Category Archives: Editing

Marian Oliver upped to editor at Cutters Chicago

Cutters Studios has promoted Marian Oliver to editor at its Chicago location. Oliver began her career in client services at Red Car Chicago in 2009. After earning her degree from Columbia College Chicago, she joined Cutters in 2012 as an assistant editor working on advertising projects. Her most recent projects include campaigns for Meijer, Hallmark, Southwest Airlines, Kiwi, Abbott, Chamberlain and Triscuit.

She uses Avid Media Composer as her main tool, but can edit on Adobe Premiere as well.

Oliver has worked a lot with agency The Distillery Project on jobs including Arrow, Meijer, Tropic Sport, Athletico and RetailMeNot. Per Jacobson, founding partner/CD of The Distillery Project, says, “We fell for Marian long ago when she was assisting Chris Claeys — and snickering along with our antics in the back of his edit suite. From day one, she was quick, smart and had great instincts, which is why we started giving her editing assignments long before she scored the sweet official title of editor.”

The Distillery Project’s founder/chief creative officer John Condon adds, “They say what we do isn’t rocket science, but then one day you find yourself doing a spot that is in fact rocket science. Marian put together a story that not only explained what it took for the European Space Agency to land a probe on a comet going 34,000 mph, but that also touched people emotionally.”

Oliver loves the art of editing. “There is something about the problem solving aspect of the job that I love,” she says. “I know it seems like that isn’t a large part, but it’s like a good 70%. You just keep moving forward, keep trying things, keep thinking and rethinking… sometimes you have to step outside of that frame you have painted yourself into. It’s a challenge and it is frustrating but man when you get it, when you solve that problem and it really works, that’s it, you’re hooked.”

Oliver is a member of the Free the Bid database of women in the creative industry. You can check out her profile here. And when not editing? This passionate photographer can be found traveling “in search of the perfect light.”

CoreMelt’s new PaintX provides planar tracking for FCPX

CoreMelt’s PaintX planar tracking-based paint utility software for Apple Final Cut Pro X editors and artists is now available. CoreMelt PaintX is powered by Boris FX’s Mocha technology, which tracks camera motion, objects and people for seamless visual effects and screen composites. PaintX enables editors and artists to quickly and accurately apply “fixes” to footage and sequences by using standard color, blur, sharpen, clone, smear and warp brushes and applying the planar tracker.

PaintX integrates a number of features designed to significantly simplify and accelerate the editing workflow within FCPX.

Here are some highlights:
– Each paint stroke is editable after being made and is fully non-destructive with unlimited undo;
– The tracked clone brush solves many common problems quickly
– The integrated Mocha tracker is accessible in a single button press
– Each stroke can have a different track applied to multiple tracks all in one plugin
– Users can copy and paste track data from one stroke to another in order to apply different effects with the same track data
– Users can save and restore brush preset shapes and sizes

CoreMelt has worked closely with the FCPX community to develop a series of tutorials to help new users familiarize themselves with the PaintX workflow within FCPX. The entire library of tutorials is available here.

PaintX is available for $99. CoreMelt is offering significant discounts on its Everything Bundle (which also includes PaintX) and its Chromatic + PaintX bundles. For more information on these bundles click here.

DG 7.9, 8.27

Review: Mobile Filmmaking with Filmic Pro, Gnarbox, LumaFusion

By Brady Betzel

There is a lot of what’s become known as mobile filmmaking being done with cell phones, such as the iPhone, Samsung Galaxy and even the Google Pixel. For this review, I will cover two apps and one hybrid hard drive/mobile media ingest station built specifically for this type of mobile production.

Recently, I’ve heard how great the latest mobile phone camera sensors are, and how those embracing mobile filmmaking are taking advantage of them in their workflows. Those workflows typically have one thing in common: Filmic Pro.

One of the more difficult parts of mobile filmmaking, whether you are using a GoPro, DSLR or your phone, is storage and transferring the media to a workable editing system. The Gnarbox, which is designed to help solve this issue, is in my opinion one of the best solutions for mobile workflows that I have seen.

Finally, editing your footage together in a professional nonlinear editor like Adobe Premiere Pro or Blackmagic’s Resolve takes some skills and dedication. Moreover, if you are doing a lot of family filmmaking (like me), you usually have to wait for the kids to go to sleep to start transferring and editing. However, with the iOS app LumaFusion — used simultaneously with the Gnarbox — you can transfer your GoPro, DSLR or other pro camera shots, while your actors are taking a break, allowing you to clear your memory cards or get started on a quick rough cut to send to executives that might be waiting off site.

Filmic Pro
First up is Filmic Pro V.6. Filmic Pro is an iOS and Android app that gives you fine-tuned control over your phone’s camera, including live image analyzation features, focus pulling and much more.

There are four very useful live analytic views you can enable at the top of the app: Zebra Stripes, Clipping, False Color and Focus Peaking. There is another awesome recording view that allows simultaneous focus and exposure adjustments, conveniently placed where you would naturally rest your thumbs. With the focus pulling feature you can even set start and end focus points that Filmic Pro will run for you — amazing!

There are many options under the hood of Filmic Pro, including the ability to record at almost any frame rate and aspect ratio, such as 9:16 vertical video (Instagram TV anyone?). You can also film at one particular frame rate, such as 120fps and record at a more standard frame rate of 24fps, essentially processing your high-speed footage in the phone. Vertical video is one of those constant questions that arises when producing video for mobile viewing. If you don’t want the app to automatically change to vertical video recording mode, you can set an orientation lock in the settings. When recording video there are four data rate options: Filmic Extreme, with 100Mb/s for any frame size 2K or higher and 50Mb/s for 1080p or lower; Filmic Quality, which limits the data rate to 35Mb/s (your phone’s default data rate); or Economy, which you probably don’t need to use.

