Cinnafilm 6.6.19

Category Archives: Editing

Review: FXhome’s HitFilm Pro 12 for editing, compositing, VFX

By Brady Betzel

If you have ever worked in Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple FCP X or Avid Media Composer and wished you could just flip a tab and be inside After Effects, with access to 3D objects directly in your timeline, you are going to want to take a look at FXhome’s HitFilm Pro 12.

Similar to how Blackmagic brought Fusion inside of its most recent versions of DaVinci Resolve, HitFilm Pro offers a nonlinear editor, a composite/VFX suite and a finishing suite combined into one piece of software. Haven’t heard about HitFilm yet? Let me help fill in some blanks.

Editing and 3D model Import

Editing and 3D model Import

What is HitFilm Pro 12?
Technically, HitFilm Pro 12 is a non-subscription-based nonlinear editor, compositor and VFX suite that costs $299. Not only does that price include 12 months of updates and tech support, but one license can be used on up to three computers simultaneously. In my eyes, HitFilm Pro is a great tool set for independent filmmakers, social media content generators and any editor who goes beyond editing and dives into topics like 3D modeling, tracking, keying, etc. without having to necessarily fork over money for a bunch of expensive third-party plugins. That doesn’t mean you won’t want to buy third-party plugins, but you are less likely to need them with HitFilm’s expansive list of native features and tools.

At my day job, I use Premiere, After Effects, Media Composer and Resolve. I often come home and want to work in something that has everything inside, and that is where HitFilm Pro 12 lives. Not only does it have the professional functionality that I am used to, such as trimming, color scopes and more, but it also has BorisFX’s Mocha planar tracking plugin built in for no extra cost. This is something I use constantly and love.

One of the most interesting and recent updates to HitFilm Pro 12 is the ability to use After Effects plugins. Not all plugins will work since there are so many, but in a video released after NAB 2019, HitFilm said plugins like Andrew Kramer’s Video CoPilot Element3D and ones from Red Giant are on the horizon. If you are within your support window, or you continue to purchase HitFilm, FXhome will work with you to get your favorite After Effects plugins working directly inside of HitFilm.

Timeline and 3D model editor

Some additional updates to HitFilm Pro 12 include a completely redesigned user interface that resembles Premiere Pro… kind of. Threaded rendering has also been added, so Windows users who have Intel and Nvidia hardware will see increased GPU speeds, the ability to add title directly in the editor and more.

The Review
So how doees HitFilm Pro 12 compare to today’s modern software packages? That is an interesting question. I have become more and more of a Resolve convert over the past two years, so I am constantly comparing everything to that. In addition, being an Avid user for over 15 years, I am used to a rock-solid NLE with only a few hiccups here and there. In my opinion, HitFilm 12 lands itself right where Premiere and FCP X live.

It feels prosumer-y, in a YouTuber or content-generator capacity. Would it stand up to 10 hours of abuse with content over 45 minutes? It probably would, but much like with Premiere, I would probably split my edits in scenes or acts to avoid slowdowns, especially when importing things like OBJ files or composites.

The nonlinear editor portion feels like Premiere and FCP X had a baby, but left out FCP X’s Magnetic Timeline feature. The trimming in the timeline feels smooth, and after about 20 minutes of getting comfortable with it I felt like it was what I am generally used to. Cutting in footage feels good using three-point edits or simply dragging and dropping. Using effects feels very similar to the Adobe world, where you can stack them on top of clips and they each affect each other from the top down.

Mocha within HitFilm Pro

Where HitFilm Pro 12 shines is in the inclusion of typically third-party plugins directly in the timeline. From the ability to create a scene with 3D cameras and particle generators to being able to track using BorisFX’s Mocha, HitFilm Pro 12 has many features that will help take your project to the next level. With HitFilm 12 Pro’s true 3D cameras, you can take flat text and enhance it with raytraced lighting, shadows and even textures. You can even use the included BorisFX Continuum 3D Objects to make great titles relatively easily. To take it a step further, you can even track them and animate them.

Color Tools
By day, I am an online editor/colorist who deals with the finishing aspect of media creation. Throughout the process, from color correction to exporting files, I need tools that are not only efficient but accurate. When I started to dig into the color correction side of HitFilm Pro 12, things slowed down for me. The color correction tools are very close to what you’ll find in other NLEs, like Premiere and FCP X, but they don’t quite rise to the level of Resolve. HitFilm Pro 12 does operate inside of a 32-bit color pipeline, which really helps avoid banding and other errors when color correcting. However, I didn’t feel that the toolset was making me more efficient; in fact, it was the opposite. I felt like I had to learn FXhome’s way of doing it. It wasn’t that it totally slowed me down, but I felt it could be better.

Color

Color

Summing Up
In the end, HitFilm 12 Pro will fill a lot of holes for individual content creators. If you love learning new things (like I do), then HitFilm Pro 12 will be a good investment of your time. In fact, FXhome post tons of video tutorials on all sorts of good and topical stuff, like how to create a Stranger Things intro title.

If you are a little more inclined to work with a layer-based workflow, like in After Effects, then HitFilm Pro Pro 12 is the app you’ll want to learn. Check out HitFilm Pro 12 on FXhome’s website and definitely watch some of the company’s informative tutorials.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Biff Butler joins Work as editor, creative partner

Work Editorial has added Biff Butler to its roster as editor and creative partner. Currently based in Los Angeles, Butler will be available to work in all of the company’s locations, which also include New York and London.

Originally from the UK, Butler moved to Los Angeles in 1999 to pursue a career as a musician, releasing albums and touring the country. Inspired by the title sequence for the movie Se7en cut by Angus Wall at Rock Paper Scissors (RPS), he found himself intrigued by the craft of editing. Following the breakup of his band in 2005 Butler got a job at RPS and, as he puts it, RPS was his film school. There he found his editorial voice and satiated another interest — advertising.

(Check out an interview we did with Butler recently while he was still at RPS.)

Within a couple years, he was cutting spots for Nike, Microsoft, Lexus and Adidas, and in 2008 he made a breakthrough with the Emmy Award-winning will.i.am video Yes We Can video by then-presidential candidate Barack Obama. By 2012 his clientele spanned across both coasts and after moving to New York, he went on to collaborate on some of the era-defining work coming out of the US at the time, with Wieden +Kennedy NY, Anomaly and BBDO amongst others. Perhaps, most notably, was his involvement in the Derek Cianfrance/Dicks Sporting Goods campaign that defined a style in sports commercials.

“I’ve always had an interest in advertising and the process,” says Butler. “I love watching a campaign roll out, seeing it permeate the culture. I still get such a kick out of coming out of the subway and seeing a huge poster from something I’ve been involved with.”

Butler has been recognized for his work, winning numerous AICE, the Clio and Cannes Lion awards as well as receiving an Emmy for the six-part documentary Long Live Benjamin, which he edited and co-directed with creative director Jimm Lasser.

Work founding partner Jane Dilworth says, “I have always been aware of Biff and the great work he does. He is an editor with great feeling and instinct that not only works for the director or creative but what is right for the job.”

Cinnafilm 6.6.19

Review: Western Digital’s Blue SN500 NVMe SSD

By Brady Betzel

Since we began the transfer of power from the old standard SATA 3.5-inch hard drives to SSD drives, multimedia-based computer users have seen a dramatic uptick in read and write speeds. The only issue has been price. You can still find a 3.5-inch brick drive, ranging in size from 2TB to 4TB, for under $200 (maybe closer to $100), but if you upgraded to an SSD drive over the past five years, you were looking at a huge jump in price. Hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. These days you are looking at just a couple of hundred for 1TB and even less for 256GB or 512GB SSD.

Western Digital hopes you’ll think of NVMe SSD drives as more of an automatic purchase than a luxury with the Western Digital Blue SN500 NVMe M.2 2280 line of SSD drives.

Before you get started, you will need a somewhat modern computer with an NVMe M.2-compatible motherboard (also referred to as a PCIe Gen 3 interface). This NVMe SSD is a “B+M key” configuration, so you will need to make sure you are compatible. Once you confirm that your motherboard is compatible, you can start shopping around. The Western Digital Blue series has always been the budget-friendly level of hard drives. Western Digital also offers the next level up: the Black series. In terms of NVMe SSD M.2 drives, the Western Digital Blue series drives will be budget-friendly, but they also use two fewer PCIe lanes, which results in a slower read/write speed. The Black series uses up to four PCIe lanes, as well as has a heat sink to dissipate the heat. But for this review, I am focusing on the Blue series and how it performs.

On paper the Western Digital Blue SN500 NVMe SSD is available in either 250GB or 500GB sizes, measures approximately 80mm long and uses the M.2 2280 form factor for the PCIe Gen 3 interface in up to two lanes. Technically, the 500GB drive can achieve up to 1,700MB/s read and 1450MB/s write speeds, and the 250GB can achieve up to 1700MB/s read and 1300MB/s write speeds.

As of this review, the 250GB version sells for $53.99, while the 500GB version sells for $75.99. You can find specs on the Western Digital website and learn more about the Black series as well.

One of the coolest things about these NVMe drives is that they come standard with a five-year limited warranty (or max endurance limit). The max endurance (aka TBW — terabytes written) for the 250GB SSD is 150TB, while the max endurance for the 500GB version is 300TB. Both versions have a MTTF (mean time to failure) of 1.75 million hours.

In addition, the drive uses an in-house controller and 3D NAND logic. Now those words might sound like nonsense, but the in-house controller is what tells the NVMe what to do and when to do it (it’s essentially a dedicated processor), while3D NAND is a way of cramming more memory into smaller spaces. Instead of hard drive manufacturers adding more memory on the same platform in an x- or y-axis, they achieve more storage space by stacking layers vertically on top — or on the z-axis.

Testing Read and Write Speeds
Keep in mind that I ran these tests on a Windows-based PC. Doing a straight file transfer, I was getting about 1GB/s. When using Crystal Disk Mark, I would get a burst of speed at the top, slow down a little and then mellow out. Using a 4GB sample, my speeds were:
“Seq Q32T” – Read: 1749.5 MB/s – Write: 1456.6 MB/s
“4KiB Q8T8” – Read: 1020.4 MB/s – Write: 1039.9 MB/s
“4KiB Q32T1” – Read: 732.5 MB/s – Write: 676.5 MB/s
“4KiB Q1T1” – Read: 35.77 MB/s – Write: 185.5 MB/s

If you would like to read exactly what these types of tests entail, check out the Crystal Disk Mark info page. In the AJA System Test I had a little drop off, but with a 4GB test file size, I got an initial read speed of 1457MB/s and a write speed of 1210MB/s, which seems to fall more in line with what Western Digital is touting. The second time I ran the AJA System Test, I got a read speed of 1458MB/s and write speed of 883MB/s. I wanted a third opinion, so I ran the Blackmagic Design Disk Speed Test (you’ll have to install drivers for a Blackmagic card, like the Ultrastudio 4K). On my first run, I got a read speed of 1359.6MB/s and write speed of 1305.8MB/s. On my second run, I got a read speed of 1340.5MB/s and write speed of 968.3MB/s. My read numbers were generally above 1300MB/s, and my write numbers varied between 800 and 1000MB/s. Not terrible for a sub-$100 hard drive.

Summing Up
In the end, the Western Digital Blue SN500 NVMe SSD is an amazing value at under $100, and hopefully we will get expanded sizes in the future. The drive is a B+M key configuration, so when you are looking at compatibility, make sure to check which key your PCIe card, external drive case or motherboard supports. It is typically M or B+M key, but I found a PCI card that supported both. If you need more space and speed than the WD Blue series can offer, check out Western Digital’s Black series of NVMe SSDs.

The sticker price starts to go up significantly when you hit the 1TB or 2TB marks — $279.99 and $529.99, respectively (with the heat sink attachment). If you stick to the 500GB version, you are looking at a more modest price tag.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


Quick Chat: Robert Ryang on editing Netflix’s Zion doc

Back in May, Cut+Run’s Robert Ryang took home a Sports Emmy in the Outstanding Editing category for the short film Zion. The documentary, which premiered at Sundance and was released on Netflix, tells the story of Zion Clark, a young man who was born without legs, grew up in foster care and found community and hope in wrestling.

Robert Ryang and his Emmy for his work on Zion.

Clark began wrestling in second grade against his able-bodied peers. The physical challenge became a therapeutic outlet and gave him a sense of family. Moving from foster home to foster home, wrestling became the one constant in his childhood.

Editor Ryang and Zion’s director, Floyd Russ, had worked together previously — on the Ad Council’s Fans of Love and SK-II’s Marriage Market Takeover, among other projects — and developed a creative shorthand that helped tell this compelling, feel-good story.

We spoke with Ryang about the film, his process and working with the director

How and when did you become involved in this project?
In the spring of 2017, my good friend director Floyd Russ asked me to edit his passion project. Initially, I was hesitant, since it was just after the birth of my second child. Two years later, both the film and my kid have turned out great.

You’ve worked him before. What defines the way you work together?
I think Floyd and I work really well together because we’re such good friends; we don’t have to be polite. He’ll text me ideas any time of day, and I feel comfortable enough to tell him if I don’t like something. He wins most of the fights, but I think this dialectic probably makes the work better.

How did you approach the edit on the film? How did you hone the story structure?
At first, Floyd had a basic outline that I followed just to get something on the timeline. But from there, it was a pretty intense process of shuffling and reshaping. At one point, we tried to map the beats onto a whiteboard, and it looked like a Richter scale. Editor Adam Bazadona helped cut some of these iterations while I was on paternity leave.

How does working on a short film like this differ — hats worn, people involved, etc. — from advertising projects?
The editing process was a lot different from most commercial projects in that it was only Floyd and me in the room. Friends floated a few thoughts here and there, but we were only working toward a director’s cut.

What tools did you use?
Avid Media Composer for editing, some Adobe After Effects for rough comps.

What are the biggest creative and technical challenges you faced in the process?
With docs, there are usually infinite ways to put it together, so we did a lot of exploration. Floyd definitely pushed me out of my comfort zone in prescribing the more abstract scenes, but I think those touches ultimately made the film stand out.

From Sundance, to Netflix, to Sports Emmy awards. Did you ever imagine it would take this journey?
There wasn’t much precedent for a studio or network acquiring a 10-minute short, so our biggest hope was that it would get into Sundance then live on Vimeo. It really exceeded everyone’s expectations. And I would have never imagined receiving an Emm, but am really honored I did.


Review: The Loupedeck+ editing console for stills and video

By Brady Betzel

As an online editor I am often tasked with wearing multiple job hats, including VFX artist, compositor, offline editor, audio editor and colorist, which requires me to use special color correction panel hardware. I really love photography and cinematography but have never been able to use the color correction hardware I’m used to in  Adobe’s Photoshop or Lightroom, so for the most part I’ve only done basic photo color correction.

You could call it a hobby, although this knowledge definitely helps many aspects of my job. I’ve known Photoshop for years and use it for things like building clean plates to use in apps like Boris FX Mocha Pro and After Effects, but I had never really mastered Lightroom. However, that changed when I saw the Loupedeck. I was really intrigued with its unique layout but soon dismissed it since it didn’t work on video… until now. I’m happy to say the new Loupedeck+ works with both photo and video apps.

Much like the Tangent Element and Wave or Blackmagic Micro and Mini panels, the Loupedeck+ is made to adjust parameters like contrast, exposure, saturation, highlights, shadows and individual colors. But, unlike Tangent or Blackmagic products, the Loupedeck+ functions not only in Adobe Premiere and Apple Final Cut Pro X but in image editing apps like Lightroom 6, Photoshop CC, and Skylum Aurora HDR; the audio editing app Adobe Audition and the VFX app Adobe After Effects. There’s also beta integration with Capture One.

It works via USB 2.0 connection on Windows 10 and Mac OS 10.12 or later. In order to use the panel and adjust its keys, you must also download the Loupedeck software, which you can find here. The Loupedeck+ costs just $249 dollars, which is significantly less than many of the other color correction panels on the market offering so many functions.

Digging In
In this review, I am going to focus on Loupedeck+’s functionality with Premiere, but keep in mind that half of what makes this panel interesting is that you can jump into Lightroom Classic or Photoshop and have the same, if not more, functionality. Once you install the Loupedeck software, you should restart your system. When I installed the software I had some weird issues until I restarted.

When inside of Premiere, you will need to tell the app that you are using this specific control panel by going to the Edit menu > Preferences > Control Surface > click “Add” and select Loupedeck 2. This is for a PC, but Mac OS works in a similar way. From there you are ready to use the Loupedeck+. If you have any customized keyboard shortcuts (like I do) I would suggest putting your keyboard shortcuts to default for the time being, since they might cause the Loupedeck+ to use different keypresses than you originally intended.

Once I got inside of Premiere, I immediately opened up the Lumetri color panels and began adjusting contrast, exposure and saturation, which are all clearly labeled on the Loupedeck+. Easy enough, but what if you want to use the Loupedeck+ as an editing panel as well as a basic color correction console? That’s when you will want to print out pages six through nine of the Premiere Pro Loupedeck+ manual, which you can find here. (If you like to read on a tablet you could pull that up there, but I like paper for some reason… sorry trees.) In these pages, you will see that there are four layers of controls built into the Loupedeck+.

Shortcuts
Not only can you advance frames using the arrow keypad, jump to different edit points with the jog dial, change LUTs, add keyframes and extend edits, you also have three more layers of shortcuts. To get to the second layer of shortcuts, press the “Fn” button located toward the lower left, and the Fn layer will appear. Here you can do things like adjust the shadows and midtones on the X and Y axes, access the Type Tool or add edits to all tracks. To go even further, you can access the “Custom” mode, which has defaults but can be customized to whichever keypress and functions the Loupedeck+ app allows.

Finally, while in the Custom mode, you can press the Fn button again and enter “Custom Fn” mode — the fourth and final layer of shortcuts. Man, that is a lot of customizable buttons. Do I need all those buttons? Probably not, but still, they are there —and it’s better to have too much than not enough, right?

Beyond the hundreds of shortcuts in the Loupedeck+ console you have eight color-specific scroll wheels for adjusting. In Lightroom Classic, these tools are self-explanatory as they adjust each color’s intensity.

In Premiere they work a little differently. To the left of the color scroll wheels are three buttons: hue, saturation and luminance (Hue, Sat and Lum, respectively). In the standard mode, they each equate to a different color wheel: Hue = highlights, Sat = midtones and Lum = shadows. The scroll wheel above red will adjust the up/down movement in the selected color wheel’s x-axis, orange will adjust the left/right movement in the selected color wheel’s y-axis, and yellow will adjust the intensity (or luminance) of the color wheel.

Controlling the Panel
In traditional color correction panels, color correction is controlled by roller balls surrounded by a literal wheel to control intensity. It’s another way to skin a cat. I personally love the feel of the Tangent Element Tk panel, which simply has three roller balls and rings to adjust the hue, but some people might like the ability to precisely control the color wheels in x- and y-axis.

To solve my issue, I used both. In the preferences, I enabled both Tangent and Loupedeck options. It worked perfectly (once I restarted)! I just couldn’t get past the lack of hue balls and rings in the Loupedeck, but I really love the rest of the knobs and buttons. So in a weird hodge-podge, you can combine a couple of panels to get a more “affordable” set of correction panels. I say affordable in quotes because, as of this review, the Tangent Element Tk panels are over $1,100 for one panel, while the entire set is over $3,000.

So if you already have the Tangent Element Tk panel, but want a more natural button and knob layout, the Loupedeck+ is a phenomenal addition as long as you are staying within the Adobe or FCP X world. And while I clearly like the Tangent Elements panels, I think the overall layout and design of the Loupedeck+ is more efficient and overall more modern.

Summing Up
In the end, I really like the Loupedeck+. I love being able to jump back and forth between photo and video apps seamlessly with one panel. What I think I love the most is the “Export” button in the upper right corner of the Loupedeck+. I wish that button existed on all panels.

When using the Loupedeck+, you can really get your creative juices flowing by hitting the “Full Screen” button and color correcting away, even using multiple adjustments at once to achieve your desired look — similar to how a lot of people use other color correction panels. And at $249, the Loupedeck+ might be the overall best value for the functionality of any editing/color correction panel currently out there.

Can I see using it when editing? I can, but I am such a diehard keyboard and Wacom tablet user that I have a hard time using a panel for editing functions like trimming and three-point edits. I did try the trimming functionality and it was great, not only on a higher-end Intel Xeon-based system but on an even older Windows laptop. The responsiveness was pretty impressive and I am a sucker for adjustments using dials, sliders and roller balls.

If you want to color correct using panels, I think the Loupedeck+ is going to fit the bill for you if you work in Adobe Creative Suite or FCP X. If you are a seasoned colorist, you will probably start to freak out at the lack of rollerballs to adjust hues of shadows, midtones and highlights. But if you are a power user who stays inside the Adobe Creative Cloud ecosystem, there really isn’t a better panel for you. Just print up the shortcut pages of the manual and tape them to the wall by your monitor for constant reference.

As with anything, you will only get faster with repetition. Not only did I test out color correcting footage for this review, I also used the Loupedeck+ in Adobe Lightroom Classic to correct my images!


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


Behind the Title: Spot Welders’ editor Matt Osborne

After the time-consuming and sometimes stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material.

NAME: Matt Osborne

COMPANY: Spot Welders

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Spot Welders is a creative editorial company.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Offline Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I take all the footage that production shoots, make selects on the best shots and performances, and craft it into a cohesive narrative or visually engaging film. I then work with the director, agency and client to get the best out of the material and try to make sure everyone is happy with the final result.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably the amount of footage that editors get these days. The average person might think we just cut out the bad bits or choose the best takes and string them together, but we might get up to 30 hours of footage or more for a single 60-second commercial with no storyboard. It’s our job to somehow make sense of it all.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with directors. After the time-consuming and sometimes quite stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I really enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material. I like making sure we have the best moments and are telling the story in the most interesting way possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sitting for long hours. I really want to try out one of those standing desks! Also, trying to wrangle 100 different opinions into the edit without butchering it.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Probably the morning after sleeping on an edit. There’s something about coming in with fresh eyes and marveling at your wondrous edit from the previous night. Or, conversely, crying about the disaster you have in front of you that needs immediate fixing. Either way, I find this is the best time to get in the flow with new ideas and work very quickly at improving the edit.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
After high school, I spent about five years working at various ski resorts in Australia and Canada and snowboarding every day, so I guess I’d still be doing that.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
It sounds cheesy but in hindsight I was probably destined to be an editor. I was always drawn to puzzles and figuring out how things go together, and editing is a lot like a giant puzzle with no correct answers.

I made skate videos with two VHS decks as a teenager, and then I realized a few years later that you could do it on a computer and could get paid to basically do the same thing. That’s when I knew it was the job for me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Audi, Nike, BMW and a couple of very cool passion projects, which will hopefully be released soon.

DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
Not really. It almost always comes down to storytelling. Whether that’s narrative or purely visual, you want to make the viewer feel something, so that’s always the goal. The methods to get there are usually pretty much the same.

Cayenne

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Commercially, probably the Porsche film, Cayenne, with Rob Chiu at Iconoclast. It was a big project for the global release of a new car. They shot in amazing locations, and the footage was incredible, so I felt a lot of pressure on that one I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

Personally, the Medicine music video I did with Salomon Ligthelm and Khalid Mohtaseb was a humbling experience and something I’m very proud of. It’s actually more of a narrative short film than a music video and tells the fictionalized story of a real-life couple, in which the wife is blind.

It was a very sensitive story, shot beautifully and using non-actors. It might be the only time I’ve cried watching the rushes. I think we successfully managed to instill that raw emotion into the final edit.

Medicine

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I grew up on Final Cut Pro. I taught myself to edit back on Version 2 by reading the manual while working in a factory packing carrots. I was pretty upset when they ditched it but moved over to Avid Media Composer and haven’t looked back. I love it now. Well, maybe except for the effects tool.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Yes, it’s sometimes expected these days that the offline will look and sound like the final product, so color grading, sound design, music editing, comping, etc.

Personally, if I have time, I’ll try and do some of these things on a basic level to get the edit approved, but it’s all going to be taken over by very talented professionals in their own craft who will do a much better job than I ever could. So I prefer to focus on the actual nuts and bolts — am I using the best shots? Am I telling this story in the most compelling, engaging and entertaining way possible? But sometimes you’ve got to throw a whoosh in to make people happy.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, Garmin, MacBook. Although I spent a couple weeks on beaches last year and learned we don’t really need any of it, well, at least while you’re on the beach, and not working!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’ve gotten completely addicted to running the past couple of years. I find there’s nothing better than a run at 5am to clear the mind.


Editing Roundtable

By Randi Altman

The world of the editor has changed over the years as a result of new technology, the types of projects they are being asked to cut (looking at you social media) and the various deliverables they must create. Are deadlines still getting tighter and are budgets still getting smaller? The answer is yes, but some editors are adapting to the trends, and companies that make products for editors are helping by making the tools more flexible and efficient so pros can get to where they need to be.

We posed questions to various editors working in TV, short form and indies, who do a variety of jobs, as well as to those making the tools they use on a daily basis. Enjoy.

Cut+Run Editor/Partner Pete Koob

What trends do you see in commercial editing? Good or bad?
I remember 10 years ago a “colleague,” who was an interactive producer at the time, told me rather haughtily that I’d be out of work in a few years when all advertising became interactive and lived online. Nothing could have been further from the truth, of course, and I think editors everywhere have found that the viewer migration from TV to online has yielded an even greater need for content.

The 30-second spot still exists, both online and on TV, but the opportunities for brands to tell more in-depth stories across a wide range of media platforms mean that there’s a much more diverse breadth of work for editors, both in terms of format and style.

For better or worse, we’ve also seen every human being with a phone become their own personal brand manager with a highly cultivated and highly saturated digital presence. I think this development has had a big impact on the types of stories we’re telling in advertising and how we’re telling them. The genre of “docu-style” editing is evolving in a very exciting way as more and more companies are looking to find real people whose personal journeys embody their brands. Some of the most impressive editorial work I see these days is a fusion of styles — music video, fashion, documentary — all being brought to bear on telling these real stories, but doing it in a way that elevates them above the noise of the daily social media feed.

Selecting the subjects in a way that feels authentic — and not just like a brand co-opting someone’s personal struggle — is essential, but when done well, there are some incredibly inspirational and emotional stories to be told. And as a father of a young girl, it’s been great to show my daughter all the empowering stories of women being told right now, especially when they’re done with such a fresh and exciting visual language.

What is it about commercial editing that attracted you and keeps attracting you?
Probably the thing that keeps me most engaged with commercial editing is the variety and volume of projects throughout the year. Cutting commercials means you’re on to the next one before you’ve really finished the last.

The work feels fresh when I’m constantly collaborating with different people every few weeks on a diverse range of projects. Even if I’m cutting with the same directors, agencies or clients, the cast of characters always rotates to some degree, and that keeps me on my toes. Every project has its own unique challenges, and that compels me to constantly find new ways to tell stories. It’s hard for me to get bored with my work when the work is always changing.

Conoco’s Picnic spot

Can you talk about challenges specific to short-form editing?
I think the most obvious challenge for the commercial editor is time. Being able to tell a story efficiently and poignantly in a 60-, 30-, 15- or even six-second window reveals the spot editor’s unique talent. Sometimes that time limit can be a blessing, but more often than not, the idea on the page warrants a bigger canvas than the few seconds allotted.

It’s always satisfying to feel as if I’ve found an elegant editorial solution to telling the story in a concise manner, even if that means re-imagining the concept slightly. It’s a true testament to the power of editing and one that is specific to editing commercials.

How have social media campaigns changed the way you edit, if at all?
Social media hasn’t changed the way I edit, but it has certainly changed my involvement in the campaign as a whole. At its worst, the social media component is an afterthought, where editors are asked to just slap together a quick six-second cutdown or reformat a spot to fit into a square framing for Instagram. At its best, the editor is brought into the brainstorming process and has a hand in determining how the footage can be used inventively to disperse the creative into different media slots. One of the biggest assets of an editor on any project is his or her knowledge of the material, and being able to leverage that knowledge to shape the campaign across all platforms is incredibly rewarding.

Phillips 76 “Jean and Gene”

What system do you edit on, and what else other than editing are you asked to supply?
We edit primarily on Avid Media Composer. I still believe that nothing else can compete when it comes to project sharing, and as a company it allows for the smoothest means of collaboration between offices around the world. That being said, clients continue to expect more and more polish from the offline process, and we are always pushing our capabilities in motion graphics and visual effects in After Effects and color finessing in Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve.

What projects have you worked on recently?
I’ve been working on some bigger campaigns that consist of a larger number of spots. Two campaigns that come to mind are a seven-spot TV campaign for Phillips 76 gas stations and 13 short online films for Subaru. It’s fun to step back and look at how they all fit together, and sometimes you make different decisions about an individual spot based on how it sits in the larger group.

The “Jean and Gene” spots for 76 were particularly fun because it’s the same two characters who you follow across several stories, and it almost feels like a mini TV series exploring their life.

Earlier in the  year I worked on a Conoco campaign, featuring the spots Picnic, First Contact and River, via Carmichael Lynch.

Red Digital Cinema Post and Workflow Specialist Dan Duran

How do you see the line between production and post blurring?
Both post and on set production are evolving with each other. There has always been a fine line between them, but as tech grows and becomes more affordable, you’re seeing tools that previously would have been used only in post bleed onto set.

One of my favorite trends is seeing color-managed workflows on locations. With full color control pipelines being used with calibrated SDR and HDR monitors, a more accurate representation of what the final image will look like is given. I’ve also seen growth in virtual productions where you’re able to see realtime CGI and environments on set directly through camera while shooting.

What are the biggest trends you’ve been facing in product development?
Everyone is always looking for the highest image quality at the best price point. As sensor technology advances, we’re seeing users ask for more and more out of the camera. Higher sensitivity, faster frame rates, more dynamic range and a digital RAW that allows them to effortlessly shape the images into a very specific creative look that they’re trying to achieve for their show. 8K provides a huge canvas to work with, offering flexibility in what they are trying to capture.

Smaller cameras are able to easily adapt into a whole new myriad of support accessories to achieve shots in ways that weren’t always possible. Along with the camera/sensor revolution, Red has seen a lot of new cinema lenses emerge, each adding their own character to the image as it hits the photo sites.

What trends do you see from editors these days. What enables their success?
I’ve seen post production really take advantage of modern tech to help improve and innovate new workflows. Being able to view higher resolution, process footage faster and playback off of a laptop shows how far hardware has come.

We have been working more with partners to help give pros the post tools they need to be more efficient. As an example, Red recently teamed up with Nvidia to not only get realtime full resolution 8K playback on laptops, but also allow for accelerated renders and transcode times much faster than before. Companies collaborating to take advantage of new tech will enable creative success.

AlphaDogs Owner/Editor Terence Curren

What trends do you see in editing? Good or bad.
There is a lot of content being created across a wide range of outlets and formats, from theatrical blockbusters and high-end TV shows all the way down to one-minute videos for Instagram. That’s positive for people desiring to use their editing skills to do a lot of storytelling. The flip side is that with so much content being created, the dollars to pay editors gets stretched much thinner. Barring high-end content creation, the overall pay rates for editors have been going down.

The cost of content capture is a tiny fraction of what it was back in the film days. The good part of that is there is a greater likelihood that the shot you need was actually captured. The downside is that without the extreme expense of shooting associated with film, we’ve lost the disciplines of rehearsing scenes thoroughly, only shooting while the scene is being performed, only printing circled takes, etc. That, combined with reduced post schedules, means for the most part editors just don’t have the time to screen all the footage captured.

