Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: Editing

Black Panther editors Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver

By Amy Leland

Black Panther was a highly anticipated film that became a massive hit with audiences and critics alike. Just the fact that it’s a Marvel film would have been enough to create both anticipation and success, but this movie went beyond that, breaking barriers as well as box office records. The film was nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture.

Instead of being referred to as a great superhero film, it was simply called a great film. It’s also the kind of high-quality offering you would expect from director Ryan Coogler, whose prior credits include Fruitvale Station and Creed, both of which feature Michael B. Jordon, who is also in Black Panther.

Michael Shawver

I had a chance to talk with the Black Panther editing team — Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver — about the film and their process co-editing such a huge project.

How did you both end up on this project?
Michael Shawver: I’ve known Ryan since our days in film school at the University of Southern California. We met back in 2009 in a directing class, and he was making short films that were just above and beyond everybody else. They were about society, race, culture, everything, and they really made you feel and think. That’s the kind of thing that I always wanted to do, the whole reason I wanted to make movies.

One day after class I went up to him and said, “I’d love to work with you. I can edit a little bit.” Things then fell into place, and I was able to work on a short film we did in school. From there he fought to keep me and the rest of the short film team involved in Fruitvale Station. Then we worked on Creed and then Black Panther.

Debbie Berman: For me it was kind of a serendipitous backstory. I was awarded an editing fellowship to the Sundance Institute in 2012, and as part of the fellowship I went to the Sundance Film Festival and went to the awards ceremony for the first time. That was the year that Fruitvale won Sundance. So I was actually there watching Ryan’s career begin, and I remember absolutely loving the movie and really being drawn to him as a filmmaker. I thought Creed was absolutely brilliant. I ugly cried through most of Creed. I think it’s phenomenal.

Debbie Berman

When I was working on Spider-Man: Homecoming, I kept talking about Black Panther. As a South African, it was a film that really spoke to me, and really felt like it was going to be important to me. So Marvel connected us.

Shawver: When we met with Debbie, we just kind of knew. Ryan and I both knew a few minutes in that she was the right choice and that this was going to be the right fit. Between her work ethic, her worldview, her passion and what she focuses on to tell a story and to bring characters alive, I think it all just rang true with how we felt and our process.
And you never know. It’s tough when you co-edit with somebody because you kind of just go on one date and then you’re married. You never know how it’s going to work out. And there’s always creative discussion; there’s always, “What if this is better? What if that’s better?” But everybody left their egos at the door. We’re all “movies first.” We don’t take anything personally, and we help each other not take anything personally, and we support each other. It couldn’t have worked out better.

Berman: I totally agree. It’s like one day you’re married, but you’re married during a world war. You’re going through a very stressful time together. I did feel an instant kinship with Mike and Ryan the second we all met. It just felt like meeting old family. I’ve been passionate about filmmaking my entire life, and they have the same amount of passion. And as Mike said, we always put the film first, and with having that shared love of this movie in particular, it really just got us through everything.

I got to meet Ryan at a screening of Fruitvale Station, and I was struck by how humble he is. As a leader of a project, he must bring that to the environment. Did you all feel that when you were working with him?
Shawver: Oh yeah. That’s what he’s really like. I tell people that he’s a great director, but he’s a hundred times better person. He believes that people who make the movies are more important than the movie itself. That humility that he has allows him to learn. He’ll be the first one to say that he’s not the smartest person in the room, even though everybody would disagree with him. He understands that when you can admit that you don’t know everything, you can start to learn.

I think that, much like T’Challa does in the movie, Ryan feeds off of the people around him. There’s a reason we have certain members of the team that have stayed with Ryan for so long, and he would fight for us. When he brought Debbie into the fold, it was the same way. We all feel like we have so much to learn, and we’re so grateful to be in the position that we’re in. We can’t see operating any other way.

Berman: Ryan insists on honesty from his crew, and never feels that anything you say is a critique of him or his work. He understands that everything you say is just trying to make the film better. There is an open environment where it’s okay to say anything you want. It’s a safe environment to fail because out of a hundred ideas, if you get three that are great then it was worth the other 97 that maybe weren’t so great, because it’s all for the greater good of the film.

Were you both on the project from the beginning, and how did that process work with the two of you cutting the film together?
Berman: Mike started a bit before me, but the film as you see today is something we built from scratch together. We mostly worked on separate scenes. A film this big, it’s good to take ownership of certain sections, because there’s so much to track in terms of the visual effects load. But we collaborated on everything, we always watched each other’s work and we always gave input, suggestions and feedback. There were a couple of scenes we handed back and forth. If someone had an idea for something, then they would take over that scene and do a pass on it. It was basically a good mixture of complete ownership and collaboration all at the same time.

Shawver: I think the key for us was to work as organically as possible and never let anybody’s creative idea or creative juices go to waste. If Debbie came in one day just raring to go on a scene and had a dream about it, an epiphany about it or something, and wanted to dig in and explore more and see if she could elevate a moment, we would be dumb to get in the way of her doing that.

I think we understood that we had to find a balance of feeling of ownership over the scenes, the moments and the movie as a whole, but also understand that this is a story that needs to speak to everybody. We had a very diverse post team, and that’s not by accident. It’s because diversity can bring about the greatest art. Even down to some of our production assistants, who we would bring in to watch certain things just to give us thoughts, and that would always be filtered to Ryan. With a beast of a movie as big as Black Panther — what was it, like, 500 hours of footage.

As the editors, we’re the first audience. We’re the gatekeepers for everything else. So we have to focus on the details, and the movie as a whole. And with a thing that size and with that many people on a team, it helps to break it down but never be hard and fast with those boundaries.

Berman: One thing that was really important to me was all of the strong female characters in the film. I really focused on the ladies, and just making sure they were the most spectacular, powerful representations they could be. And, of course, we both worked on everything, but I think Mike probably took a bit more of T’Challa. It was such a difficult mix to have our central character surrounded by all of these other strong characters, but still make him feel like the strong and central presence. We both worked quite a lot on Killmonger, because we had to try creating an empathetic villain. It would have been easy to veer in either direction too far. We just had to keep the balance of, you can empathize with the point he’s making, but he’s going about it in the wrong way.