I have only touched on a few of the options inside of Filmic Pro. There are many more, including mic input selections, sample rate selections (including 48kHz), timelapse mode and, in my opinion, the most powerful feature, Log recording. Log recording inside of a mobile phone can unlock some unnoticed potential in your phone’s camera chip, allowing for a better ability to match color between cameras or expose details in shadows when doing color correction in post.

The only slightly bad news is that on top of the $14.99 price for the Filmic Pro app itself, to gain access to the Log ability (labeled Cinematographer’s Toolkit) you have to pay an additional $9.99. In the end, $25 is a really, really, really small price to pay for the abilities that Filmic Pro unlocks for you. And while this won’t turn your phone into an Arri Alexa or Red Helium (yet), you can raise your level of mobile cinematography quickly, and if you are using your phone for some B-or C-roll, Filmic Pro can help make your colorist happy, thanks to Log recording.

One feature that I couldn’t test because I do not own a DJI Osmo is that you can control the features on your iOS device from the Osmo itself, which is pretty intriguing. In addition, if you use any of the Moondog Labs anamorphic adapters, Filmic Pro can be programmed to de-squeeze the footage properly.

You can really dive in with Filmic Pro’s library of tutorials here.

Gnarbox 1.0
After running around with GoPro cameras strapped to your (or your dog’s) head all day, there will be some heavy post work to get it offloaded onto your computer system. And, typically, you will have much more than just one GoPro recording during the day. Maybe you took some still photos on your DSLR and phone, shot some drone footage and had GoPro on a chest mount.

As touched on earlier, the Gnarbox 1.0 is a stand-alone WiFi-enabled hard drive and media ingestion station that has SD, microSD, USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports to transfer media to the internal 128GB or 256GB Flash memory. You simply insert the memory cards or the camera’s USB cable and connect to the Gnarbox via the App on your phone to begin working or transferring.

There are a bunch of files that will open using the Gnarbox 1.0 iOS and Android apps, but there are some specific files that won’t open, including ProRes, H.265 iPhone recordings, CinemaDNG, etc. However, not all hope is lost. Gnarbox is offering up the Gnarbox 2.0 via IndieGogo and can be pre-ordered. Version 2.0 will offer compatibility with file types such as ProRes, in addition to having faster transfer times and app-free backups.

So while reading this review of the Gnarbox 1.0, keep Version 2 in the back of your mind, since it will likely contain many new features that you will want… if you can wait until the estimated delivery of January 2019.

Gnarbox 1.0 comes in two flavors: a 128GB version for $299.99, and the version I was sent to review, which is 256GB for $399.99. The price is a little steep, but the efficiency this product brings is worth the price of admission. Click here for all the lovely specs.

The drive itself is made to be used with an iPhone or Android-based device primarily, but it can be put into an external hard drive mode to be used with a stand-alone computer. The Gnarbox 1.0 has a write speed of 132MB/s and read speed of 92MB/s when attached to a computer in Mass Storage Mode via the USB 3.0 connection. I actually found myself switching modes a lot when transferring footage or photos back to my main system.

It would be nice to have a way to switch to the external hard drive mode outside of the app, but it’s still pretty easy and takes only a few seconds. To connect your phone or tablet to the Gnarbox 1.0, you need to download the Gnarbox app from the App Store or Google Play Store. From there you can access content on your phone as well as on the Gnarbox when connected to it. In addition to the Gnarbox app, Gnarbox 1.0 can be used with Adobe Lightroom CC and the mobile NLE LumaFusion, which I will cover next in the review.

The reason I love the Gnarbox so much is how simply, efficiently and powerfully it accomplishes its task of storing media without a computer, allowing you to access, edit and export the media to share online without a lot of technical know-how. The one drawback to using cameras like GoPros is it can take a lot of post processing power to get the videos on your system and edited. With the Gnarbox, you just insert your microSD card into the Gnarbox, connect your phone via WiFi, edit your photos or footage then export to your phone or the Gnarbox itself.

If you want to do a full backup of your memory card, you open the Gnarbox app, find the Connected Devices, select some or all of the clips and photos you want to backup to the Gnarbox and click Copy Files. The same screen will show you which files have and have not been backed up yet so you don’t do it multiple times.

When editing photos or video there are many options. If you are simply trimming down a video clip, stringing out a few clips for a highlight reel, adding some color correction, and even some music, then the Gnarbox app is all you will need. With the Gnarbox 1.0, you can select resolution and bit rates. If you’re reading this review you are probably familiar with how resolutions and bit rates work, so I won’t bore you with those explanations. Gnarbox 1.0 allows for 4K, 2.7K. 1080p and 720p resolutions and bitrates of 65 Mbps, 45Mbps, 30Mbps and 10Mbps.

My rule of thumb for social media is that resolution over 1080p doesn’t really apply to many people since most are watching it on their phone, and even with a high-end HDR, 4K, wide gamut… whatever, you really won’t see much difference. The real difference comes in bit rates. Spend your megabytes wisely and put all your eggs in the bit rate basket. The higher the bit rates the better quality your color will be and there will be less tearing or blockiness. In my opinion a higher bit rate 1080p video is worth more than a 4K video with a lower bit rate. It just doesn’t pay off. But, hey, you have the options.

Gnarbox has an awesome support site where you can find tutorial GIFs and writeups covering everything from powering on your Gnarbox to bitrates, like this one. They also have a great YouTube playlist that covers most topics with the Gnarbox, its app, and working with other apps like LumaFusion to get you started. Also, follow them on Instagram for some sweet shots they repost.