The commoditization of the toolsets, (some editing systems are actually free) combined with the plethora of training materials readily available on the Internet and in most schools means that video storytelling is now a skill available to everyone. This means that the next great editors won’t be faced with the barriers to entry that past generations experienced, but it also means that there’s a much larger field of editors to choose from. The rules of supply and demand tell us that increased availability and competition of a service reduces its cost. Traditionally, many editors have been able to make upper-middle-class livings in our industry, and I don’t see as much of that going forward.

To sum it up, it’s a great time to become an editor, as there’s plenty of work and therefore lots of opportunity. But along with that, the days of making a higher-end living as an editor are waning.

What is it about editing that attracted you and keeps attracting you?
I am a storyteller at heart. The position of editor is, in my opinion, matched with the director and writer for responsibility of the structural part of telling the story. The writer has to invent the actual story out of whole cloth. The director has to play traffic cop with a cornucopia of moving pieces under a very tight schedule while trying to maintain the vision of the pieces of the story necessary to deliver the final product. The editor takes all those pieces and gives the final rewrite of the story for the audience to hopefully enjoy.

Night Walk

As with writing, there are plenty of rules to guide an editor through the process. Those rules, combined with experience, make the basic job almost mechanical much of the time. But there is a magic thing that happens when the muse strikes and I am inspired to piece shots together in some way that just perfectly speaks to the audience. Being such an important part of the storytelling process is uniquely rewarding for a storyteller like me.

Can you talk about challenges specific to short-form editing versus long-form?
Long-form editing is a test of your ability to maintain a fresh perspective of your story to keep the pacing correct. If you’ve been editing a project for weeks or months at a time, you know the story and all the pieces inside out. That can make it difficult to realize you might be giving too much information or not enough to the audience. Probably the most important skill for long form is the ability to watch a cut you’ve been working on for a long time and see it as a first-time viewer. I don’t know how others handle it, but for me there is a mental process that just blanks out the past when I want to take a critical fresh viewing.

Short form brings the challenge of being ruthless. You need to eliminate every frame of unnecessary material without sacrificing the message. While the editors don’t need to keep their focus for weeks or months, they have the challenge of getting as much information into that short time as possible without overwhelming the audience. It’s a lot like sprinting versus running a marathon. It exercises a different creative muscle that also enjoys an immediate reward.

Lafayette Escadrille

I can’t say I prefer either one over the other, but I would be bored if I didn’t get to do both over time, as they bring different disciplines and rewards.

How have social media campaigns changed the way you edit, if at all? Can you talk about the variety of deliverables and how that affects things?
Well, there is the horrible vertical framing trend, but that appears to be waning, thankfully. Seriously, though, the Instagram “one minute” limit forces us all to become commercial editors. Trying to tell the story in as short a timeframe as possible, knowing it will probably be viewed on a phone in a bright and noisy environment is a new challenge for seasoned editors.

There is a big difference between having a captive audience in a theater or at home in front of the TV and having a scattered audience whose attention you are trying to hold exclusively amid all the distractions. This seems to require more overt attention-grabbing tricks, and it’s unfortunate that storytelling has come to this point.

As for deliverables, they are constantly evolving, which means each project can bring all new requirements. We really have to work backward from the deliverables now. In other words, one of our first questions now is, “Where is this going?” That way we can plan the appropriate workflows from the start.

What system do you edit on and what else other than editing are you asked to supply?
I primarily edit on Media Composer, as it’s the industry standard in my world. As an editor, I can learn any tool to use. I have cut with Premiere and FCP. It’s knowing where to make the edit that is far more important than how to make the edit.

When I started editing in the film days, we just cut picture and dialogue. There were other editors for sound beyond the basic location-recorded sound. There were labs from which you ordered something as simple as a dissolve or a fade to black. There were color timers at the film lab who handled the look of the film. There were negative cutters that conformed the final master. There were VFX houses that handled anything that wasn’t actually shot.

Now, every editor has all the tools at hand to do all those tasks themselves. While this is helpful in keeping costs down and not slowing the process, it requires editors to be a jack-of-all-trades. However, what typically follows that term is “and master of none.”

Night Walk

One of the main advantages of separate people handling different parts of the process is that they could become really good at their particular art. Experience is the best teacher, and you learn more doing the same thing every day than occasionally doing it. I’ve met a few editors over the years that truly are masters in multiple skills, but they are few and far between.

Using myself as an example, if the client wants some creatively designed show open, I am not the best person for that. Can I create something? Yes. Can I use After Effects? Yes, to a minor degree. Am I the best person for that job? No. It is not what I have trained myself to do over my career. There is a different skill set involved in deciding where to make a cut versus how to create a heavily layered, graphically designed show open. If that is what I had dedicated my career to doing, then I would probably be really good at it, but I wouldn’t be as good at knowing where to make the edit.

What projects have gone through the studio recently?
We work on a lot of projects at AlphaDogs. The bulk of our work is on modest-budget features, documentaries and unscripted TV shows. A recent example is a documentary on World War I fighter pilots called The Lafayette Escadrille and an action-thriller starring Eric Roberts and Mickey Rourke, called Night Walk.

Unfortunately for me I have become so focused on running the company that I haven’t been personally working on the creative side as much as I would like. While keeping a post house running in the current business climate is its own challenge, I don’t particularly find it as rewarding as “being in the chair.”

That feeling is offset by looking back at all the careers I have helped launch through our internship program and by offering entry-level employment. I’ve also tried hard to help editors over the years through venues like online user groups and, of course, our own Editors’ Lounge events and videos. So I guess that even running a post house can be rewarding in its own way.

Luma Touch Co-Founder/Lead Designer Terri Morgan

Have there been any talks among NLE providers about an open timeline? Being able to go between Avid, Resolve or Adobe with one file like an AAF or XML?
Because every edit system uses its own editing paradigms (think Premiere versus FCP X), creating an open exchange is challenging. However, there is an interesting effort by Pixar (https://github.com/PixarAnimationStudios/OpenTimelineIO) that includes adapters for the wide range of structural differences of some editors. There are also efforts for standards in effects and color correction. The core editing functionality in LumaFusion is built to allow easy conversion in and out to different formats, so adapting to new standards will not be challenging in most cases.

With AI becoming a popular idea and term, at what point does it stop? Is there a line where AI won’t go?
Looking at AI strictly as it relates to video editing, we can see that its power is incrementally increasing, and automatically generated movies are getting better. But while a neural network might be able to put together a coherent story, and even mimic a series of edits to match a professional style, it will still be cookie-cutter in nature, rather than being an artistic individual endeavor.

What we understand from our customers — and from our own experience — is that people get profound joy from being the storyteller or the moviemaker. And we understand that automatic editing does not provide the creative/ownership satisfaction that you get from crafting your own movie. You only have to make one automatic movie to learn this fact.

It is also clear that movie viewers feel a lack of connection or even annoyance when watching an automatically generated movie. You get the same feeling when you pay for parking at an automated machine, and the machine says, “Thank you, have a nice day.”

Here is a question from one of our readers: There are many advancements in technology coming in NLEs. Are those updates coming too fast and at an undesirable cost?
It is a constant challenge to maintain quality while improving a product. We use software practices like Agile, engage in usability tests and employ testing as robust as possible to minimize the effects of any changes in LumaFusion.

In the case of LumaFusion, we are consistently adding new features that support more powerful mobile video editing and features that support the growing and changing world around us. In fact, if we stopped developing so rapidly, the app would simply stop working with the latest operating system or wouldn’t be able to deliver solutions for the latest trends and workflows.

To put it all in perspective, I like to remind myself of the amount of effort it took to edit video 20 years ago compared to how much more efficient and fun it is to edit a video now. It gives me reason to forgive the constant changes in technology and software, and reason to embrace new workflows and methodologies.

Will we ever be at a point where an offline/online workflow will be completely gone?
Years ago, the difference in image quality provided a clear separation between offline and online. But today, online is differentiated by the ability to edit with dozens of tracks, specialized workflows, specific codecs, high-end effects and color. Even more importantly, online editing typically uses the specialized skills that a professional editor brings to a project.

Since you can now edit a complex timeline with six tracks of 4K video with audio and another six tracks of audio, basic color correction and multilayered titles straight from an iPad, for many projects you might find it unnecessary to move to an online situation. But there will always be times that you need more advanced features or the skills of a professional editor. Since not everybody wants to understand the complex world of post production, it is our challenge at Luma Touch to make more of these high-end features available without greatly limiting who can successfully use the product.

What are the trends you’re seeing in customer base from high-end post facility vs. independent editor/contractor?
High-end post facilities tend to have stationary workstations that employ skilled editor/operators. The professionals that find LumaFusion to be a valuable tool in their bag are often those who are responsible for the entire production and post production, including independent producers, journalists and high-end professionals who want the flexibility of starting to edit while on location or while traveling.

What are the biggest trends you’ve been seeing in product development?
In general, moving away from lengthy periods of development without user feedback. Moving toward getting feedback from users early and often is an Agile-based practice that really makes a difference in product development and greatly increases the joy that our team gets from developing LumaFusion. There’s nothing more satisfying than talking to real users and responding to their needs.

New development tools, languages and technologies are always welcome. At WWDC this year, Apple announced it would make it easier for third-party developers to port their iOS apps over to the desktop with Project Catalyst. This will likely be a viable option for LumaFusion.

You come from a high-end editing background, with deep experience editing at the workstation level. When you decided to branch off and do something on your own, why did you choose mobile?
Mobile offered a solution to some of the longest running wishes in professional video editing: to be liberated from the confines of an edit suite, to be able to start editing on location, to have a closer relationship to the production of the story in order to avoid the “fix it in post” mentality, and to take your editing suite with you anywhere.

It was only after starting to develop for mobile that we fully understood one of the most appealing benefits. Editing on an iPad or iPhone encourages experimentation, not only because you have your system with you when you have a good idea, but also because you experience a more direct relationship to your media when using the touch interface; it feels more natural and immersive. And experimentation equals creativity. From my own experience I know that the more you edit, the better you get at it. These are benefits that everyone can enjoy whether they are a professional or a novice.

Hecho Studios Editor Grant Lewis

What trends do you see in commercial editing? Good or bad.
Commercials are trending away from traditional, large-budget cinematic pieces to smaller, faster, budget-conscious ones. You’re starting to see it now more and more as big brands shy away from big commercial spectacles and pivot toward a more direct reflection of the culture itself.

Last year’s #CODNation work for the latest installment of the Call of Duty franchise exemplifies this by forgoing a traditional live-action cinematic trailer in favor of larger number of game-capture, meme-like films. This pivot away from more dialogue-driven narrative structures is changing what we think of as a commercial. For better or worse, I see commercial editing leaning more into the fast-paced, campy nature of meme culture.

What is it about commercial editing that attracted you and keeps attracting you?
What excites me most about commercial editing is that it runs the gamut of the editorial genre. Sometimes commercials are a music video; sometimes they are dramatic anthems; other times they are simple comedy sketches. Commercials have the flexibility to exist as a multitude of narrative genres, and that’s what keeps me attracted to commercial editing.

Can you talk about challenges specific to short form versus long form?
The most challenging thing about short-form editing is finding time for breath. In a 30-second piece, where do you find a moment of pause? There’s always so much information being packed into smaller timeframes; the real challenge is editing at a sprint, but still having it feel dynamic and articulate.

How have social media campaigns changed the way you edit, if at all? Can you talk about the variety of deliverables and how that affects things?
All campaigns will either live on social media or have specific social components now. I think the biggest thing that has changed is being tasked with telling a compelling narrative in 10 or even five or six seconds. Now, the 60-second and 90-second anthem film has to be able to work in six seconds as well. It is challenging to boil concepts down to just a few seconds and still maintain a sense of story.

#CODNation

All the deliverable aspect ratios editors are asked to make now is also a blossoming challenge. Unless a campaign is strictly shot for social, the DP probably shot for a traditional 16×9 framing. That means the editor is tasked with reframing all social content to work in all the different deliverable formats. This makes the editor act almost as the DP for social in the post process. Shorter deliverables and a multitude of aspect ratios have just become another layer to editing and demand a whole new editorial lens to view and process the project through.

What system do you edit on and what else other than editing are you asked to supply?
I currently cut in Adobe Premiere Pro. I’m often asked to supply graphics and motion graphic elements for offline cuts as well. That means being comfortable with the whole Adobe suite of tools, including Photoshop and After Effects. From type setting to motion tracking, editors are now asked to be well-versed in all tangential aspects of editorial.

What projects have you worked on recently?
I cut the launch film for Razer’s new Respawn energy drink. I also cut Toms Shoes’ most recent campaign, “Stand For Tomorrow.”

EditShare Head of Marketing Lee Griffin

What are the biggest trends you’ve been seeing in product development?
We see the need to produce more video content — and produce it faster than ever before — for social media channels. This means producing video in non-broadcast standards/formats and, more specifically, producing square video. To accommodate, editing tools need to offer user-defined options for manipulating size and aspect ratio.

What changes have you seen in terms of the way editors work and use your tools?
There are two distinct changes: One, productions are working with editors regardless of their location. Two, there is a wider level of participation in the content creation process.

In the past, the editor was physically located at the facility and was responsible for assembling, editing and finishing projects. However, with the growing demand for content production, directors and producers need options to tap into a much larger pool of talent, regardless of their location.

EditShare AirFlow and Flow Story enable editors to work remotely from any location. So today, we frequently see editors who use our Flow editorial tools working in different states and even on different continents.

With AI becoming a popular idea and term, at what point does it stop?
I think AI is quite exciting for the industry, and we do see its potential to significantly advance productions. However, AI is still in its infancy with regards to the content creation market. So from our point of view, the road to AI and its limits are yet to be defined. But we do have our own roadmap strategy for AI and will showcase some offerings integrated within our collaborative solutions at IBC 2019.

Will we ever be at a point where an offline/online workflow will be completely gone?
It depends on the production. Offline/online workflows are here to stay in the higher-end production environment. However, for fast turnaround productions, such as news, sports and programs (for example, soap operas and reality TV), there is no need for offline/online workflows.

What are the trends you’re seeing in customer base from high-end post facility vs, independent editor. How is that informing your decisions on products and pricing?
With the increase in the number of productions thanks to OTTs, high-end post facilities are tapping into independent editors more and more to manage the workload. Often the independent editor is remote, requiring the facility to have a media management foundation that can facilitate collaboration beyond the facility walls.

So we are seeing a fundamental shift in how facilities are structuring their media operations to support remote collaborations. The ability to expand and contract — with the same level of security they have within the facility — is paramount in architecting their “next-generation” infrastructure.

What do you see as untapped potential customer bases that didn’t exist 10 to 20 years ago, and how do you plan on attracting and nurturing them? What new markets are you seeing.
We are seeing major growth beyond the borders of the media and entertainment industry in many markets. From banks to real estate agencies to insurance companies, video has become one of the main ways for them to communicate to their media-savvy clientele.

While EditShare solutions were initially designed to support traditional broadcast deliverables, we have evolved them to accommodate these new customers. And today, these customers want simplicity coupled with speed. Our development methodology puts this at the forefront of our core products.

Puget Systems Senior Labs Technician Matt Bach

Have there been any talks between NLE providers about an open timeline. Essentially being able to go between Avid, Resolve, or Adobe with one file like an AAF or XML?
I have not heard anything on this topic from any developers, so keep in mind that this is pure conjecture, but the pessimistic side of me doesn’t see an “open timeline” being something that will happen anytime soon.

If you look at what many of the NLE developers are doing, they are moving more and more toward a pipeline that is completely contained within their ecosystem. Adobe has been pushing Dynamic Link in recent years in order to make it easier to move between Premiere Pro and After Effects. Blackmagic is going even a step further by integrating editing, color, VFX and audio all within DaVinci Resolve.

These examples are both great advancements that can really improve your workflow efficiency, but they are being done in order to keep the user within their specific ecosystem. As great as an open timeline would be, it seems to be counter to what Adobe, Blackmagic, and others are actively pursuing. We can still hold out hope, however!

With AI becoming a popular idea and term, at what point does it stop?
There are definitely limitations to what AI is capable of, but that line is moving year by year. For the foreseeable future, AI is going to take on a lot of the tedious tasks like tagging of footage, content-aware fill, shot matching, image enhancement and other similar tasks. These are all perfect use cases for artificial intelligence, and many (like content-aware fill) are already being implemented in the software we have available right now.

The creative side is where AI is going to take the longest time to become useful. I’m not sure if there is a point where AI will stop from a technical standpoint, but I personally believe that even if AI was perfect, there is value in the fact that an actual person made something. That may mean that the masses of videos that get published will be made by AI (or perhaps simply AI-assisted), but just like furniture, food, or even workstations, there will always be a market for high-quality items crafted by human hands.

I think the main thing to keep in mind with AI is that it is just a tool. Moving from black and white to color, or from film to digital, was something that at the time, people thought was going to destroy the industry. In reality, however, they ended up being a huge boon. Yes, AI will change how some jobs are approached — and may even eliminate some job roles entirely —but in the end, a computer is never going to be as creative and inventive as a real person.

There are many advancements in technology coming in NLEs seemingly daily, are those updates coming too fast and at an undesirable cost?
I agree that this is a problem right now, but it isn’t limited to just NLEs. We see the same thing all the time in other industries, and it even occurs on the hardware side where a new product will be launched simply because they could, not because there is an actual need for it.

The best thing you can do as an end-user is to provide feedback to the companies about what you actually want. Don’t just sit on those bugs, report them! Want a feature? Most companies have a feature request forum that you can post on.

In the end, these companies are doing what they believe will bring them the most users. If they think a flashy new feature will do it, that is what they will spend money on. But if they see a demand for less flashy, but more useful, improvements, they will make that a priority.

Will we ever be at a point where an offline/online workflow will be completely gone?
Unless we hit some point where camera technology stops advancing, I don’t think offline editing is ever going to fully go away. It is amazing what modern workstations can handle from a pure processing standpoint, but even if the systems themselves could handle online editing, you also need to have the storage infrastructure that can keep up. With the move from HD to 4K, and now to 8K, that is a lot of moving parts that need to come together in order to eliminate offline editing entirely.

With that said, I do feel like offline editing is going to be used less and less. We are starting to hit the point that people feel their footage is higher quality than they need without having to be on the bleeding edge. We can edit 4K ProRes or even Red RAW footage pretty easily with the technology that is currently available, and for most people that is more than enough for what they are going to need for the foreseeable future.

What are the trends you’re seeing in customer base from high-end post facility vs. independent editor, and how is that informing your decisions on products and pricing?
From a workstation side, there really is not too much of a difference beyond the fact that high-end post facilities tend to have larger budgets that allow them to get higher-end machines. Technology is becoming so accessible that even hobbyist YouTubers often end up getting workstations from us that are very similar to what high-end professionals use.

The biggest differences typically revolves not around the pure power or performance of the system itself, but rather how it interfaces with the other tools the editor is using. Things like whether the system has 10GB (or fiber) networking, or whether they need a video monitoring card in order to connect to a color calibrated display, are often what sets them apart.

What are the biggest trends you’ve been seeing in product development?
In general, the two big things that have come up over and over in recent years are GPU acceleration and artificial intelligence. GPU acceleration is a pretty straight-forward advancement that lets software developers get a lot more performance out of a system for tasks like color correction, noise reduction and other tasks that are very well suited for running on a GPU.

Artificial intelligence is a completely different beast. We do quite a bit of work with people that are on the forefront of AI and machine learning, and it is going to have a large impact on post production in the near future. It has been a topic at conferences like NAB for several years, but with platforms like Adobe Sensei starting to take off, it is going to become more important

However, I do feel that AI is going to be more of an enabling technology rather than one that replaces jobs. Yes, people are using AI to do crazy things like cut trailers without any human input, but I don’t think that is going to be the primary use of it anytime in the near future. It is going to be things like assisting with shot matching, tagging of footage, noise reduction, and image enhancement that is going to be where it is truly useful.

What do you see as untapped potential customer bases that didn’t exist 10-20 years ago, and how do you plan on attracting and nurturing them? What new markets are you seeing?
I don’t know if there are any customer bases that are completely untapped, but I do believe that there is going to be more overlap between industries in the next few years. One example is how much realtime raytracing has improved recently, which is spurring the use of video game engines in film. This has been done for previsualization for quite a while, but the quality is getting so good that there are some films already out that include footage straight from the game engine.

For us on the workstation side, we regularly work with customers doing post and customers who are game developers, so we already have the skills and technical knowledge to make this work. The biggest challenge is really on the communication side. Both groups have their own set of jargon and general language, so we often find ourselves having to be the “translator” when a post house is looking at integrating realtime visualization in their workflow.

This exact scenario is also likely to happen with VR/AR as well.

Lucky Post Editor Marc Stone

What trends do you see in commercial editing?
I’m seeing an increase in client awareness of the mobility of editing. It’s freeing knowing you can take the craft with you as needed, and for clients, it can save the ever-precious commodity of time. Mobility means we can be an even greater resource to our clients with a flexible approach.

I love editing at Lucky Post, but I’m happy to edit anywhere I am needed — be it on set or on location. I especially welcome it if it means you can have face-to-face interaction with the agency team or the project’s director.

What is it about commercial editing that attracted you and keeps attracting you?
The fact that I can work on many projects throughout the year, with a variety of genres, is really appealing. Cars, comedy, emotional PSAs — each has a unique creative challenge, and I welcome the opportunity to experience different styles and creative teams. I also love putting visuals together with music, and that’s a big part of what I do in 30-or 60-second… or even in a two-minute branded piece. That just wouldn’t be possible, to the same extent, in features or television.

Can you talk about challenges specific to short-form editing?
The biggest challenge is telling a story in 30 seconds. To communicate emotion and a sense of character and get people to care, all within a very short period of time. People outside of our industry are often surprised to hear that editors take hours and hours of footage and hone it down to a minute or less. The key is to make each moment count and to help make the piece something special.

Ram’s The Promise spot

How has social media campaigns changed the way you edit, if at all?
It hasn’t changed the way I edit, but it does allow some flexibility. Length isn’t constrained in the same way as broadcast, and you can conceive of things in a different way in part because of the engagement approach and goals. Social campaigns allow agencies to be more experimental with ideas, which can lead to some bold and exciting projects.

What system do you edit on, and what else other than editing are you asked to supply?
For years I worked on Avid Media Composer, and at Lucky Post I work in Adobe Premiere. As part of my editing process, I often weave sound design and music into the offline so I can feel if the edit is truly working. What I also like to do, when the opportunity presents, is to be able to meet with the agency creatives before the shoot to discuss style and mood ahead of time.

What projects have you worked on recently?
Over the last six months, I have worked on projects for Tazo, Ram and GameStop, and I am about to start a PSA for the Salvation Army. It gets back to the variety I spoke about earlier and the opportunity to work on interesting projects with great people.

Billboard Video Post Supervisor/Editor Zack Wolder

What trends do you see in editing? Good or bad.I’m noticing a lot of glitch transitions and RGB splits being used. Much flashier edits, probably for social content to quickly grab the viewers attention.

Can you talk about challenges specific to short-form editing versus long-form?
With short-form editing, the main goal is to squeeze the most amount of useful information into a short period of time while not overloading the viewer. How do you fit an hour-long conversation into a three-minute clip while hitting all the important talking points and not overloading the viewer? With long-form editing, the goal is to keep viewers’ attention over a long period of time while always surprising them with new and exciting info.

What is it about editing that attracted you and keeps attracting you?
I loved the fact that I could manipulate time. That hooked me right away. The fact that I could take a moment that lasts only a few seconds and drag it out for a few minutes was incredible.

Can you talk about the variety of deliverables for social media and how that affects things?
Social media formats have made me think differently about framing a shot or designing logos. Almost all the videos I create start in the standard 16×9 framing but will eventually be delivered as a vertical. All graphics and transitions I build need to easily work in a vertical frame. Working in a 4K space and shooting in 4K helps tremendously.

Rainn Wilson and Billie Eilish

What system do you edit on, and what else other than editing are you asked to supply?
I edit in Adobe Premiere Pro. I’m constantly asked to supply design ideas and mockups for logos and branding and then to animate those ideas.

What projects have you worked on recently?
Recently, I edited a video that featured Rainn Wilson — who played Dwight Schrute on The Office — quizzing singer Billie Eilish, who is a big-time fan of the show.

Main Image: AlphaDogs editor Herrianne Catolos


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 


Editing for Short Form

By Karen Moltenbrey

Unlike features or even series, short-form projects such as commercials give the editor the opportunity for a fresh start with each new job. Indeed, some brands have a specific style that they adhere to, but even so, there is a good deal of creative flexibility placed in the hands of the editor.

The challenge here is to condense a story into 30, 60 or 90 seconds. And more and more, there are other deliverables associated with a job aside from the traditional commercial, as editors also may be asked to provide social media spots, cinema spots and more. And as some editors point out, it’s no longer enough to excel at solely working with video; today, it is helpful to have a wider range of skills, such as audio editing and basic animation, to support the workflow.

Here we examine the editing work on a trio of spots and the approach each editor took to deliver a compelling piece.

Nespresso: The Quest
George Clooney has been the brand ambassador for coffee-machine maker Nespresso since 2006, and his commercials have been featured in Europe and around the world. In a recent spot airing in North America, Clooney embarks on a quest for the perfect cup of coffee, and does so with true Hollywood flair.

In The Quest, the actor plays a medieval knight who throws the head of a dragon he has just slain at the feet of his queen. Thankful, she asks what he desires as his reward. He pauses, then steps through a movie screen and enters the modern world, where he wanders the streets in his armor until he finds a coffee shop and his long-sought-after cup of Nespresso coffee. Satisfied, he heads back, walks down the theater aisle, through the movie screen once again and is back in the medieval world. When the queen asks if he has enough coffee for the kingdom, the actor gives a sheepish look, and soon we see the queen and court riding in a double-decker city bus, merrily on their way to get their own cup of Nespresso coffee.

Clooney’s producing partner, Grant Heslov, directed the spot, which was filmed against greenscreen on a backlot in Los Angeles. The background plates were shot in New York City, and compositing was done by VFX supervisor Ryan Sears from Big Sky Edit. The spot was edited by Chris Franklin, who launched New York-based Big Sky Edit in 1992.

Chris Franklin

“Ryan and I were working as a team on this. As I’m cutting, he’s compositing scenes so we can really get an idea of what everything looks like, and then I properly sound-designed it,” says Franklin. “He dealt with everything in terms of George on the movie screen and popping out of the screen and walking through New York, while I dealt with the sound design and the editing. It helped keep the job efficient, so Grant could come in and see everything pretty much completed.”

Having the various departments under one roof at Big Sky Edit enables Franklin to show work to clients, agencies or directors with effects integrated into the cut, so they do not have to rely on their imaginations to visualize the spot. “They’re judging the story as opposed to the limitations of the footage if effects work isn’t done yet,” he explains.

This is not Franklin’s first Nespresso ad, having worked on the very first one for the US market, and all of them have been directed by Heslov (who also directed Clooney in the Hulu series Catch-22). “He has shorthand with George, so the shoots go beautifully,” Franklin says, noting there is also a feeling of trust with everyone who has a responsibility on the post side.

When asked to describe the editing style he used for The Quest, Franklin was hard-pressed to pinpoint one specifically, saying “sometimes you just go by instinct in terms of what feels right. The fact that this was a movie within a movie, you’re kind of looking at it like an epic. So, you deal with it as a bigger type of thing. And then once [the story] got to New York, we were feeding off the classic man-on-the-street vibe.” So, rather than using a specific editing style on the spot, Franklin says he concentrated on making sure the piece was put together well, had a good storytelling aspect and that everything clicked.

The footage was delivered to Big Sky Edit as transcoded dailies, which were downloaded overnight from LA. Franklin cut the spot on an Avid Media Composer, and the completed spot was delivered in standard HD for 60- and 30-second versions, as well as pullouts and social media material. “There are so many deliverables attached to things now, and a job tends to be longer than it used to be due to all the elements and pieces of content you’re delivering to finish the job,” Franklin says. While time-consuming, these demands also force him to tell the story in different ways for the various deliverables.

Franklin describes his general workflow as fairly straightforward. He will string the entire shoot together – “literally every piece of film that was exposed” — and go through the material, then whittle that down and review it a second time. After that, he starts breaking it down in terms of sequences for all the pieces he needs, and then he starts building the edit. Without question, this process takes a substantial amount of time on the front end, as it takes an editor roughly four hours to go through one hour of footage in order to screen it properly, learn it, understand the pieces in it, break it apart, label it and prepare it — all before any assembly can be done. “It’s not unusual to have 10 or 12 hours of footage, so it’s going to take 40 hours to go through that material and break it down before I can start assembling,” he says.

As Franklin points out, he does his own sound design — his favorite part of the process — while editing. In fact, he started out as an audio engineer years ago, and doing both the audio and editing simultaneously “helps me see the story,” he says. “If I wasn’t doing sound design while I am working, I would get totally lost.” (Tom Jucarone at Sound Lounge mixed The Quest.)

Franklin has edited features, documentaries and even short films, and his workflow remains fairly constant across the genres. “It’s just longer sometimes. You have to learn the footage, so you’ve got to watch everything. It’s a lot of watching and thinking,” he notes. “Deadlines give you an end that you have to shoot for, but you can’t rush things. It takes time to do the work properly.”

Despite his experience with other genres, commercials have been Franklin’s bread and butter for the past 30 years. He says he likes the challenge of whittling down 10 hours of footage into 30 or 60 seconds of storytelling.

M&M’s ‘Hazelnut Spread’ Campaign
Over the years, audiences have been treated to commercial spots featuring the various spokescandies for Mars Incorporated’s M&M’s, from the round-bodied regular flavored character to the egg-shaped yellow peanut character. And, there have been other new flavor characters, too. Most recently, the company introduced its latest addition: hazelnut spread M&M’s. And helping to launch the product is PS260 owner/editor Maury Loeb and assistant editor Sara Sachs, who “divided and conquered” on the campaign, which features three spots to promote the new flavor and the ever-popular M&M’s chocolate bar, which came out in 2018.

The first spot, New Spokescandy, is currently airing. The two other spots, which will be launching next year, are called Injury Attorney and Psychiatrist. Sachs focused on the latter, a comical session between a therapist and the yellow M&M, who is “feeling stuck.” The therapist points out that it’s because he is stuck in a chocolate bar. “We played around a lot with the humor of that moment. It was scripted with three progressively wider shots to ultimately reveal the candy bar, but in the edit, we decided the humor was more impactful if it was just one single reveal at the end,” says Sachs.

Helping to unite the three spots, aside from the brand’s humor and characters, is a consistent editing style. “The pacing is consistent. M&M’s as a whole doesn’t really do very music-heavy spots; they are more real-world in nature,” Sachs notes.

At PS260, the editors often collaborate on client campaigns, so as ideas are being worked out and implemented in one suite, revisions are made in another, allowing the clients to move from space to space to view the work progression.

Sara Sachs

To edit the spot, Sachs worked primarily in Adobe Premiere, using After Effects and Photoshop for some of the quick graphics, as PS260’s graphics department did the heavy lifting for the bigger moving elements, such as the M&M’s characters. The biggest challenge came from getting the tonality of the actor just right. “When a person is talking on camera to an empty couch or stage, you really have to think about both sides of the emotion,” she explains. “VO talent comes in after you have a cut in place, so even though these things are recorded a month apart, it still needs to feel like the characters are talking to each other and come across emotionally true.”

Having to do some minor graphics work is not so unusual these days; Sachs points out that editors today are becoming multitalented and handling other aspects of a project aside from cutting. “It’s not enough to just know the edit side; you also need a base in graphics, audio fine-tuning and color correction. More and more we try to get the rough cut closer to what the final picture will actually look like,” she says. “In this campaign, they even took a lot of the graphics that we applied in the rough and used them directly for air.”

Most of Sachs’ experience has come from commercials, but she has also done shorts, features, documentaries, music videos, promotional and internal videos, pitch and instructional videos, web series and so on. Of those, she prefers short-form projects because they afford her the opportunity to painstakingly watch every frame of a video “900 times and put some love into every 24th of a second,” she adds.