Shawver: With anything you do as an editor, these things are hard. I’m not going to lie. You’re second-guessing yourself. We all need to find our story in it, but also how we can share ourselves in each of these characters. What we focused on a lot, in our own ways, were the relationships in the movie. Because if you boil it down, the relationships make that world go upwards, downwards, leftward, rightwards. My son had just turned one at the time, so the theme of fathers and sons that’s achieved in the movie really resonated with me. Just like Debbie with the female characters. Female characters often don’t get what they deserve on screen, but we made sure that they did. Debbie really took guardianship of that, shepherding it through. I think those are some of the strongest points in the movie.

Berman: Mike was really incredible at putting emotion into scenes. The fight scenes, for example. There are these amazing Warrior Falls scenes, which are action scenes, but they’re so emotional. Most of that is the work Mike put in, like folding it around the characters watching the action, and how you’re filtering your own audience reaction through what they’re experiencing.

I remember there was a lot of talk in the press when the movie came out about representation and inclusion in the film, especially for an action or superhero film. As a woman, I really felt like, “Wow this is an action movie that’s showing people I can relate to on screen.”
Berman: Every time I watched a scene, I would do a pass where I would try to watch it through the female gaze. One of the examples of that editorially is right at the end, when the Dora Milaje are surrounded and the Jabari save them. Originally the Jabari warriors were all male. So I had a conversation with Ryan and I said, “You know, we go through this entire movie with these absolutely spectacular female warriors and then at the end of the film the men save them. I think that it undercuts a lot of what we have built up with them over the course of the film.” But I didn’t know what the solution was.

Ryan, in his brilliance, was like, “Well, what if we make some of the Jabari warriors female?” Which I thought was amazing. But, of course, they’d already shot this massive, complicated action sequence. Luckily, in additional photography, Marvel supported that idea, and they created Jabari female warriors. The very first warrior to break through the force field and save them is this absolutely kick-ass Jabari female warrior. It really made such a difference, not only to that moment, which is one of the coolest moments in the film to me, but just throughout the entire film with what we’re trying to say.

When you first started working, was there any sense of, “Okay, Michael, you’ve been working on the indie film side, so you start with some of the dialogue scenes. Debbie you just came from another Marvel film, so work on the action scenes”? How did you decide who was working on what scenes?

Shawver: We didn’t want to keep it separate in that way. I know for myself, and Debbie as well, if there’s something that we’re not as strong at as an editor, we use the opportunity to be able to edit and get better at those things.

Debbie was on Spider-Man, and I went to Atlanta a little early to start on Panther because I’d never done one of these before, and I was terrified. Every morning I woke up having to pinch myself that I was working on a movie like this. But then the whole rest of the day was, “Don’t screw this up. Don’t screw this up.” Then, when Debbie came in, and said, “This would be a good idea if we did it this way. Here’s what you can do to help this process move along faster. Here’s what you can do to have more specific discussions with the effects teams.” Just those in and outs of having gone through a process like that with Spider-Man helped us immensely. Debbie and I are strong editors. We have our strengths and we have a couple of weaknesses, but I feel like we’re both pretty well rounded. In certain ways, Debbie is stronger than I am, and she would critique certain things and give me notes.

We had a discussion early on. Ryan said he felt better when both of his editors touched a scene, because that way both of our stories could be told. He’d also say that if both of us agreed on something and he didn’t, he’d go with our idea because, “You guys are smart. If you guys say this is better and you both agree on it, then we’re going to do it.”

Berman: We actually pushed each other to go further, because there might be a point where you’re like, “Yeah, I’m happy with the scene” and then someone comes in and prompts you and questions things, and it forces you to re-evaluate and see if you can make every single moment just a little bit better.

I had just done Spider-Man, but I’d also done some indie films. I wasn’t too far removed from understanding what the knowledge gaps would be, ‘because I’d only filled those knowledge gaps myself about five seconds earlier. So I felt like I came from the same world, and I understood what they needed to know based on what I had just learned from my past experience.

Were you in edit rooms next to each other?
Berman: We had separate edit suites. But every time someone was finished with a scene we would sit together, either just the two of us or if Ryan was around sometimes the three of us together. We were on the same floor, a few doors away from each other, but we’re working on our own systems pretty much most of the day, and then checking in with each other. We also sat in the effects reviews together, making sure that the visual effects were serving the story and serving the way we created the scenes. We were also in the sound mix together.

Shawver: One of the things that I learned from Ryan, and about Ryan, is you just have to trust him. There are times as an editor, especially when you have a team of dozens and dozens of people, when they are looking at you and needing a scene to be done or a decision to be made, but we haven’t fully gotten it there yet. Ryan said to me, I think it was an Abraham Lincoln quote, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I’ll spend the first four sharpening the ax.” He told me that right after I was getting very nervous about a deadline we had, because he had to go to a bunch of other meetings and stuff like that, and that really put things into perspective.

There were times that we’d just sit and talk for an hour or two. The days are long — 10-, 12-hour days, sometimes longer. But we would have conversations; they’d be conversations about specific scenes, current events, our daily lives, how we feel, if one of us is going through something. First of all, if someone’s not having a good day, Ryan’s going to notice as soon as they step foot in the building, and he’s going to drop everything to make sure that that person is okay and find out if they need to go home. Whether it’s a personal tragedy, national tragedy, anything like that.

Berman: Whether it’s one of his key crew, or one of the PAs, he’ll notice.

Shawver: Yeah, it doesn’t matter who you are. The movie is a political movie. T’Challa’s a politician, and it has to do with world events and current events, and I think we’d be mistaken to not discuss those and see how we feel. But not just discuss, because the three of us probably agree on a lot of things that maybe a good amount of viewers in the world wouldn’t agree on. We talked from all different sides. That’s where that diversity comes in, and that love for making this movie that really is about bringing people together.