LumaFusion
With Filmic Pro to capture your video and with the Gnarbox you can lightly edit and consolidate your media, but you might need to go a little further in the editing than just simple trims. This is where LumaFusion comes in. At the moment, LumaFusion is an iOS only app, but I’ve heard they might be working on an Android version. So for this review I tried to get my hands on an iPad and an iPad Pro because this is where LumaFusion would sing. Alas, I had to settle for my wife’s iPhone 7 Plus. This was actually a small blessing, because I was afraid the app would be way too small to use on a standard iPhone. To my surprise it was actually fine.

LumaFusion is an iOS-based nonlinear editor, much like Adobe Premiere or FCPX, but it only costs $19.99 in the App store. I added LumaFusion to this review because of its tight integration with Gnarbox (by accessing the files directly on the Gnarbox for editing and output), but also because it has presets for Filmic Pro aspect ratios: 1.66:1, 17:9, 2.2:1, 2.39:1, 2.59:1. LumaFusion will also integrate with external drives like the Western Digital wireless SSD, as well as cloud services like Google Drive.

In the actual editing interface LumaFusion allows for advanced editing with titles, music, effects and color correction. It gives you three video and audio tracks to edit with, allowing for J and L cuts or transitions between clips. For an editor like me who is so used to Avid Media Composer that I want to slip and trim in every app, LumaFusion allows for slips, trims, insert edits, overwrite edits, audio track mixing, audio ducking to automatically set your music levels — depending on when dialogue occurs — audio panning, chroma key effects, slow and fast motion effects, titles with different fonts and much more.

There is a lot of versatility inside of LumaFusion, including the ability to export different frame rates between 18, 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 48, 50, 59.94, 60, 120 and 240 fps. If you are dealing with 360-degree video, you can even enable the 360-degree metadata flag on export.

LumaFusion has a great reference manual that will fill you in on all the aspects of the app, and it’s a good primer on other subjects like exporting. In addition, they have a YouTube playlist. Simply, you can export for all sorts of social media platforms or even to share over Air Drop between Mac OS and iOS devices. You can choose your export resolution such as 1080p or UHD 4K (3840×2160), as well as your bit rate, and then you can select your codec, whether it be H.264 or H.265. You can also choose whether the container is a MP4 or MOV.

Obviously, some of these output settings will be dictated by the destination, such as YouTube, Instagram or maybe your NLE on your computer system. Bit rate is very important for color fidelity and overall picture quality. LumaFusion has a few settings on export, including: 12Mbps, 24Mbps, 32Mbps and 50Mbps if in 1080p, otherwise 100 Mbps if you are exporting UHD 4k (3840×2160).

LumaFusion is a great solution for someone who needs the fine tuning of a pro NLE on their iPad or iPhone. You can be on an exotic vacation without your laptop and still create intricately edited highlight reels.

Summing Up
In the end, technology is amazing! From the ultra-high-end camera app Filmic Pro to the amazing wireless media hub Gnarbox and even the iOS-based nonlinear editor LumaFusion, you can film, transfer and edit a professional-quality UHD 100Mbps clip without the need for a stand-alone computer.

If you really want to see some amazing footage being created using Filmic Pro you should follow Richard Lackey on all social media platforms. You can find more info on his website. He has some amazing imagery as well as tips on how to shoot more “cinematic” video using your iPhone with Filmic Pro.

The Gnarbox — one of my favorite tools reviewed over the years — serves a purpose and excels. I can’t wait to see how the Gnarbox 2.0 performs when it is released. If you own a GoPro or any type of camera and want a quick and slick way to centralize your media while you are on the road, then you need the Gnarbox.

LumaFusion will finish off your mobile filmmaking vision with titles, trimming and advanced edit options that will leave people wondering how you pulled off such a professional video from your phone or tablet.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


Quick Chat: ATK PLN’s David Bates on alliance with Butcher Post

By Randi Altman

Creative group ATK PLN, which focuses on design, animation and live action, has partnered with LA-based editorial and post shop Butcher Post. ATK PLN will represent Butcher’s editors in the Texas market, and Butcher will represent ATK PLN’s editors in their markets. While ATK PLN is headquartered in Dallas, they have offices in LA and Montreal as well.

We reached out to ATK PLN managing director David Bates to find out more about the partnership.

ATK PLN has multiple offices. Is this partnership only with the Dallas facility? If so, why only Dallas and not across the board?
This is a strategic first step. Butcher hasn’t had representation in the Texas market, and this gave us a way to begin Phase 1 in a manageable way, while still making a big impact by bringing national talent into our Texas market.

The flip side is that we do have multiple brick and mortar offices that allow Butcher to have locations to work at as the need arises. ATK PLN is specifically representing Butcher in the Texas market, but operationally, our relationship goes much deeper than that.

Are the editors going to work in Texas or from where they are based? If remotely, what will that review and approval process look like?
One of the things we love the most about Butcher is their flexibility. We love that they can work on set, in a hotel suite or at a client’s office. They have already honed the skill of doing very high-quality work in whatever location they are called upon to do it. So much of the work that both Butcher and ATK PLN does is reviewed remotely.

The days of clients having the time to sit in a suite for hours or days on end to review work in progress are long gone. The key becomes setting clear expectations for both calendars and the content to be reviewed. We’re basically bringing the work to the client instead of asking them to come to us. We understand that agencies are continually asked to run leaner and meaner, and our aim is to be as supportive and as beneficial to them as possible. We’re mapping our workflow to their needs.

What systems does Butcher use?
They work on Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere, depending on the specific needs of the project. Both are easily portable.

Why was now the right time to partner, and why Butcher? There are many editorial houses out there.
So much of harnessing opportunity is just keeping your eyes open and being bold enough to leap when the opportunities present themselves. Our EP Jim Riche has had a long relationship with the team at Butcher and said, “David, you need to meet these guys.”