That level of focus is usually not practical or applicable on longer-form projects, which often require scene-to-scene organization with 15- and 30-second spots. “Shorter content maintains the same basic project structure but tends to get more attention on the little things like line-by-line sequences, which are every time a character says something in any situation,” she explains.

Nike Choose Phenomenal
Charlie Harvey recently finished a unique spot for Nike Korea for the South Korean market titled Choose Phenomenal, an empowering ad for women created by Wieden + Kennedy Tokyo that has over 10 million views on YouTube. The spot opens on a young girl dressed in traditional Korean clothing before evolving into a fast-paced, split-screen succession of images — video, animation, graphic elements, pictures and more, mainly of women in action — set to an inspiring narration.

“The agency always wanted it to be split-screen,” says Harvey of Whitehouse Post, who edited the spot. The DP shot the majority of the “moments” in a few different ways and from different angles, giving her the ability to find the elements that complemented each other from a split-screen standpoint. Yet it was up to Harvey to sort through the plethora of clips and images and select the most appropriate ones.

“There’s a Post-it note moment in there, too. That’s a big thing in South Korea, where people write messages on Post-its and stick them on a wall, so it’s culturally significant,” Harvey explains. Foremost in her mind while editing the spot was that it was culturally significant and inspiring to young women, resulting in her delving deep into that country’s traditions to find elements that would resonate best with the intended audience.

Charlie Harvey

Harvey initially began cutting the spot in Los Angeles but then traveled to Tokyo to do the majority of the edit.

In fact, when Harvey began the project, she didn’t have an opportunity to work one-on-one with the director – something that would always be her preference. “I always want to create what the director has envisioned. I always like to make that [vision] come to life while adding my own point of view, too,” she says.

Working with split screens or multiple screens is always trickier because you need to work with multiple layers while maintaining the rhythm of the film, Harvey says. “Making what seems like a small change in one shot will affect not only the shot that comes before and after it, but also the shots next to those. It’s more a puzzle you are solving,” she adds.

The visual element, however, was just one aspect of the project; here, like on many other projects, finding the right music accompaniment is not easy. “You end up going around and around trying to find exactly what you are looking for, and music is always a challenge. If you find the right track, it makes all the difference. It elevates a spot, or impacts it negatively,” Harvey points out. “Music is so important.”

In addition, the split-screen concept forced Harvey to concentrate on both sides of the screen – akin to concentrating on two shorts playing at the same time. “You have to make sure they work together and they link to the next page, where you have another two shorts,” she explains. “You need that harmonious relationship, and there needs to be a rhythm. Otherwise, it could get choppy, and then you are looking at one side or the other, not both together in unison.”

Indeed, dealing with the multiple split-screen images was difficult, but perhaps even more daunting was ensuring that the spot respected the culture of the young women to whom it was directed. To this end, Harvey incorporated as much reference as she could that would resonate with the audience, as opposed to using more generic references geared for audiences outside of that country. “I’m sure it meant a lot to these girls,” she says of the inspirational spot and the effort put into it.

Harvey performed the edit on an Avid system, preferring the simplistic interface to other systems. “It has everything for what I want to do,” she says. “There are no extra tabs here and there. It’s just really easy to use, and it’s very stable and steady.”

For the most part, Harvey sticks with shorter-form projects like commercials, though she has experience with longer formats. “I think you get into a routine with commercials, so you know you have a certain number of days to do what you need to do. I know where I need to be at certain points, and where I need to get to by the time I see the director or the agency,” she explains. “I have a very specific routine. I have a way that I work, and I am comfortable with it. It works for me.”


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran writer/editor covering VFX and post production.


Tribeca: Emily Cohn on editing her own film, CRSHD

By Amy Leland

At this year’s Tribeca Film Festival, I went to a screening of the college comedy CRSHD, a feature film by first-time feature writer/director Emily Cohn. CRSHD tells the story of a group of college freshman trying to gain entry to an invitation-only “crush” party, in order to accomplish a pledge one of them made to lose her virginity before the end of the year. The story is told in part through dramatization of their social networking activity in unique and creative ways I hadn’t seen before. She also edited the film.

While I had initially set out to write something about editors working on feature films edited with Adobe Premiere, Emily turned out to be an interesting story all on her own.

Emily Cohn

A fairly recent college graduate, this enterprising and incredibly talented young woman managed to write her first feature, find a way to get it produced and handle the bulk of the post production process herself. I needed to know more about how she navigated all of this and ended up with a film that looked like far more than a first-time, small-budget indie.

You wrote, directed, edited and produced this film. What was it like bringing your baby to life?
While it’s been so much work, I never really saw it that way. When I look back at it, I’ve loved every step of the process, and I feel so grateful that through this process, I’ve had the most extreme film school boot camp. I was a creative writing major in college, but this was beyond any prior film experience I had, especially in post. I didn’t understand the full process of getting a feature through post.

When I was in high school and was part of the Film Fellows program at the Tribeca Film Institute, I thought that I wanted to be an editor. So that’s something that I really took to.

But on this film, I learned all about OMFs for sound deliverables, and XMLs and all of that. I couldn’t believe I had never heard of all this, because I’d been editing for a while. But for short films or web series, you don’t have to do the back and forth, the round tripping, you don’t have to worry about it as much.

Did that play a part in your decision to edit in Premiere?
Choosing Premiere was definitely a strategic decision. I learned editing on Final Cut, and then I was editing on Avid for a while. I was an assistant editor on a feature doc, doing transcoding and organizing the files in Avid. There was a big part of me that thought, “We should just use Avid,” but it’s an indie film, and I knew we were going to have to use a lot of After Effects, so Premiere was going to be the most streamlined. It was also something that I could operate on my laptop, which is where 90 percent of the editing happened.

What did you shoot the film with?
We had an equipment sponsorship from Canon, so we shot on the C100 with some really nice Prime lenses they gave us. The big question was, “Do we try to shoot 4K or not?” Ultimately, we didn’t because that meant I didn’t have to spend as much money on hard drives, and my laptop could handle the footage. Obviously, I could’ve transcoded it to work with the proxies, but this was all-around much easier and more manageable.

You used a lot of VFX in this, but nothing where having the extra resolution of 4K would make a huge difference, right?
It probably would have been better if we had shot 4K for some of those things, yeah. But it was manageable, and it’s … I mean, it’s an indie film. It’s a baby film. The fact that it made it to Tribeca was beyond cool to say the least.

You said something during the Q&A at Tribeca about focusing on the people using social media versus showing screens —you didn’t want to show technology that would look out of date as fast. That was smart.
I’ve done a lot of reading on it, and it’s a subject I’m very interested in. I’ve been to many filmmaker Q&A panels where the question was, “What makes you want to set it in the ‘90s?” and the answer was, “Because there are no cell phones.” That feels so sad to me.

I’ve read articles that say rom-coms from the ‘90s, or other other older movies, wouldn’t exist if they were set in the 2000s because you would just get a text, and the central conflict would be over.

Some people talk about issues editing long form. Some complain that the project becomes too bloated, or that things don’t perform as well once the project is too long. Did you have any issues like that?
I organized the project carefully. I know a lot of people who say the bin system in Avid is superior to Premiere’s, but I didn’t find that to be a problem, although I did have a major crash that I ended up solving. I do wish Adobe had some sort of help line because that would have helped a lot.

CRSHD was shot with a Canon 100.

But that was toward the beginning, and essentially what it came down to was that I’m still running the 2017 OS on my laptop with no upgrade, because when I upgraded my OS, Premiere started crashing. It just needed it all to stay where it was, which, now I know!

In addition to After Effects, what other post tools did you use on the film?
We used After Effects for the VFX, Resolve for color and Avid Pro Tools sound. My cousin Jim Schultz, who is a professional music editor, really held my hand through all of that. He’s in LA, but whenever I had a question, he would answer it. Our whole post sound team, which included Summit Post, also in LA, was amazing and made Crshd feel like a real film. I loved that process.

Did you still keep everything grounded in Premiere, and roundtrip everything out to Resolve or Pro Tools, and then bring it back?
Yeah, I onlined everything in Premiere myself.

I’m so overwhelmed thinking about you doing all of this yourself.
I didn’t know any other way to do it. I think it would be a lot easier if I had a bigger team. But that’s also something that’s been really funny with the sales agents (which we secured through the Tribeca Film Festival). They’re like, “Can your team do that?” and I’m like, “No, that’s all me. It’s just me.”

I mean, I have a colorist and a really great sound team. But I was the one who onlined everything.

When the festivals are saying, “We need a cut like this,” you are probably the one pushing all of those exports and deliverables out yourself.
Yeah. I wouldn’t have had it any other way.

During that whole process, did you have any parts where you were happy you did it in Premiere, or things that were frustrating?
The film is really funky. We have some YouTube clips in there, a lot of VFX and other types of footage. There were so many moments where I needed to test things out quickly and easily. In Premiere, you don’t have to worry about transcoding everything and different file formats. That was definitely the best in terms of accessibility and how quickly you can play around with your timeline and experiment.

My least favorite thing is, as I said, there is no real help line for Premiere. I was asking friends of friends of friends about a weird exporting glitch that I had. The forums are fine but, yeah, I wish there was a help line.

This film is your baby, but you did collaborate with some others in post. How did that process go?
I feel really lucky. I had an amazing post team. When I watch the movie, I’m happiest about all the things everyone else added that I never would’ve added myself.

One of the sound designers, Taylor Flinn — there’s a moment where our comical security guard character leans forward in his car, and Taylor added a little siren “whoop” sound. It’s so funny to me, and I like it more because I’m not the one who did it. It’s the one moment I always laugh at in the film now, even after seeing it hundreds of times. We had an amazing animator as well, Sean Buckelew. That was another portion of post for us.

I just didn’t realize how long it was going to take. We finished shooting in August 2017, and I was like, “We’re going to submit in December 2017 to Tribeca!” And then it was a full other year of insanity. I did a first cut by September 2017, did a lot of test screenings in my apartment and kept hammering away. I was working with another co-editor, Michelle Botticelli, for about six weeks leading up to submissions, and she was also giving her opinion on all of the future cuts and color and sound.

Any updates on where the film is heading next?
I hope we get distribution. It was at the Cannes marketplace, and we have sales agents. They came on as soon as we got into Tribeca. Tribeca recommended them, and I’m learning as I go.

What’s next for you?
I have a pilot and a show bible for the TV version of CRSHD. Then I have another rom-com that I’m writing. I’m still editing, and since making the movie, I’ve been doing a ton of other side work, like camera operating. But, ultimately, I hope to be writing and directing.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Tips for inside —and outside — the edit suite

By Brady Betzel

Over the past 15 years, I’ve seen lots of good and bad while working in production and post — from people being overly technical (only looking at the scopes and not the creative) to being difficult just for the sake of being difficult. I’ve worked on daytime and nighttime talk shows, comedies, reality television, Christmas parades, documentaries and more. All have shaped my editing skills as well as my view on the work-life balance.

Here are some tips I try to keep in mind that have helped me get past problems I’ve encountered in and out of the edit bay:

No One Cares
This one is something I constantly have to remind myself. It’s not necessarily true all the time, but it’s a good way to keep my own ego in check, especially on social media. When editing and coloring, I constantly ask myself, “Does anyone care about what I’m doing? If not, why not?” And if the answer is that they don’t, then something needs to change. I also ask myself, “Does anything about my comment or edit further the conversation or the story, or am I taking away from the story to draw attention to myself?” In other words, am I making an edit just to make an edit?

It’s an especially good thing to think about when you get trolled on Twitter by negative know-it-alls telling you why you’re wrong about working in certain NLEs. Really, who cares? After I write my response and edit it a bunch of times, I tell myself, “No one cares.” This philosophy not only saves me from feeling bad about not answering questions that no one really cares about, but it also helps improve my editing, VFX and color correction work.

Don’t be Difficult!
As someone who has worked everywhere and in all sorts of positions — from a computer tech at Best Buy (before Geek Squad), a barista at Starbucks, a post PA for the Academy Awards, and assistant editor, editor, offline editor, online editor — I’ve seen the power of being amenable.

I am also innately a very organized person, both at work and at home, digitally and in real life — sometimes to my wife’s dismay. I also constantly repeat this mantra to my kids: “If you’re not early, you’re late.”

But sometimes I need to be reminded that it’s OK to be late, and it’s OK not to do things the technically “correct” way. The same applies to work. Someone might have a different way of doing something that’s slower than the way I’d do it, but that doesn’t mean that person is wrong. Avoiding confrontation is the best way to go. Sure, go ahead and transcode inside of Adobe Premiere Pro instead of batch transcoding in Media Encoder. If the outcome is the same and it helps avoid a fight, just let it slide. You might also learn something new by taking a back seat.

Sometimes Being Technically Perfect Isn’t Perfect
I often feel like I have a few obsessive traits: leaving on time, having a tidy desktop and doing things (I feel) correctly. One of the biggest examples is when color correcting. It is true that scopes don’t lie; they give you the honest truth. But when I hear about colorists bragging that they turn off the monitors and color using only Tektronix Double Diamond displays, waveforms and vectorscopes — my skeptical hippo eyes come out. (Google it; it’s a thing).

While scopes might get you to a technically acceptable spot in color correction, you need to have an objective view from a properly calibrated monitor. Sometimes an image with perfectly white whites and perfectly black blacks is not the most visually pleasing image. I constantly need to remind myself to take a step back and really blend the technical with the creative. That is, I sit back and imagine myself as the wide-eyed 16-year-old in the movie theater being blown away and intrigued by American Beauty.

You shouldn’t do things just because you think that is how they should be done. Take a step back and ask yourself if you, your wife, brother, uncle, mom, dad, or whoever else might like it.

Obviously, being technically correct is vital when creating things like deliverables, and that is where there might be less objectivity, but I think you understand my point. Remember to add a little objectivity into your life.

Live for Yourself, Practice and Repeat
While I constantly tell people to watch tutorials on YouTube and places like MZed.com, you also need to physically practice your craft. This idea becomes obvious when working in technically creative positions like editing.

I love watching tutorials on lighting and photography since so much can be translated over to editing and color correcting. Understanding relationships between light and motion can help guide scenes. But if all you do is watch someone tell you how light works, you might not really be absorbing the information. Putting into practice the concepts you learn is a basic but vital skill that is easy to forget. Don’t just watch other people live life, live it for yourself.

For example, a lot of people don’t understand trimming and re-linking in Media Composer. They hear about it but don’t really use these skills to their fullest unless they actively work them out. Same goes for people wanting to use a Wacom tablet instead of a mouse. It took me two weeks of putting my mouse in the closet to even get started on the Wacom tablet, but in the end, it is one of those things I can’t live without. But I had to make the choice to try it for myself and practice, practice, practice to know it.

If you dabble and watch videos on a Wacom tablet, using it once might turn you off. Using trimming once might not convince you it is great. Using roles in FCPX once might not convince you that it is necessary. Putting those skills into practice is how you will live editing life for yourself and discover what is important to you … instead of relying on other people to tell you what’s important.

Put Your Best Foot Forward
This bit of advice came to me from a senior editor on my first real professional editing job after being an assistant editor. I had submitted a rough cut and — in a very kind manner — the editor told me that it wasn’t close to ready for a rough cut title. Then we went through how I could get there. In the end, I essentially needed to spend a lot more time polishing the audio, checking for lip flap, polishing transitions and much more. Not just any time, but focused time.

Check your edit from a 30,000-foot view for things like story and continuity, but also those 10-foot view things like audio pops and interviews that sound like they are all from one take. Do all your music cues sting on the right beat? Is all your music panned for stereo and your dialogue all center-panned to cut up the middle?

These are things that take time to learn, but once you get it in your head, it will be impossible to forget … if you really want to be a good editor. Some might read this and say, “If you don’t know these workflows, you shouldn’t be an editor.” Not true! Everyone starts somewhere, but regardless of what career stage you’re in, always put your best foot forward.

Trust Your Instincts
I have always had confidence in my instincts, and I have my parents to thank for that. But I have noticed that a lot of up-and-coming production and post workers don’t want to make decisions. They also are very unsure if they should trust their first instinct. In my experience, your first instinct is usually your best instinct. Especially when editing.

Obviously there are exceptions to this rule, but generally I rely heavily on my instincts even when others might not agree. Take this with a grain of salt, but also throw that salt away and dive head first!

This notion really came to a head for me when I was designing show titles in After Effects. The producers really encouraged going above and beyond when making opening titles of a show I worked on. I decided to go into After Effects instead of staying inside of the NLE. I used crazy compositing options that I didn’t often use, tried different light leaks, inverted mattes … everything. Once I started to like something, I would jump in head first and go all the way. Usually that worked out, but even if it didn’t, everyone could see the quality of work I was putting out, and that was mainly because I trusted my instincts.

Delete and Start Over
When you are done trusting your instincts and your project just isn’t hitting home — maybe the story doesn’t quite connect, the HUD you are designing just doesn’t quite punch or the music you chose for a scene is very distracting — throw it all away and start over. One of the biggest skills I have acquired in my career thus far seems to be the ability to throw a project away and start over.

Typically, scenes can go on and on with notes, but if you’re getting nowhere, it might be time to start over if you can. Not only will you have a fresh perspective, but you will have a more intimate knowledge of the content than you had the first time you started your edit — which might lead to an alternate pathway into your story.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Editing for Features and Docs

By Karen Moltenbrey

When editing a feature film, the cutter can often feel as if he or she is assembling a puzzle, putting together a plethora of pieces, from the acting, to the lighting, to the production design, and turning those raw elements into a cohesive, comprehensive story. With so much material to sort through, so many shots to select from and so many choices to be made overall, the final cut indeed is reflective of these many choices made by the editor over a significant period of time.

Here, we examine the unique workflow of two editors, one who worked on a drama with an up-and-coming director, and another who cut a documentary with a director who is very well known throughout the film world.

Clemency
The feature film Clemency will be released at the end of the year, but already it commanded attention at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival and beyond, taking home the Grand Jury Prize. The drama, directed by Chinonye Chukwu, stars Alfre Woodard as prison warden Bernadine Williams, who’s preparing for the execution of another inmate and struggling with the emotional toll that task has taken on her. The film was edited by Phyllis Housen.

As is often the case, while cutting Clemency, the editing style evolved organically from the story being told. “That happens all the time, unless it’s a very specific genre piece, like a thriller or horror film,” Housen says. For this film, she describes the style as “deliberate.” “There is no racing through the day. We feel the time pass. In prison, time stretches and changes, and we wanted to recreate that feeling of time. Often you don’t know if it’s night or day,” she says.

Also, the director wanted the film to feel as though the audience was there, living inside the prison. “So, there is a lot of repetition. We visit and revisit some of the routines of daily life like the prisoners do,” Housen adds.

Phyllis Housen

According to Housen, the film looks at what it is like for the warden to have a day-to-day relationship with the inmates on the ward as well as what happens when the warden, ultimately and occasionally, has to perform an execution. “By creating the routine of daily life, we would get to know how the prisoners live and experience that through them,” she explains.

The focus in the film turns to one prisoner in particular, Anthony Woods, a convicted felon on death row. “You get attached to these people, and to him,” Housen points out.

For instance, there is a good deal of walking in the movie, as the camera follows the warden while she sets out from her office and through the prison hallways, passing prisoners all the way to the death row ward, which is separated from everything and everyone — even the general population of prisoners. “You feel that length and distance as she is walking. You get a sense of how far away — literally and figuratively — the death row prisoners are,” Housen explains.

Housen (Cargo, the I, Witness TV documentary series and much more) cut the film at Tunnel in Santa Monica, California, using Adobe Premiere Pro, after having migrated from Apple Final Cut Pro years back. She says she finds the Adobe platform very intuitive.

In terms of her workflow, Housen believes it is fairly consistent across all projects. She receives dailies that are transcoded from raw footage, an assistant organizes all the footage for her, then she starts putting scenes together, maybe one or two days after principal photography begins so there is some footage to work with. “I am thinking of the footage as if I am building a house, with the scenes as the bricks,” she says. “So, I might get footage from, say, scenes 12, 84 and 105 on the first day, and I start lightly sketching those scenes out. I watch the dailies to get a feeling of what the scenes might eventually become. It takes longer than it sounds! And then the next day, four more scenes might come in, and the day after, seven. You’re always getting a bit behind the eight ball during dailies, but you sketch as best you can.”

Once Housen begins building out the scenes, she starts creating what she calls “reels,” an assembly of the film in 20-minute segments — a habit from the days of working with film in the predigital age. “Once you create your reels, then you end up, when they are done shooting, with a rather long, but not paced, assembly of the film that serves as a blueprint,” she says. “When post begins, we roll up our sleeves and start at Scene 1 and dig in.”

Housen finds that on an independent film, there isn’t a lot of time to interact with the director while the film is being shot, and this held true for Clemency; but once they got to the cutting room, “we were there every day together, all day, attached at the hip,” she says.

Clemency was the first time Housen had the opportunity to work with Chukwu. “She’s a very bold director, and there are some very bold choices in this film,” Housen says. She points out that some liberties were taken in terms of pacing and editing style, especially toward the end of the film, which she believes really pays off. However, Housen stops short of revealing too much about the scenes prior to the film’s release.

“It is a very heavy film, a difficult film,” Housen continues. “It’s thought-provoking. For such a heavy movie, we had a light time making it. We laughed a lot and enjoyed the process very much. I was just so pleased with [Chukwu’s] vision. She is a young and up-and-coming filmmaker. I think we are going to continue hearing a lot about her.”

Pavarotti
In the documentary Pavarotti, in limited release starting June 7, director Ron Howard tells the story of the opera legend Luciano Pavarotti through an assemblage of unique footage, concert performances and interviews. The film was edited by Paul Crowder, ACE.

Director Ron Howard and editor Paul Crowder take a selfie at the Pavarotti premiere.

As Crowder notes, it seemed logical to approach the story of Pavarotti in the format of an opera. His art and his life lent themselves to a natural three-act arc: The tenor starts his career as an opera singer and becomes successful. Then there is a period of self-doubt, followed by the meteoric success of The Three Tenors, his philanthropic period and then his marriage to a much younger woman. “You have these dramatic moments in his life story like you do in an opera, and we thought if we could use Pavarotti’s music and operas, that would tell the story, so we gave the documentary an operatic feel,” he says.

A musician himself, Crowder well understood this unique dimension to the documentary. Still, approaching the film in this way required careful navigation in the editing suite. “It’s not like editing pop music or something like that. You can’t just drop in and out of arias. They don’t come in four-bar sections or a middle-eight section,” he points out. “They’re all self-contained. Each section is its own thing. You have to select the moments when you can get in and out of them. Once you commit to them, you have to really commit to a degree, and it all becomes part of the style and approach of the editing.”

Crowder edited the film on an Avid system at his home studio. “I am an Avid Media Composer guy and will be to the day I die,” he says. “I was brought up on Avid, and that will always be my go-to choice.”

The biggest editing challenge on the documentary was dealing with the large mix of media and formats, as the film integrates footage from past concerts and interviews that took place all over the world at different points in time. In all, music was pulled from 22 different operas – not opera pieces, but different operas themselves. The footage was digitized in Avid using native frame rates “because Avid is so adept at dealing with multiple frame rates on a single timeline,” he says, noting that his assistant, Sierra Neal, was instrumental in keeping all the various media in check.

Nevertheless, dealing with various frame rate issues in the online was tough. Everyone has a way to do it, Crowder says, but “there is no definitive excellent way to go from standard def to HD.”

The mixed frame rates and formats also made it difficult to spot flaws in the imported footage: The overall transfer might look good, but there might be a frame or two that did not transfer well. “We kept spotting them throughout the online in the same clips we had already fixed, but then we’d find another flaw that we hadn’t seen,” Crowder says.

The film was built in pieces. The first section Crowder and writer Mark Monroe built pertained to Pavarotti’s children. “It was a leaping-off point for the film. We knew the girls were going to be in it and they would have something fun to say,” he says. He then worked forward from that point.

Crowder praises the research team at Pavarotti production company White Horse Pictures with assembling the tremendous amount of research and documentation for the film, organizing the various content and clips that made it easier for him and Neal to locate those with the best potential for particular scenes. “Still, it was essential to really look closely at everything and know where it was,” he adds, “Otherwise, you don’t know what you might miss.”

In fact, Crowder has something he calls his “hip pocket,” interesting material that hasn’t been placed yet. “It’s just a bin that contains material when I need something strong,” he says. On this project, footage of Pavarotti’s trip to the Amazon in 1995 is in that bin. And, they found an ideal place for it in the opening of the film.

“The film always talks to you, and sometimes you can’t find something you’re looking for but it’s staring you right in the face,” Crowder says. In this case, it was the Amazon footage. “It was vital that we hear Luciano’s voice at the opening of the film. If you don’t hear him sing, then there’s no point because it’s all about his voice. And everything we are going to tell you from that point on comes off the back of his voice.”

While he has worked on series as well as other kinds of projects, Crowder prefers films — documentaries, in particular. Series work, he says, can become a little too “factory-esque” for his taste — especially when there is a deadline and you are aware of what worked before, it can be come easy to get into a rhythm and possibly lose creative drive. “With a film, you lead audiences on an emotional journey, but you can take it to completion in one sitting, and not drag it out week after week,” Crowder says.

And, how did the editor feel working alongside famed director Ron Howard? Crowder says it was a fantastic experience, calling Howard very decisive and knowledgeable. “A wonderful and generous person to learn from. It was a great working relationship where we could discuss ideas honestly.”

Another bonus about this project: Crowder’s mom was an amateur opera singer, a soprano, while his grandfather was an amateur tenor. “I wanted to work on the film for my mom. She passed away, unfortunately, but she would have loved it.” Surely others will as well.


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran writer/editor covering VFX and post production.

Editing for Episodics

By Karen Moltenbrey

Consistency is important when editing series. Initially, the editor may collaborate with the director and DP on the style of the show, and once it is set, the focus is on supporting that direction, reflecting the essence and feel of the show and the performance of the characters.

However, not every series is the same, and editors adapt their editing pattern and pacing based on the project’s genre. For instance, the pacing of a comedy should elevate the punchline, not detract from it, whereas with a drama, choosing the best performance that fits the story is paramount. Additionally, the use of music and sound design can heighten the emotion or tension far more than, say, in a comedy.

Here we look at two very different series — a comedy and a drama — and examine how the editors approached the cut on their respective shows.

Insecure
Life is complicated, especially for the main characters of HBO’s Insecure, which focuses on two African American women as they navigate modern-day life in Los Angeles. Best friends since college and now in their late 20s, they are trying to find their footing both personally and professionally, with Issa Dee working at a nonprofit school and living with her longtime boyfriend, and Molly Carter finding success as a lawyer but less so in her dating life.

The comedy has been renewed for a fourth season, which will be released sometime in 2019. The series debuted in 2016 and is created by Issa Rae — who plays the main character Issa Dee — and Larry Wilmore. A number of people have directed and served as DP, and there have been four editors, including Nena Erb, ACE, who came aboard during Season 3.

“The series is built around [Issa’s and Molly’s] experiences as they try to find their place in the world. When I approach a scene, I do so from their point of view,” says Erb. “South LA is also portrayed as a character in the series; we do our best to incorporate shots of the various neighborhoods in each episode so viewers get a flavor of the city.”

According to Erb, the composition for the series is cinematic and unconventional from the typical television series. “The editing pattern is also not the typical start with a master, go to medium shots, close-up and so forth,” she says. “Having unique composition and coming up with interesting ways to transition in and out of a scene give this series a distinct visual style that’s unlike other television shows out right now.”

Nena Erb

Scenes wherein Issa is the focus are shot mostly handheld. The shots have more movement and convey a sense of uncertainty and flux, which is in keeping with the character, who is trying to find herself when it comes to her career. On the other hand, Molly’s scenes are typically locked-off to convey steadiness, as she is a little more settled in her career as an attorney. For example, in “Fresh-Like” (Season 3 Episode 4), Molly has a difficult time establishing herself after taking a job at a new law firm, and things are not going as smoothly as she had hoped. When she discusses her frustrations with her therapist, the scene was shot with locked-off cameras since it focuses on Molly, but camera moves were then added in the edit to give it a handheld look to convey she was on unsteady ground at that moment.

Erb edits the series on an Avid Media Composer, and temp effects are done in Adobe Photoshop and After Effects.

Erb’s workflow for Insecure is similar to other series she has edited. She reads the script a few times, and before starting dailies, will re-read the scene she is working on that day, paying particular attention to the screen direction. “That is extremely helpful in letting me know the tone of the scene. I like having that fresh in my mind when I watch the dailies,” says Erb. She also reviews all the circle as well as non-circle takes — a step that is time-consuming but ensures she is using all the best performances. “And sometimes there are hidden gems in the non-circle takes that make all the difference, so I feel it’s worth the time to watch them all,” she adds.

While watching the dailies, Erb often jots down notes while cutting it in her head. Then she sits down and starts putting the scene together in the actual edit.

When Erb signed on to do the series, the style and tone were already established, and the crew had been together since the beginning. “It’s never easy to come into a show like that,” she says. “I was the new kid on the block who had to figure out team dynamics in addition to learning the style of the show. My biggest challenge was to make sure my work was in the language of the series, while still maintaining my own sense of style.”

Insofar as social media has become a big part of everyone’s life, it is now turning up in series such as Insecure, where it has become a recurring character — although in the episode titled “Obsessed-Like,” it is much more. As Erb explains, Insecure uses social media graphics as elements that play on the screen next to the person texting or tweeting. But in that episode, the editor wanted the audience alongside Issa as she checks on her new love interest Nathan and used social media graphics in a completely different way than had been done previously on the show.

“I told my assistant editor, Lynarion Hubbard, that I wanted her to create all these graphics in a way that they could be edited as if they were dailies. Doing so enabled me to use them full-screen, and I could animate them so they could crash-zoom into the shot of this woman kissing Nathan and then tilt down to the caption, which is when you realize the woman is his mom, as she delivers the punchline, ‘Oh, it’s your mom. She looks young for 50,’” says Erb.

“I felt the graphics made me more invested and allowed me to experience the emotional roller coaster with Issa as she obsesses over being ghosted. It was a risk to use them that way because it wasn’t in the language of the show. Fortunately for me, the producers loved it, and that episode was nominated for an ACE Eddie Award earlier this year.”

Erb might be new to Insecure, but she feels a personal connection to the series: When she and her family first immigrated to the US, they settled in Ladera Heights, and she attended school in Inglewood. “I remember this awkward girl who didn’t speak a word of English, and yet the neighbors welcomed us with open arms,” she recalls. “That community will always be special to me. The series pokes fun at Ladera Heights, but I think it’s great that they are highlighting a part of South LA that was my first connection in the US.”

Erb predominantly edits television series, but she has also edited feature films and documentaries. “I’d say I am drawn to powerful stories and captivating characters rather than a genre or format. Performance is paramount. Everything is in service of the story and the characters, regardless of whether it’s a series or a film,” she states.

On a series, “it’s a sprint to the finish, especially if it’s a series that has started airing while you’re still shooting and editing the later episodes. You’ll have anywhere from one to three days after the last day of dailies to do your editor’s cut, and then it’s off to the director, producers, the studio and so forth,” Erb explains. Conversely, with the features she has done, the schedule has offered more wiggle room – more time to do the editor’s cut and more time for the directors’ involvement. “And you have the luxury to experiment and sit with the cut to make sure it is working.”

In addition to Insecure, Erb has worked on Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Being Mary Jane and Project Greenlight, to name a few. And each has its own recipe. For instance, Crazy Ex has music videos in each episode that run the gamut from the ’50s to present day, from a Fosse-inspired number to ’80s rock, ’90s hip-hop and three decades of the Beach Boys. “In an industry where it is easy to get pigeonholed, being able to work on a show that allows you to challenge yourself with different genres is rare, and I loved the experience.”