Berman: Yeah, that was very interesting to me, because I’m not used to sitting and talking so much. I’m used to like, “Editing! Editing! Editing!” It worked its way into the film. You spend a few hours chatting and you get to know each other, but it’s all working its way into the film. You’re connecting to each other as human beings and making this piece of art together, so it all works its way in… and it all makes the film better.

What’s up next for both of you?
Shawver: I’m working on a movie called Honest Thief. It’s starring Liam Neeson. It’s about a bank robber looking for redemption. It’s nice to be back on a movie just about relationships and small interpersonal drama to help sharpen those skills. It’s directed by Mark Williams, a really talented director.

Berman: I’m working on Captain Marvel, at the moment, sort of the final sprint to the finish line right now.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Sundance Videos: Watch our editor interviews

postPerspective traveled to Sundance for the first time this year, and it was great. In addition to attending some parties, brunches and panels, we had the opportunity to interview a number of editors who were in Park City to help promote their various projects. (Watch here.)

Billy McMillin

We caught up with the editors on the comedy docu-series Documentary Now!, Michah Gardner and Jordan Kim. We spoke to Courtney Ware about cutting the film Light From Light, as well as Billy McMillin, editor on the documentary Mike Wallace is Here. We also chatted with Phyllis Housen, the editor on director Chinonye Chukwu’s Clemency and Kent Kincannon who cut Hannah Pearl Utt’s comedy, Before you Know It. Finally, we sat down with Bryan Mason, who had the dual roles of cinematographer and editor on Animals.

We hope you enjoy watching these interviews as much as we enjoyed shooting them.

Don’t forget, click here to view!

Oh, and a big shout out to Twain Richardson from Jamaica’s Frame of Reference, who edited and color graded the videos. Thanks Twain!

Arraiy 4.11.19

ACE celebrates editing, names Eddie Award winners

By Dayna McCallum

On Friday evening, the 69th Annual ACE Eddie Awards were presented at the Beverly Hilton Hotel with over 1,000 in attendance. ACE president Stephen Rivkin, ACE, presided over the evening’s festivities with comedian Tom Kenny serving as the evening’s host (SpongeBob!).

(L-R) Director Peter Farrelly, Bohemian Rhapsody’s John Ottman, ACE

Bohemian Rhapsody, edited by John Ottman, ACE, and The Favourite, edited by Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy) respectively. Ottman and Mavropsaridis, who are also nominated for the Oscar in film editing, were both first time Eddie winners.

Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse, edited by Robert Fisher, Jr., won Best Edited Animated Feature Film and Free Solo, edited by Bob Eisenhardt, ACE, won Best Edited Documentary (Feature).

Television winners included Kyle Reiter for Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Commercial Television), Kate Sanford, ACE for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Non-Commercial Television), Gary Dollner, ACE for Killing Eve – “Nice Face” (Best Edited Drama Series for Commercial Television), Steve Singleton for Bodyguard – Episode 1 (Best Edited Drama Series for Non-Commercial Television), Malcolm Jamieson and Geoffrey Richman, ACE for Escape at Dannemora – Episode Seven (Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television), Greg Finton, ACE and Poppy Das, ACE for Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind (Best Edited Documentary, Non-Theatrical), and Hunter Gross, ACE for Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia” (Best Edited Non-Scripted Series), who delivered a very moving acceptance speech in tribute to the late Bourdain.

The Anne V. Coates Student Editing Award went to Boston University’s Marco Gonzalez, who beat out hundreds of competitors from film schools and universities around the country. The Student Editing honor was re-named in honor of the legendary editor who passed away this past year. In another emotional moment, the award was presented by Coates daughter, Emma Hickox, ACE (What Men Want).

Jerrold Ludwig, ACE and Craig McKay, ACE received Career Achievement awards.  Their work was highlighted with clip reels exhibiting their tremendous contributions to film and television throughout their careers.

(L-R) Octavia Spencer, Golden Eddie Honoree Guillermo del Toro

ACE’s prestigious Golden Eddie honor was presented to artist and Oscar-winning filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. He received the award from his friend and collaborator Octavia Spencer, who starred in del Toro’s The Shape of Water last year.

Other presenters at the show included Oscar nominated director Spike Lee (BlacKkKlansman); Oscar nominated director and ACE Eddie Award nominee for Roma, Alfonso Cuarón; director Jon M. Chu (Crazy Rich Asians); director Peter Farrelly (Green Book); D’Arcy Carden (The Good Place); Jennifer Lewis (Black-ish); Angela Sarafyan (Westworld); Harry Shum, Jr. (Crazy Rich Asians); Paul Walter Hauser (BlacKkKlansman); and film editor Carol Littleton, ACE.

Here is the full list of winners:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
Bohemian Rhapsody
John Ottman, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
The Favourite
Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Robert Fisher, Jr.

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Free Solo
Bob Eisenhardt, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):
Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind
Greg Finton, ACE & Poppy Das, ACE

Killing Eve Editor Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins”
Kyle Reiter

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone”
Kate Sanford, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Killing Eve – “Nice Face”
Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Bodyguard – “Episode 1”
Steve Singleton

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Escape at Dannemora – “Episode Seven”
Malcolm Jamieson & Geoffrey Richman ACE

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia”
Hunter Gross, ACE

STUDENT WINNER
Marco Gonzalez – Boston University

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE, The Favourite’s Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, Paul Walter Hauser.


More Than Just Words: Lucky Post helps bring Jeep’s viral piece to life


Jeep’s More Than Words commercial, out of agency The Richards Group, premiered online just prior to this year’s Super Bowl as part of its Big Game Blitz, which saw numerous projects launched leading up to the Super Bowl.

Quickly earning millions of views, the piece features a version of our national anthem by One Republic, as well as images of the band. The two-minute spot is made up of images of small, everyday moments that add up to something big and evoke a feeling of America.

There is a father and his infant son, people gathered in front of a barn, a football thrown through a hanging tire swing. We see bits of cities and suburbs, football, stock images of Marilyn Monroe and soldiers training for battle — and every once in a while, an image of a Jeep is in view.

The spot ends as it began, with images of One Republic in the studio before the screen goes black and text appears reading: More Than Just Words. Then the Jeep logo appears.