Our partnership began with a simple conversation… a discussion of how we think, and of what we do and how we do it. We discovered that our philosophies overlap, yet our skills are different enough to significantly extend the reach of the other. We had actually brought up the idea to other editorial houses in the past, but it was almost as if they couldn’t grasp the idea of being stronger together, while still retaining individuality. Butcher immediately understood the idea because they’re already in that mindset, and have been thinking in new strategic ways.

And conversely for Butcher, why partner with ATL PLN?
This partnership allows both companies to offer complete solutions without the long arduous process of building it from scratch. We allow Butcher to have three additional bases to operate from, as well as access to our young editorial talent. We provide them with representation in a significant market, and offer a level of design, animation, and general finishing that allows us to tackle potential work together and in a more strategic and efficient way.

What have they partnered on so far? Any projects to date? If so, what and how was the workflow on that?
We are at the very beginning of our relationship, and we’ve just begun the process of letting the marketplace know about it. Step one was to create awareness, letting the marketplace know that we are bringing something different to the table.

We have been approached by a Dallas agency for a project, but it never materialized. Butcher has successfully worked in two other markets with local agencies there. In one city, they had the editor set up in a hotel suite close to the client, in another they four-walled at a local edit company. In most cases the finishing, conform and color are all done at a facility local to the client. Here in Dallas, we offer all of the finishing needed, conform, Flame VFX, color and audio.


Edit house PS260 launches content studio, We Know the Future

Creative editorial house PS260 has launched its own creative content studio. We Know the Future offers in-house production capabilities and advertising solutions across all screens. These offerings will be available in NYC and LA.

JJ Lask, PS260’s co-founder, partner and editor, is leading the new content studio from the company’s LA office, with support from all PS260 editors and staff across both offices.

Currently, PS260’s We Know the Future partners with various creatives, from writers and directors to social media influencers, to support its content production with plans to build out the team in the next year. The first project from We Know the Future is American Counselor, which launched during the first week of July on PS260’s YouTube channel timed to the Fourth of July holiday. The link to the first episode is here, and the subsequent episodes will post each week throughout the summer.

PS260 and We Know the Future edited and produced American Counselor, respectively, and worked with the director of the 14-episode digital series, Brendan Gibbons. The series personifies both the liberal and conservative sides of the US as a husband and wife going through marriage counseling. Actors include Annie Sertich (2 Broke Girls, The Office), Ptolemy Slocum (Westworld, The Sopranos) and Marc Evans Jackson (Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Jumanji), who plays the American counselor.

In addition to American Counselor, Lask is working on a show directed at dads, called That Dad Show. It will appear on Facebook this fall and will be produced by the new content studio.

“The launch of PS260’s content studio is a response to a new advertising landscape,” says Lask. “PS260’s advantage is our visual storytelling talent. We are now leveraging that talent to develop, create and produce longer format episodic content combined with advertising solutions distributed across all the leading social channels.”


Roundtable: Director Autumn McAlpin and her Miss Arizona post team

By Randi Altman

The independent feature film Miss Arizona is a sort of fish out of water tale that focuses on Rose Raynes, former beauty queen and current bored wife and mother who accepts an invitation to teach a life skills class at a women’s shelter. As you might imagine, the four women who she meets there don’t feel they have much in common. While Rose is “teaching,” the women are told that one of their abusers is on his way to the shelter. The women escape and set out on an all-night adventure through LA and, ultimately, to a club where the women enter Rose into a drag queen beauty pageant — and, of course, along the way they form a bond that changes them all.

L-R: Camera operator Eitan Almagor, DP Jordan McKittrick and Autumn McAlpin.

Autumn McAlpin wrote and directed the film, which has been making its way through the film festival circuit. She hired a crew made up of 70 percent women to help tell this tale of female empowerment. We reached out to her, her colorist Mars Williamson and her visual effects/finishing artist John Davidson to find out more.

Why did you choose the Alexa Mini? And why did you shoot mostly handheld?
Autumn McAlpin: The Alexa Mini was the first choice of our DP Jordan McKittrick, with whom I frequently collaborate. We were lucky enough to be able to score two Alexa Mini cameras on this shoot, which really helped us achieve the coverage needed for an ensemble piece in which five-plus key actors were in almost every shot. We love the image quality and dynamic range of the Alexas, and the compact and lightweight nature of the Mini helped us achieve an aggressive shooting schedule in just 14 days.

We felt handheld would achieve the intimate yet at times erratic look we were going for following an ensemble of five women from very different backgrounds who were learning to get along while trying to survive. We wanted the audience to feel as if they were going on the journey along with the women, and thus felt handheld would be a wise approach to accomplish this goal.

How early did post — edit, color — get involved?
McAlpin: We met with our editor Carmen Morrow before the shoot, and she and her assistant editor Dustin Fleischmann were integral in delivering a completed rough cut just five weeks after we wrapped. We needed to make key festival deadlines. Each day Dustin would drive footage from set over to Carmen’s bay, where she could assemble while we were shooting so we could make sure we weren’t missing anything crucial. This was amazing, as we’d often be able to see a rough assembly of a scene we had shot in the morning by the end of day. They cut on Avid Media Composer.

My DP Jordan and I agreed on the overall look of the film and how we wanted the color to feel rich and saturated. We were really excited about what we saw in our colorist’s reel. We didn’t meet our colorist Mars Williamson until after we had wrapped production. Mars had moved from LA to Melbourne, so we knew we wouldn’t be able to work in close quarters, but we were confident we’d be able to accomplish the desired workflow in the time needed. Mars was extremely flexible to work with.

Can you talk more about the look of the film.
McAlpin: Due to the nature of our film, we sought to create a rich, saturated look color wise. Our film follows a former pageant queen on an all-night adventure through LA with four unlikely friends she meets at a women’s shelter. In a way, we tried to channel an Oz-like world as our ensemble embarks into the unknown. We deliberately used color to represent the various realities the women inhabit. In the film’s open, our production design (by Gabriel Gonzales) and wardrobe (by Cat Velosa) helped achieve a stark, cold world — filled with blues and whites — to represent our protagonist Rose’s loneliness.