Ozark
At first glance, the Ozarks seem to be a tranquil place, a wholesome, idyllic location to raise a family. But, looks can be deceiving, especially when it comes to the Netflix family crime drama Ozark, which will be starting its third season sometime this year.

The series follows financial planner Marty Byrde, who relocates with his family from Chicago to the summer resort area of Osage Beach, Missouri, in the Ozark Mountains. The move is not voluntary. To make amends for a scheme that went awry, he must launder millions of dollars belonging to a Mexican drug cartel through the Ozarks. Soon he becomes entangled with local criminals.

Jason Bateman, who plays Marty, directed some of the episodes in Season 1 and 2, with other directors filling that role as well. Editing the series since it began is Cindy Mollo, ACE, and Heather Goodwin Floyd, who have a longtime working relationship. Goodwin Floyd, who was Mollo’s assistant editor for many years, started on both seasons of Ozark in the assistant role but also edited and co-edited episodes in each season.

Cindy Mollo

When Mollo first met with Bateman to talk about the project, they discussed the series as being akin to a 10-hour feature. “He wanted to spend time in moments, giving time to the performances, and not be too ‘cutty’ or too manipulative,” she says. “There’s a tendency with someone like Bateman to always be looking for the comedy and to cut for comedy, but ours is a dramatic show where sometimes things just happen to be funny; we don’t cut for that.”

The show has a naturalistic feel, and many scenes are shot outdoors, but there is always a lingering sense of threat, played up with heavy shadows. The look, as the humor, is dark, in a figurative and literal way. And the editors play into the suspense. “By letting moments play out, it helps put you in the head of the character, figuring things out as you go along. So, you’re not ever letting the audience get ahead of the character by showing them something that the character doesn’t see,” explains Mollo. “There’s a little bit of a remoteness in that, so you’re not really spoon-feeding the audience.”

On Ozark, the editors make sure they do not get in the way of the material. The writing is so solid, says Mollo, and the performances are so good, “the challenge is to resist the temptation to impose too much on the material and to just achieve the goals of the scene. Doing things simply and elegantly, that is how I approach this series.”

Goodwin Floyd agrees. “We support the material and let it speak for itself, and tell the story in the most authentic way possible,” she adds.

The series is set in the Ozarks but is filmed outside Atlanta, where the dailies are processed before they are sent to editorial. Assistants pull all the media into a Media Composer, where the cut is done.

Heather Goodwin Floyd

According to Mollo, she and Goodwin Floyd have four days to work on their cut. Then the directors have four days per episode to work with them. “We’re cross-boarded, so that ends up being eight days with the director for two episodes, for the most part,” she says. After that, the producers are brought in, and as Mollo points out, Bateman is very involved in the edit. Once the producers sign off, the final cut is sent to producer Media Rights Capital (MRC) and Netflix.

The first two seasons of Ozark were shot at 4K; this season, it is shot at nearly 6K, though delivery to Netflix is still at 4K.

Both editors have a range of experience in terms of genres. Goodwin Floyd started out in features and now primarily edits TV dramas. Mollo got her start in commercials and then migrated to dramatic series, with some TV movies and features, as well. “I love the mix. Honestly, I love doing both [series and films]. I have fun when I’m on a series, and then it seems like every two years or so I get to do a feature. With everyone editing digitally, the feature process has become very similar to the television process,” she says. “It’s just a little more director-focused rather than producer/writer-focused.”

For Goodwin Floyd, she’s drawn more to the content as opposed to the format. “I started in features and at the time thought I wanted to stay in features, but the quality of series on television has evolved and gotten so great that I love working in TV as much as in features,” she says.

With the rise of cable, then premium movie channels and now streaming services, Mollo says there is a feeling that the material can be trusted more, that there is no longer the need to feel like you have to be cutting every couple of seconds to keep the audience excited and engaged. For instance, when she worked on House of Cards, the MRC and Netflix executives were very hands-off — they wanted to have a fantastic opening episode every season and a really compelling cliffhanger, and for everything in between, they trusted the filmmakers to take care of it.

“I really gravitated toward that trend of trusting the filmmakers, and it is resulting in some really great television,” says Mollo.

In as much as we are in a golden age of television, Mollo also believes we are in a golden age of editing, where people understand more of what an editor does and appreciates the results more. Editing is basically a final rewrite of the script, she says. “You’re the last line of defense; sometimes you need to guide the story back to its original direction [if it veers off course].”


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran writer/editor covering VFX and post production.

LumaFusion mobile filmmaking editing app updated

Luma Touch has updated LumaFusion, its video editing application for iOS. Created by video editing industry veterans Chris Demiris and Terri Morgan, LumaFusion Version 2 introduces new features and a new UI, and effectively doubles the number of audio/video tracks supported to 12 tracks, with six video tracks supporting 4K video in realtime.

The UI now features all-new vector icons streamline editing, with new track headers for locking, hiding and muting all tracks, and an overview of the timeline that lets users jump to any location in your edit with a single touch.

Keying

Additional updates include:
• New Timeline Overview:, which makes it quick and easy to see your whole project and jump to a specific location in your edit
• New Shuttle Control: Press-and-hold the Play button to scrub at different rates to find the right frame
• Track Headers with track link/unlink, track locking, hide and mute
• Flexible Editing: Video and audio clips on the primary (anchor) track let users to edit the way they want
• External Display: Users can view their video on the large screen and get more room for your timeline and library with new UI layouts
• Support for Gnarbox 2.0 SSD, as well as improvements for supporting Gnarbox1.0
• Dozens of editing and media management improvements

Ryan Connolly is a filmmaker, writer, director and creator of the YouTube channel, Film Riot. He has been testing LumaFusion 2.0. “LumaFusion is surprisingly fast and fluid, and is also perfect for doing previs on location scouts.”

LumaFusion Version 2  is available now on the App Store for $29.99, but the company is offering a discount of 50% until June 27, 2019.

Lenovo intros next-gen ThinkPads

Lenovo has launched the next generation of its ThinkPad P Series with the release of five new ThinkPads, including the ThinkPad P73, ThinkPad P53, ThinkPad P1 Gen 2 and ThinkPad P53s and P43s.

The ThinkPad P53 features the Nvidia Quadro RTX 5000 GPU with RT and Tensor cores, offering realtime raytracing and AI acceleration. It now features Intel Xeon and 9th Gen Core class CPUs with up to eight cores (including the Core i9) up to 128GB of memory and 6TB of storage.

This mobile workstation also boasts a new OLED touch display with Dolby Vision HDR for superb color and some of the deepest black levels ever. Building on the innovation behind the ThinkPad P1 power supply, Lenovo is also maximizing the portability of this workstation with a 35 percent smaller power supply. The ThinkPad P53 is designed to handle everything from augmented reality and VR content creation to the deployment of mobile AI or ISV workflows. The ThinkPad P53 will be available in July, starting at $1,799.

At 3.74 pounds and 17.2mm thin, Lenovo’s thinnest and lightest 15-inch workstation — the ThinkPad P1 Gen 2 — includes the latest Nvidia Quadro Turing T1000 and T2000 GPUs. The ThinkPad P1 also features eight-core Intel 9th Gen Xeon and Core CPUs and an OLED touch display with Dolby Vision HDR.

The ThinkPad P1 Gen 2 will be available at the end of June starting at $1,949.

With its 17.3-inch Dolby Vision 4K UHD screen and mobility with a 35% smaller power adaptor, Lenovo’s ThinkPad P73 offers users maximum workspace and mobility. Like the ThinkPad 53, it features the Intel Xeon and Core processors and the most powerful Nvidia Quadro RTX graphics. The ThinkPad P73 will be available in August starting at $1,849.

The ThinkPad P43s features a 14-inch chassis and will be available in July starting at $1,499.

Rounding out the line is the ThinkPad P53s which combines the latest Nvidia Quadro graphics and Intel Core processors — all in a thin and light chassis. The ThinkPad P53s will be available in June, starting at $1,499.

For the first time, Lenovo is adding new X-Rite Pantone Factory Color Calibration to the ThinkPad P1 Gen 2, ThinkPad P53 and ThinkPad P73. The unique factory color calibration profile is stored in the cloud to ensure more accurate recalibration. This profile allows for dynamic switching between color spaces, including sRGB, Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 to ensure accurate ISV application performance.

The entire ThinkPad portfolio is also equipped with advanced ThinkShield security features – from ThinkShutter to privacy screens to self-healing BIOS that recover when attacked or corrupted – to help protect users from every angle and give them the freedom to innovate fearlessly.

Behind the Title: Live Nation Entertainment Editor Hillary Lewis

This Indiana-based editor uses Avid Media Composer at work, Adobe Premiere for personal projects and After Effects for both.

NAME: Indianapolis-based Hillary Lewis

COMPANY: TourDesign Creative/Live Nation Entertainment

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are the post house for all Live Nation artists creating their broadcast, online, print, radio and advertising for concert tours, nationally and internationally.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Using the approved ad materials from our art department and approved radio materials from our audio department, we create TV and online commercials using concert footage and/or music videos, adding motion graphics, transitions, color grading, etc. With the approved commercial, we localize and deliver for each market (city) where the tour will perform.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The editors here are jacks-of-all-trades. We don’t have colorists, assistant editors or other post positions that you’d normally find in TV/film post houses. We truly do it all from start to finish.

One of the things that still surprises me is working with artist management teams that give you unusable footage. Whether it be terrible camera work, aspect ratio differences, low resolution, baked-in logos, etc.

A good majority of artist management teams don’t keep a sufficient archive of raw, uncompressed footage of their artist performances. This inevitably backs us into a corner and we’re tasked with finding and ripping usable footage off of YouTube. The humanity!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When I have the most possible time to be creative on a new spot. When I can work on one of my favorite artists or bands. And when I can learn new things and put them in my bag of tricks.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Having to put my name on something I’ve created that I’m not proud of, but that was completely out of my control. For example, a commercial spot that I artistically and creatively didn’t call the shots on.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
For me, there’s a difference between when I’m most productive and when I’m the busiest. We tend to be busiest in the afternoons — from 3pm to 6pm — because we cater to our smaller office on the West Coast. This means the majority of my work is done right before I leave for the day, which often means staying late. But I’m truly more productive in the mornings when the office is less chaotic and when there’s time to be most creative, rather than sacrificing creativity to push a product out in the late afternoon.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Two things. I’m obsessed with Vox’s explainer videos and would be making similar highly designed, motion-graphics-based content on broad topics such as film/TV, music, FAQs, food, travel, etc.

Or, I’d be a phenomenal post production coordinator/supervisor in film/TV.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I entered college as a business major and knew pretty early on it wasn’t going to be a fulfilling career path for me. I happened to take a new media course to fill elective requirements, and it resonated with me so much I switched my major to new media arts and sciences and have been on the post production path ever since. It hasn’t been easy making a name in this industry, but I’ve never once looked back or had any regrets.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The most recent artist tours created by TourDesign: Cardi B, Madonna, Khalid, Live Nation $20 National Concert Week, Lewis Black, MasterChef Junior Live!, Mary J. Blige/NAS, Dave Matthews Band, The Head and the Heart… I could go on.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Not a specific work project, but several accomplishments through my side hustles. I’ve also been a panelist at recent conferences speaking on topics like the gender pay gap, post workflow and new trends in AI and machine learning.

Being an integral part of the media production industry and building a vast network of pros through my travels is something I’m extremely proud of.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Our Avid Nexis server at work, my stand-up desk and my AirPods.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
The Blue Collar Post Collective on Facebook. I’m also a member and volunteer. BCPC is a nonprofit supporting emerging talent in post by providing mentorships, networking and funding to attend major industry events for pros who make less than the median income of the state they live in. I was one of the recipients of that funding and it was life-changing for me.

Hillary Lewis on panel at NAB for Gals N Gear.

If anyone reading this has questions about the program, reach out to me on Facebook
or Instagram @hillary.dillary. I follow other Facebook pages like I Am a Female Editor!, Avid Editors of Facebook, Post Chat, I Need an Editor, Austin Digital Jobs (I’ll be moving there soon).

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
If I listen to anything at work it’s either keeping up with current events from talk shows like The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, The Daily Show With Trevor Noah, Last Week Tonight With John Oliver, etc. or Vice News. Or strictly entertaining things like GoT recaps/fan theory videos, SNL, Vox, Funny or Die.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
It is extremely high stress! I have to keep my body active during the day, using my stand-up desk in intervals and stretching. I can’t be in the right state of mind if my body feels stiff or sore.

Going to the gym at least two to three nights every week also helps me sleep better, which makes me fresher mentally the next day.

Cooking is a great stress reliever for me as well as a creative outlet. I can try new things and be risky with it. Even if I make a meal that tastes horrible, I know I’ll eventually improve that meal and make something that tastes good. It reminds of something a wise man on Queer Eye once said “Failure is not the opposite of success, it’s a part of it.”

I also love a good beer at the end of the day.

RPS editors talk workflow, creativity and Michelob Ultra’s Robots

By Randi Altman

Rock Paper Scissors (RPS) is a veteran editing house specializing in commercials, music videos and feature films. Founded by Oscar-winning editor Angus Wall (The Social Network, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo), RPS has a New York office as well as a main Santa Monica location that it shares with sister companies A52, Elastic and Jax.

We recently reached out to RPS editor Biff Butler and his assistant editor Alyssa Oh (both Adobe Premiere users) to find out about how they work, their editing philosophy and their collaboration on the Michelob Ultra Robots spot that premiered during this year’s Super Bowl.

Let’s find out more about their process…

Rock Paper Scissors, Santa Monica

What does your job entail?
Biff Butler: Simply put, someone hands us footage (and a script) and we make something out of it. The job is to act as cheerleader for those who have been carrying the weight of a project for weeks, maybe months, and have just emerged from a potentially arduous shoot.

Their job is to then sell the work that we do to their clients, so I must hold onto and protect their vision, maintaining that initial enthusiasm they had. If the agency has written the menu, and the client has ordered the meal, then a director is the farmer and the editor the cook.

I frequently must remind myself that although I might have been hired because of my taste, I am still responsible for feeding others. Being of service to someone else’s creative vision is the name of the game.

What’s your workflow like?
Alyssa Oh: At the start of the project, I receive the footage from production and organize it to Biff’s specs. Once it’s organized, I pass it off and he watches all the footage and assembles an edit. Once we get deeper into the project, he may seek my help in other aspects of the edit, including sound design, pulling music, creating graphics, temporary visual effects and creating animations. At the end of the project, I prep the edits for finishing color, mix, and conform.

What would surprise people about being an editor?
Oh: When I started, I associated editorial with “footage.” It surprised me that, aside from editing, we play a large part in decision-making for music and developing sound design.

Butler: I’ve heard the editor described as the final writer in the process. A script can be written and rewritten, but a lot happens in the edit room once shots are on a screen. The reality of seeing what actually fits within the allotted time that the format allows for can shape decisions as can the ever-evolving needs of the client in question. Another aspect we get involved with is the music — it’s often the final ingredient to be considered, despite how important a role it plays.

Robots

What do you enjoy the most about your job?
Oh: By far, my favorite part is the people that I work with. We spend so much time together; I think it’s important to not just get along, but to also develop close relationships. I’m so grateful to work with people who I look forward to spending the day with.

At RPS, I’ve gained so many great friendships over the years and learn a lot from everyone around me —- not just in the aspect of editorial, but also from the people at companies that work alongside us — A52, Elastic and Jax.

Butler: At the risk of sounding corny, what turns me on most is collaboration and connection with other creative talents. It’s a stark contrast to the beginning of the job, which I also very much adore — when it’s just me and my laptop, watching footage and judging shots.

Usually we get a couple days to put something together on our own, which can be a peaceful time of exploration and discovery. This is when I get to formulate my own opinions and points of view on the material, which is good to establish but also is something I must be ready to let go of… or at least be flexible with. Once the team gets involved in the room — be it the agency or the director — the real work begins.

As I said before, being of service to those who have trusted me with their footage and ideas is truly an honorable endeavor. And it’s not just those who hire us, but also talents we get to join forces with on the audio/music side, effects, etc. On second thought, the free supply of sparkly water we have on tap is probably my favorite part. It’s all pretty great.

What’s the hardest part of the job?
Oh: For me, the hardest part of our job are the “peaks and valleys.” In other words, we don’t have a set schedule, and with each project, our work hours will vary.

Robots

Butler: I could complain about the late nights or long weekends or unpredictable schedules, but those are just a result of being employed, so I count myself fortunate that I even get to moan about that stuff. Perhaps one of the trickiest parts is in dealing with egos, both theirs and mine.

Inevitably, I serve as mediator between a creative agency and the director they hired, and the client who is paying for this whole project. Throw in the mix my own sense of ownership that develops, and there’s a silly heap of egos to manage. It’s a joy, but not everyone can be fully satisfied all the time.

If you couldn’t edit for a living, what would you do?
Oh: I think I would definitely be working in a creative field or doing something that’s hands-on (I still hope to own a pottery studio someday). I’ve always had a fondness for teaching and working with kids, so perhaps I’d do something in the teaching field.

Butler: I would be pursuing a career in directing commercials and documentaries.

Did you know from a young age that you would be involved in this industry?
Oh: In all honesty, I didn’t know that this would be my path. Originally, I wanted to go into
broadcast, specifically sports broadcasting. I had an interest in television production since
high school and learned a bit about editing along the way.

However, I had applied to work at RPS as a production assistant shortly after graduating and quickly gained interest in editing and never looked back!
Butler : I vividly recall seeing the movie Se7en in the cinema and being shell-shocked by the opening title sequence. The feeling I was left with was so raw and unfiltered, I remember thinking, “That is what I want to do.” I wasn’t even 100 percent sure what that was. I knew I wanted to put things together! It wasn’t even so much a mission to tell stories, but to evoke emotion — although storytelling is most often the way to get there.

Robots

At the same time, I was a kid who grew up under the spell of some very effective marketing campaigns — from Nike, Jordan, Gatorade — and knew that advertising was a field I would be interesting in exploring when it came time to find a real job.

As luck would have it, in 2005 I found myself living in Los Angeles after the rock band I was in broke up, and I walked over to a nearby office an old friend of mine had worked at, looking for a job. She’d told me it was a place where editors worked. Turns out, that place was where many of my favorite ads were edited, and it was founded by the guy who put together that Se7en title sequence. That place was Rock Paper Scissors, and it’s been my home ever since.

Can you guys talk about the Michelob Ultra Robots spot that first aired during the Super Bowl earlier this year? What was the process like?
Butler: The process involved a lot of trust, as we were all looking at frames that didn’t have any of the robots in — they were still being created in CG — so when presenting edits, we would have words floating on screen reading “Robot Here” or “Robot Runs Faster Now.”

It says a lot about the agency in that it could hold the client’s hand through our rough edit and have them buy off on what looked like a fairly empty edit. Working with director Dante Ariola at the start of the edit helped to establish the correct rhythm and intention of what would need to be conveyed in each shot. Holding on to those early decisions was paramount, although we clearly had enough human performances to rest are hats on too.

Was there a particular cut that was more challenging than the others?
Butler: The final shot of the spot was a battle I lost. I’m happy with the work, especially the quality of human reactions shown throughout. I’m also keen on the spot’s simplicity. However, I had a different view of how the final shot would play out — a closer shot would have depicted more emotion and yearning in the robot’s face, whereas where we landed left the robot feeling more defeated — but you can’t win them all.

Robots

Did you feel extra stress knowing that the Michelob spot would air during the Super Bowl?
Butler: Not at all. I like knowing that people will see the work and having a firm airdate reduces the likelihood that a client can hem and haw until the wheels fall off. Thankfully there wasn’t enough time for much to go wrong!

You’ve already talked about doing more than just editing. What are you often asked to do in addition to just editing?
Butler: Editors are really also music supervisors. There can be a strategy to it, also knowing when to present a track you really want to sell through. But really, it’s that level of trust between myself and the team that can lead to some good discoveries. As I mentioned before, we are often tasked with just providing a safe and nurturing environment for people to create.

Truly, anybody can sit and hit copy and paste all day. I think it’s my job to hold on to that initial seed or idea or vision, and protect it through the final stages of post production. This includes ensuring the color correction, finishing and sound mix all reflect intentions established days or weeks ahead when we were still fresh enough in our thinking to be acting on instinct.

I believe that as creative professionals, we are who we are because of our instincts, but as a job drags on and on, we are forced to act more with our heads than our hearts. There is a stamina that is required, making sure that what ends up on the TV is representative of what was initially coming out of that instinctual artistic expression.

Does your editing hat change depending on the type of project you are cutting?
Butler: No, not really. An edit is an edit. All sessions should involve laughter and seriousness and focus and moments to unwind and goof off. Perhaps the format will determine the metaphorical hat, or to be more specific, the tempo.

Selecting shots for a 30- or 60-second commercial is very different than chasing moments for a documentary or long-form narrative. I’ll often remind myself to literally breathe slower when I know a shot needs to be long, and the efficiency with which I am telling a story is of less importance than the need to be absorbed in a moment.

Can you name some of your favorite technology?
Oh: My iPhone and all the apps that come with it; my Kindle, which allows me to be as indecisive as I want when it comes to picking a book and traveling; my laptop; and noise-cancelling headphones!

Butler: The carbonation of water, wireless earphones and tiny solid-state hard drives.

Using editing to influence the tone of a spot

By Maury Loeb

We all have a basic understanding about what editing consists of. In the simplest terms, editors stitch together raw footage to create a cohesive and coherent story. But one of the most vital features of a “good edit” is the establishment of tone. Tone is the aspect of a piece that describes its particular mood, character, atmosphere and flavor. Dictating the proper tone of an ad is a deceivingly sophisticated endeavor that goes beyond the simple mechanics of a few well-spliced shots. Editors need to tell a cohesive story, but we also have to tell the right story.

While some commercials can be ill-conceived and fundamentally “tone-deaf,” trying too hard to project “cool,” the best commercials make viewers feel connected to something. Wieden + Kennedy’s original Go Forth work for Levi’s is a great example. It’s a hipster anthem, but one that makes bold tonal choices in the edit to unique and memorable effect.

Another is the hilarious It’s a Tide Ad, which so precisely and successfully recreates the tonal doppelgangers of existing ads that it’s actually deceiving at first. The ability to produce a very specific, intentional flavor from disparate, raw ingredients is what elevates editing from a craft into an art. The script might be the script, and the footage might be the footage but creating the right tone for a spot not only honors the vision of the ad, but also enhances and elevates the finished piece.

This requires an editor’s technical skill of manipulating and synthesizing their raw ingredients, but more importantly, it relies on an editor’s taste, creativity and sensibility. In the commercial world, offline editors are uniquely positioned to get the first crack at establishing the tone of a spot and the opportunity to shepherd a spot through its finishing, making sure that the intended tone of the ad is realized at the end. It takes the brilliance of talented colorists, sound designers, musicians and animators to achieve a polished finished product, but a good offline editor can sketch out a comprehensive “tonal roadmap” for a spot.

Sound, picture and pace are the most fundamental determinants of tone. Editors manipulate these elements by employing an infinite arsenal of weapons in order to achieve the intended tone of a commercial.

Sound
Sound and our emotions have a primal relationship. Sound is essentially a form of “invisible touch” that is processed in the same part of our brains that processes emotion and perception, making it an ideal parameter of tone. Music is probably the most effective, immediate and raw influencer of tone. It is quite literally a construct designed to create an emotional response. Throw three different pieces of music against the same footage and you will walk away with three entirely different experiences. As far as weapons in an editor’s arsenal go, its standard issue for a reason. Would ASPCA ads be as iconic with any other track besides Sara McLachlan’s “In the Arms of the Angel” even if they were equally as cloying and maudlin?

A thousand different tracks could have complemented Sony’s famous Balls spot, but would it have had the same impact without Jose Gonzalez’s dreamy, slightly unexpected version of “Heartbeats”? Tone can be equally dictated by an editor’s approach to sound design. Google Chrome’s “Speed Tests” dynamically toggled between hyper-real and overtly stylized sounds, creating a piece that’s both observational and awe-inspiring. The result is a unique tonal voice that is utterly engaging with just the right amount of cheekiness.

Color
Editors can inform the tone of a spot beyond the images initially captured in the camera. Manipulating the color palette of the film colors the character of a spot in profound ways. Editors can dial through a range of emotions as they dial through the color spectrum, capitalizing on a color’s ability to elicit specific emotions — from the isolation and melancholy found in blue tones and the menace and danger found in greens to the welcoming warmth of rich reds and golds. A film’s light and dark tones can telegraph an impressive amount of information to an audience as well. Consider the flat palette of Skittles commercials and the way it helps enhance their awkward, comedic tone. Or the way crunchy contrast and saturated colors can make a tabletop spot look punchy and appetizing.

Pacing
Editors also set tone by the pace at which a commercial is cut, both in the tempo of the edits and the speed of the footage itself. The tonal adrenaline of Nike’s Write the Future is due in large part to its dynamic edit as it jerks the audience through kinetic bursts of flurried cuts and pregnant lulls of over-cranked shots. Likewise, Ikea’s Lamp wouldn’t feel nearly as sad if it weren’t for the deliberately paced, measured editing. Nike’s Michael Jordan ad Frozen moments played out in real time would feel like a trite highlight reel, but the deftly handled ramping between super slow motion and real time creates an epic grandeur that amplifies the message of the spot.

Double Duty
Commercials have the unique role of being little films in the greater service of advertising something while also representing a particular brand. In commercials, an editor’s sensibility is key. Is the tone of a particular spot congruous with its message? Does its tone align with the sensibility of the brand? Commercial editors have the dual duty of approaching their task as both stewards of the filmmaking process and stewards of the brand itself. Our role is crucial in making sure the end result both conveys the intended message of an ad in a way that jibes with how a brand wants to be perceived.

Editors are crucial at establishing tone in broad-strokes, but also on a granular level, understanding how a particular line is delivered or graphics are placed can have an impact on the overall tone and experience of a spot. It’s important that brands and agencies see editors as more than just craftspeople who know how to cut footage together using certain programs. Good, experienced commercial editors are tonal specialists who understand how to influence the tone of an ad and make it just feel right.


Maury Loeb is the co-founder of and editor at PS260 , a creative editorial company in New York City, Boston and Venice, California. Check out his reel here.

Cutters Studios promotes Heather Richardson, Patrick Casey

Cutters Studios has promoted Heather Richardson to executive producer and Patrick Casey to head of production. Richardson’s oversight will expand into managing and recruiting talent, and in maintaining and building the company’s client base. Casey will focus on optimizing workflows, project management and bidding processes.

Richardson joined Cutters in 2015, after working as a producer for visual effects studio A52 in LA and for editorial company Cosmo Street in both LA and New York for more than 10 years. On behalf of Cutters, she has produced Super Bowl spots for Lifewtr, Nintendo and WeatherTech, and campaigns including Capital One, FCA North America (Fiat, Dodge Ram, and Jeep), Gatorade, Google, McDonald’s and Modelo.

“I’ve been fortunate to have worked with some excellent executive producers during my career, and I’m honored and excited for the opportunity to expand the scope of my role on behalf of Cutters Studios, and alongside Patrick Casey,” says Richardson. “Patrick’s kindness and thoughtfulness in addition to his intelligence and experience are priceless.”

In addition to leading Cutters editors, Casey produced the groundbreaking Always “#LikeAGirl” campaign, Budweiser’s Harry Caray’s Last Call and Whirlpool’s “Care Counts” campaign that won top Cannes Lions, Clio, Effie and Adweek Project Isaac Awards.

The editing and tech behind Netflix’s Black Mirror: Bandersnatch

This interactive film’s editor talks challenges as well as how Netflix’s Branch Manager tech made it all possible.

By Karen Moltenbrey

In any film, or web/television series for that matter, the final presentation is the culmination of many choices. The director’s, the scriptwriter’s, the editor’s… just about everyone’s but the viewers. However, Netflix changed that with Black Mirror: Bandersnatch, a special interactive TV movie during which viewers are prompted to make selections that affect the decision-making and, ultimately, determine the fate of the main character: a young video game programmer.

Alas, while the viewer is tasked with making certain decisions at various intervals in the movie, that certainly did not mean the workload was any less for those on the project. In fact, they had to devise a plethora of paths that could be selected — so many, in fact, that a new tool, called Branch Manager, was devised and integrated into the workflow to maintain order and elegance to what could easily have become a tangled web on so many fronts.

Black Mirror, a British science-fiction series of stand-alone stories, mostly focuses on the consequences of new technologies. It was created by Charlie Brooker, who serves as showrunner along with Annabel Jones. The very first episode debuted in late 2011, and after four “series,” the pair introduced the interactive movie Black Mirror: Bandersnatch on December 28, 2018, in which reality and fantasy merge together for programmer Stefan Butler (Fionn Whitehead) as he adapts a choose-your-own-adventure type novel into a video game. Soon Butler’s life begins to resemble that of the tragic author, and he begins to break down mentally, slipping further down the rabbit hole as he tries to make a seemingly impossible release date for the game.

Within this storyline, viewers are tasked with making certain decisions, each leading them along various paths in the narrative. In addition, there are a number of possible story endings. Viewers have 10 seconds to make decisions or one is made for them. But, once a play-through ends, viewers can go back and make a different choice. According to Netflix, the average viewing time for the movie is 90 minutes.

Tony Kearns

With 150 minutes of unique footage divided into 250 segments, just about every aspect of production was impacted in some way, perhaps none more so than editing. And that task was given to Tony Kearns, a veteran editor who calls Bandersnatch “the biggest challenge of my editing career” thus far. In terms of production, Kearns estimates the shoot to have been two to three weeks longer than a regular Black Mirror episode, and the edit took five to seven weeks longer than a show of similar duration, lasting 17 weeks.

“When we started working on Bandersnatch, we realized we were doing something that none of us had done before by making an interactive movie — especially one of such complexity,” says Kearns. “I think everyone who had a major role in the production grasped quite early on the need to be very organized and to get our heads around the structure of the script and the segments, as well as the implications of a nonlinear storytelling based on viewers’ choices at every choice point.”

Then, as the group worked through the movie and began getting more footage in the can, “it was obviously clear we had to work out a way of keeping track of things and getting the right results from the edit and how we were constructing it,” he continues. “Having the Branch Manager software [developed in-house by Netflix] enabled us to watch the movie with the various choices, and while making them, seeing the implications for editing — particularly at the end of a segment and when starting another. That’s because you weren’t moving to just one thing; you were going to two things, and both had to work. Some of the segments had six variations, so you had to make sure they all worked. It was a novel experience and very intense. We had to be on our toes all the time.”

Bandersnatch is not Netflix’s first interactive show. In fact, the company has experimented with more simplified interactive, or “branching narrative,” children’s shows since 2017. However, Bandersnatch marked the first time it has done so for live action and for an adult audience — and to resounding success based on audience reaction. On the heels of that success, Netflix has followed up with the live-action interactive show You vs. Wild, putting viewers into the tracks of adventurer Bear Grylls as they make decisions for him while he tries to survive an adventure in the wilderness.

For Kearns, though, Bandersnatch was his first interactive “adventure.” (He is currently editing the Netflix drama The End of the F***ing World, Season 2.) He found the process “very, very different from a linear experience.” Making things even more daunting was the level of interactive complexity that was introduced in Bandersnatch. “We had no idea how it was going to be received. Would people become too frustrated, or would the emotional aspects of the story come through within all the choices?”

One of the biggest considerations was in terms of structure — making sure there weren’t too many recaps and that they balanced out with the story’s complexity, lest viewers give up on the movie. Another big focus was ensuring that the performances within this structure maintained the empathy, or humanity, that would keep viewers engaged and invested in the characters and story.