The production Company was Zoom USA with partner Mark Toia directing. Lucky Post in Dallas contributed editorial, color, sounds design and finish to the piece.

Editor Sai Selvarajan used Adobe’s Premiere. Neil Anderson provided the color grade in Blackmagic Resolve, while Scottie Richardson performed the sound design and mix using Avid Pro Tools. Online finishing and effects were via Tim Nagle, who worked in Autodesk Flame.

“The concept is genius in its simplicity; a tribute to faith in our country’s patchwork with our anthem’s words reinforced and represented in image,” says Lucky Post’s Selvarajan. “Behind the scenes, everyone provided collective energy and creativity to bring it to life. It was the product of many, just like the message of the film, and I was so excited to see the groundswell of positive reaction.”

 

 

 


Review: Boris FX’s Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019

By Brady Betzel

I realize I might sound like a broken record, but if you are looking for the best plugin to help with object removals or masking, you should seriously consider the Mocha Pro plugin. And if you work inside of Avid Media Composer, you should also seriously consider Boris Continuum and/or Sapphire, which can use the power of Mocha.

As an online editor, I consistently use Continuum along with Mocha for tight blur and mask tracking. If you use After Effects, there is even a whittled-down version of Mocha built in for free. For those pros who don’t want to deal with Mocha inside of an app, it also comes as a standalone software solution where you can copy and paste tracking data between apps or even export the masks, object removals or insertions as self-contained files.

The latest releases of Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 continue the evolution of Boris FX’s role in post production image restoration, keying and general VFX plugins, at least inside of NLEs like Media Composer and Adobe Premiere.

Mocha Pro

As an online editor I am alway calling on Continuum for its great Chroma Key Studio, Flicker Fixer and blurring. Because Mocha is built into Continuum, I am able to quickly track (backwards and forwards) difficult shapes and even erase shapes that the built-in Media Composer tools simply can’t do. But if you are lucky enough to own Mocha Pro you also get access to some amazing tools that go beyond planar tracking — such as automated object removal, object insertion, stabilizing and much more.

Boris FX’s latest updates to Boris Continuum and Mocha Pro go even further than what I’ve already mentioned and have resulted in a new version naming, this round we are at 2019 (think of it as Version 12). They have also created the new Application Manager, which makes it a little easier to find the latest downloads. You can find them here. This really helps when jumping between machines and you need to quickly activate and deactivate licenses.

Boris Continuum 2019
I often get offline edits effects from a variety plugins — lens flares, random edits, light flashes, whip transitions, and many more — so I need Continuum to be compatible with offline clients. I also need to use it for image repair and compositing.

In this latest version of Continuum, BorisFX has not only kept plugins like Primatte Studio, they have brought back Particle Illusion and updated Mocha and Title Studio. Overall, Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 feel a lot snappier when applying and rendering effects, probably because of the overall GPU-acceleration improvements.

Particle Illusion has been brought back from the brink of death in Continuum 2019 for a 64-bit keyframe-able particle emitter system that can even be tracked and masked with Mocha. In this revamp of Particle Illusion there is an updated interface, realtime GPU-based particle generation, expanded and improved emitter library (complete with motion-blur-enabled particle systems) and even a standalone app that can design systems to be used in the host app — you cannot render systems inside of the standalone app.

While Particle Illusion is a part of the entire Continuum toolset that works with OFX apps like Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, Media Composer, After Effects, and Premiere, it seems to work best in applications like After Effects, which can handle composites simply and naturally. Inside the Particle Illusion interface you can find all of the pre-built emitters. If you only have a handful make sure you download additional emitters, which you can find in the Boris FX App Manager.

       
Particle Illusion: Before and After

I had a hard time seeing my footage in a Media Composer timeline inside of Particle Illusion, but I could still pick my emitter, change specs like life and opacity, exit out and apply to my footage. I used Mocha to track some fire from Particle Illusion to a dumpster I had filmed. Once I dialed in the emitter, I launched Mocha and tracked the dumpster.

The first time I went into Mocha I didn’t see the preset tracks for the emitter or the world in which the emitter lives. The second time I launched Mocha, I saw track points. From there you can track where you want your emitter to track and be placed. Once you are done and happy with your track, jump back to your timeline where it should be reflected. In Media Composer I noticed that I had to go to the Mocha options and change the option from Mocha Shape to no shape. Essentially, the Mocha shape will act like a matte and cut off anything outside the matte.

If you are inside of After Effects, most parameters can now be keyframed and parented (aka pick-whipped) natively in the timeline. The Particle Illusion plugin is a quick, easy and good-looking tool to add sparks, Milky Way-like star trails or even fireworks to any scene. Check out @SurfacedStudio’s tutorial on Particle Illusion to get a good sense of how it works in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Continuum Title Studio
When inside of Media Composer (prior to the latest release 2018.12), there were very few ways to create titles that were higher resolution than HD (1920×1080) — the New Blue Titler was the only other option if you wanted to stay within Media Composer.

Title Studio within Media Composer

At first, the Continuum Title Studio interface appeared to be a mildly updated Boris Red interface — and I am allergic to the Boris Red interface. Some of the icons for the keyframing and the way properties are adjusted looks similar and threw me off. I tried really hard to jump into Title Studio and love it, but I really never got comfortable with it.

On the flip side, there are hundreds of presets that could help build quick titles that render a lot faster than New Blue Titler did. In some of the presets I noticed the text was placed outside of 16×9 Title Safety, which is odd since that is kind of a long standing rule in television. In the author’s defense, they are within Action Safety, but still.

If you need a quick way to make 4K titles, Title Studio might be what you want. The updated Title Studio includes realtime playback using the GPU instead of the CPU, new materials, new shaders and external monitoring support using Blackmagic hardware (AJA will be coming at some point). There are some great pre-sets including pre-built slates, lower thirds, kinetic text and even progress bars.

If you don’t have Mocha Pro, Continuum can still access and use Mocha to track shapes and masks. Almost every plugin can access Mocha and can track objects quickly and easily.
That brings me to the newly updated Mocha, which has some new features that are extremely helpful including a Magnetic Spline tool, prebuilt geometric shapes and more.