As Rose moves into the shelter, we went with warmer tones and a more eclectic production design. A good portion of Act II takes place in a drag club, which we asked Gabe to design to be rich and vibrant, using reds and purples. Toward the end of the film as Rose finds resolution, we went with more naturalistic lighting, primarily outdoor shots and golden hues. Before production, Jordan and I pulled stills from films such as Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist, Black Swan and Short Term 12, which provided strong templates for the looks we were trying to achieve.

Is there a particular scene or look that stands out for you?
McAlpin: There is a scene when our lead Rose (Johanna Braddy) performs a ventriloquist act onstage with a puppet and they sing Shania Twain’s “Man, I Feel Like a Woman.”  Both Rose and the puppet wore matching cowgirl wardrobe and braids, and this scene was lit to be particularly vibrant with hot pinks and purples. I remember watching the monitors on set and feeling like we had really nailed the rich, saturated look we were going for in this offbeat pageant world we had created.

L-R: Dana Wheeler-Nicholson, Shoniqua Shandai, producer De Cooper, Johanna Brady, Autumn McAlpin, Otmara Marrero and Robyn Lively.

Can you talk about the workflow from set to post?
McAlpin: As a low-budget indie, many of our team work from home offices, which made collaboration friendly and flexible. For the four months following production, I floated between the workspaces of our talented and efficient editor Carmen Morrow, brilliant composer Nami Melumad, dedicated sound designer Yu-Ting Su, VFX and online extraordinaire John Davidson, and we used Frame.io to work with our amazing colorist Mars Williamson. Everyone worked so hard to help achieve our vision in our timeframe. Using Frame.io and Box helped immensely with file delivery, and I remember many careful drives around LA, toting our two RAID drives between departments. Postmates food delivery service helped us power through! Everyone worked hard together to deliver the final product, and for that I’m so grateful.

Can you talk about the type of film you were trying to make, and did it turn out as you hoped?
McAlpin: I volunteered in a women’s shelter for several years teaching a life skills class, and this was an experience that introduced me to strong, vibrant women whose stories I longed to tell. I wrote this script very quickly, in just three weeks, though really, the story seemed to write itself. It was the fall of 2016, at a time where I was agitated by the way women were being portrayed in the media. This was shortly before the #metoo movement, and during the election and women’s march. The time felt right to tell a story about women and other marginalized groups coming together to help each other find their voices and a safe community in a rapidly divisive world.

I’m not going to lie, with our budget, all facets of production and post were quite challenging, but I was so overwhelmed by the fastidious efforts of everyone on our team to create something powerful. I feel we were all aligned in vision, which kept everyone fueled to create a finished product I am very proud of. The crowning moment of the experience was after our world premiere at Geena Davis’ Bentonville Film Fest, when a few women from the audience approached and confided that they, too, had lived in shelters and felt our film spoke to the truths they had experienced. This certainly made the whole process worthwhile.

Autumn, you wrote as well as directed. Did the story change or evolve once you started shooting or did you stick to the original script?
McAlpin: As a director who is very open to improv and creative play on set, I was quite surprised by how little we deviated from the script. Conceptually, we stuck to the story as written. We did have a few actors who definitely punched up scenes by making certain lines more their own (and much more humorous, i.e. the drag queens). And there were moments when location challenges forced last-minute rewrites, but hey, I guess that’s one advantage to having the writer in the director’s chair! This story seemed to flow from the moment it first arrived in my head, telling me what it wanted to be, so we kind of just trusted that, and I think we achieved our narrative goals.

You used a 70 percent female crew. Can you talk about why that was important to you?
McAlpin: For this film, our producer DeAnna Cooper and I wanted to flip the traditional gender ratios found on sets, as ours was indeed a story rooted in female empowerment. We wanted our set to feel like a compatible, safe environment for characters seeking safety and trusted female friendships. So many of the cast and crew who joined our team expressed delight in joining a largely female team, and I think/hope we created a safe space for all to create!

Also, as women, we tend to get each other — and there were times when those on our production team (all mothers) were able to support each other’s familial needs when emergencies at home arose. We also want to give a shout-out to the numerous woman-supporting men we had on our team, who were equally wonderful to work with!

What was everyone’s favorite scene and why?
McAlpin: There’s a moment when Rose has a candid conversation with a drag queen performer named Luscious (played by Johnathan Wallace) in a green room during which each opens up about who they are and how they got there. Ours is a fish out of water story as Rose tries to achieve her goal in a world quite new to her, but in this scene, two very different people bond in a sincere and heartfelt way. The performances in this scene were just dynamite, thanks to the talents of Johanna and Johnathan. We are frequently told this scene really affects viewers and changes perspectives.

I also have a personal favorite moment toward the end of the film in which a circle of women from very different backgrounds come together to help out a character named Leslie, played by the dynamic Robyn Lively, who is searching for her kids. One of the women helping Leslie says, “I’m a mama, too,” and I love the strength felt in this group hug moment as the village comes together to defend each other.

If you all had to do it again, what would you do differently?
McAlpin: This was one fast-moving train, and I know, as is the case in every film, there are little shots or scenes we’d all love to tweak just a little if given the chance to start over from scratch. But at this point, we are focusing on the positives and what lies in store for Miss Arizona. Since our Bentonville premiere and LA premiere at Dances With Films, we have been thrilled to receive numerous distribution offers, and it’s looking like a fall worldwide release may be in store. We look forward to connecting with audiences everywhere as we share the message of this film.