As a result, the nonlinear process fostered closer communication among the group, with script supervisor Marilyn Kirby and assistant director Jay Author invaluable on set, and a particularly crowded editing room. “That prevented us from going mad while trying to get our heads around things,” says Kearns.

While the editor and director always work closely on projects, at times director David Slade, executive producers Brooker and Jones, producer Russell McLean, assistant editor John Weeks and VFX editor Will Howden were all working together in the cutting room. “Everyone was contributing. It wasn’t that it made things difficult; it was essential and made things more interesting and exciting,” says Kearns.

New Workflow
As Kearns points out, a typical TV show, drama or film has a main cut and that’s it. Not so for Bandersnatch, which had segments that at times had upward of 14 cuts, all of which had to be tracked and organized.

The script was divided into eight sections, and each segment in those sections was assigned a four-character alphanumeric number, along with the corresponding variant. “The workflow was based on keeping track of the segments. We knew by the number which section of the script it belonged to,” Kearns explains. “The workflow was dependent on us keeping a record, spreadsheets. While editing, we had to know which was the latest version, or cut, because they were constantly being reworked. And the latest one went into Branch Manager to be viewed on our laptops. That was an important part of the workflow.”

Using Branch Manager, however, required some technical savvy, and helping the editing team navigate the software was assistant editor John Weeks, who just happened to be an experienced coder and worked his magic with the QuickTime files for each segment and ingested them into Branch Manager. “He was able to be so proactive and communicate with the engineers and developers at Netflix. He really took to this like a duck to water,” Kearns says. “I know it took up a lot of his time, but it ended up being essential for us in terms of making decisions for the edit and structure.”

Kearns would receive footage to a particular segment after each day of filming, do an assembly and then integrate it into the system. Then he would work on further edits as the segment progressed and as the structure was reworked and aspects re-aligned. “The numbering system for each segment was kind of the spine of the process and helped us keep track of what we were doing,” he adds. “You have to be prepared to pull things apart and reassemble them because the experience is different.”

For the movie, Kearns edited on Adobe Premiere, since it allowed him to open more than one sequence at a time. “It was essential to have more than one segment edit up at a time and switch between them just to see how [the segments] flowed,” he says. He also used Adobe Premiere for the VFX work.

Branch Manager
The big star in terms of software on the project, though, was Branch Manager, developed by Netflix, which enabled the editing team to play with various options, choice points and timing, to ensure that the viewer was presented with the correct next segment based on the selection he or she had made. “You have a viewer’s experience, rather than looking at it on the edit system,” Kearns says of using the software. “We could view the movie in an interactive way on our laptops. We could see how the segments were working with each other, which was very useful.”

Carla Engelbrecht

He explains: “We’d basically do a pass and watch it, make notes and adjust the edit accordingly, because sometimes you see things in isolation and think, ‘Oh, they’re working,’ and then using Branch Manager, we were able to see that, well, maybe they aren’t working so well. It was an essential platform. It made the process more fluid and creative, and easy to understand the structural and editorial aspects. We wouldn’t have been able to do this movie without it.”

According to Carla Engelbrecht, Netflix director of product innovation, her team met with Brooker and Jones in May 2017 and introduced them to the interactive storytelling technology, which, at the time, enabled Netflix to tell various interactive stories. A few months later, the pair returned with what would be the beginnings of Bandersnatch, “and we could see this was going to be a much more complex story than what we had previously done for our interactive titles for kids, which contained simple maps with just 15 or so choices, and each often led to maybe three different endings,” she says.

Not so with the plans for Bandersnatch. “The complexity of the stories Charlie [Brooker] wanted to tell, as well as the complexity of the stories adults can tackle in general, was partly what really drove us to create Branch Manager.”

Initially, the Bandersnatch scriptwriters began their process using Twine, an open-source interactive fiction engine, but it was easy to see that would not be sufficient for the planned complexity of Bandersnatch. This prompted Engelbrecht’s group to begin developing its own software. Moreover, production teams were developing their own mapping systems, often using spreadsheets for the interactive content. “We knew we could smooth this out and make the process easier for everyone by creating a common language so we could all be on the same page,” she explains.

As Engelbrecht notes, Branch Manager is a visualization tool that is used throughout the production process, from viewing an outline to creating a flowchart of the story structure, within which pieces of the outline are embedded as a script is formed. During the shoot, rough (or even fine) cuts are added to the software. “Then you can start watching it and experiencing all of the pieces, whether for continuity or choices.”

After a few months, the software was up and running and ready to be migrated over for use on the project. “That become the ongoing tool, as we used it during the rest of scriptwriting through the actual production and even into post production,” she says. “We were sort of beta-testing it on the fly [with Bandersnatch]. As we got script deliveries, we would also get notes on Branch Manager and on other features they wanted us to add.”

Engelbrecht points out that for some in production and post, the new workflow was seamless, involving “just more” — in essence, one big linear file. (She estimates that the final file ingested into the system is approximately five hours long due to the various options.) But for others, like the DP and actors, scenes had to be reshot with slightly different takes, and editing had to track and assemble those different options. “Throughout development and beyond, we had conversations and tried to be mindful of where problems could occur at the various stages. We wanted the software to be as minimally disruptive [to the production workflow] as possible, given what we were doing.”

While Netflix hasn’t specifically quantified the time-savings that Branch Manager brought to Bandersnatch, Engelbrecht notes that it was significant and allows for the telling of much more complex interactive stories.


Listen to Netflix and Black Mirror execs discuss how Branch Manager helped drive Bandersnatch’s production and innovation.

An Interactive Future
Kearns attributes the project’s success to the group carefully considering how it would approach the movie and managing to avoid major “teething” problems by making the right decisions along the way. He notes it was important, as well, to stay on top of what was going on at any given moment in terms of how a particular segments of story. “There were so many dimensions that, mentally, it was really taxing, but exciting as well,” he says. “I had to be able to recalibrate my editing brain to not think of the story overall, but rather from the point of view of individual segments, and keep them coherent.”

Looking to the future, Kearns expects an uptick in interactive projects but believes the key to their success — as evidenced with Bandersnatch — is to develop good scripts that suit the format, rather than trying to do it as a gimmick. He warns: “You really need people in important roles to be at the top of their game. It’s not for the faint of heart. And, you have to be prepared to make those tough decisions, which are made even tougher due to the nature of the interactive structure.”

He adds, “No matter how difficult your next job is, it is going to be so easy after Bandersnatch.”

Meanwhile, Engelbrecht’s team is working on improvements to Branch Manager. “On Bandersnatch, we were building the airplane as we were flying it,” she says. “We’re now moving into Version 2, better integrating the software with external tools to make the work even more seamless. We’re also looking to improve the onboarding experience to make the learning curve shorter, so it’s not like learning a new programming language. We want it to feel more drag-and-drop.”

For instance, the group has made Branch Manager compatible with Final Draft screenwriting software, enabling a script to be imported directly into Netflix’s tool. The team is still working on the interface. “We have a long wish list just pertaining to the visualization experience with the tools. And, we’re working on how to better integrate it on the other end, so when we ingest files into the system, the metadata flows from Branch Manager directly into our [production] system, whereas right now we still have to create a spreadsheet to negotiate part of the process.”

Thanks to Branch Manager, the team on Bandersnatch was able to negotiate a complex web of shifting directions. So, too, for the executives at Netflix, who are able to explore and more easily navigate new directions for content.


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran VFX and post writer.

FXhome, Vegas Creative Software partner on Vegas Post

HitFilm creator FXhome has partnered with Vegas Creative Software to launch a new suite of editing, VFX, compositing and imaging tools for video pros, editors and VFX artists called Vegas Post.

Vegas Post will combine the editing tools of Vegas Pro with FXhome’s expertise in compositing and visual effects to offer an array of features and capabilities.

FXhome is developing customized effects and compositing tools specifically for Vegas Post. The new software suite will also integrate a custom-developed version of FXhome’s new non-destructive RAW image compositor that will enable video editors to work with still-image and graphical content and incorporate it directly into their final productions. All tools will work together seamlessly in an integrated, end-to-end workflow to accelerate and streamline the post production process for artists.

The new software suite is ideally suited for video pros in post facilities of all sizes and requirements — from individual artists to large post studios, broadcasters and small/medium enterprise installations. It will be available in the third quarter, with pricing to be announced.

Meanwhile, FXhome has teamed up with Filmstro, which offers a royalty-free music library, to provide HitFilm users with access to the entire Filmstro music library for 12 months. With Filmstro available directly from the FXhome store, HitFilm users can use Filmstro soundtracks on unlimited projects and get access to weekly new music updates.

Offering more than just a royalty-free music library, Filmstro has developed a user interface that gives artists flexibility and control over selected music tracks for use in their HitFilm projects. HitFilm users can control the momentum, depth and power of any Filmstro track, using sliders to perfectly match any sequence in a HitFilm project. Users can also craft soundtracks to perfectly fit images by using a keyframe graph editor within Filmstro. Moving sliders automatically create keyframes for each element and can be edited at any point.

Filmstro offers over 60 albums’ worth of music with weekly music releases. All tracks are searchable using keywords, film and video genre, musical style, instrumental palette or mood. All Filmstro music is licensed for usage worldwide and in perpetuity. The Filmstro dynamic royalty-free music library is available now on the FXhome Store for $249 and can be purchased here.

Behind the Title: Editor and colorist Grace Novak

One of her favorite parts of the job is when she encounters a hard edit and it finally clicks and falls into place.

NAME: New York-based Grace Novak

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor and Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with directors/clients to make their project come to life using an editing program. Then during the color process, I bring it even closer to their aesthetic vision.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It can include a lot of not-so-creative work like troubleshooting and solving technical problems, especially when doing assistant color/edit work either for myself or for someone else.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love the great moment when you push through a hard edit and it finally clicks. I also love getting to collaborate with other great creators and filmmakers and working one-on-one in the editing room. I find it to be a great learning experience.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When nothing works and I don’t know why. But, luckily, once I figure it out (eventually, hours later sometimes) I’ve learned to solve a new issue.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Definitely the mornings once I’ve had some coffee. I’m a morning person who is most active around the hours of 8-11. Once lunch hits, it can be hard not to want to take a good midday nap.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
When I was younger, for some reason, I told everyone I wanted to be a barber. I think that’s because I liked using scissors. Seriously, though, I’d probably be working with kids in some way or as an educator. I still hope to teach down the road.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I knew I wanted a job where I could be creative, and with editing I can also be technically proficient. I love the combination of the two.

Dissonance

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I always knew I wanted to be involved with film, probably since I was 12. I remember starting to edit on Windows Movie Maker and being enamored with the effects. I especially liked the really awful and gaudy one that went through a gradient of colors. Don’t worry, I would never use something like that now.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’m working on a lot of short indie films right now including Dissonance, Bogalusa and Siren. I’m also an assistant editor on the feature film The Outside Story.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Dissonance, a short experimental film that is currently in color right now (with me), is probably the most proud I am of a project purely because of how far it pushed me as an artist, editor and collaborator.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I follow a lot, but in the post world that includes postPerspective, BCPC and Jonny Elwyn.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
If I can, I like to listen to podcasts. That’s probably my primary podcast listening time besides at the gym. Obviously, I can only do this during my color work. For music, I like tunes that aren’t too upbeat and more relaxing. For podcasts I like to listen to either comedians or Reply All, Blank Check and Reveal.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I like to read and play video games. I also started to do cross-stitch recently and it’s nice to find a way to use my hands that doesn’t involve a computer or a controller. I make sure to exercise a lot as well because I find that helps my stress levels like nothing else can.

Review: CyberPower PC workstation with AMD Ryzen

By Brady Betzel

With the influx of end users searching for alternatives to Mac Pros, as well as new ways to purchase workstation-level computing solutions, there is no shortage of opinions on what brands to buy and who might build it. Everyone has a cousin or neighbor that builds systems, right?

I’ve often heard people say, “I’ve never built a system or used (insert brand name here), but I know they aren’t good.” We’ve all run into people who are dubious by nature. I’m not so cynical, and when it comes to operating and computer systems, I consider myself Switzerland.

When looking for the right computer system, the main question you should ask is, “What do you need to accomplish?” Followed by, “What might you want to accomplish in the future?” I’m a video editor and colorist, so I need the system I build to work fluidly with Avid Media Composer, Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve and Adobe’s Premiere and After Effects. I also want my system to work with Maxon Cinema 4D in case I want to go a little further than Video Copilot’s Element 3D and start modeling in Cinema 4D. My main focus is video editing and color correction but I also need flexibility for other tools.

Lately, I’ve been reaching out to companies in the hopes of testing as many custom-built Windows -based PCs as possible. There have been many Mac OS-to-Windows transplants over the past few years, so I know pros are eager for options. One of the latest seismic shifts have come from the guys over at Greyscalegorilla moving away from Mac to PCs. In particular, I saw that one of the main head honchos over there, Nick Campbell (@nickvegas), went for a build complete with the Ryzen Threadripper 32-core workhorse. You can see the lineup of systems here. This really made me reassess my thoughts on AMD being a workstation-level processor, and while not everyone can afford the latest Intel i9 or AMD Threadripper processors, there are lower-end processors that will do most people just fine. This is where the custom-built PC makers like CyberPower PC, who equip machines with AMD processors, come into play.

So why go with a company like CyberPowerPC? The prices for parts are usually competitive, and the entire build isn’t much more than if you purchased the parts by themselves. Also, you deal with CyberPower PC for Warranty issues and not individual companies for different parts.

My CustomBuild
In my testing of an AMD Ryzen 7 1700x-based system with a Samsung NVMe hard drive and 16GB of RAM, I was able to run all of the software I mentioned before. The best part was the price; the total was around, $1,000! Not bad for someone editing and color correcting. Typically those machines can run anywhere from $2,000 to $10,000. Although the parts in those more expensive systems are more complex and have double to triple the amount of cores, some of that is wasted. And when on a budget you will be hard-pressed to find a better deal than CyberPower PC. If you build a system yourself, you might get close but not far off.

While this particular build isn’t going to beat out the AMD Threadripper’s or Intel i9-based systems, the AMD Ryzen-based systems offer a decent bang for the buck. As I mentioned, I focus on video editing and color correcting so I tested a simple one-minute UHD (3840×2160) 23.98 H.264 export. Using Premiere along with Adobe’s Media Encoder, I used about :30 seconds of Red UHD footage as well as some UHD S-log3/s-gamut3 footage I shot on the Sony a7 III creating a one-minute long sequence.

I then exported it as an H.264 at a bitrate around 10Mb/s. With only a 1D LUT on the Sony a7iii footage, the one-minute sequence took one minute 13 seconds. With added 10% resizes and a “simple” Gaussian blur over all the clips, the sequence exported in one minute and four seconds. This is proof that the AMD GPU is working inside of Premiere and Media Encoder. Inside Premiere, I was able to playback the full-quality sequence on a second monitor without any discernible frames dropping.

So when people tell you AMD isn’t Intel, technically they are right, but overall the AMD systems are performing at a high enough level that for the money you are saving, it might be worth it. In the end, with the right expectations and dollars, an AMD-based system like this one is amazing.

Whether you like to build your own computer or just don’t want to buy a big-brand system, custom-built PCs are a definite way to go. I might be a little partial since I am comfortable opening up my system and changing parts around, but the newer cases allow for pretty easy adjustments. For instance, I installed a Blackmagic DeckLink and four SSD drives for a RAID-0 setup inside the box. Besides wishing for some more internal drive cages, I felt it was easy to find the cables and get into the wiring that CyberPowerPC had put together. And because CyberPowerPC is more in the market for gaming, there are plenty of RGB light options, including the memory!

I was kind of against the lighting since any color casts could throw off color correction, but it was actually kind of cool and made my setup look a little more modern. It actually kind of got my creativity going.

Check out the latest AMD Ryzen processors and exciting improvements to the Radeon line of graphics cards on www.cyberpowerpc.com and www.amd.com. And, hopefully, I can get my hands on a sweet AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX with 32 cores and 64 threads to really burn a hole in my render power.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Sugar Studios LA gets social for celebrity-owned Ladder supplement

Sugar Studios LA completed a social media campaign for Ladder perfect protein powder and clean energy booster supplements starring celebrity founders Arnold Schwarzenegger, LeBron James, DJ Khaled, Cindy Crawford and Lindsey Vonn. The playful ad campaign focuses on social media, foregoing the usual TV commercial push and pitching the protein powder directly to consumers.

One spot shows Arnold in the gym annoyed by a noisy dude on the phone, prompting him to turn up his workout soundtrack. Then DJ Khaled is scratching encouragement for LeBron’s workout until Arnold drowns them out with his own personal live oompah band.

The ads were produced and directed by longtime Schwarzenegger collaborator Peter Grigsby, while Sugar Studios’ editor Nico Alba (Chevrolet, Ferrari, Morongo Casino, Mattel) cut the project using Adobe Premiere. When asked about using random spot lengths, as opposed to traditional :15s, :30s, and :60s, Alba explains, “Because it’s social media, we’re not always bound to those segments of time anymore. Basically, it’s ‘find the story,’ and because there are no rules, it makes the storytelling more fun. It’s a process of honing everything down without losing the rhythm or the message and maintaining a nice flow.”

Nico Alba and Jijo Reed. Credit: David Goggin

“Peter Grigsby requested a skilled big-brand commercial editor on this campaign,” Reed says. “Nico was the perfect fit to create that rhythm and flow that only a seasoned commercial editor could bring to the table.”

“We needed a heavy-weight gym ambience to set the stage,” says Alba, who worked closely with sound design/mixers Bret Mazur and Troy Ambroff to complement his editing. “It starts out with a barrage of noisy talking and sounds that really irritate Arnold, setting up the dueling music playlists and the sonic payoff.”

The audio team mixed and created sound design with Avid Pro tools Ultimate. Audio plugins called on include Waves Mercury bundle,, DTS Surround tools and iZotope RX7 Advanced.

The Sugar team also created a cinematic look to the spots, thanks to colorist Bruce Bolden, who called on Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve and a Sony BVM OLED monitor. “He’s a veteran feature film colorist,” says Reed, “so he often brings that sensibility to advertising spots as well, meaning rich blacks and nice, even color palettes.”

Storage used at the studio is Avid Nexis and Facilis Terrablock.

Sight, Sound & Story focuses on editing, June 13 in NYC

The Sight, Sound & Story: Post Production Summit will take place at the NYIT Auditorium Theater on Broadway in New York City on June 13.

This year’s line-up features editors Mary Jo Markey, ACE (Star Wars — Episode VII: The Force Awakens, Star Trek, Mission Impossible III, Charlie’s Angels), Kate Sanford, ACE (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, The Deuce, The Wire), Carla Gutierrez, ACE (RBG, La Corona, Chavela), Leo Trombetta, ACE (13 Reasons Why, True Detective, Mad Men) Jean Tsien, ACE (The Apollo, Dixie Chicks: Shut Up & Sing), moderator Bobbie O’Steen (author of “Cut to the Chase” and “The Invisible Cut”), moderator Jeremy Workman (Magical Universe, The World Before Your Feet) and moderator Gordon Burkell (AOTG.com).

Following the event is a networking/tech party sponsored by the American Cinema Editors, including light food, drinks and sponsored giveaways. Event admission is $49. You can register here. (Use Code: POSTPERSPECTIVE and save $20 off of your registration.)  

Boris FX will provide all attendees a free one-month subscription to Sapphire, Continuum & Mocha Pro.

Wacom updates its Intuos Pro Small tablet

Wacom has introduced a new Intuos Pro pen and touch tablet Small model to its advanced line of creative pen tablets. The new Intuos Pro Small joins the Intuos Pro Medium and Intuos Pro Large sizes already available.

Featuring Wacom’s precise Pro Pen 2 technology with over 8K pen pressure levels, pen tilt sensitivity, natural pen-on-paper feel and battery-free performance, artists now can choose the size — small, medium or large — that best fits their way of working.

The new small size features the same tablet working area as the previous model of Intuos Pro Small and targets on-the go creatives, whose Wacom tablet and PC or Mac laptops are always nearby. The space-saving tablet’s small footprint, wireless connectivity and battery-free pen technology that never needs charging makes setting makes working anywhere easy.

Built for pros, all three sizes of Intuos Pro tablets feature a TouchRing and ExpressKeys, six on the Small and eight on the Medium and Large, for the creation of customized shortcuts to speed up the creative workflow. In addition, incorporating both pen and touch on the tablet allows users to explore new ways to navigate and helps the whole creative experience become more interactive. The slim tablets, also feature a durable anodized aluminum back case and come with a desktop pen stand containing 10 replacement pen nibs.

The Wacom Pro Pen 2 features Wacom’s most advanced creative pen technology to date, with four times the pressure sensitivity as the original Pro Pen. 8,192 levels of pressure, tilt recognition and lag-free tracking effectively emulate working with traditional media by offering a natural drawing experience. Additionally, the pen’s customizable side switch allows one to easily access commonly used shortcuts, greatly speeding production.

Wacom offers two helpful accessory pens (purchased separately). The Pro Pen 3D, features a third button which can be set to perform typical 3D tasks such as tumbling objects in commonly used 3D creative apps. The newly released Pro Pen slim, supports some artists ergonomic preferences for a slimmer pen with a more pencil-like feel. Both are compatible with the Intuos Pro family and can help customize and speed the creative experience.

Intuos Pro is Bluetooth-enabled and compatible with Macs and PCs. All three sizes come with the Wacom Pro Pen 2, pen stand and feature ExpressKeys, TouchRing and multi-touch gesture control. The Intuos Pro Small ($249.95), Intuos Pro Medium ($379.95) and Intuos Pro Large ($499.95) are available now.

ACE announces new Eddie Awards timing

American Cinema Editors (ACE) has set the 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards, which recognize outstanding editing in film and television, for Friday, January 17, 2020 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. That date is almost three weeks earlier than usual as the truncated awards season landscape — ignited by the Oscars moving up to Feb. 9, 2020 — takes shape.

The television categories eligibility dates have also changed — television contenders must have aired between Jan. 1, 2019 and Nov. 1, 2019. Feature film eligibility remains the same with contenders having to be released between Jan. 1, 2019 and Dec. 31, 2019.

The black-tie awards ceremony will unveil winners for outstanding editing in 11 categories of film and television including:

Best Edited Feature Film (Drama)

Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy)

Best Edited Animated Film

Best Edited Documentary (Feature)

Best Edited Documentary (Non-Theatrical)

Best Edited Drama Series for Non-Commercial Television

Best Edited Drama Series for Commercial Television

Best Edited Comedy Series for Non-Commercial Television

Best Edited Comedy Series for Commercial Television

Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television

Best Edited Non-Scripted Series

Three special honors will be handed out that evening including two Career Achievement recipients presented to film editors of outstanding merit and the Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year honor presented to a filmmaker who exemplifies distinguished achievement in the art and business of film. Honorary award recipients will be announced later this year.

Submissions for the ACE Eddie Awards open September 13 and close on November 1. For more information or to submit for awards consideration beginning September 13, visit the ACE web site.

Key dates for the 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards are:

September 13, 2019 Submissions for Nominations Begin

November 1, 2019 Submissions for Nominations End

November 18, 2019 Nomination Ballots Sent

December 9, 2019 Nomination Ballots Due

December 11, 2019 Nominations Announced

December 16, 2019 Final Ballots Sent

December 20, 2019 Deadline for Advertising

January 5, 2020 Blue Ribbon Screenings (Television categories)

January 6, 2020 Final Ballots Due

January 15, 2020 Nominee Cocktail Party

January 17, 2020 70th Annual ACE Eddie Awards

 

Review: Avid Media Composer Symphony 2018 v.12

By Brady Betzel

In February of 2018, we saw a seismic shift in the leadership at Avid. Chief executive officer Louis Hernandez Jr. was removed and subsequently replaced by Jeff Rosica. Once Rosica was installed, I think everyone who was worried Avid was about to be liquidated to the highest bidder breathed a sigh of temporary relief. Still unsure whether new leadership was going to right a tilting ship, I immediately wanted to see a new action plan from Avid, specifically on where Media Composer and Symphony were going.

Media Composer with Symphony

Not long afterward, I was happily reading how Avid was taking lessons from its past transgressions and listening to its clients. I heard Avid was taking tours around the industry and listening to what customers and artists needed from them. Personally, I was asking myself if Media Composer with Symphony would ever be the finishing tool of Avid DS was. I’m happy to say, it’s starting to look that way.

It appears from the outside that Rosica is indeed the breath of fresh air Avid needed. At NAB 2019, Avid teased the next iteration of Media Composer, version 2019, with overhauled interface and improvements, such as a 32-bit float color pipeline workflow complete with ACES color management and a way to deliver IMF packages; a new engine with a distributed processing engine; and a whole new product called Media Composer|Enterprise, all of which will really help sell this new Media Composer. But the 2019 update is coming soon and until then I took a deep dive into Media Composer 2018 v12, which has many features editors, assistants, and even colorists have been asking for: a new Avid Titler, shape-based color correction (with Symphony option), new multicam features and more.

Titling
As an online editor who uses Avid Media Composer with Symphony option about 60% of the time, titling is always a tricky subject. Avid has gone through some rough seas when dealing with how to fix the leaky hole known as the Avid Title Tool. The classic Avid Title Tool was basic but worked. However, if you aligned something in the Title Tool interface to Title Safe zones, it might jump around once you close the Title Tool interface. Fonts wouldn’t always stay the same when working across PC and MacOS platforms. The list goes on, and it is excruciatingly annoying.

Titler

Let’s take a look at some Avid history: In 2002, Avid tried to appease creators and introduced the, at the time, a Windows-only titler: Avid Marquee. While Marquee was well-intentioned, it was extremely difficult to understand if you weren’t interested in 3D lighting, alignment and all sorts of motion graphics stuff that not all editors want to spend time learning. So, most people didn’t use it, and if they did it took a little while for anyone taking over the project to figure out what was done.

In December of 2014, Avid leaned on the New Blue Titler, which would work in projects higher than 1920×1080 resolution. Unfortunately, many editors ran into a very long render at the end, and a lot bailed on it. Most decided to go out of house and create titles in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe After Effects. While this all relates to my experience, I assume others feel the same.

In Avid Media Composer 2018, the company has introduced the Avid Titler, which in the Tools menu is labeled: Avid Titler +. It works like an effect rather than a rendered piece of media like in the traditional Avid Title Tool, where an Alpha and a Fill layer worked. This method is similar to how NewBlue or Marquee functioned. However, Avid Titler works by typing directly on the record monitor; adding a title is as easy as marking an in and out point and clicking on the T+ button on the timeline.

You can specify things like kerning, shadow, outlines, underlines, boxes, backgrounds and more. One thing I found peculiar was that under Face, the rotation settings rotate individual letters and not the entire word by default. I reached out to Avid and they are looking into making the entire word rotation option the default in the mini toolbar of Avid Titler. So stay tuned.

Also, you can map your fast forward and rewind buttons to “Go To Next/Previous Event.” This allows you to jump to your next edits in the timeline but also to the next/previous keyframes when in the Effect Editor. Typically, you click on the scrub line in the record window and then you can use those shortcuts to jump to the next keyframe. In the Avid Titler, it would just start typing in the text box. Furthermore, when I wanted to jump out of Effect Editor mode and back into Edit Mode, I usually hit “y,” but that did not get me out of Effects Mode (Avid did mention they are working on updates to the Avid Titler that would solve this issue). The new Avid Titler definitely has some bugs and/or improvements that are needed, and they are being addressed, but it’s a decent start toward a modern title editor.

Shape-based color correction

Color
If you want advanced color correction built into Media Composer, then you are going to want the Symphony option. Media Composer with the Symphony option allows for more detailed color correction using secondary color corrections as well as some of the newer updates, including shape-based color correction. Before Resolve and Baselight became more affordable, Symphony was the gold standard for color correction on a budget (and even not on a budget since it works so well in the same timeline the editors use). But what we are really here for is the 2018 v.12 update of Shapes.

With the Symphony option, you can now draw specific regions on the footage for your color correction to affect. It essentially works similarly to a layer-based system like Adobe Photoshop. You can draw shapes with the same familiar tools you are used to drawing with in the Paint or AniMatte tools and then just apply your brightness, saturation or hue swings in those areas only. On the color correction page you can access all of these tools on the right-hand side, including the softening, alpha view, serial mode and more.

When using the new shape-based tools you must point the drop-down menu to “CC Effect.” From there you can add a bunch of shapes on top of each other and they will play in realtime. If you want to lay a base correction down, you can specify it in the shape-based sidebar, then click shape and you can dial in the specific areas to your or your client’s taste. You can check off the “Serial Mode” box to have all corrections interact with one another or uncheck the box to allow for each color correction to be a little more isolated — a really great option to keep in mind when correcting. Unfortunately, tracking a shape can only be done in the Effect Editor, so you need to kind of jump out of color correction mode, track, and then go back. It’s not the end of the world, but it would be infinitely better if you could track efficiently inside of the color correction window. Avid could even take it further by allowing planar tracking by an app like Mocha Pro.

Shape-based color correction

The new shape-based corrector also has an alpha view mode identified by the infinity symbol. I love this! I often find myself making mattes in the Paint tool, but it can now be done right in the color correction tool. The Symphony option is an amazing addition to Media Composer if you need to go further than simple color correction but not dive into a full color correction app like Baselight or Resolve. In fact, for many projects you won’t need much more than what Symphony can do. Maybe a +10 on the contrast, +5 on the brightness and +120 on the saturation and BAM a finished masterpiece. Kind of kidding, but wait until you see it work.

Multicam
The final update I want to cover is multicam editing and improvements to editing group clips. I cannot emphasize enough how much time this would have saved me as an assistant editor back in the pre-historic Media Composer days… I mean we had dongles, and I even dabbled in the Meridian box. Literally days of grouping and regrouping could have been avoided with the Edit Group feature. But I did make a living fixing groups that were created incorrectly, so I guess this update is a Catch 22. Anyway, you can now edit groups in Media Composer by creating a group, right-clicking on that group and selecting Edit Group. From there, the group will now open in the Record Monitor as a sequence, and from there you can move, nudge and even add cameras to a previously created group. Once you are finished, you can update the group and refresh any sequences that used that group to update if you wish. One issue is that with mixed frame rate groups, Avid says committing to that sequence might produce undesirable effects.

Editing workspace

Cost of Entry
How much does Media Composer cost these days? While you can still buy it outright, it seems a bit more practical to go monthly since you will automatically get updates, but it can still be a little tricky. Do you need PhraseFind and/or ScriptSync? Do you need the Symphony option? Do you need to access shared storage? There are multiple options depending on your needs. If you want everything, then Media Composer Ultimate for $49 per month is what you want. If you want Media Composer and just one add-on, like Symphony, it will cost $19 per month plus $199 per year for the Symphony option. If you want to test the water before jumping in, you can always try Media Composer First.

For a good breakdown of the Media Composer pricing structure, check out KeyCode Media  page (a certified reseller). Another great link with tons of information organized into easily digestible bites is this. Additionally, www.freddylinks.com is a great resource chock full of everything else Avid, written by Avid technical support specialist Fredrik Liljeblad out of Sweden.

Group editing

Summing Up
In the end, I use and have used Media Composer with Symphony for over 15 years, and it is the most reliable nonlinear editor supporting multiple editors in a shared network environment that I have used. While Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple Final Cut Pro X and Blackmagic Resolve are offering fancy new features and collaboration modes, Avid seems to always hold stabile when I need it the most. These new improvements and a UI overhaul (set to debut in May), new leadership from Rosica, and the confidence of Rosica’s faithful employees all seem to be paying off and getting Avid back on the track they should have always been on.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Jesse Averna: A veteran editor shares some wisdom

You work hard in a tough industry in challenging times. It can be easy to get bogged down with the expectations you’ve set for yourself and your career. If you’re in need of a dose of perspective and positivity, then take a moment to step away from your timeline, grab a coffee and meditate on a series of recent tweets by LA-based editor Jesse Averna (@dr0id).While they might not be strictly post production tweets, per say, it’s nice to hear some encouragement from a fellow post pro.

