflow. It’s a tremendous achievement for both companies.”

Honorable Mention:
Samsung — Samsung Onyx
The Samsung Onyx Cinema LED technology with DCI certification has come to market for both cinema and post uses with two models: a 2K resolution five-meter screen and a 4K resolution 10.3-meter screen. LED technology delivers visual quality, technical performance and reliability beyond that of traditional projector-based operations. This system also features surround sound from Harman/JBL. While operating nominally with traditional 14 fT-L SDR imagery, the screen is adopting support for HDR systems such as EClairColor and PQ with operating points at least to 300 cd/m2 and black performance including “off” and 0.005 cd/m2.

In addition to the honors for excellence in engineering, the HPA Awards will recognize excellence in 12 craft categories including color grading, editing, sound and visual effects.

The recipients of the Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation and other special awards will be announced in the coming weeks.


HPA issues a call for award entries, adds two new TV categories

The HPA (Hollywood Professional Association) has opened the call for entries in creative categories for the 13th annual HPA Awards. These awards recognize artistic excellence in color grading, editing, sound and visual effects in feature film, television and commercials.

The 13th annual awards presentation will be held at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles on November 15.

This year, two additional creative categories have been announced to reflect the evolution of the industry — Editing for Television and Visual Effects for Television. The category additions were based upon input on the changing nature of the industry from core creative constituents of the HPA Awards, as well as the editing and visual effects communities.

Entries are now being accepted in the following competitive categories:
•  Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film
•  Outstanding Color Grading – Television
•  Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial
•  Outstanding Editing – Feature Film
•  Outstanding Editing – Television (30 Minutes and Under)
•  Outstanding Editing – Television (Over 30 Minutes)
•  Outstanding Sound – Feature Film
•  Outstanding Sound – Television
•  Outstanding Sound – Commercial
•  Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film
•  Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (13 Episodes and Fewer)
•  Outstanding Visual Effects – Television (Over 13 Episodes)

Changes to visual effects submissions teams were also announced. Complete rules, guidelines and entry information for the creative categories and all of the HPA Awards are available here.

Submissions for consideration in the Creative Categories will be accepted between May 16 and July 13. Early Bird Entries (at a reduced entry fee for the Creative Categories) will be accepted through June 11. To be considered eligible, work must have debuted domestically and/or internationally during the eligibility period — September 6, 2017 through September 4, 2018. Entrants do not need to be members of the Hollywood Professional Association or working in the US.

The call for entries for the HPA Engineering Excellence Award opened last month. Submissions for the Engineering Excellence Award will be accepted until May 25.


HPA opens call for entries for Engineering Excellence Award

The HPA (Hollywood Professional Association) has opened its call for entries for the Engineering Excellence Award, which will be presented at the 2018 HPA Awards. Now in its 13th year, the HPA Engineering Excellence Award spotlights companies and individuals who draw upon technical and creative ingenuity to develop breakthrough technologies.

Submissions for this year’s Engineering Excellence category will close on May 25, 2018.

2017 award winners with presenters Barbara Lange (left) and Joachim Zell (right).

Joachim Zell, who chairs the committee for this award, said, “Artistic vision is what drives the technical and engineering processes that bring that vision to life. Ultimately, our work is fundamentally about helping filmmakers realize their vision. The companies and individuals supporting creative storytellers face constant pressure to evolve and expand the creative palette. Their contribution to the entertainment industry cannot be overstated. The Engineering Excellence Award is a highly competitive honor, and the past winners have changed the course of entertainment technology. We encourage the submission of your significant technological achievements.”

Entrants for this peer-judged award may include products or processes, and must represent a significant step forward for its industry beneficiaries. Past winners have included Aspera, Canon, Colorfront, Dolby, The Foundry/Sony Pictures Imageworks, Macom, Nvidia, Panasonic, Quantel, and Red Digital Cinema.

Winners will be announced in advance and celebrated during the HPA Awards show on November 15, 2018 at the Skirball Cultural Center in LA.

Our HPA Tech Retreat video coverage

Last month, tech folks from all aspects of post production gathered in the California desert to learn about new trends, tech and workflows at the annual HPA Tech Retreat.
They also got to mingle… a lot.

postPerspective was there and had the opportunity to capture some video of the goings-on and interview folks from Cinnafilm, MTI Film, FilmLight, SMPTE and more.

Click this link to watch them all!