Mars Williamson

Mars, can you talk about your process and how you worked with the team? 
Williamson: Autumn put us in touch, and John and I touched based a little bit before I was going to start color. We all had a pretty good idea of where we were taking it from the offline and discussed little tweaks here and there, so it was fairly straightforward. There were a couple of things like changing a wall color and the last scene needing more sunset than was shot. Autumn and John are super easy and great to work with. We found out pretty early that we’d be able to collaborate pretty easily since John has DaVinci Resolve on his end in the states as well.  I moved to Melbourne permanently right before I really got into the grade.

Unbeknownst to me, Melbourne was/is in the process of upgrading their Internet, which is currently painfully slow. We did a couple of reviews via Frame.io and eventually moved to me just emailing John my project. He could relink to the media on his end and all of my color grading would come across for sessions in LA with Autumn. It was the best solution to contend with the snail pace uploads of large files. From there it was just going through it reel by reel and getting notes from the stateside team. I couldn’t have worked on this with a better group of people.

What types of projects do you work on most often?
Williamson: My bread and butter has always been TV commercials, but I’ve worked hard to make sure I work on all sort of formats across different genres. I like to make sure I’ve got a wide range of stuff under my belt. The pool is smaller here in Australia than it is in LA (where I moved from) so TV commercials are still the bill payers, but I’m also still dipping into the indie scene here and trying to diversify what I work on. Still working on a lot of indie projects and music videos from the states as well so thank you stateside clients! Thankfully the difference in time hasn’t hindered most of them (smiles). It has led to an all-nighter here and there for me, but I’m happy to lose sleep for the right projects.

How did you work with the DP and director on the look of the film? What look did you want and how did you work to achieve that look or looks?
John Davidson: Magic Feather is a production company and creative agency that I started back in 2004. We provide theatrical marketing and creative services for a wide variety of productions. From the 3D atomic transitions in Big Bang Theory to the recent Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom week-long event on Discovery, we have a pretty great body of work. I came onboard Miss Arizona very much by accident. Last year, after working with Weta in New Zealand, we moved to Laguna Niguel and connected with Autumn and her husband Michael via some mutual friends. I was intrigued that they had just finished shooting this movie on their own and offered to replace a few license plates and a billboard. Somehow I turned that into coordinating the post-Avid workflow across the planet and creating 100-plus visual effects shots. It was a fantastic opportunity to use every tool in our arsenal to help a film with a nice message and a family we have come to adore.

John Davidson

Working with Jordan and Autumn for VFX and final mastering was educational for all of us, but definitely so with me. As I mentioned to Jordan after the showing in Hollywood, if I did my job right you would never know. There were quite a few late nights, but I think that they are both very happy with the results.

John, I understand there were some challenges in the edit? Relinking the camera source footage? Can you talk about that and how you worked around it?
Davidson: The original Avid cut was edited off of the dailies at 1080p with embedded audio. The masters were 3.2k Arri Alexa Mini Log with no sync sound. There were timecode issues the first few days on set and because Mars was using DaVinci Resolve to color, we knew we had to get the footage from Avid to Resolve somehow. Once we got the footage into DaVinci via AAF, I realized it was going to be a challenge relinking sources from the dailies. Resolve was quite the utility knife, and after a bit of tweaking we were able to get the silent master video clips linked up. Because 12TB drives are expensive, we thought it best to trim media to 48-frame handles and ship a smaller drive to Australia for Mars to work with. With Mars’s direction we were able to get that handled and shipped.

While Mars was coloring in Australia, I went back into the sources and began the process of relinking the original separate audio to the video sources because I needed to be able to adjust/re-edit a few scenes that had technical issues we couldn’t fix with VFX. Resolve was fantastic here again. Any clip that couldn’t be automatically linked via timecode was connected with clap marks using the waveform. For safety, I batch-exported all of the footage out with embedded audio and then relinked the film to that. This was important for archival purposes as well as any potential fixes we might have to do before the film delivered.

At this point Mars was sharing her cuts on Frame.io with Jordan and Autumn. I felt like a little green shift was being introduced over H.264 so we would occasionally meet here to review a relinked XML that Mars would send for a full quality inspection. For VFX we used Adobe After Effects and worked in flat color. We then would upload shots to box.com for Mars to incorporate into her edit. There were also two re-cut scenes that were done this way as well which was a challenge because any changes had to be shared with the audio teams who were actively scoring and mixing.

Once Mars was done we put the final movie together here, and I spent about two weeks working on it. At this point I took the film from Resolve to FCP X. Because we were mastering at 1080p, we had the full 3.2K frame for flexibility. Using a 1080p timeline in FCP X, the first order of business was making final on-site color adjustments with Autumn.

Can you talk about the visual effects provided?
Davidson: For VFX, we focused on things like the license plates and billboards, but also took a bit of initiative and reviewed the whole movie for areas we could help. Like everyone else, I loved the look of the stage and club scenes, but wanted to add just a little flare to the backlights so the LED grids would be less visible. This was done in Final Cut Pro X using the MotionVFX plugin mFlare2. It made very quick work of using its internal Mocha engine to track the light sources and obscure them as needed when a light went behind a person’s head, for example. It would have been agony tracking so many lights in all those shots using anything else. We had struggled for a while getting replacement license plates to track using After Effects and Mocha. However, the six shots that gave us the most headaches were done as a test in FCP X in less than a day using CoreMelt’s TrackX. We also used Final Cut Pro X’s stabilization to smooth out any jagged camera shakes as well as added some shake using FCP X’s handheld effect on a few shots that needed it for consistency.

Another area we had to get creative with was with night driving shots that were just too bright even after color. By layering a few different Rampant Design overlays set to multiply, we were able to simulate lights in motion around the car at night with areas randomly increasing and decreasing in brightness. That had a big impact on smoothing out those scenes, and I think everyone was pretty happy with the result. For fun, Autumn also let me add in a few mostly digital shots, like the private jet. This was done in After Effects using Trapcode Particular for the contrails, and a combination of Maxon Cinema 4D and Element 3D for the jet.