Caricature of Jesse Averna:  by Kevin Deters.

Averna is an editing veteran who has five Emmy Award wins with two additional nominations — all for his work on Sesame Street. You can currently find him working away at Walt Disney Animation Studios in Burbank, where he’s been awarded an Annie nomination for his most recent work on Ralph Breaks the Internet. Many of you might know him as one of the founders of the Twitter group #postchat.

Every so often he will Tweet out words of wisdom, hope and inspiration. We wanted to share those with you.

Passion:
If you have a passion for something, pursue it. We only get to do this life once. I’m just an idiot kid from Albuquerque who’s doing my dreams. Please go for it. You can get there. Believe in yourself. Work hard. Be kind. Ask for help.

You’re not wasting your time:
It all counts. Everything you have worked on will educate your next project and work ethic. Don’t get down if you aren’t working on the type of material you want to be working on at the moment. Squeeze everything you can out of it. Take it with you to the next gig. It all counts.

Good news:
Here’s some good news — it doesn’t matter what you think you should have accomplished by now. You’re not competing with anyone else. Your timetable doesn’t matter. It doesn’t even matter how many times you’ve failed. YOU MATTER. You are valuable regardless of your accomplishments.

A high tide raises all boats:
The only way to survive this industry is to support your friends, cheer them on, celebrate their victories, mourn their losses, help when asked. Give when you can.

You’ve already made it:
Look at what you’ve achieved. What you’ve overcome. Where you are now. Sure, you are looking at the road ahead and where you feel that you need to be. But, for today, be proud of what you’ve done.

Jesse

Be the change:
We’ll spend our whole lives being judged by others and ourselves. The issues and the problems. But there are wonderful, unique, powerful aspects to you. Know your weaknesses, but also know that you can change lives. You can impact the world around you. Your kindness can do that.

Know your value:
Value. If you don’t value your worth, you can’t expect others to. You are valuable. And I’m not talking about money. You’re worth more than that.

Your uniqueness:
You are the only YOU in this world. That’s a big deal. Let’s not waste it measuring ourselves to other people. You’ll never be them, only yourself.

Take a deep breath:
It seems important right now, but it’s most likely not as important as you think it is.

No matter how you feel tonight, there’s always tomorrow. Feelings pass. You are more valuable than you know. Today does not define you.

Perspective:
You are valuable. You are loved. You are missed. You are important. You are thought about.

Kindness:
There is no “them.” Only “us.” And we need to love our way through this moment in history. People need you. People need help, kindness, love, advice, mentoring, an ear to listen, a shoulder to cry on. You are important and NEEDED right now.

If you’d like to hear Averna’s professional advice and some additional encouragement, check out our last article with him.


Jesse Averna tweets from a personal account and in no way speaks for or represents the companies he works for.

Behind the Title: Exile editor Lorin Askill

Name: Lorin Askill

Company: Exile (@exileedit)

Can you describe your company?
Exile is an editorial and finishing house based in NYC and LA. I am based in New York.

What’s your job title?
Editor

What does that entail?
I take moving images, sound and other raw materials and arrange them in time to create shape and meaning and ultimately tell stories. I always loved the Tarkovsky book title, sculpting in Time. I like to think that is what I do.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Probably how much of an all-encompassing creative process it is. As well as editing picture, I source and edit sounds, I experiment with music, I create rough comps and block compositions for VFX, I play with color and place titles. At its best, editing is not only finding the best pieces of footage and ordering them to tell a story, an editor is crafting the whole visual-aural world that will be carried through to the finished piece.

Hyundai

What’s your favorite part of the job?
I love watching the first cut! When you’re excited about a project, you’ve found the gems and assembled your favorite pieces, solved some challenging problems, fudged together some tricky stunt or effects moments (and it’s already working!). Then you put a piece of music under it that (which you know you can’t actually use), and you feel like it has a good shape and runs from start to finish — usually very over length. It’s so much fun getting to this stage, then sitting back, turning the volume up, pressing play and watching it all together for the first time!

What’s your least favorite part?
My least favorite part is then going through and destroying that first cut with boring realities like running length and client requirements… JOKING. I also love the process of tightening and honing a cut to hit all the right notes and achieve the ultimate vision. But there is nothing like watching the first assembly of a project you love.

What is your most productive time of the day?
Probably first thing when I’ve got fresh eyes and I’m solving problems that seemed impossible the day before. Also the very end of the day when you’re in a little delirious zone and you’re really immersed and engrossed. When I’m cutting a music video, I like to pull up the project late at night and give myself the freedom to play because your brain is definitely functioning in a different way, and sometimes it’s really creative.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I think I’d photograph landscapes and spread environmental awareness while having food pop-ups in my garden.

Why did you choose this profession? How early on did you know this would be your path?
Ever since I got my first iMac in high school and started speeding up, slowing down and reversing footage in iMovie. I was addicted to it. I was manipulating time and creating stories with images and sound, and it felt like a beautiful combination of visual art and music, both of which I loved and studied. When I realized I could make a living being creative, and hopefully one day make movies. It seemed like a no-brainer.

Sia

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Most recently I’ve been editing a passion project. It’s a short film directed by my brother. It’s a proof-of-concept for a film we’ve been writing together for a long time. Before that I was working on a bunch commercial projects while also cutting musical sequences for a feature film directed by Sia.

What do you use to edit?
I grew up on iMovie and then Final Cut Pro. Now I use Adobe Premiere Pro and find it does exactly what I need it to do.

Name a few pieces of technology you can’t live without.
I hate to say my phone, but it’s undeniable. My laptop for edits on the run. Good headphones. My Hasselblad from the ‘60s.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I get into nature whenever possible, and I cook.

NAB 2019: postPerspective Impact Award winners

postPerspective has announced the winners of our Impact Awards from NAB 2019. Seeking to recognize debut products with real-world applications, the postPerspective Impact Awards are voted on by an anonymous judging body made up of respected industry artists and pros (to whom we are very grateful). It’s working pros who are going to be using these new tools — so we let them make the call.

It was fun watching the user ballots come in and discovering which products most impressed our panel of post and production pros. There are no entrance fees for our awards. All that is needed is the ability to impress our voters with products that have the potential to make their workdays easier and their turnarounds faster.

We are grateful for our panel of judges, which grew even larger this year. NAB is exhausting for all, so their willingness to share their product picks and takeaways from the show isn’t taken for granted. These men and women truly care about our industry and sharing information that helps their fellow pros succeed.

To be successful, you can’t operate in a vacuum. We have found that companies who listen to their users, and make changes/additions accordingly, are the ones who get the respect and business of working pros. They aren’t providing tools they think are needed; they are actively asking for feedback. So, congratulations to our winners and keep listening to what your users are telling you — good or bad — because it makes a difference.

The Impact Award winners from NAB 2019 are:

• Adobe for Creative Cloud and After Effects
• Arraiy for DeepTrack with The Future Group’s Pixotope
• ARRI for the Alexa Mini LF
• Avid for Media Composer
• Blackmagic Design for DaVinci Resolve 16
• Frame.io
• HP for the Z6/Z8 workstations
• OpenDrives for Apex, Summit, Ridgeview and Atlas

(All winning products reflect the latest version of the product, as shown at NAB.)

Our judges also provided quotes on specific projects and trends that they expect will have an impact on their workflows.

Said one, “I was struck by the predicted impact of 5G. Verizon is planning to have 5G in 30 cities by end of year. The improved performance could reach 20x speeds. This will enable more leverage using cloud technology.

“Also, AI/ML is said to be the single most transformative technology in our lifetime. Impact will be felt across the board, from personal assistants, medical technology, eliminating repetitive tasks, etc. We already employ AI technology in our post production workflow, which has saved tens of thousands of dollars in the last six months alone.”

Another echoed those thoughts on AI and the cloud as well: “AI is growing up faster than anyone can reasonably productize. It will likely be able to do more than first thought. Post in the cloud may actually start to take hold this year.”

We hope that postPerspective’s Impact Awards give those who weren’t at the show, or who were unable to see it all, a starting point for their research into new gear that might be right for their workflows. Another way to catch up? Watch our extensive video coverage of NAB.

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Ned Borgman

This editor’s path began early. “I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials,” he says.

Name: Ned Borgman

Company: PS260

Can you describe your company?
PS260 is a post house built for ideas, creative solutions and going beyond the boards. We have studios in New York, Venice, California and Boston. I am based in New York.

What’s your job title?
Film editor, problem solver, cleaner of messes.

What does that entail?
My job is to make everything look great. Every project takes an entire team of super-talented people who bring their expertise to bear to tell a story. They create all of the puzzle pieces that end up in the dailies, and I put them together in such a way that they can all shine their best.

Facebook small business campaign

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think it would be the sheer amount of stuff that can become an editor’s responsibility. So many details go into crafting a successful edit, and an editor needs to be well-versed in all of it. Color grading, visual effects, design, animation, music, sound design, the list goes on. The point isn’t to be a master of all of those things, (that’s why we work with other amazing people when it comes to finishing), but to know the needs of each of those parts and how to make sure every detail can get properly addressed.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
It’s the middle part. When we’re all in the middle of the edit, up to our necks in footage and options and ideas. Out of all of that exploration the best bits start to stand out. The sound design element from that cut and the music track from that other version and a take we tried last night. It all starts to make sense, and from there it’s about making sure the best bits can work well together.

What’s your least favorite?
Knowing there are always some great cuts that will only ever exist inside a Premiere Pro bin. Not every performance or music track or joke can make it into the final cut and out into the world and that’s ok. Maybe those cuts are airing in some other parallel universe.

What is your most productive time of the day?
Whenever the office is empty. So either early in the morning or late at night.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Probably something with photography. I’m too attached to visual storytelling, and I’m a horrible illustrator.

Why did you choose this profession? How early on did you know this would be your path? 
I’ve always been enamored with commercials. I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials. I remember making my first in-camera edit in third grade when I was messing around with the classroom camcorder set up on a tripod. I had recorded myself in front of the camera and then recorded a bit of the empty classroom. Playing it back, it looked like I had vanished into thin air. It blew my eight-year-old mind.

Burger King

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Let’s see, Burger King’s flame-broiled campaign with MullenLowe was great. It has a giant explosion, which is always nice. Facebook’s small business campaign with 72andSunny was a lot of fun with an amazing team of people. And some work for the Google Home Hub launch with Google Creative Labs was fun because launching stuff is exciting.

Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre? 
Not exactly. Every genre has its specific needs, but I think the fundamentals remain the same. I need to pay attention to rhythm, to performances, to music, to sound design, to VO — all of that stuff. It’s about staying in tune with how all of these ingredients interact with each other to create a reaction from the audience, no matter the reaction you’re striving for.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
I grew up obsessed with practical effects in movies, so I’d have to say Burger King “Gasoline Shuffle”. It has a massive explosion that was shot in camera and it looks incredible. I wish I was on set that day.

What do you use to edit?
Adobe Premiere Pro all the way. I like to think that one day I’ll be back on Avid Media Composer though.

What is your favorite plugin?
I don’t have one. Just give me that basic install.

Are you often asked to do more than edit? If so, what else are you asked to do?
Sure. I’ll often record the scratch VO when there’s one needed. My voice is…serviceable. What that means is that as soon as the real VO talent gets placed in the cut, everyone’s thrilled with how much better everything sounds. That’s cool by me.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPhone, my Shure in-ear headphones, and an extra long charging cable.

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Change some diapers. My wife and I just had our first kid last August, and she’s incredible. A game of peek-a-boo can really change your perspective.

NAB 2019: First impressions

By Mike McCarthy

There are always a slew of new product announcements during the week of NAB, and this year was no different. As a Premiere editor, the developments from Adobe are usually the ones most relevant to my work and life. Similar to last year, Adobe was able to get their software updates released a week before NAB, instead of for eventual release months later.

The biggest new feature in the Adobe Creative Cloud apps is After Effects’ new “Content Aware Fill” for video. This will use AI to generate image data to automatically replace a masked area of video, based on surrounding pixels and surrounding frames. This functionality has been available in Photoshop for a while, but the challenge of bringing that to video is not just processing lots of frames but keeping the replaced area looking consistent across the changing frames so it doesn’t stand out over time.

The other key part to this process is mask tracking, since masking the desired area is the first step in that process. Certain advances have been made here, but based on tech demos I saw at Adobe Max, more is still to come, and that is what will truly unlock the power of AI that they are trying to tap here. To be honest, I have been a bit skeptical of how much AI will impact film production workflows, since AI-powered editing has been terrible, but AI-powered VFX work seems much more promising.

Adobe’s other apps got new features as well, with Premiere Pro adding Free-Form bins for visually sorting through assets in the project panel. This affects me less, as I do more polishing than initial assembly when I’m using Premiere. They also improved playback performance for Red files, acceleration with multiple GPUs and certain 10-bit codecs. Character Animator got a better puppet rigging system, and Audition got AI-powered auto-ducking tools for automated track mixing.

Blackmagic
Elsewhere, Blackmagic announced a new version of Resolve, as expected. Blackmagic RAW is supported on a number of new products, but I am not holding my breath to use it in Adobe apps anytime soon, similar to ProRes RAW. (I am just happy to have regular ProRes output available on my PC now.) They also announced a new 8K Hyperdeck product that records quad 12G SDI to HEVC files. While I don’t think that 8K will replace 4K television or cinema delivery anytime soon, there are legitimate markets that need 8K resolution assets. Surround video and VR would be one, as would live background screening instead of greenscreening for composite shots. No image replacement in post, as it is capturing in-camera, and your foreground objects are accurately “lit” by the screens. I expect my next major feature will be produced with that method, but the resolution wasn’t there for the director to use that technology for the one I am working on now (enter 8K…).

AJA
AJA was showing off the new Ki Pro Go, which records up to four separate HD inputs to H.264 on USB drives. I assume this is intended for dedicated ISO recording of every channel of a live-switched event or any other multicam shoot. Each channel can record up to 1080p60 at 10-bit color to H264 files in MP4 or MOV and up to 25Mb.

HP
HP had one of their existing Z8 workstations on display, demonstrating the possibilities that will be available once Intel releases their upcoming DIMM-based Optane persistent memory technology to the market. I have loosely followed the Optane story for quite a while, but had not envisioned this impacting my workflow at all in the near future due to software limitations. But HP claims that there will be options to treat Optane just like system memory (increasing capacity at the expense of speed) or as SSD drive space (with DIMM slots having much lower latency to the CPU than any other option). So I will be looking forward to testing it out once it becomes available.

Dell
Dell was showing off their relatively new 49-inch double-wide curved display. The 4919DW has a resolution of 5120×1440, making it equivalent to two 27-inch QHD displays side by side. I find that 32:9 aspect ratio to be a bit much for my tastes, with 21:9 being my preference, but I am sure there are many users who will want the extra width.

Digital Anarchy
I also had a chat with the people at Digital Anarchy about their Premiere Pro-integrated Transcriptive audio transcription engine. Having spent the last three months editing a movie that is split between English and Mandarin dialogue, needing to be fully subtitled in both directions, I can see the value in their tool-set. It harnesses the power of AI-powered transcription engines online and integrates the results back into your Premiere sequence, creating an accurate script as you edit the processed clips. In my case, I would still have to handle the translations separately once I had the Mandarin text, but this would allow our non-Mandarin speaking team members to edit the Mandarin assets in the movie. And it will be even more useful when it comes to creating explicit closed captioning and subtitles, which we have been doing manually on our current project. I may post further info on that product once I have had a chance to test it out myself.

Summing Up
There were three halls of other products to look through and check out, but overall, I was a bit underwhelmed at the lack of true innovation I found at the show this year.

Full disclosure, I was only able to attend for the first two days of the exhibition, so I may have overlooked something significant. But based on what I did see, there isn’t much else that I am excited to try out or that I expect to have much of a serious impact on how I do my various jobs.

It feels like most of the new things we are seeing are merely commoditized versions of products that may originally have been truly innovative when they were initially released, but now are just slightly more fleshed out versions over time.

There seems to be much less pioneering of truly new technology and more repackaging of existing technologies into other products. I used to come to NAB to see all the flashy new technologies and products, but now it feels like the main thing I am doing there is a series of annual face-to-face meetings, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Until next year…


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with over 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

Blackmagic’s Resolve 16: speedy cut page, Resolve Editor Keyboard, more

Blackmagic was at NAB with Resolve 16, which in addition to dozens of new features includes a new editing tab focused on speed. While Resolve still has its usual robust editing offerings, this particular cut page is designed for those working on short-form projects and on tight deadlines. Think of having a client behind you watching you cut something together, or maybe showing your director a rough cut. You get in, you edit and you go — it’s speedy, like editing triage.

For those who don’t want to edit this way, no worries, you don’t have to use this new tab. Just ignore it and move on. It’s an option, and only an option. That’s another theme with Resolve 16 — if you don’t want to see the Fairlight tab, turn it off. You want to see something in a different way, turn it on.

Blackmagic also introduced the DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard, a new premium keyboard for Resolve that helps improve the speed of editing. It allows the use of two hands while editing, so transport control and selecting clips can be done while performing edits. The Resolve Editor Keyboard will be available in August for $995.

The keyboard combined with the new cut page is designed to further speed up editing. This alternate edit page lets users import, edit, trim, add transitions, titles, automatically match color, mix audio and more. Whether you’re delivering for broadcast or for YouTube, the cut page allows editors to do all things in one place. Plus, the regular edit page is still available, so customers can switch between edit and cut pages to change editing styles right in the middle of a job.

“The new cut page in DaVinci Resolve 16 helps television commercial and other high-end editors meet super tight deadlines on fast turn-around projects,” says Grant Petty, Blackmagic CEO. “We’ve designed a whole new high-performance, nonlinear workflow. The cut page is all about power and speed. Plus, editors that need to work on more complex projects can still use the regular edit page. DaVinci Resolve 16 gives different editors the choice to work the way they want.”

The cut page is reminiscent of how editors used to work in the days of tape, where finding a clip was easy because customers could just spool up and down the tape to see their media and select shots. Today, finding the right clip in a bin with hundreds of files can be slow. With source tape, users no longer have to hunt through bins to find the clip they need. They can click on the source tape button and all of the clips in their bin appear in the viewer as a single long “tape.” This makes it easy to scrub through all of the shots, find the parts they want and quickly edit them to the timeline. Blackmagic calls it an “old-fashioned” concept that’s been modernized to help editors find the shots they need fast.

The new cut page features a dual timeline so editors don’t have to zoom in or out. The upper timeline shows users the entire program, while the lower timeline shows the current work area. Both timelines are fully functional, allowing editors to move and trim clips in whichever timeline is most convenient.

Also new is the DaVinci Neural Engine, which uses deep neural networks and learning, along with AI, to power new features such as speed warp motion estimation for retiming, super scale for up-scaling footage, auto color and color matching, facial recognition and more. The DaVinci Neural Engine is entirely cross-platform and uses the latest GPU innovations for AI and deep learning. The Neural Engine provides simple tools to solve complex, repetitive and time-consuming problems. For example, it enables facial recognition to automatically sort and organize clips into bins based on people in the shot.

DaVinci Resolve 16 also features new adjustment clips that let users apply effects and grades to clips on the timeline below; quick export that can be used to upload projects to YouTube, Vimeo and Frame.io from anywhere in the application; and new GPU-accelerated scopes providing more technical monitoring options than before. So now sharing your work on social channels, or for collaboration via Frame.io., is simple because it’s integrated into Resolve 16 Studio

DaVinci Resolve 16 Studio features improvements to existing ResolveFX, along with several new plugins that editors and colorists will like. There are new ResolveFX plugins for adding vignettes, drop shadows, removing objects, adding analog noise and damage, chromatic aberration, stylizing video and more. There are also improvements to the scanline, beauty, face refinement, blanking fill, warper, dead pixel fixer and colorspace transformation plugins. Plus, users can now view and edit ResolveFX keyframes from the timeline curve editor on the edit page or from the keyframe panel on the color page.

Here are all the updates within Resolve 16:

• DaVinci Neural Engine for AI and deep learning features
• Dual timeline to edit and trim without zooming and scrolling
• Source tape to review all clips as if they were a single tape
• Trim interface to view both sides of an edit and trim
• Intelligent edit modes to auto-sync clips and edit
• Timeline review playback speed based on clip length
• Built-in tools for retime, stabilization and transform
• Render and upload directly to YouTube and Vimeo
• Direct media import via buttons
• Scalable interface for working on laptop screens
• Create projects with different frame rates and resolutions
• Apply effects to multiple clips at the same time
• DaVinci Neural Engine detects faces and auto-creates bins
• Frame rate conversions and motion estimation
• Cut and edit page image stabilization
• Curve editor ease in and out controls
• Tape-style audio scrubbing with pitch correction
• Re-encode only changed files for faster rendering
• Collaborate remotely with Frame.io integration
• Improved GPU performance for Fusion 3D operations
• Cross platform GPU accelerated tools
• Accelerated mask operations including B-Spline and bitmap
• Improved planar and tracker performance
• Faster user and smart cache
• GPU-accelerated scopes with advanced technical monitoring
• Custom and HSL curves now feature histogram overlay
• DaVinci Neural Engine auto color and shot match
• Synchronize SDI output to viewer zoom
• Mix and master immersive 3D audio
• Elastic wave audio alignment and retiming
• Bus tracks with automation on timeline
• Foley sampler, frequency analyzer, dialog processor, FairlightFX
• 500 royalty-free Foley sounds effects
• Share markers and notes in collaboration workflows
• Individual user cache for collaborative projects
• Resolve FX plugins with timeline and keyframes

Avid offers rebuilt engine and embraces cloud, ACES, AI, more

By Daniel Restuccio

During its Avid Connect conference just prior to NAB, Avid announced a Media Composer upgrade, support for ACES color standard and additional upgrades to a number of its toolsets, apps and services, including Avid Nexis.

The chief news from Avid is that Media Composer, its flagship video editing system, has been significantly retooled: sporting a new user interface, rebuilt engine, and additional built-in audio, visual effects, color grading and delivery features.

In a pre-interview with postPerspective, Avid president/CEO Jeff Rosica said, “We’re really trying to leap frog and jump ahead to where the creative tools need to go.”

Avid asked themselves, what did they need to do “to help production and post production really innovate?” He pointed to TV shows and films, and how complex they’re getting. “That means they’re dealing with more media, more elements, and with so many more decisions just in the program itself. Let alone the fact that the (TV or film) project may have to have 20 different variants just to go out the door.”

Jeff Rosica

The new paneled user interface simplifies the workspace, has redesigned bins to find media faster, as well as task-based workspaces showing only what the user wants and needs to see.

Dave Colantuoni, VP of product management at Avid, said they spent the most amount of time studying the way that editors manage and organize bins and content within Media Composer. “Some of our editors use 20, 30, 40 bins at a time. We’ve really spent a lot of time so that we can provide an advantage to you in how you approach organizing your media. “

Avid is also offering more efficient workflow solutions. Users, without leaving Media Composer, can work in 8K, 16K or HDR thanks to the newly built-in 32-bit full float color pipeline. Additionally, Avid continues to work with OTT content providers to help establish future industry standards.

“We’re trying to give as much creative power to the creative people as we can, and bring them new ways to deal with things,” said Rosica. “We’re also trying to help the workflow side. We’re trying to help make sure production doesn’t have to do more with less, or sometimes more with the same budget. Cloud (computing) allows us to bring a lot of new capabilities to the products, and we’re going to be cloud powering a lot of our products… more than you’ve seen before.”

The new Media Composer engine is now native OP1A, can handle more video and audio streams, offers Live Timeline and background rendering, and a distributed processing add-on option to shorten turnaround times and speed up post production.

“This is something our competitors do pretty well,” explained Colantuoni. “And we have different instances of OP1A working among the different Avid workflows. Until now, we’ve never had it working natively inside of Media Composer. That’s super-important because a lot of capabilities started in OP1A, and we can now keep it pristine through the pipeline.”

Said Rosica, “We are also bringing the ability to do distributive rendering. An editor no longer has to render or transcode on their machine. They can perform those tasks in a distributed or centralized render farm environment. That allows this work to get done behind the scenes. This is actually an Avid Supply solution, so it will be very powerful and reliable. Users will be able to do background rendering, as well as distributive rendering and move things off the machine to other centralized machines. That’s going to be very helpful for a lot of post workflows.”

Avid had previously offered three main flavors of Media Composer: Media Composer First, the free version; Media Composer; and Media Composer Ultimate. Now they are also offering a new Enterprise version.

For the first time, large production teams can customize the interface for any role in the organization, whether the user is a craft editor, assistant, logger or journalist. It also offers unparalleled security to lock down content, reducing the chances of unauthorized leaks of sensitive media. Enterprise also integrates with Editorial Management 2019.

“The new fourth tier at the top is what we are calling the Enterprise Edition or Enterprise. That word doesn’t necessarily mean broadcast,” says Rosica. “It means for business deployment. This is for post houses and production companies, broadcast, and even studios. This lets the business, or the enterprise, or production, or post house to literally customize interfaces and customize work spaces to the job role or to the user.”

Nexis Cloudspaces
Avid also announced Avid Nexis|Cloudspaces. So Instead of resorting to NAS or external drives for media storage, Avid Nexis|Cloudspaces allows editorial to offload projects and assets not currently in production. Cloudspaces extends Avid Nexis storage directly to Microsoft Azure.

“Avid Nexis|Cloudspaces brings the power of the cloud to Avid Nexis, giving organizations a cost-effective and more efficient way to extend Avid Nexis storage to the cloud for reliable backup and media parking,” said Dana Ruzicka, chief product officer/senior VP at Avid. “Working with Microsoft, we are offering all Avid Nexis users a limited-time free offer of 2TB of Microsoft Azure storage that is auto-provisioned for easy setup and as much capacity as you need, when you need it.”

ACES
The Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) team also announced that Avid is now part of the ACES Logo Program, as the first Product Partner in the new Editorial Finishing product category. ACES is a free, open, device-independent color management and image interchange system and is the global standard for color management, digital image interchange and archiving. Avid will be working to implement ACES in conformance with logo program specifications for consistency and quality with a high quality ACES-color managed video creation workflow.

“We’re pleased to welcome Avid to the ACES logo program,” said Andy Maltz, managing director of the ACES Council. “Avid’s participation not only benefits editors that need their editing systems to accurately manage color, but also the broader ACES end-user community through expanded adoption of ACES standards and best practices.”

What’s Next?
“We’ve already talked about how you can deploy Media Composer or other tools in a virtualized environment, or how you can use these kind of cloud environments to extend or advance production,” said Rosica. “We also see that these things are going to allow us to impact workloads. You’ll see us continue to power our MediaCentral platform, editorial management of MediaCentral, and even things like Media Composer with AI to help them get to the job faster. We can help automate functions, automate environments and use cloud technologies to allow people to collaborate better, to share better, to just power their workloads. You’re going to see a lot from us over time.”

Adobe’s new Content-Aware fill in AE is magic, plus other CC updates

By Brady Betzel

NAB is just under a week away, and we are here to share some of Adobe’s latest Creative Cloud offerings. And there are a few updates worth mentioning, such as a freeform project panel in Premiere Pro, AI-driven Auto Ducking for Ambience for Audition and addition of a Twitch extension for Character Animator. But, in my opinion, the Adobe After Effects updates are what this year’s release will be remembered by.


Content Aware: Here is the before and after. Our main image is the mask.

There is a new expression editor in After Effects, so us old pseudo-website designers can now feel at home with highlighting, line numbers and more. There are also performance improvements, such as faster project loading times and new deBayering support for Metal on macOS. But the first prize ribbon goes to the Content-Aware fill for video powered by Adobe Sensei, the company’s AI technology. It’s one of those voodoo features that when you use it, you will be blown away. If you have ever used Mocha Pro by BorisFX then you have had a similar tool known as the “Object Removal” tool. Essentially, you draw around the object you want to remove, such as a camera shadow or boom mic, hit the magic button and your object will be removed with a new background in its place. This will save users hours of manual work.

Freeform Project panel in Premiere.

Here are some details on other new features:

● Freeform Project panel in Premiere Pro— Arrange assets visually and save layouts for shot selects, production tasks, brainstorming story ideas, and assembly edits.
● Rulers and Guides—Work with familiar Adobe design tools inside Premiere Pro, making it easier to align titling, animate effects, and ensure consistency across deliverables.
● Punch and Roll in Audition—The new feature provides efficient production workflows in both Waveform and Multitrack for longform recording, including voiceover and audiobook creators.
● Surprise viewers in Twitch Live-Streaming Triggers with Character Animator Extension—Livestream performances are enhanced where audiences engage with characters in real-time with on-the-fly costume changes, impromptu dance moves, and signature gestures and poses—a new way to interact and even monetize using Bits to trigger actions.
● Auto Ducking for ambient sound in Audition and Premiere Pro — Also powered by Adobe Sensei, Auto Ducking now allows for dynamic adjustments to ambient sounds against spoken dialog. Keyframed adjustments can be manually fine-tuned to retain creative control over a mix.
● Adobe Stock now offers 10 million professional-quality, curated, royalty-free HD and 4K video footage and Motion Graphics templates from leading agencies and independent editors to use for editorial content, establishing shots or filling gaps in a project.
● Premiere Rush, introduced late last year, offers a mobile-to-desktop workflow integrated with Premiere Pro for on-the-go editing and video assembly. Built-in camera functionality in Premiere Rush helps you take pro-quality video on your mobile devices.

The new features for Adobe Creative Cloud are now available with the latest version of Creative Cloud.

Arvato to launch VPMS MediaEditor NLE at NAB

First seen as a technology preview at IBC 2018, Arvato’s MediaEditor is a browser-based desktop editor aimed at journalistic editing and content preparation workflows. MediaEditor projects can be easily exported and published in various formats, including square and vertical video, or can be opened in Adobe Premiere with VPMS EditMate for craft editing.

MediaEditor, which features a familiar editing interface, offers simple drag-and-drop transitions and effects, as well as basic color correction. Users can also record voiceovers directly into a sequence, and the system enables automatic mixing of audio tracks for quicker turnaround. Arvato will add motion graphics for captioning and pre-generated graphics in an upcoming version of MediaEditor.

MediaEditor is a part of Arvato Systems’ Video Production Management Suite (VPMS) enterprise MAM solution. Like other products in the suite, it can be independently deployed and scaled, or combined with other products for workflows across the media enterprise. MediaEditor can also be used with Vidispine-based systems, and VPMS and Vidispine clients can access their material through MediaEditor whether on-premise or via the cloud. MediaEditor takes advantage of the advanced VPMS streaming technology allowing users to work anywhere with high-quality, responsive video playback, even on lower-speed connections.

Duo teams up to shoot, post Upside Down music video

The Gracie and Rachel music video Upside Down, a collaboration between the grand prize-winners of Silver Sound Showdown, was written, directed and edited by Ace Salisbury and Adam Khan. Showdown is one-part music video film festival, one-part battle of the bands. In a rare occurrence, Salisbury and Khan, both directors in competition, tied for grand prize with their music videos (RhodoraStairwell My Love). Showdown is held annually at Brooklyn Bowl, a bowling alley and venue in Brooklyn, New York.

Ace Salisbury

We reached out to the directors and the band to find out more about this Silver Sound-produced four-minute offering about a girl slowly unraveling emotionally, which was shot with a Red camera.

What did you actually win? What resources were available to you?
Salisbury: Winning the grand prize got me teamed up with the winning band Gracie and Rachel, and with Adam, to make a music video, with Silver Sound stepping in to offer their team to help shoot and edit, and giving time at their partner’s studio space at Parlay Studios in New Jersey.