Mocha Pro 2019
If you loved the previous version of Mocha, you are really going to love Mocha Pro 2019. Not only do you get the Magnetic Lasso, pre-built geometric shapes, the Essentials interface and high-resolution display support, but BorisFX has rewritten the Remove Module code to use GPU video hardware. This increases render speeds about four to five times. In addition, there is no longer a separate Mocha VR software suite. All of the VR tools are included inside of Mocha Pro 2019.

If you are unfamiliar with what Mocha is, then I have a treat for you. Mocha is a standalone planar tracking app as well as a native plugin that works with Media Composer, Premiere and After Effects, or through OFX in Blackmagic’s Fusion, Foundry’s Nuke, Vegas Pro and Hitfilm.

Mocha tracking

In addition (and unofficially) it will work with Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve by way of importing the Mocha masks through Fusion. While I prefer to use After Effects for my work, importing Mocha masks is relatively painless. You can watch colorist Dan Harvey run through the process of importing Mocha masks to Resolve through Fusion, here.

But really, Mocha is a planar tracker, which means it tracks multiple points in a defined area that works best in flat surfaces or at least segmented surfaces, like the side of a face, ear, nose, mouth and forehead tracked separately instead of all at once. From blurs to mattes, Mocha tracks objects like glue and can be a great asset for an online editor or colorist.

If you have read any of my plugin reviews you probably are sick of me spouting off about Mocha, saying how it is probably the best plugin ever made. But really, it is amazing — especially when incorporated with plugins like Continuum and Sapphire. Also, thanks to the latest Media Composer with Symphony option you can incorporate the new Color Correction shapes with Mocha Pro to increase the effectiveness of your secondary color corrections.

Mocha Pro Remove module

So how fast is Mocha Pro 2019’s Remove Module these days? Well, it used to be a very slow process, taking lots of time to calculate an object’s removal. With the latest Mocha Pro 2019 release, including improved GPU support, the render time has been cut down tremendously. In my estimation, I would say three to four times the speed (that’s on the safe side). In Mocha Pro 2019 removal jobs that take under 30 seconds would have taken four to five minutes in previous versions. It’s quite a big improvement in render times.

There are a few changes in the new Mocha Pro, including interface changes and some amazing tool additions. There is a new drop-down tab that offers different workflow views once you are inside of Mocha: Essentials, Classic, Big Picture and Roto. I really wish the Essentials view was out when I first started using Mocha, because it gives you the basic tools you need to get a roto job done and nothing more.

For instance, just giving access to the track motion objects (Translation, Scale, Rotate, Skew and Perspective) with big shiny buttons helps to eliminate my need to watch YouTube videos on how to navigate the Mocha interface. However, if like me you are more than just a beginner, the Classic interface is still available and one I reach for most often — it’s literally the old interface. Big Screen hides the tools and gives you the most screen real estate for your roto work. My favorite after Classic is Roto. The Roto interface shows just the project window and the classic top toolbar. It’s the best of both worlds.

Mocha Pro 2019 Essentials Interface

Beyond the interface changes are some additional tools that will speed up any roto work. This has been one of the longest running user requests. I imagine the most requested feature that BorisFX gets for Mocha is the addition of basic shapes, such as rectangles and circles. In my work, I am often drawing rectangles around license plates or circles around faces with X-splines, so why not eliminate a few clicks and have that done already? Answering my need, Mocha now has elliptical and rectangular shapes ready to go in both X-splines and B-splines with one click.

I use Continuum and Mocha hand in hand. Inside of Media Composer I will use tools like Gaussian Blur or Remover, which typically need tracking and roto shapes created. Once I apply the Continuum effect, I launch Mocha from the Effect Editor and bam, I am inside Mocha. From here I track the objects I want to affect, as well as any objects I don’t want to affect (think of it like an erase track).

Summing Up
I can save tons of time and also improve the effectiveness of my work exponentially when working in Continuum 2019 and Mocha Pro 2019. It’s amazing how much more intuitive Mocha is to track with instead of the built-in Media Composer and Symphony trackers.

In the end, I can’t say enough great things about Continuum and especially Mocha Pro. Mocha saves me tons of time in my VFX and image restoration work. From removing camera people behind the main cast in the wilderness to blurring faces and license plates, using Mocha in tandem with Continuum is a match made in post production heaven.

Rendering in Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 is a lot faster than previous versions, really giving me a leg up on efficiency. Time is money right?! On top of that, using Mocha Pro’s magic Object removal and Modules takes my image restoration work to the next level, separating me from other online editors who use standard paint and tracking tools.

In Continuum, Primatte Studio gives me the leg up on greenscreen keys with its exceptional ability to auto analyze a scene and perform 80% of the keying work before I dial-in the details. Whenever anyone asks me what tools I couldn’t live without, I without a doubt always say Mocha.
If you want a real Mocha Pro education you need to watch all of Mary Poplin’s tutorials. You can find them on YouTube. Check out this one on how to track and replace a logo using Mocha Pro 2019 in Adobe After Effects. You can also find great videos at Borisfx.com.

Mocha point parameter tracking

I always feel like there are tons of tools inside of the Mocha Pro toolset that go unused simply because I don’t know about them. One I recently learned about in a Surfaced Studio tutorial was the Quick Stabilize function. It essentially stabilizes the video around the object you are tracking allowing you to more easily rotoscope your object with it sitting still instead of moving all over the screen. It’s an amazing feature that I just didn’t know about.

As I was finishing up this review I saw that Boris FX came out with a training series, which I will be checking out. One thing I always wanted was a top-down set of tutorials like the ones on Mocha’s YouTube page but organized and sent along with practical footage to practice with.

You can check out Curious Turtle’s “More Than The Essentials: Mocha in After Effects” on their website where I found more Mocha training. There is even a great search parameter called Getting Started on BorisFX.com. Definitely check them out. You can never learn enough Mocha!