Resolve’s face refinement and eye brightening were used in many scenes to give a little extra eye light. We also used Resolve for sky replacement on the final shot of the film. Resolve’s tracker is also pretty incredible, and was used to hide little things that needed to be masked or de-emphasized.

What about finishing?
Davidson: We finalized everything in FCP X and exported a full, clean ProRes cut of the film. We then re-imported that and added grain, unsharp masks and a light vignette for a touch of cinematic texture. The credits were an evolving process, so we created an Apple Numbers document that was shared with my internal Magic Feather team, as well as Autumn and the producers. As the final document was adjusted and tweaked we would edit an Affinity Photo file that my editor AJ Paschall and I shared. We would then export a huge PNG file of the credits into FCP X and set position keyframes to animate the scroll. Any time a change was made we would just relink to the new PNG export and FCP X would automatically update the credits. Luckily, that was easy because we did that probably 50 times.

Lastly, our final delivery to the DCP company was a HEVC 10-bit 2K encode. I am a huge fan of HEVC. It’s a fantastic codec, but it does have a few caveats in that it takes forever to encode. Using Apple Compressor and a 10-core iMac Pro, it took approximately 13 hours. That said, it was worth it because the colors were accurately represented and gave us a file that 5.52GB versus 18GB or 20GB. That’s a hefty savings on size while also being an improvement in quality over H.264.

Photo Credit: Rich Marchewka

 


Behind the Title: Sim LA’s VP of Post LA Greg Ciaccio

Name: Greg Ciaccio

Company: Sim

Can you describe your company?
We’re a full-service company providing studio space, lighting and grip, cameras, dailies and finishing in Los Angeles, New York, Toronto, Vancouver and Atlanta with outposts in New Mexico and Texas.

What’s your job title?
VP, Post Los Angeles

What does that entail?
Essentially, I’m the GM of our dailies and rentals and finishing businesses — the 2nd and 3rd floor of our building — formerly Kodak Cinesite. The first floor houses our camera rental business.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I coproduce our SimLab industry events with Bill Russell in our camera department.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Having camera, dailies, editorial and finishing under one roof — the workflows that tie them all together provide meaningful solutions for our clients.

What’s your least favorite?
Like most facility heads, business constraints. There’s not much of it, which is great, but running any successful company relies on managing the magic.

What is your favorite time of the day?
The early mornings when I can power through management work so I can spend time with staff and clients.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Probably a post sound mixer. I teach post production management one night a week at CSUN, so that provides a fresh perspective on my role in the industry.

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I really started back in the 4th grade in lighting. I then ran and designed lighting in high school and college, moving into radio-TV-film halfway through. I then moved into production sound. The move from production to post came out of a desire for (fairly) regular hours and consistent employment.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
TV series: Game of Thrones, The Gifted, Krypton, The Son, Madam Secretary, Jane the Virgin. On the feature dailies and DI side: Amy Poehler’s Wine Country.

We’re also posting Netflix’ Best Worst Weekend Ever in ACES (Academy Color Encoding System) in UHD/Dolby Vision HDR.

Game of Thrones

What is the project that you are most proud of?
Game of Thrones. The quality bar which HBO has set is evident in the look of the show. It’s so well-produced — the production design, cinematography, editing and visual effects are stunning.

Name three pieces of technology that you can’t live without.
My iPhone X, my Sony Z9D HDR TV and my Apple Watch.

What social media channels do you follow?
Instagram for DP/other creative photography interests; LinkedIn for general socially/influencer-driven news; Facebook for peripheral news/personal insights; and channels, which include ETCentric — USC ETC; ACES Central for ACES-related community info; and Digital Cinema Society for industry events

Do you listen to music while you work? Care to share your favorite music to work to?
I listen to Pandora. The Thievery Corporation station.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Getting out for lunch and walking when possible. I visit our staff and clients throughout the day. Morning yoga. And the music helps!


An editor recaps Sight, Sound & Story 2018

By Amy Leland

Manhattan Edit Workshop’s Sight, Sound & Story (SS&S) was established in June of 2013, first offering post-related events, and then those based around cinematography as well.

As a working editor always looking to learn, I attend numerous industry events throughout the year, but this one has become one of the “can’t miss” items on my list. They bring in top-notch panelists sharing their work and their insights. This year’s post event was once again a chance to hear from professionals at the top of their craft across documentary, scripted television and feature film.

Documentary Panel
First up was the panel of documentary editors, including Bryan Chang (Brasslands, Narco Cultura, A Year in Space), Ann Collins (Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold, Swim Team), Matthew Hamachek (Cartel Land, The Trade, Amanda Knox, Meet the Patels) and moderator Garret Savage (My Perestroika, Karen Schmeer Film Editing Fellowship).

Ann Collins

The panel started at a logical place — at the beginning. Savage asked each of them how they like to begin the cutting process. Both Chang and Collins described processes that involve screening the footage and pulling selects, a fairly traditional approach. While Hamachek said he used to work that way, when faced with hundreds of hours of footage, his process evolved. Now he just starts cutting. Part of his motivation is the pressures of schedule, which made sense given that his most recent project was The Fourth Estate, a documentary series rather than a feature. To cut the first 90-minute episode of the series, he had 14 weeks. He described the advantages of getting to a rough cut as fast as he can. “Editing is a process of failure. The sooner I can get to my first mistakes, the better,” he said.

The difference in his process can also be explained by working with a story producer. A good story producer provides a path through the footage. Feature editors often work as their own story producers. Both Chang and Collins talked about the need to see the footage and find those special clips and sound bites. This way when the time came in the edit where they had to fill the blank, they would know where to find them. Though they used different methods — Chang will lay out selects in a sequence, while Collins creates subclips with metadata — both create a library of moments to draw on later.