Khan: Silver Sound offered a DP, editor and colorist, but Ace and I decided to do of all that ourselves. Parlay Studios graced us with three days in one of their spaces, as well as access to any equipment available. I was a kid in a candy store.

What was it like collaborating with a co-director and a band you had never met before?
Salisbury: Working with a co-director can be great — you can balance the workload, benefit from your differing skillsets and shake up your usual comfort zone for how you go about making work.

It’s important to stop being precious about your vision for the project, and be game to compromise on every idea you bring, but you learn a lot. Having never met Adam before made the whole experience more exciting. I had no ability to predict what he would bring to the project in terms of personality and work style from looking at his reel.

Adam Khan

Making a video with a production company is like having a well-connected producer on your project; once you get them onboard with your idea, all of the resources at their disposal come out of the woodwork, and things like studio space and high-power DPs come into the mix if you want them.

Pitching a music video to a band you’ve never met is interesting. You look at their music, aesthetics and previous music videos and try to predict what direction they’ll want to move in. You want to make them something they’ll embrace and want to promote the hell out of, not sweep under the rug. With Gracie and Rachel, they have such an established aesthetic, the key was figuring out how to take what they had and make it look polished.

Khan: At first I was wary of co-directing, I was concerned our ideas/egos would clash. But after meeting with Ace all worry vanished. Sure both of us had to compromise but there was never any friction; ideas and concepts flowed. Working with a new band requires looking back at their previous work and getting a feel for the aesthetic.

Gracie and Rachel: Collaborating with people you haven’t yet worked with is always a unique experience. You really get to hone your skills when it comes to thinking on your feet and practicing the art of give-and-take. Compromise is important, and so is staying true to your artistic values. If you can learn from others how to expand on what you already know, you’re gaining something powerful.

What is Upside Down about?
Salisbury: Upside Down is a video about emotional unraveling. Gracie portrays a girl whose world literally turns upside down as her mental state deteriorates. She is attached via a long rope to her shadow self, portrayed by Rachel, who takes control of her, pulling her across the floor and suspending her in the air. I co-authored the concept, co-directed and co-edited the video with Adam.

The original concept involved the fabrication of a complicated camera rig that would rotate both the actor and camera together. Imagine a giant rotisserie with the actor strapped in on one side and the camera on another, all rotating together. Just three days before our shoot date, the machine fabricator let us know that there were safety and liability issues which meant they couldn’t give us a finished rig. Adam and I scrambled to put together a modified concept using rope rigging in place of this ill-fated machine.

Khan: Upside Down is abstract; it was our job to make it tangible.

Gracie, you actually performed in upside down. What was that like, and what did you learn from that experience?
Yes, I really was suspended upside down! I trained for that for only about an hour or two prior to the actual shoot with some really lovely aerialist professionals. It was surprising to learn what your body feels like after doing dozens of takes upside down!

Can you talk about the digital glitches in the video?
Salisbury: On set, one of the monitors was seriously glitching out. I took a video of the glitched monitor with my phone and showed it to Adam, saying, “This is what our video needs to look like!”

We tried to match the footage of the glitching monitor on set, manipulating our footage in After Effects. We developed a scrambling technique for randomly generating white blocks on screen. As much as we liked those effects, the original phone video of the glitched monitor ended up making it into the final video.

People might be surprised by how much animation goes into a live-action project that they would never notice. For a project like Upside Down, a lot of invisible animation goes into it, like matting the edges of the spotlight’s spill on the stage floor. Not all animation jobs look like Steamboat Willie.

This video had a few invisible animated elements, like removing stunt wire, removing a spot on the stage, and cleaning up the black portions of the frame.

What did you shoot on?
Khan: This video was shot with a Red Epic Dragon rocking the Fujinon 19-90.

What tools were used for post?
Salisbury: The software used on this video was Adobe Premiere and After Effects—Premiere for the basic assembly of the footage, and After Effects for the heavy graphical lifting and color correct. Everything looks better coming out of After Effects.

Are there tools that you wish you had access to?
Salisbury: Personally, I was pretty happy with the tools we had access to. For this concept, we had everything we needed, tool-wise.

Khan: Faster computers.

How much of what you do is music video work? Do you work differently depending on the genre?
Khan: My focus is music videos, though you can find me working on all types of projects. From the production standpoint, things are the same. The real difference comes from what can be done in front of the camera. In a music video, one does not need to follow the rules. In fact, it is encouraged to break the rules.

Salisbury: I get hired to direct music videos every so often. The budget tends to be what dictates the experience, whether it’s going to be a video of a band rocking out shot on a DSLR or a high-intensity animated spectacle. Music videos can be a chance to establish wild aesthetics without the burden of having to justify them in your film’s world. You can go nuts. It’s a music video!

Where do you find inspiration?
Khan: Inspiration comes from past filmmakers and artists alike. I also pay close attention to my peers, there is some incredible stuff coming out. For this project, we pulled from Gracie and Rachel’s previous songs and visuals.

Salisbury: I find that I’m usually most influenced by old video games, but that wasn’t going to be a good fit for this band. My initial intention was to combine Gracie and Rachel’s aesthetic with a Quay Brothers aesthetic, but things shifted a bit by the end of the project.

InSync intros frame rate converter plug-in for Mac-based Premiere users

InSync Technology’s FrameFormer motion compensated frame rate converter now is available as a plug-in for Adobe Premiere Pro users working on Macs. Simplifying and accelerating deployment through automated settings, FrameFormer provides conversion for all types of content from sub-QCIF up to 8K and beyond.

“Frame rate conversion is an essential requirement for monetizing content domestically and internationally, as well as for integrating mixed frame rate footage into a production,” reports managing director of InSync Technology Paola Hobson. “A high-quality motion compensated standards converter is the only solution for these applications, and we’re adding to our solutions for Mac users with our new FrameFormer plug-in for Adobe Premiere Pro for macOS.”

The FrameFormer Adobe Premiere Pro Mac plug-in complements InSync’s plug-ins for Final Cut Pro (Mac) and Adobe Premiere Pro (Windows), quickly and conveniently meeting any frame rate and format conversion requirements. Integrated seamlessly into Adobe Premiere Pro, the plug-in offers a simple user interface that allows users to select the required conversion and to preview in-progress results via on-screen thumbnails.

“In repurposing different frame rate material for integration into your media projects, attention to detail makes all the difference,” added Hobson. “Picture quality must be preserved at every step because even the smallest error introduced early in the process will propagate, resulting in highly visible defects down the line. Now our family of FrameFormer plug-ins gives Adobe Premiere Pro users working on both Mac and Windows systems confidence in the results of their frame rate conversion processes.”

FrameFormer is available in a standard edition that provides conversions for content up to HD resolution, with presets for common conversions, and in a professional edition that provides conversions for content up to UHD and beyond.

Posting director Darren Lynn Bousman’s horror film, St. Agatha

Atlanta’s Moonshine Post helped create a total post production pipeline — from dailies to finishing — for the film St. Agatha, directed by Darren Lynn Bousman (Saw II, Saw III, Saw IV, Repo the Genetic Opera). 

The project, from producers Seth and Sara Michaels, was co-edited by Moonshine’s Gerhardt Slawitschka and Patrick Perry and colored by Moonshine’s John Peterson.

St. Agatha is a horror film that shot in the town of Madison, Georgia. “The house we needed for the convent was perfect, as the area was one of the few places that had not burned down during the Civil War,” explains Seth Michaels. “It was our first time shooting in Atlanta, and the number one reason was because of the tax incentive. But we also knew Georgia had an infrastructure that could handle our production.”

What the producers didn’t know during production was that Moonshine Post could handle all aspects of post, and were initially brought in only for dailies. With the opportunity to do a producer’s cut, they returned to Moonshine Post.

Time and budget dictated everything, and Moonshine Post was able to offer two editors working in tandem to edit a final cut. “Why not cut in collaboration?” suggested Drew Sawyer, founder of Moonshine Post and executive producer. “It will cut the time in half, and you can explore different ideas faster.”

“We quite literally split the movie in half,” reports Perry, who, along with Slawitschka, cut on Adobe Premiere “It’s a 90-minute film, and there was a clear break. It’s a little unusual, I will admit, but almost always when we are working on something, we don’t have a lot of time, so splitting it in half works.”

Patrick Perry

Gerhardt Slawitschka

“Since it was a producer’s cut, when it came to us it was in Premiere, and it didn’t make sense to switch over to Avid,” adds Slawitschka. “Patrick and I can use both interchangeably, but prefer Premiere; it offers a lot of flexibility.”

“The editors, Patrick and Gerhardt, were great,” says Sara Michaels. “They watched every single second of footage we had, so when we recut the movie, they knew exactly what we had and how to use it.”

“We have the same sensibilities,” explains Gerhardt. “On long-form projects we take a feature in tandem, maybe split it in half or in reels. Or, on a TV series, each of us take a few episodes, compare notes, and arrive at a ‘group mind,’ which is our language of how a project is working. On St. Agatha, Patrick and I took a bit of a risk and generated a four-page document of proposed thoughts and changes. Some very macro, some very micro.”

Colorist John Peterson, a partner at Moonshine Post, worked closely with the director on final color using Blackmagic’s Resolve. “From day one, the first looks we got from camera raw were beautiful.” Typically, projects shot in Atlanta ship back to a post house in a bigger city, “and maybe you see it and maybe you don’t. This one became a local win, we processed dailies, and it came back to us for a chance to finish it here,” he says.

Peterson liked working directly with the director on this film. “I enjoyed having him in session because he’s an artist. He knew what he was looking for. On the flashbacks, we played with a variety of looks to define which one we liked. We added a certain amount of film grain and stylistically for some scenes, we used heavy vignetting, and heavy keys with isolation windows. Darren is a director, but he also knows the terminology, which gave me the opportunity to take his words and put them on the screen for him. At the end of the week, we had a successful film.”

John Peterson

The recent expansion of Moonshine Post, which included a partnership with the audio company Bare Knuckles Creative and a visual effects company Crafty Apes, “was necessary, so we could take on the kind of movies and series we wanted to work with,” explains Sawyer. “But we were very careful about what we took and how we expanded.”

They recently secured two AMC series, along with projects from Netflix. “We are not trying to do all the post in town, but we want to foster and grow the post production scene here so that we can continue to win people’s trust and solidify the Atlanta market,” he says.

Uncork’d Entertainment’s St. Agatha was in theaters and became available on-demand starting February 8. Look for it on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Vudu, Fandango Now, Xbox, Dish Network and local cable providers.

Free Solo: The filmmakers behind the Oscar-winning documentary

By Iain Blair

Do you suffer from vertigo? Are you deathly afraid of heights? Does the thought of hanging by your fingertips over the void make you feel like throwing up? Then the new, nail-biting climbing film Free Solo, which won the Oscar for Best Documentary feature, might not be for you.

But if you enjoy an edge-of-your-seat thriller that allows you — thanks to truly awesome cinematography — to virtually “free solo” (climb a rock face without any safety gear) from the comfort of your own armchair, then you should rush to see this inspiring portrait of an athlete who challenges both his body and his beliefs on a quest to triumph over the impossible.

Jimmy Chin and E. Chai Vasarhelyi

Made by the award-winning husband-and-wife team of documentary filmmakers E. Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin (a renowned photographer and mountaineer), it follows daredevil climber Alex Honnold as he prepares to tackle the greatest challenge of his career: a death-defying ascent of Yosemite’s famous 3,200-foot sheer rock face El Capitan — without any ropes, safety harness or assistance in a “free solo” climb. His meticulous preparation is complicated by his falling in love with a new girlfriend, Sanni.

I spoke with the filmmaking couple, whose credits include the acclaimed 2015 climbing epic Meru, about making the Nat Geo film, their love of post, and the Oscars.

Congratulations on your Oscar win. How important are Oscars to a film like this?
E. Chai Vasarhelyi (ECV): Incredibly important, as they bring so much attention to it and get it to a far wider audience than it might otherwise get. But, of course, we didn’t make this with awards in mind. You can’t think like that when you’re doing it, but we’re so grateful for the nomination.

This is not your typical climbing movie. Jimmy, you’re also an elite climber. What drives someone to do this, and what sort of film did you set out to make?
Jimmy Chin (JC): I think it’s the same thing as what makes us want to go to the moon, or why someone pushes themselves to the edge for their calling or passion: to see how far you can take it. That’s at the heart of this and the sort of film we set out to make, and what’s amazing about Alex and his story is just how far he’s come.

He was this very shy, sort of awkward kid who was scared of all kinds of things, and through his determination to face all his fears — whether it was simply hugging people or his dislike of vegetables — he’s gone through this huge transformation. Climbing like this was, I think, ultimately easier for him to conquer than some other stuff in his life. So we wanted to capture all of that, but also all the raw emotional moments that really engage an audience. It’s a film about this amazing climb, but it’s not just a climbing movie. That’s how we approached it.

Alex is also a friend of yours. How do you film a potentially fatal climb like this without exploiting it?
ECV: It was a big ethical question, even if a more extreme case of it than comes with every documentary. Did we even want to make this film? And, if so, how did we honor Alex and what he was trying to do without making it at all sensational. There are so many different ways to tell a story, and Alex had to trust us. Then there’s that existential ethical question at the center of it all — is he more likely to fall because we’re there filming it? That’s something we really had to wrestle with.

Alex thought more about his own mortality than anyone else, and he chooses every day to live a certain way and we were going to do everything in our power to mitigate the risk. So it was all about doing justice to the story and respecting Alex and every decision he makes, including the way he prepared so carefully for the climb.

How tough was the shoot?
ECV: It was very hard, even though we had a big team of elite climbers who were also great cameramen and trained for two years to do this.

JC: We had over 30 people on El Cap alone, including four cameramen on the wall, including myself, and most of us were very up high — around 2,000 feet. We used some very long lens cameras on the ground, as well as some remote rigs and drones and other equipment. But we knew that we were in situations where a simple mistake could be catastrophic. There were a lot of potential hazards, and the big thing for the crew was to never get distracted, which is so easy when you’re watching someone free solo up 3,000 feet in front of you. It was grueling and exhausting for everyone involved — super-intense, both physically and mentally. It’s hard to overstate what everyone went through to make this film.

Talk about re-teaming with Meru editor Bob Eisenhardt, who just won the ACE Eddie for this film. He told me it took over a year to edit.
ECV: It actually took over 18 months, partly because we had so much footage to look at and sort through. But I don’t think the sheer volume of footage was the main editing challenge. We were attracted to his story because there’s so much more to it than just the climb itself, and while we were all so prepared for that, we never anticipated him and Sanni falling in love. When that happened, you have to just go with it. We spent a lot of time trying stuff and figuring out how to marry that with the climb so that it played authentically to people very familiar with climbing as well as to people like me, who aren’t. It was all about a negotiation.

Where did you post?
ECV: All in New York, at our own post place called Little Monster Films, and then we did our sound work and mixing at Soundtrack with re-recording mixer Tommy Fleischman, and we also did some ADR work at C5 Inc.

Do you like the post process?
ECV: We love it, because you finally start pulling in all the layers — like the music and sound and VFX — and you see the film come to life and change as you go along. We also had the luxury of a long post schedule to play around with the material, and it’s so much fun.

Obviously, sound is very important, especially when Alex was out of range of wireless mics.
ECV: Having made a few films, we know just how important the sound is and we had a great sound recordist in the field and a great sound team. When you don’t climb with ropes, all the sounds are very subtle.

What VFX were involved?
JC: One of the big ones was trying to give you a sense of El Cap’s true scale. It’s so hard to get across just how big it is. We tried a lot of things and finally ended up getting access to Google Earth high-res satellite imagery, and we were able to 3D map that and then build out those moving, contextual shots, and all that stuff was done by Big Star.

Where did you do the DI, and how important was it to you?
JC: We did the DI at Company 3 with Stefan Sonnenfeld. It was very important as one of the big challenges was that we shot using a lot of different cameras, and so we had to work to get a consistent look and feel the whole way through, so you don’t pull people out of it at key moments. But we also didn’t want to create a stylized look to the footage. We wanted to keep it fairly naturalistic, and we worked hard on that.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
ECV: Yes, as we’d planned it so carefully — how to treat the climb, how you get to know Alex. This whole project took about four years, from start to finish. But Sanni was the big surprise.

What’s your view of Alex today?
JC: He’s an incredible person who did something no one else has ever done. It’s still hard to comprehend just how amazing this feat was.

What’s next? Another climbing film?
ECV: (Laughs) No. No more climbing for a while. It’s a documentary about conservation.

Black Panther editors Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver

By Amy Leland

Black Panther was a highly anticipated film that became a massive hit with audiences and critics alike. Just the fact that it’s a Marvel film would have been enough to create both anticipation and success, but this movie went beyond that, breaking barriers as well as box office records. The film was nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture.

Instead of being referred to as a great superhero film, it was simply called a great film. It’s also the kind of high-quality offering you would expect from director Ryan Coogler, whose prior credits include Fruitvale Station and Creed, both of which feature Michael B. Jordon, who is also in Black Panther.

Michael Shawver

I had a chance to talk with the Black Panther editing team — Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver — about the film and their process co-editing such a huge project.

How did you both end up on this project?
Michael Shawver: I’ve known Ryan since our days in film school at the University of Southern California. We met back in 2009 in a directing class, and he was making short films that were just above and beyond everybody else. They were about society, race, culture, everything, and they really made you feel and think. That’s the kind of thing that I always wanted to do, the whole reason I wanted to make movies.

One day after class I went up to him and said, “I’d love to work with you. I can edit a little bit.” Things then fell into place, and I was able to work on a short film we did in school. From there he fought to keep me and the rest of the short film team involved in Fruitvale Station. Then we worked on Creed and then Black Panther.

Debbie Berman: For me it was kind of a serendipitous backstory. I was awarded an editing fellowship to the Sundance Institute in 2012, and as part of the fellowship I went to the Sundance Film Festival and went to the awards ceremony for the first time. That was the year that Fruitvale won Sundance. So I was actually there watching Ryan’s career begin, and I remember absolutely loving the movie and really being drawn to him as a filmmaker. I thought Creed was absolutely brilliant. I ugly cried through most of Creed. I think it’s phenomenal.

Debbie Berman

When I was working on Spider-Man: Homecoming, I kept talking about Black Panther. As a South African, it was a film that really spoke to me, and really felt like it was going to be important to me. So Marvel connected us.

Shawver: When we met with Debbie, we just kind of knew. Ryan and I both knew a few minutes in that she was the right choice and that this was going to be the right fit. Between her work ethic, her worldview, her passion and what she focuses on to tell a story and to bring characters alive, I think it all just rang true with how we felt and our process.
And you never know. It’s tough when you co-edit with somebody because you kind of just go on one date and then you’re married. You never know how it’s going to work out. And there’s always creative discussion; there’s always, “What if this is better? What if that’s better?” But everybody left their egos at the door. We’re all “movies first.” We don’t take anything personally, and we help each other not take anything personally, and we support each other. It couldn’t have worked out better.

Berman: I totally agree. It’s like one day you’re married, but you’re married during a world war. You’re going through a very stressful time together. I did feel an instant kinship with Mike and Ryan the second we all met. It just felt like meeting old family. I’ve been passionate about filmmaking my entire life, and they have the same amount of passion. And as Mike said, we always put the film first, and with having that shared love of this movie in particular, it really just got us through everything.

I got to meet Ryan at a screening of Fruitvale Station, and I was struck by how humble he is. As a leader of a project, he must bring that to the environment. Did you all feel that when you were working with him?
Shawver: Oh yeah. That’s what he’s really like. I tell people that he’s a great director, but he’s a hundred times better person. He believes that people who make the movies are more important than the movie itself. That humility that he has allows him to learn. He’ll be the first one to say that he’s not the smartest person in the room, even though everybody would disagree with him. He understands that when you can admit that you don’t know everything, you can start to learn.

I think that, much like T’Challa does in the movie, Ryan feeds off of the people around him. There’s a reason we have certain members of the team that have stayed with Ryan for so long, and he would fight for us. When he brought Debbie into the fold, it was the same way. We all feel like we have so much to learn, and we’re so grateful to be in the position that we’re in. We can’t see operating any other way.

Berman: Ryan insists on honesty from his crew, and never feels that anything you say is a critique of him or his work. He understands that everything you say is just trying to make the film better. There is an open environment where it’s okay to say anything you want. It’s a safe environment to fail because out of a hundred ideas, if you get three that are great then it was worth the other 97 that maybe weren’t so great, because it’s all for the greater good of the film.

Were you both on the project from the beginning, and how did that process work with the two of you cutting the film together?
Berman: Mike started a bit before me, but the film as you see today is something we built from scratch together. We mostly worked on separate scenes. A film this big, it’s good to take ownership of certain sections, because there’s so much to track in terms of the visual effects load. But we collaborated on everything, we always watched each other’s work and we always gave input, suggestions and feedback. There were a couple of scenes we handed back and forth. If someone had an idea for something, then they would take over that scene and do a pass on it. It was basically a good mixture of complete ownership and collaboration all at the same time.

Shawver: I think the key for us was to work as organically as possible and never let anybody’s creative idea or creative juices go to waste. If Debbie came in one day just raring to go on a scene and had a dream about it, an epiphany about it or something, and wanted to dig in and explore more and see if she could elevate a moment, we would be dumb to get in the way of her doing that.

I think we understood that we had to find a balance of feeling of ownership over the scenes, the moments and the movie as a whole, but also understand that this is a story that needs to speak to everybody. We had a very diverse post team, and that’s not by accident. It’s because diversity can bring about the greatest art. Even down to some of our production assistants, who we would bring in to watch certain things just to give us thoughts, and that would always be filtered to Ryan. With a beast of a movie as big as Black Panther — what was it, like, 500 hours of footage.

As the editors, we’re the first audience. We’re the gatekeepers for everything else. So we have to focus on the details, and the movie as a whole. And with a thing that size and with that many people on a team, it helps to break it down but never be hard and fast with those boundaries.

Berman: One thing that was really important to me was all of the strong female characters in the film. I really focused on the ladies, and just making sure they were the most spectacular, powerful representations they could be. And, of course, we both worked on everything, but I think Mike probably took a bit more of T’Challa. It was such a difficult mix to have our central character surrounded by all of these other strong characters, but still make him feel like the strong and central presence. We both worked quite a lot on Killmonger, because we had to try creating an empathetic villain. It would have been easy to veer in either direction too far. We just had to keep the balance of, you can empathize with the point he’s making, but he’s going about it in the wrong way.

Shawver: With anything you do as an editor, these things are hard. I’m not going to lie. You’re second-guessing yourself. We all need to find our story in it, but also how we can share ourselves in each of these characters. What we focused on a lot, in our own ways, were the relationships in the movie. Because if you boil it down, the relationships make that world go upwards, downwards, leftward, rightwards. My son had just turned one at the time, so the theme of fathers and sons that’s achieved in the movie really resonated with me. Just like Debbie with the female characters. Female characters often don’t get what they deserve on screen, but we made sure that they did. Debbie really took guardianship of that, shepherding it through. I think those are some of the strongest points in the movie.

Berman: Mike was really incredible at putting emotion into scenes. The fight scenes, for example. There are these amazing Warrior Falls scenes, which are action scenes, but they’re so emotional. Most of that is the work Mike put in, like folding it around the characters watching the action, and how you’re filtering your own audience reaction through what they’re experiencing.

I remember there was a lot of talk in the press when the movie came out about representation and inclusion in the film, especially for an action or superhero film. As a woman, I really felt like, “Wow this is an action movie that’s showing people I can relate to on screen.”
Berman: Every time I watched a scene, I would do a pass where I would try to watch it through the female gaze. One of the examples of that editorially is right at the end, when the Dora Milaje are surrounded and the Jabari save them. Originally the Jabari warriors were all male. So I had a conversation with Ryan and I said, “You know, we go through this entire movie with these absolutely spectacular female warriors and then at the end of the film the men save them. I think that it undercuts a lot of what we have built up with them over the course of the film.” But I didn’t know what the solution was.

Ryan, in his brilliance, was like, “Well, what if we make some of the Jabari warriors female?” Which I thought was amazing. But, of course, they’d already shot this massive, complicated action sequence. Luckily, in additional photography, Marvel supported that idea, and they created Jabari female warriors. The very first warrior to break through the force field and save them is this absolutely kick-ass Jabari female warrior. It really made such a difference, not only to that moment, which is one of the coolest moments in the film to me, but just throughout the entire film with what we’re trying to say.

When you first started working, was there any sense of, “Okay, Michael, you’ve been working on the indie film side, so you start with some of the dialogue scenes. Debbie you just came from another Marvel film, so work on the action scenes”? How did you decide who was working on what scenes?

Shawver: We didn’t want to keep it separate in that way. I know for myself, and Debbie as well, if there’s something that we’re not as strong at as an editor, we use the opportunity to be able to edit and get better at those things.

Debbie was on Spider-Man, and I went to Atlanta a little early to start on Panther because I’d never done one of these before, and I was terrified. Every morning I woke up having to pinch myself that I was working on a movie like this. But then the whole rest of the day was, “Don’t screw this up. Don’t screw this up.” Then, when Debbie came in, and said, “This would be a good idea if we did it this way. Here’s what you can do to help this process move along faster. Here’s what you can do to have more specific discussions with the effects teams.” Just those in and outs of having gone through a process like that with Spider-Man helped us immensely. Debbie and I are strong editors. We have our strengths and we have a couple of weaknesses, but I feel like we’re both pretty well rounded. In certain ways, Debbie is stronger than I am, and she would critique certain things and give me notes.

We had a discussion early on. Ryan said he felt better when both of his editors touched a scene, because that way both of our stories could be told. He’d also say that if both of us agreed on something and he didn’t, he’d go with our idea because, “You guys are smart. If you guys say this is better and you both agree on it, then we’re going to do it.”

Berman: We actually pushed each other to go further, because there might be a point where you’re like, “Yeah, I’m happy with the scene” and then someone comes in and prompts you and questions things, and it forces you to re-evaluate and see if you can make every single moment just a little bit better.

I had just done Spider-Man, but I’d also done some indie films. I wasn’t too far removed from understanding what the knowledge gaps would be, ‘because I’d only filled those knowledge gaps myself about five seconds earlier. So I felt like I came from the same world, and I understood what they needed to know based on what I had just learned from my past experience.

Were you in edit rooms next to each other?
Berman: We had separate edit suites. But every time someone was finished with a scene we would sit together, either just the two of us or if Ryan was around sometimes the three of us together. We were on the same floor, a few doors away from each other, but we’re working on our own systems pretty much most of the day, and then checking in with each other. We also sat in the effects reviews together, making sure that the visual effects were serving the story and serving the way we created the scenes. We were also in the sound mix together.

Shawver: One of the things that I learned from Ryan, and about Ryan, is you just have to trust him. There are times as an editor, especially when you have a team of dozens and dozens of people, when they are looking at you and needing a scene to be done or a decision to be made, but we haven’t fully gotten it there yet. Ryan said to me, I think it was an Abraham Lincoln quote, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I’ll spend the first four sharpening the ax.” He told me that right after I was getting very nervous about a deadline we had, because he had to go to a bunch of other meetings and stuff like that, and that really put things into perspective.

There were times that we’d just sit and talk for an hour or two. The days are long — 10-, 12-hour days, sometimes longer. But we would have conversations; they’d be conversations about specific scenes, current events, our daily lives, how we feel, if one of us is going through something. First of all, if someone’s not having a good day, Ryan’s going to notice as soon as they step foot in the building, and he’s going to drop everything to make sure that that person is okay and find out if they need to go home. Whether it’s a personal tragedy, national tragedy, anything like that.

Berman: Whether it’s one of his key crew, or one of the PAs, he’ll notice.

Shawver: Yeah, it doesn’t matter who you are. The movie is a political movie. T’Challa’s a politician, and it has to do with world events and current events, and I think we’d be mistaken to not discuss those and see how we feel. But not just discuss, because the three of us probably agree on a lot of things that maybe a good amount of viewers in the world wouldn’t agree on. We talked from all different sides. That’s where that diversity comes in, and that love for making this movie that really is about bringing people together.

Berman: Yeah, that was very interesting to me, because I’m not used to sitting and talking so much. I’m used to like, “Editing! Editing! Editing!” It worked its way into the film. You spend a few hours chatting and you get to know each other, but it’s all working its way into the film. You’re connecting to each other as human beings and making this piece of art together, so it all works its way in… and it all makes the film better.

What’s up next for both of you?
Shawver: I’m working on a movie called Honest Thief. It’s starring Liam Neeson. It’s about a bank robber looking for redemption. It’s nice to be back on a movie just about relationships and small interpersonal drama to help sharpen those skills. It’s directed by Mark Williams, a really talented director.

Berman: I’m working on Captain Marvel, at the moment, sort of the final sprint to the finish line right now.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Sundance Videos: Watch our editor interviews

postPerspective traveled to Sundance for the first time this year, and it was great. In addition to attending some parties, brunches and panels, we had the opportunity to interview a number of editors who were in Park City to help promote their various projects. (Watch here.)

Billy McMillin

We caught up with the editors on the comedy docu-series Documentary Now!, Michah Gardner and Jordan Kim. We spoke to Courtney Ware about cutting the film Light From Light, as well as Billy McMillin, editor on the documentary Mike Wallace is Here. We also chatted with Phyllis Housen, the editor on director Chinonye Chukwu’s Clemency and Kent Kincannon who cut Hannah Pearl Utt’s comedy, Before you Know It. Finally, we sat down with Bryan Mason, who had the dual roles of cinematographer and editor on Animals.

We hope you enjoy watching these interviews as much as we enjoyed shooting them.

Don’t forget, click here to view!

Oh, and a big shout out to Twain Richardson from Jamaica’s Frame of Reference, who edited and color graded the videos. Thanks Twain!

ACE celebrates editing, names Eddie Award winners

By Dayna McCallum

On Friday evening, the 69th Annual ACE Eddie Awards were presented at the Beverly Hilton Hotel with over 1,000 in attendance. ACE president Stephen Rivkin, ACE, presided over the evening’s festivities with comedian Tom Kenny serving as the evening’s host (SpongeBob!).

(L-R) Director Peter Farrelly, Bohemian Rhapsody’s John Ottman, ACE

Bohemian Rhapsody, edited by John Ottman, ACE, and The Favourite, edited by Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy) respectively. Ottman and Mavropsaridis, who are also nominated for the Oscar in film editing, were both first time Eddie winners.

Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse, edited by Robert Fisher, Jr., won Best Edited Animated Feature Film and Free Solo, edited by Bob Eisenhardt, ACE, won Best Edited Documentary (Feature).

Television winners included Kyle Reiter for Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Commercial Television), Kate Sanford, ACE for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Non-Commercial Television), Gary Dollner, ACE for Killing Eve – “Nice Face” (Best Edited Drama Series for Commercial Television), Steve Singleton for Bodyguard – Episode 1 (Best Edited Drama Series for Non-Commercial Television), Malcolm Jamieson and Geoffrey Richman, ACE for Escape at Dannemora – Episode Seven (Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television), Greg Finton, ACE and Poppy Das, ACE for Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind (Best Edited Documentary, Non-Theatrical), and Hunter Gross, ACE for Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia” (Best Edited Non-Scripted Series), who delivered a very moving acceptance speech in tribute to the late Bourdain.

The Anne V. Coates Student Editing Award went to Boston University’s Marco Gonzalez, who beat out hundreds of competitors from film schools and universities around the country. The Student Editing honor was re-named in honor of the legendary editor who passed away this past year. In another emotional moment, the award was presented by Coates daughter, Emma Hickox, ACE (What Men Want).

Jerrold Ludwig, ACE and Craig McKay, ACE received Career Achievement awards.  Their work was highlighted with clip reels exhibiting their tremendous contributions to film and television throughout their careers.