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


AICE Awards rebranded to AICP Post Awards

AICP has announced the Call for Entries for the AICP Post Awards, its revamped and rebranded competition for excellence in the post production arts. Formerly the AICE Awards, its categories have been re-imagined with a focus on recognizing standout examples of various crafts and technique in editing, audio, design, visual effects artistry and finishing. The AICP Post Awards are a part of the AICP Awards suite of competitions, which also include The AICP Show: The Art & Technique of the American Commercial and the AICP Next Awards, both of which are also currently accepting entries.

Among the changes for the AICP Post Awards this year are the opening of the competition to any entity having involvement in the creation of a piece of content beyond the AICP membership —previously the AICE Awards was a “members only” competition.

For the full rundown on rules, categories, eligibility and fees, visit the AICP Post Awards entry portal. Deadline for entries is Thursday, February 8 at 11:59pm PST. Entrants can use the portal to cross-enter work between all three of the 2019 AICP competitions, including the AICP Show: The Art & Technique of the American Commercial and the AICP Next Awards.

Regarding categories, the competition has regrouped its existing categories, introduced a range of new sections, expanded others and added an entirely new category for vertical video.

Danny Rosenbloom

“While we’ll continue to recognize editorial across a wide range of product, genre and technique categories, we now have a wider range of subcategories in areas like audio, visual effects and design and color grading,” says Danny Rosenbloom, AICP’s VP, post and digital Production.

“We saw this as an opportunity to make the Post Awards more reflective of the varied artists working across the spectrum of post production disciplines,” noted Matt Miller, president/CEO of AICP.  “Now that we’ve brought all this post production expertise into AICP, we want the Post Awards to be a real celebration of creative talent and achievement.”

A full list of AICP Post Awards categories now includes the following:

Editorial Categories
Automotive
Cause Marketing
Comedy
Dialogue
Monologue/Spoken Word
Docu-Style
Fashion/Beauty
Montage
Music Video
Storytelling
National Campaign
Regional Campaign

Audio Categories
Audio Mix
Sound Design With Composed Music
Sound Design Without Composed Music

Color Categories
Color :60
Color :30
Color Other Lengths
Color Music Video

Design, Visual Effects & Finishing Categories
Character Design & Animation
Typography Design & Animation
Graphic Design & Animation
End Tag
CGI
Compositing & Visual Effects
Vertical

In addition to its category winners and Best of Show honoree, the AICP Post Awards will continue to recognize Best of Region winners that represent the best work emanating from companies submitting within each AICP Chapter. These now encompass East, Florida, Midwest, Minnesota, Southeast, Southwest and West.


Industry vets open editorial, post studio Made-SF

Made-SF, a creative studio offering editorial and other services, has been launched by executive producer Jon Ettinger, editor/director Doug Walker and editors Brian Lagerhausen and Connor McDonald, all formerly of Beast Editorial. Along with creative editorial (Adobe Premiere), the company will provide motion graphic design (After Effects, Mocha), color correction and editorial finishing (likely Flame and Resolve). Eventually, it plans to add concept development, directing and production to its mix.

“Clients today are looking for creative partners who can help them across the entire production chain,” says Ettinger. “They need to tell stories and they have limited budgets available to tell them. We know how to do both, and we are gathering the resources to do so under one roof.”

Made is currently set up in interim quarters while completing construction of permanent studio space. The latter will be housed in a century-old structure in San Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood and will feature five editorial suites, two motion graphics suites, and two post production finishing suites with room for further expansion.

The four Made partners bring deep experience in traditional advertising and branded content, working both with agencies and directly with clients. Ettinger and Walker have worked together for more than 20 years and originally teamed up to launch FilmCore, San Francisco. Both joined Beast Editorial in 2012. Similarly, Lagerhausen and McDonald have been editing in the Bay Area for more than two decades. Collectively, their credits include work for agencies in San Francisco and nationwide. They’ve also helped to create content directly for Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Salesforce and other corporate clients.

Made is indicative of a trend where companies engaged in content development are adopting fluid business models to address a diversifying media landscapes and where individual talent is no longer confined to a single job title. Walker, for example, has recently served as director on several projects, including a series of short films for Kelly Services, conceived by agency Erich & Kallman and produced by Caruso Co.

“People used to go to great pains to make a distinction about what they do,” Ettinger observes. “You were a director or an editor or a colorist. Today, those lines have blurred. We are taking advantage of that flattening out to offer clients a better way to create content.”

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Doug Walker, Brian Lagerhausen, Jon Ettinger and Connor McDonald.


Telestream CaptionMaker supports 100 languages, audio transcription

Telestream’s latest version of CaptionMaker, the company’s closed captioning and subtitling software, has been updated. The product now supports over 100 languages and allows users to also auto-transcribe via the Telestream Timed Text Speech cloud service.

Video media in languages such as Russian, Tagalog, Japanese, German and other Asian, African and European languages can automatically be transcribed by accessing the Timed Text Speech service directly from within CaptionMaker. The results can then be edited, formatted and exported as industry-standard caption and subtitle files.

For high-volume, enterprise workflows, users can batch submit media using the Vantage Cloud Speech connector, saving time and processing media faster. The Vantage Cloud Speech Action can return a plain text document or a subtitle SRT file. The result can be converted to an SCC or various other subtitle formats using Vantage Timed Text Flip. Subtitle files can be further edited in CaptionMaker or used by a transcoder such as IPTV Flip.

CaptionMaker also now includes an Audio Waveform Timeline that displays a graphical representation of all spoken dialogue. This feature helps editors when making critical adjustments to any professional subtitle or caption project.

Click here for complete list of languages supported in CaptionMaker Version 8.

CaptionMaker Version 8 is available now.


Quick Chat: Crew Cuts’ Nancy Jacobsen and Stephanie Norris

By Randi Altman

Crew Cuts, a full-service production and post house, has been a New York fixture since 1986. Originally established as an editorial house, over the years as the industry evolved they added services that target all aspects of the workflow.

This independently-owned facility is run by executive producer/partner Nancy Jacobsen, senior editor/partner Sherri Margulies Keenan and senior editor/partner Jake Jacobsen. While commercial spots might be in their wheelhouse, their projects vary and include social media, music videos and indie films.