(L-R) Octavia Spencer, Golden Eddie Honoree Guillermo del Toro

ACE’s prestigious Golden Eddie honor was presented to artist and Oscar-winning filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. He received the award from his friend and collaborator Octavia Spencer, who starred in del Toro’s The Shape of Water last year.

Other presenters at the show included Oscar nominated director Spike Lee (BlacKkKlansman); Oscar nominated director and ACE Eddie Award nominee for Roma, Alfonso Cuarón; director Jon M. Chu (Crazy Rich Asians); director Peter Farrelly (Green Book); D’Arcy Carden (The Good Place); Jennifer Lewis (Black-ish); Angela Sarafyan (Westworld); Harry Shum, Jr. (Crazy Rich Asians); Paul Walter Hauser (BlacKkKlansman); and film editor Carol Littleton, ACE.

Here is the full list of winners:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
Bohemian Rhapsody
John Ottman, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
The Favourite
Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Robert Fisher, Jr.

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Free Solo
Bob Eisenhardt, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):
Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind
Greg Finton, ACE & Poppy Das, ACE

Killing Eve Editor Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins”
Kyle Reiter

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone”
Kate Sanford, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Killing Eve – “Nice Face”
Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Bodyguard – “Episode 1”
Steve Singleton

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Escape at Dannemora – “Episode Seven”
Malcolm Jamieson & Geoffrey Richman ACE

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia”
Hunter Gross, ACE

STUDENT WINNER
Marco Gonzalez – Boston University

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE, The Favourite’s Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, Paul Walter Hauser.

More Than Just Words: Lucky Post helps bring Jeep’s viral piece to life


Jeep’s More Than Words commercial, out of agency The Richards Group, premiered online just prior to this year’s Super Bowl as part of its Big Game Blitz, which saw numerous projects launched leading up to the Super Bowl.

Quickly earning millions of views, the piece features a version of our national anthem by One Republic, as well as images of the band. The two-minute spot is made up of images of small, everyday moments that add up to something big and evoke a feeling of America.

There is a father and his infant son, people gathered in front of a barn, a football thrown through a hanging tire swing. We see bits of cities and suburbs, football, stock images of Marilyn Monroe and soldiers training for battle — and every once in a while, an image of a Jeep is in view.

The spot ends as it began, with images of One Republic in the studio before the screen goes black and text appears reading: More Than Just Words. Then the Jeep logo appears.

The production Company was Zoom USA with partner Mark Toia directing. Lucky Post in Dallas contributed editorial, color, sounds design and finish to the piece.

Editor Sai Selvarajan used Adobe’s Premiere. Neil Anderson provided the color grade in Blackmagic Resolve, while Scottie Richardson performed the sound design and mix using Avid Pro Tools. Online finishing and effects were via Tim Nagle, who worked in Autodesk Flame.

“The concept is genius in its simplicity; a tribute to faith in our country’s patchwork with our anthem’s words reinforced and represented in image,” says Lucky Post’s Selvarajan. “Behind the scenes, everyone provided collective energy and creativity to bring it to life. It was the product of many, just like the message of the film, and I was so excited to see the groundswell of positive reaction.”

 

 

 

Review: Boris FX’s Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019

By Brady Betzel

I realize I might sound like a broken record, but if you are looking for the best plugin to help with object removals or masking, you should seriously consider the Mocha Pro plugin. And if you work inside of Avid Media Composer, you should also seriously consider Boris Continuum and/or Sapphire, which can use the power of Mocha.

As an online editor, I consistently use Continuum along with Mocha for tight blur and mask tracking. If you use After Effects, there is even a whittled-down version of Mocha built in for free. For those pros who don’t want to deal with Mocha inside of an app, it also comes as a standalone software solution where you can copy and paste tracking data between apps or even export the masks, object removals or insertions as self-contained files.

The latest releases of Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 continue the evolution of Boris FX’s role in post production image restoration, keying and general VFX plugins, at least inside of NLEs like Media Composer and Adobe Premiere.

Mocha Pro

As an online editor I am alway calling on Continuum for its great Chroma Key Studio, Flicker Fixer and blurring. Because Mocha is built into Continuum, I am able to quickly track (backwards and forwards) difficult shapes and even erase shapes that the built-in Media Composer tools simply can’t do. But if you are lucky enough to own Mocha Pro you also get access to some amazing tools that go beyond planar tracking — such as automated object removal, object insertion, stabilizing and much more.

Boris FX’s latest updates to Boris Continuum and Mocha Pro go even further than what I’ve already mentioned and have resulted in a new version naming, this round we are at 2019 (think of it as Version 12). They have also created the new Application Manager, which makes it a little easier to find the latest downloads. You can find them here. This really helps when jumping between machines and you need to quickly activate and deactivate licenses.

Boris Continuum 2019
I often get offline edits effects from a variety plugins — lens flares, random edits, light flashes, whip transitions, and many more — so I need Continuum to be compatible with offline clients. I also need to use it for image repair and compositing.

In this latest version of Continuum, BorisFX has not only kept plugins like Primatte Studio, they have brought back Particle Illusion and updated Mocha and Title Studio. Overall, Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 feel a lot snappier when applying and rendering effects, probably because of the overall GPU-acceleration improvements.

Particle Illusion has been brought back from the brink of death in Continuum 2019 for a 64-bit keyframe-able particle emitter system that can even be tracked and masked with Mocha. In this revamp of Particle Illusion there is an updated interface, realtime GPU-based particle generation, expanded and improved emitter library (complete with motion-blur-enabled particle systems) and even a standalone app that can design systems to be used in the host app — you cannot render systems inside of the standalone app.

While Particle Illusion is a part of the entire Continuum toolset that works with OFX apps like Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, Media Composer, After Effects, and Premiere, it seems to work best in applications like After Effects, which can handle composites simply and naturally. Inside the Particle Illusion interface you can find all of the pre-built emitters. If you only have a handful make sure you download additional emitters, which you can find in the Boris FX App Manager.

       
Particle Illusion: Before and After

I had a hard time seeing my footage in a Media Composer timeline inside of Particle Illusion, but I could still pick my emitter, change specs like life and opacity, exit out and apply to my footage. I used Mocha to track some fire from Particle Illusion to a dumpster I had filmed. Once I dialed in the emitter, I launched Mocha and tracked the dumpster.

The first time I went into Mocha I didn’t see the preset tracks for the emitter or the world in which the emitter lives. The second time I launched Mocha, I saw track points. From there you can track where you want your emitter to track and be placed. Once you are done and happy with your track, jump back to your timeline where it should be reflected. In Media Composer I noticed that I had to go to the Mocha options and change the option from Mocha Shape to no shape. Essentially, the Mocha shape will act like a matte and cut off anything outside the matte.

If you are inside of After Effects, most parameters can now be keyframed and parented (aka pick-whipped) natively in the timeline. The Particle Illusion plugin is a quick, easy and good-looking tool to add sparks, Milky Way-like star trails or even fireworks to any scene. Check out @SurfacedStudio’s tutorial on Particle Illusion to get a good sense of how it works in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Continuum Title Studio
When inside of Media Composer (prior to the latest release 2018.12), there were very few ways to create titles that were higher resolution than HD (1920×1080) — the New Blue Titler was the only other option if you wanted to stay within Media Composer.

Title Studio within Media Composer

At first, the Continuum Title Studio interface appeared to be a mildly updated Boris Red interface — and I am allergic to the Boris Red interface. Some of the icons for the keyframing and the way properties are adjusted looks similar and threw me off. I tried really hard to jump into Title Studio and love it, but I really never got comfortable with it.

On the flip side, there are hundreds of presets that could help build quick titles that render a lot faster than New Blue Titler did. In some of the presets I noticed the text was placed outside of 16×9 Title Safety, which is odd since that is kind of a long standing rule in television. In the author’s defense, they are within Action Safety, but still.

If you need a quick way to make 4K titles, Title Studio might be what you want. The updated Title Studio includes realtime playback using the GPU instead of the CPU, new materials, new shaders and external monitoring support using Blackmagic hardware (AJA will be coming at some point). There are some great pre-sets including pre-built slates, lower thirds, kinetic text and even progress bars.

If you don’t have Mocha Pro, Continuum can still access and use Mocha to track shapes and masks. Almost every plugin can access Mocha and can track objects quickly and easily.
That brings me to the newly updated Mocha, which has some new features that are extremely helpful including a Magnetic Spline tool, prebuilt geometric shapes and more.

Mocha Pro 2019
If you loved the previous version of Mocha, you are really going to love Mocha Pro 2019. Not only do you get the Magnetic Lasso, pre-built geometric shapes, the Essentials interface and high-resolution display support, but BorisFX has rewritten the Remove Module code to use GPU video hardware. This increases render speeds about four to five times. In addition, there is no longer a separate Mocha VR software suite. All of the VR tools are included inside of Mocha Pro 2019.

If you are unfamiliar with what Mocha is, then I have a treat for you. Mocha is a standalone planar tracking app as well as a native plugin that works with Media Composer, Premiere and After Effects, or through OFX in Blackmagic’s Fusion, Foundry’s Nuke, Vegas Pro and Hitfilm.

Mocha tracking

In addition (and unofficially) it will work with Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve by way of importing the Mocha masks through Fusion. While I prefer to use After Effects for my work, importing Mocha masks is relatively painless. You can watch colorist Dan Harvey run through the process of importing Mocha masks to Resolve through Fusion, here.

But really, Mocha is a planar tracker, which means it tracks multiple points in a defined area that works best in flat surfaces or at least segmented surfaces, like the side of a face, ear, nose, mouth and forehead tracked separately instead of all at once. From blurs to mattes, Mocha tracks objects like glue and can be a great asset for an online editor or colorist.

If you have read any of my plugin reviews you probably are sick of me spouting off about Mocha, saying how it is probably the best plugin ever made. But really, it is amazing — especially when incorporated with plugins like Continuum and Sapphire. Also, thanks to the latest Media Composer with Symphony option you can incorporate the new Color Correction shapes with Mocha Pro to increase the effectiveness of your secondary color corrections.

Mocha Pro Remove module

So how fast is Mocha Pro 2019’s Remove Module these days? Well, it used to be a very slow process, taking lots of time to calculate an object’s removal. With the latest Mocha Pro 2019 release, including improved GPU support, the render time has been cut down tremendously. In my estimation, I would say three to four times the speed (that’s on the safe side). In Mocha Pro 2019 removal jobs that take under 30 seconds would have taken four to five minutes in previous versions. It’s quite a big improvement in render times.

There are a few changes in the new Mocha Pro, including interface changes and some amazing tool additions. There is a new drop-down tab that offers different workflow views once you are inside of Mocha: Essentials, Classic, Big Picture and Roto. I really wish the Essentials view was out when I first started using Mocha, because it gives you the basic tools you need to get a roto job done and nothing more.

For instance, just giving access to the track motion objects (Translation, Scale, Rotate, Skew and Perspective) with big shiny buttons helps to eliminate my need to watch YouTube videos on how to navigate the Mocha interface. However, if like me you are more than just a beginner, the Classic interface is still available and one I reach for most often — it’s literally the old interface. Big Screen hides the tools and gives you the most screen real estate for your roto work. My favorite after Classic is Roto. The Roto interface shows just the project window and the classic top toolbar. It’s the best of both worlds.

Mocha Pro 2019 Essentials Interface

Beyond the interface changes are some additional tools that will speed up any roto work. This has been one of the longest running user requests. I imagine the most requested feature that BorisFX gets for Mocha is the addition of basic shapes, such as rectangles and circles. In my work, I am often drawing rectangles around license plates or circles around faces with X-splines, so why not eliminate a few clicks and have that done already? Answering my need, Mocha now has elliptical and rectangular shapes ready to go in both X-splines and B-splines with one click.

I use Continuum and Mocha hand in hand. Inside of Media Composer I will use tools like Gaussian Blur or Remover, which typically need tracking and roto shapes created. Once I apply the Continuum effect, I launch Mocha from the Effect Editor and bam, I am inside Mocha. From here I track the objects I want to affect, as well as any objects I don’t want to affect (think of it like an erase track).

Summing Up
I can save tons of time and also improve the effectiveness of my work exponentially when working in Continuum 2019 and Mocha Pro 2019. It’s amazing how much more intuitive Mocha is to track with instead of the built-in Media Composer and Symphony trackers.

In the end, I can’t say enough great things about Continuum and especially Mocha Pro. Mocha saves me tons of time in my VFX and image restoration work. From removing camera people behind the main cast in the wilderness to blurring faces and license plates, using Mocha in tandem with Continuum is a match made in post production heaven.

Rendering in Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 is a lot faster than previous versions, really giving me a leg up on efficiency. Time is money right?! On top of that, using Mocha Pro’s magic Object removal and Modules takes my image restoration work to the next level, separating me from other online editors who use standard paint and tracking tools.

In Continuum, Primatte Studio gives me the leg up on greenscreen keys with its exceptional ability to auto analyze a scene and perform 80% of the keying work before I dial-in the details. Whenever anyone asks me what tools I couldn’t live without, I without a doubt always say Mocha.
If you want a real Mocha Pro education you need to watch all of Mary Poplin’s tutorials. You can find them on YouTube. Check out this one on how to track and replace a logo using Mocha Pro 2019 in Adobe After Effects. You can also find great videos at Borisfx.com.

Mocha point parameter tracking

I always feel like there are tons of tools inside of the Mocha Pro toolset that go unused simply because I don’t know about them. One I recently learned about in a Surfaced Studio tutorial was the Quick Stabilize function. It essentially stabilizes the video around the object you are tracking allowing you to more easily rotoscope your object with it sitting still instead of moving all over the screen. It’s an amazing feature that I just didn’t know about.

As I was finishing up this review I saw that Boris FX came out with a training series, which I will be checking out. One thing I always wanted was a top-down set of tutorials like the ones on Mocha’s YouTube page but organized and sent along with practical footage to practice with.

You can check out Curious Turtle’s “More Than The Essentials: Mocha in After Effects” on their website where I found more Mocha training. There is even a great search parameter called Getting Started on BorisFX.com. Definitely check them out. You can never learn enough Mocha!


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

AICE Awards rebranded to AICP Post Awards

AICP has announced the Call for Entries for the AICP Post Awards, its revamped and rebranded competition for excellence in the post production arts. Formerly the AICE Awards, its categories have been re-imagined with a focus on recognizing standout examples of various crafts and technique in editing, audio, design, visual effects artistry and finishing. The AICP Post Awards are a part of the AICP Awards suite of competitions, which also include The AICP Show: The Art & Technique of the American Commercial and the AICP Next Awards, both of which are also currently accepting entries.

Among the changes for the AICP Post Awards this year are the opening of the competition to any entity having involvement in the creation of a piece of content beyond the AICP membership —previously the AICE Awards was a “members only” competition.

For the full rundown on rules, categories, eligibility and fees, visit the AICP Post Awards entry portal. Deadline for entries is Thursday, February 8 at 11:59pm PST. Entrants can use the portal to cross-enter work between all three of the 2019 AICP competitions, including the AICP Show: The Art & Technique of the American Commercial and the AICP Next Awards.

Regarding categories, the competition has regrouped its existing categories, introduced a range of new sections, expanded others and added an entirely new category for vertical video.

Danny Rosenbloom

“While we’ll continue to recognize editorial across a wide range of product, genre and technique categories, we now have a wider range of subcategories in areas like audio, visual effects and design and color grading,” says Danny Rosenbloom, AICP’s VP, post and digital Production.

“We saw this as an opportunity to make the Post Awards more reflective of the varied artists working across the spectrum of post production disciplines,” noted Matt Miller, president/CEO of AICP.  “Now that we’ve brought all this post production expertise into AICP, we want the Post Awards to be a real celebration of creative talent and achievement.”

A full list of AICP Post Awards categories now includes the following:

Editorial Categories
Automotive
Cause Marketing
Comedy
Dialogue
Monologue/Spoken Word
Docu-Style
Fashion/Beauty
Montage
Music Video
Storytelling
National Campaign
Regional Campaign

Audio Categories
Audio Mix
Sound Design With Composed Music
Sound Design Without Composed Music

Color Categories
Color :60
Color :30
Color Other Lengths
Color Music Video

Design, Visual Effects & Finishing Categories
Character Design & Animation
Typography Design & Animation
Graphic Design & Animation
End Tag
CGI
Compositing & Visual Effects
Vertical

In addition to its category winners and Best of Show honoree, the AICP Post Awards will continue to recognize Best of Region winners that represent the best work emanating from companies submitting within each AICP Chapter. These now encompass East, Florida, Midwest, Minnesota, Southeast, Southwest and West.

Industry vets open editorial, post studio Made-SF

Made-SF, a creative studio offering editorial and other services, has been launched by executive producer Jon Ettinger, editor/director Doug Walker and editors Brian Lagerhausen and Connor McDonald, all formerly of Beast Editorial. Along with creative editorial (Adobe Premiere), the company will provide motion graphic design (After Effects, Mocha), color correction and editorial finishing (likely Flame and Resolve). Eventually, it plans to add concept development, directing and production to its mix.

“Clients today are looking for creative partners who can help them across the entire production chain,” says Ettinger. “They need to tell stories and they have limited budgets available to tell them. We know how to do both, and we are gathering the resources to do so under one roof.”

Made is currently set up in interim quarters while completing construction of permanent studio space. The latter will be housed in a century-old structure in San Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood and will feature five editorial suites, two motion graphics suites, and two post production finishing suites with room for further expansion.

The four Made partners bring deep experience in traditional advertising and branded content, working both with agencies and directly with clients. Ettinger and Walker have worked together for more than 20 years and originally teamed up to launch FilmCore, San Francisco. Both joined Beast Editorial in 2012. Similarly, Lagerhausen and McDonald have been editing in the Bay Area for more than two decades. Collectively, their credits include work for agencies in San Francisco and nationwide. They’ve also helped to create content directly for Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Salesforce and other corporate clients.

Made is indicative of a trend where companies engaged in content development are adopting fluid business models to address a diversifying media landscapes and where individual talent is no longer confined to a single job title. Walker, for example, has recently served as director on several projects, including a series of short films for Kelly Services, conceived by agency Erich & Kallman and produced by Caruso Co.

“People used to go to great pains to make a distinction about what they do,” Ettinger observes. “You were a director or an editor or a colorist. Today, those lines have blurred. We are taking advantage of that flattening out to offer clients a better way to create content.”

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Doug Walker, Brian Lagerhausen, Jon Ettinger and Connor McDonald.

Telestream CaptionMaker supports 100 languages, audio transcription

Telestream’s latest version of CaptionMaker, the company’s closed captioning and subtitling software, has been updated. The product now supports over 100 languages and allows users to also auto-transcribe via the Telestream Timed Text Speech cloud service.

Video media in languages such as Russian, Tagalog, Japanese, German and other Asian, African and European languages can automatically be transcribed by accessing the Timed Text Speech service directly from within CaptionMaker. The results can then be edited, formatted and exported as industry-standard caption and subtitle files.

For high-volume, enterprise workflows, users can batch submit media using the Vantage Cloud Speech connector, saving time and processing media faster. The Vantage Cloud Speech Action can return a plain text document or a subtitle SRT file. The result can be converted to an SCC or various other subtitle formats using Vantage Timed Text Flip. Subtitle files can be further edited in CaptionMaker or used by a transcoder such as IPTV Flip.

CaptionMaker also now includes an Audio Waveform Timeline that displays a graphical representation of all spoken dialogue. This feature helps editors when making critical adjustments to any professional subtitle or caption project.

Click here for complete list of languages supported in CaptionMaker Version 8.

CaptionMaker Version 8 is available now.

Quick Chat: Crew Cuts’ Nancy Jacobsen and Stephanie Norris

By Randi Altman

Crew Cuts, a full-service production and post house, has been a New York fixture since 1986. Originally established as an editorial house, over the years as the industry evolved they added services that target all aspects of the workflow.

This independently-owned facility is run by executive producer/partner Nancy Jacobsen, senior editor/partner Sherri Margulies Keenan and senior editor/partner Jake Jacobsen. While commercial spots might be in their wheelhouse, their projects vary and include social media, music videos and indie films.

We decided to reach out to Nancy Jacobsen, as well as EP of finishing Stephanie Norris, to find out about trends, recent work and succeeding in an industry and city that isn’t always so welcoming.

Can you talk about what Crew Cuts provides and how you guys have evolved over the years?
Jacobsen: We pretty much do it all. We have 10 offline editors as well as artists working in VFX, 2D/3D animation, motion graphics/design, audio mix and sound design, VO record, color grading, title treatment, advanced compositing and conform. Two of our editors double as directors.

In the beginning, Crew Cuts primarily offered only editorial. As the years went by and the industry climate changed we began to cater to the needs of clients and slowly built out our entire finishing department. We started with some minimal graphics work and one staff artist in 2008.

In 2009, we expanded the team to include graphics, conform and audio mix. From there we just continued to grow and expand our department to the full finishing team we have today.

As a woman owner of a post house, what challenges have you had to overcome?
Jacobsen: When I started in this business, the industry was very different. I made less money than my male counterparts and it took me twice as long to be promoted because I am a woman. I have since seen great change where women are leading post houses and production houses and are finally getting the recognition for the hard work they deserve. Unfortunately, I had to “wait it out” and silently work harder than the men around me. This has paid off for me, and now I can help women get the credit they rightly deserve

Do you see the industry changing and becoming less male-dominated?
Jacobsen: Yes, the industry is definitely becoming less male-dominated. In the current climate, with the birth of the #metoo movement and specifically in our industry with the birth of Diet Madison Avenue (@dietmadisonave), we are seeing a lot more women step up and take on leading roles.

Are you mostly a commercial house? What other segments of the industry do you work in?
Jacobsen: We are primarily a commercial house. However, we are not limited to just broadcast and digital commercial advertising. We have delivered specs for everything from the Godzilla screen in Times Square to :06 spots on Instagram. We have done a handful of music videos and also handle a ton of B2B videos for in-house client meetings, etc., as well as banner ads for conferences and trade shows. We’ve even worked on display ads for airports. Most recently, one of our editors finished a feature film called Public Figure that is being submitted around the film festival circuit.

What types of projects are you working on most often these days?
Jacobsen: The industry is all over the place. The current climate is very messy right now. Our projects are extremely varied. It’s hard to say what we work on most because it seems like there is no more norm. We are working on everything from sizzle pitch videos to spots for the Super Bowl.

What trends have you seen over the last year, and where do you expect to be in a year?
Jacobsen: Over the last year, we have noticed that the work comes from every angle. Our typical client is no longer just the marketing agency. It is also the production company, network, brand, etc. In a year we expect to be doing more production work. Seeing as how budgets are much smaller than they used to be and everyone wants a one-stop shop, we are hoping to stick with our gut and continue expanding our production arm.

Crew Cuts has beefed up its finishing services. Can you talk about that?
Stephanie Norris: We offer a variety of finishing services — from sound design to VO record and mix, compositing to VFX, 2D and 3D motion graphics and color grading. Our fully staffed in-house team loves the visual effects puzzle and enjoys working with clients to help interpret their vision.

Can you name some recent projects and the services you provided?
Norris: We just worked on a new campaign for New Jersey Lottery in collaboration with Yonder Content and PureRed. Brian Neaman directed and edited the spots. In addition to editorial, Crew Cuts also handled all of the finishing, including color, conform, visual effects, graphics, sound design and mix. This was one of those all-hands-on-deck projects. Keeping everything under one roof really helped us to streamline the process.

New Jersey Lottery

Working with Brian to carefully plan the shooting strategy, we filmed a series of plate shots as elements that could later be combined in post to build each scene. We added falling stacks of cash to the reindeer as he walks through the loading dock and incorporated CG inflatable decorations into a warehouse holiday lawn scene. We also dramatically altered the opening and closing exterior warehouse scenes, allowing one shot to work for multiple seasons. Keeping lighting and camera positions consistent was mission-critical, and having our VFX supervisor, Dulany Foster, on set saved us hours of work down the line.

For the New Jersey Lottery Holiday spots, the Crew Cuts CG team, led by our creative director Ben McNamara created a 3D Inflatable display of lottery tickets. This was something that proved too costly and time consuming to manufacture and shoot practically. After the initial R&D, our team created a few different CG inflatable simulations prior to the shoot, and Dulany was able to mock them up live while on set. Creating the simulations was crucial for giving the art department reference while building the set, and also helped when shooting the plates needed to composite the scene together.

Ben and his team focused on the physics of the inflation, while also making sure the fabric simulations, textures and lighting blended seamlessly into the scene — it was important that everything felt realistic. In addition to the inflatables, our VFX team turned the opening and closing sunny, summer shots of the warehouse into a December winter wonderland thanks to heavy compositing, 3D set extension and snow simulations.

New Jersey Lottery

Any other projects you’d like to talk about?
Jacobsen: We are currently working on a project here that we are handling soup to nuts from production through finishing. It was a fun challenge to take on. The spot contains a hand model on a greenscreen showing the audience how to use a new product. The shoot itself took place here at Crew Cuts. We turned our common area into a stage for the day and were able to do so without interrupting any of the other employees and projects going on.

We are now working on editorial and finishing. The edit is coming along nicely. What really drives the piece here is the graphic icons. Our team is having a lot of fun designing these elements and implementing them into the spot. We are so proud because we budgeted wisely to make sure to accommodate all of the needs of the project so that we could handle everything and still turn a profit. It was so much fun to work in a different setting for the day and has been a very successful project so far. Clients are happy and so are we.

Main Image: (L-R) Stephanie Norris and Nancy Jacobsen

BlacKkKlansman director Spike Lee

By Iain Blair

Spike Lee has been on a roll recently. Last time we sat down for a talk, he’d just finished Chi-Raq, an impassioned rap reworking of Aristophanes’ “Lysistrata,” which was set against a backdrop of Chicago gang violence. Since then, he’s directed various TV, documentary and video projects. And now his latest film BlacKkKlansman has been nominated for a host of Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Film Editing,  Best Original Score and Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Adam Driver).

Set in the early 1970s, the unlikely-but-true story details the exploits of Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), the first African-American detective to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. Determined to make a name for himself, Stallworth sets out on a dangerous mission: infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan. The young detective soon recruits a more seasoned colleague, Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver), into the undercover investigation. Together, they team up to take down the extremist hate group as the organization aims to sanitize its violent rhetoric to appeal to the mainstream. The film also stars Topher Grace as David Duke.

Behind the scenes, Lee reteamed with co-writer Kevin Willmott, longtime editor Barry Alexander Brown and composer Terence Blanchard, along with up-and-coming DP Chayse Irvin. I spoke with the always-entertaining Lee, who first burst onto the scene back in 1986 with She’s Gotta Have It, about making the film, his workflow and the Oscars.

Is it true Jordan Peele turned you onto this story?
Yeah, he called me out of the blue and gave me possibly the greatest six-word pitch in film history — “Black man infiltrates Ku Klux Klan.” I couldn’t resist it, not with that pitch.

Didn’t you think, “Wait, this is all too unbelievable, too Hollywood?”
Well, my first question was, “Is this actually true? Or is it a Dave Chappelle skit?” Jordan assured me it’s a true story and that Ron wrote a book about it. He sent me a script, and that’s where we began, but Kevin Willmott and I then totally rewrote it so we could include all the stuff like Charlottesville at the end.

Iain Blair and Spike Lee

Did you immediately decide to juxtapose the story’s period racial hatred with all the ripped-from-the-headlines news footage?
Pretty much, as the Charlottesville rally happened August 11, 2017 and we didn’t start shooting this until mid-September, so we could include all that. And then there was the terrible synagogue massacre, and all the pipe bombs. Hate crimes are really skyrocketing under this president.

Fair to say, it’s not just a film about America, though, but about what’s happening everywhere — the rise of neo-Nazism, racism, xenophobia and so on in Europe and other places?
I’m so glad you said that, as I’ve had to correct several people who want to just focus on America, as if this is just happening here. No, no, no! Look at the recent presidential elections in Brazil. This guy — oh my God! This is a global phenomenon, and the common denominator is fear. You fire up your base with fear tactics, and pinpoint your enemy — the bogeyman, the scapegoat — and today that is immigrants.

What were the main challenges in pulling it all together?
Any time you do a film, it’s so hard and challenging. I’ve been doing this for decades now, and it ain’t getting any easier. You have to tell the story the best way you can, given the time and money you have, and it has to be a team effort. I had a great team with me, and any time you do a period piece you have added challenges to get it looking right.

You assembled a great cast. What did John David Washington and Adam Driver bring to the main roles?
They brought the weight, the hammer! They had to do their thing and bring their characters head-to-head, so it’s like a great heavyweight fight, with neither one backing down. It’s like Inside Man with Denzel and Clive Owen.

It’s the first time you’ve worked with the Canadian DP Chayse Irvin, who mainly shot shorts before this. Can you talk about how you collaborated with him?
He’s young and innovative, and he shot a lot of Beyonce’s Lemonade long-form video. What we wanted to do was shoot on film, not digital. I talked about all the ‘70s films I grew up with, like French Connection and Dog Day Afternoon. So that was the look I was after. It had to match the period, but not be too nostalgic. While we wanted to make a period film, I also wanted it to feel and look contemporary, and really connect that era with the world we live in now. He really nailed it. Then my great editor, Barry Alexander Brown, came up with all the split-screen stuff, which is also very ‘70s and really captured that era.

How tough was the shoot?
Every shoot’s tough. It’s part of the job. But I love shooting, and we used a mix of practical locations and sets in Brooklyn and other places that doubled for Colorado Springs.

Where did you post?
Same as always, in Brooklyn, at my 40 Acres and a Mule office.

Do you like the post process?
I love it, because post is when you finally sit down and actually make your film. It’s a lot more relaxing than the shoot — and a lot of it is just me and the editor and the Avid. You’re shaping and molding it and finding your way, cutting and adding stuff, flopping scenes, and it never really follows the shooting script. It becomes its own thing in post.

Talk about editing with Barry Alexander Brown, the Brit who’s cut so many of your films. What were the big editing challenges?
The big one was finding the right balance between the humor and the very serious subject matter. They’re two very different tones, and then the humor comes from the premise, which is absurd in itself. It’s organic to the characters and the situations.

Talk about the importance of sound and music, and Terence Blanchard’s spare score that blends funk with classical.
He’s done a lot of my films, and has never been nominated for an Oscar — and he should have been. He’s a truly great composer, trumpeter and bandleader, and a big part of what I do in post. I try to give him some pointers that aren’t restrictive, and then let him do his thing. I always put as much as emphasis on sound and music as I do on the acting, editing and cinematography. It’s hugely important, and once we have the score, we have a film.

I had a great sound team. Phil Stockton, who began with me back on School Daze, was the sound designer. David Boulton, Mike Russo and Howard London did the ADR mix, and my longtime mixer Tommy Fleischman was on it. We did it all at C5 in New York. We spent a long time on the mix, building it all up.

Where did you do the DI and how important is it to you?
At Company 3 with colorist Tom Poole, who’s so good. It’s very important but I’m in and out, as I know Tom and the DP are going to get the look I want.

Spike Lee on set.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
Here’s the thing. You try to do the best you can, and I can’t predict what the reaction will be. I made the film I wanted to make, and then I put it out in the world. It’s all about timing. This was made at the right time and was made with a lot of urgency. It’s a crazy world and it’s getting crazier by the minute.

How important are industry awards and nomination to you? 
They’re very important in that they bring more attention, more awareness to a film like this. One of the blessings from the strong critical response to this has been a resurgence in looking at my earlier films again, some of which may have been overlooked, like Bamboozled and Summer of Sam.

Do you see progress in Hollywood in terms of diversity and inclusion?
There’s been movement, maybe not as fast as I’d like, but it’s slowly happening, so that’s good.

What’s next?
We just finished the second season of She’s Gotta Have It for Netflix, and I have some movie things cooking. I’m pretty busy.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.