We decided to reach out to Nancy Jacobsen, as well as EP of finishing Stephanie Norris, to find out about trends, recent work and succeeding in an industry and city that isn’t always so welcoming.

Can you talk about what Crew Cuts provides and how you guys have evolved over the years?
Jacobsen: We pretty much do it all. We have 10 offline editors as well as artists working in VFX, 2D/3D animation, motion graphics/design, audio mix and sound design, VO record, color grading, title treatment, advanced compositing and conform. Two of our editors double as directors.

In the beginning, Crew Cuts primarily offered only editorial. As the years went by and the industry climate changed we began to cater to the needs of clients and slowly built out our entire finishing department. We started with some minimal graphics work and one staff artist in 2008.

In 2009, we expanded the team to include graphics, conform and audio mix. From there we just continued to grow and expand our department to the full finishing team we have today.

As a woman owner of a post house, what challenges have you had to overcome?
Jacobsen: When I started in this business, the industry was very different. I made less money than my male counterparts and it took me twice as long to be promoted because I am a woman. I have since seen great change where women are leading post houses and production houses and are finally getting the recognition for the hard work they deserve. Unfortunately, I had to “wait it out” and silently work harder than the men around me. This has paid off for me, and now I can help women get the credit they rightly deserve

Do you see the industry changing and becoming less male-dominated?
Jacobsen: Yes, the industry is definitely becoming less male-dominated. In the current climate, with the birth of the #metoo movement and specifically in our industry with the birth of Diet Madison Avenue (@dietmadisonave), we are seeing a lot more women step up and take on leading roles.

Are you mostly a commercial house? What other segments of the industry do you work in?
Jacobsen: We are primarily a commercial house. However, we are not limited to just broadcast and digital commercial advertising. We have delivered specs for everything from the Godzilla screen in Times Square to :06 spots on Instagram. We have done a handful of music videos and also handle a ton of B2B videos for in-house client meetings, etc., as well as banner ads for conferences and trade shows. We’ve even worked on display ads for airports. Most recently, one of our editors finished a feature film called Public Figure that is being submitted around the film festival circuit.

What types of projects are you working on most often these days?
Jacobsen: The industry is all over the place. The current climate is very messy right now. Our projects are extremely varied. It’s hard to say what we work on most because it seems like there is no more norm. We are working on everything from sizzle pitch videos to spots for the Super Bowl.

What trends have you seen over the last year, and where do you expect to be in a year?
Jacobsen: Over the last year, we have noticed that the work comes from every angle. Our typical client is no longer just the marketing agency. It is also the production company, network, brand, etc. In a year we expect to be doing more production work. Seeing as how budgets are much smaller than they used to be and everyone wants a one-stop shop, we are hoping to stick with our gut and continue expanding our production arm.

Crew Cuts has beefed up its finishing services. Can you talk about that?
Stephanie Norris: We offer a variety of finishing services — from sound design to VO record and mix, compositing to VFX, 2D and 3D motion graphics and color grading. Our fully staffed in-house team loves the visual effects puzzle and enjoys working with clients to help interpret their vision.

Can you name some recent projects and the services you provided?
Norris: We just worked on a new campaign for New Jersey Lottery in collaboration with Yonder Content and PureRed. Brian Neaman directed and edited the spots. In addition to editorial, Crew Cuts also handled all of the finishing, including color, conform, visual effects, graphics, sound design and mix. This was one of those all-hands-on-deck projects. Keeping everything under one roof really helped us to streamline the process.

New Jersey Lottery

Working with Brian to carefully plan the shooting strategy, we filmed a series of plate shots as elements that could later be combined in post to build each scene. We added falling stacks of cash to the reindeer as he walks through the loading dock and incorporated CG inflatable decorations into a warehouse holiday lawn scene. We also dramatically altered the opening and closing exterior warehouse scenes, allowing one shot to work for multiple seasons. Keeping lighting and camera positions consistent was mission-critical, and having our VFX supervisor, Dulany Foster, on set saved us hours of work down the line.

For the New Jersey Lottery Holiday spots, the Crew Cuts CG team, led by our creative director Ben McNamara created a 3D Inflatable display of lottery tickets. This was something that proved too costly and time consuming to manufacture and shoot practically. After the initial R&D, our team created a few different CG inflatable simulations prior to the shoot, and Dulany was able to mock them up live while on set. Creating the simulations was crucial for giving the art department reference while building the set, and also helped when shooting the plates needed to composite the scene together.

Ben and his team focused on the physics of the inflation, while also making sure the fabric simulations, textures and lighting blended seamlessly into the scene — it was important that everything felt realistic. In addition to the inflatables, our VFX team turned the opening and closing sunny, summer shots of the warehouse into a December winter wonderland thanks to heavy compositing, 3D set extension and snow simulations.

New Jersey Lottery

Any other projects you’d like to talk about?
Jacobsen: We are currently working on a project here that we are handling soup to nuts from production through finishing. It was a fun challenge to take on. The spot contains a hand model on a greenscreen showing the audience how to use a new product. The shoot itself took place here at Crew Cuts. We turned our common area into a stage for the day and were able to do so without interrupting any of the other employees and projects going on.

We are now working on editorial and finishing. The edit is coming along nicely. What really drives the piece here is the graphic icons. Our team is having a lot of fun designing these elements and implementing them into the spot. We are so proud because we budgeted wisely to make sure to accommodate all of the needs of the project so that we could handle everything and still turn a profit. It was so much fun to work in a different setting for the day and has been a very successful project so far. Clients are happy and so are we.

Main Image: (L-R) Stephanie Norris and Nancy Jacobsen

BlacKkKlansman director Spike Lee

By Iain Blair

Spike Lee has been on a roll recently. Last time we sat down for a talk, he’d just finished Chi-Raq, an impassioned rap reworking of Aristophanes’ “Lysistrata,” which was set against a backdrop of Chicago gang violence. Since then, he’s directed various TV, documentary and video projects. And now his latest film BlacKkKlansman has been nominated for a host of Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Film Editing,  Best Original Score and Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Adam Driver).

Set in the early 1970s, the unlikely-but-true story details the exploits of Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), the first African-American detective to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. Determined to make a name for himself, Stallworth sets out on a dangerous mission: infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan. The young detective soon recruits a more seasoned colleague, Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver), into the undercover investigation. Together, they team up to take down the extremist hate group as the organization aims to sanitize its violent rhetoric to appeal to the mainstream. The film also stars Topher Grace as David Duke.

Behind the scenes, Lee reteamed with co-writer Kevin Willmott, longtime editor Barry Alexander Brown and composer Terence Blanchard, along with up-and-coming DP Chayse Irvin. I spoke with the always-entertaining Lee, who first burst onto the scene back in 1986 with She’s Gotta Have It, about making the film, his workflow and the Oscars.

Is it true Jordan Peele turned you onto this story?
Yeah, he called me out of the blue and gave me possibly the greatest six-word pitch in film history — “Black man infiltrates Ku Klux Klan.” I couldn’t resist it, not with that pitch.

Didn’t you think, “Wait, this is all too unbelievable, too Hollywood?”
Well, my first question was, “Is this actually true? Or is it a Dave Chappelle skit?” Jordan assured me it’s a true story and that Ron wrote a book about it. He sent me a script, and that’s where we began, but Kevin Willmott and I then totally rewrote it so we could include all the stuff like Charlottesville at the end.

Iain Blair and Spike Lee

Did you immediately decide to juxtapose the story’s period racial hatred with all the ripped-from-the-headlines news footage?
Pretty much, as the Charlottesville rally happened August 11, 2017 and we didn’t start shooting this until mid-September, so we could include all that. And then there was the terrible synagogue massacre, and all the pipe bombs. Hate crimes are really skyrocketing under this president.

Fair to say, it’s not just a film about America, though, but about what’s happening everywhere — the rise of neo-Nazism, racism, xenophobia and so on in Europe and other places?
I’m so glad you said that, as I’ve had to correct several people who want to just focus on America, as if this is just happening here. No, no, no! Look at the recent presidential elections in Brazil. This guy — oh my God! This is a global phenomenon, and the common denominator is fear. You fire up your base with fear tactics, and pinpoint your enemy — the bogeyman, the scapegoat — and today that is immigrants.

What were the main challenges in pulling it all together?
Any time you do a film, it’s so hard and challenging. I’ve been doing this for decades now, and it ain’t getting any easier. You have to tell the story the best way you can, given the time and money you have, and it has to be a team effort. I had a great team with me, and any time you do a period piece you have added challenges to get it looking right.

You assembled a great cast. What did John David Washington and Adam Driver bring to the main roles?
They brought the weight, the hammer! They had to do their thing and bring their characters head-to-head, so it’s like a great heavyweight fight, with neither one backing down. It’s like Inside Man with Denzel and Clive Owen.

It’s the first time you’ve worked with the Canadian DP Chayse Irvin, who mainly shot shorts before this. Can you talk about how you collaborated with him?
He’s young and innovative, and he shot a lot of Beyonce’s Lemonade long-form video. What we wanted to do was shoot on film, not digital. I talked about all the ‘70s films I grew up with, like French Connection and Dog Day Afternoon. So that was the look I was after. It had to match the period, but not be too nostalgic. While we wanted to make a period film, I also wanted it to feel and look contemporary, and really connect that era with the world we live in now. He really nailed it. Then my great editor, Barry Alexander Brown, came up with all the split-screen stuff, which is also very ‘70s and really captured that era.

How tough was the shoot?
Every shoot’s tough. It’s part of the job. But I love shooting, and we used a mix of practical locations and sets in Brooklyn and other places that doubled for Colorado Springs.

Where did you post?
Same as always, in Brooklyn, at my 40 Acres and a Mule office.

Do you like the post process?
I love it, because post is when you finally sit down and actually make your film. It’s a lot more relaxing than the shoot — and a lot of it is just me and the editor and the Avid. You’re shaping and molding it and finding your way, cutting and adding stuff, flopping scenes, and it never really follows the shooting script. It becomes its own thing in post.

Talk about editing with Barry Alexander Brown, the Brit who’s cut so many of your films. What were the big editing challenges?
The big one was finding the right balance between the humor and the very serious subject matter. They’re two very different tones, and then the humor comes from the premise, which is absurd in itself. It’s organic to the characters and the situations.

Talk about the importance of sound and music, and Terence Blanchard’s spare score that blends funk with classical.
He’s done a lot of my films, and has never been nominated for an Oscar — and he should have been. He’s a truly great composer, trumpeter and bandleader, and a big part of what I do in post. I try to give him some pointers that aren’t restrictive, and then let him do his thing. I always put as much as emphasis on sound and music as I do on the acting, editing and cinematography. It’s hugely important, and once we have the score, we have a film.

I had a great sound team. Phil Stockton, who began with me back on School Daze, was the sound designer. David Boulton, Mike Russo and Howard London did the ADR mix, and my longtime mixer Tommy Fleischman was on it. We did it all at C5 in New York. We spent a long time on the mix, building it all up.

Where did you do the DI and how important is it to you?
At Company 3 with colorist Tom Poole, who’s so good. It’s very important but I’m in and out, as I know Tom and the DP are going to get the look I want.

Spike Lee on set.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
Here’s the thing. You try to do the best you can, and I can’t predict what the reaction will be. I made the film I wanted to make, and then I put it out in the world. It’s all about timing. This was made at the right time and was made with a lot of urgency. It’s a crazy world and it’s getting crazier by the minute.

How important are industry awards and nomination to you? 
They’re very important in that they bring more attention, more awareness to a film like this. One of the blessings from the strong critical response to this has been a resurgence in looking at my earlier films again, some of which may have been overlooked, like Bamboozled and Summer of Sam.

Do you see progress in Hollywood in terms of diversity and inclusion?
There’s been movement, maybe not as fast as I’d like, but it’s slowly happening, so that’s good.

What’s next?
We just finished the second season of She’s Gotta Have It for Netflix, and I have some movie things cooking. I’m pretty busy.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.