Interestingly, when asked if he might change his process if he were editing an indie feature documentary, Hamachek said no. Though his process developed in part because of working on a series, it was a process he had grown to really enjoy. And Collins pointed out that regardless of what process an editor uses, they must always be willing to go back to the footage and make changes as the story reveals itself.

The audience was shown a clip from Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold, and Collins explained, “Beginnings are the hardest part of the film, and the part that changes the most often. As the film evolves, that beginning changes a lot.” She said that with the beginning, you have to establish what the world of this film is — the pace, the tone, the style, the rules, etc. All of that has to be taken care of silently and invisibly while you convince the viewer to come with you. What you may find is that as the rest of the film develops you’ll understand later what that beginning should be.

Bryan Chang

Chang addressed a different kind of documentary editing challenge in presenting a clip from Narco Cultura, about the music that glorifies the narco lifestyle, and specifically one of the musicians who traveled to Mexico to meet the narcos. Shaun Schwarz, with whom he had collaborated many times, primarily on shorts for Time, directed the film.

One challenge documentarians often face is the question of permission from the subjects in front of the camera. On their trip to Mexico, one of the narcos that was there kept saying he didn’t want to be in the movie and to not shoot him, but he also kept bragging and showing off in front of the cameras. So, ultimately, they did leave him in and didn’t blur his face. They felt he had put himself in the film. Though editors face a lot of challenges that are technical, sometimes the challenges are more abstract and the solutions are less black and white.

Scripted Television Panel
Next up was a panel of scripted television editors: Naomi Geraghty (Billions, Bloodline, Treme) and Lynne Willingham, ACE (Breaking Bad, Ray Donovan, The X-Files), moderated by Michael Berenbaum, ACE (Sex & the City, The Americans, Divorce).

One of the most popular topics for the TV panel every year is the question of how to break into a scripted television edit room. This year’s panelists addressed this in two important ways. First, in talking about how each of them got their start, they made it clear that there is no one way in. Willingham did not go to film school. She was able to find her way into a studio because her brother was an assistant at Warner. She started as an apprentice, working her way up. She said, “I got my free education just working anytime I could.”

Geraghty, on the other hand, did attend film school in Ireland, which is where she discovered that she was drawn to the process of editing. There wasn’t much work in Ireland, so she got a work visa and came to New York. She eventually got her foot in the door working at Jonathan Demme’s company on a documentary. This led to an opportunity assisting on a feature back in Ireland.

L-R: Naomi Geraghty and Lynne Willingham.

Equally important, both described helping their own assistants get opportunities to cut on the shows where they worked. Willingham’s longtime assistant on Breaking Bad was Kelley Dixon. They had been working together a long time, and Willingham encouraged her to cut whenever possible. Because of union rules, she couldn’t get her a solo credit on an episode, but was able to get her shared credit. By having her in that position, Dixon was eventually able to move up and became the lead editor on the show herself.

One caution that Willingham offered was that the workload for assistants has grown so much that it is difficult to find the time to be in the room when the cutting is happening. It isn’t the same process it used to be when assistants were in the room with their editors for much of the process. So the challenge is to balance the workload with seeing the action and being seen. But the flip side to that, Geraghty pointed out, is that there is so much work in television these days that the path to moving forward can actually be more readily available in television than in film.

A frequently popular topic when discussing television these days is the rising quality of shows, and the “cinematic” quality of the work being done. Both talked about the joys of working on shows that are more character driven and developed over a long period of time. One interesting aspect of this, said Willingham, it that with the current popularity of doing more compact seasons — 10 episodes, instead of 22 or 23 — and shooting them all at once, the work attracts higher-end talent. Actors and directors can commit to the projects, shoot all of the episodes in one concentrated period, and then move on to other projects. All of which is opening the doors to better — and more — work for everyone involved in the process.

Scripted Television Panel

Willingham shared the opening scene from the pilot of Breaking Bad. When asked if she knew, while she was working on it, how good and how popular it would be. She said, yes and no. Everyone working on it knew what they were doing was going to be brilliant simply because it was created by Vince Gilligan. She said that as much as she wanted to take credit for how great that opening scene was, everything she cut came from the script. Gilligan had such a clear plan. But even with all of that, none of them knew just how big a phenomenon it would become.

The one unplanned moment in that opening scene was the footage of Walter talking into the camera. Though that footage was shot that day in the desert, Gilligan never intended for that footage to be used until the very end of the series. But because he let Willingham work so independently, she didn’t know that. She saw the footage, saw a way to use it, and just did it. And it worked. She encouraged everyone — if you are inspired to try something while you are cutting, then try it. It could be exactly what is needed.

Geraghty showed the final scene from Season 1 of Billions. What was fascinating was that, though the scene consisted almost entirely of two men standing and talking to each other, it was filled with tension and drama. She described that sometimes, as an editor, it is your job to not get in the way of the work. The language was so rich, and the performances were so fantastic, that her job was simply to respect the performances and protect the integrity of the work being done. She could certainly help drive the scene by finding the best takes, and the moments when particular angles were the best choice, but she felt the most important thing was to let the performances shine.

Inside the Cutting Room
An ever-popular aspect of Sight Sound & Story is Inside the Cutting Room, an interview with a prominent member of the editing community, moderated by writer and film historian Bobbie O’Steen (“Cut to the Chase,” “The Invisible Cut”). Her subject this time was Kevin Tent, ACE (Sideways, Election, The Descendants, Nebraska, Blow), longtime editor for director Alexander Payne.

Kevin Tent and Bobbie O’Steen.

As with the other panels, they spoke about beginnings, and Tent’s was especially interesting. After working in educational films, he got the opportunity to work with Roger Corman. While working for the king of B-movies might seem like an inauspicious way to become an Oscar-nominated editor, it became clear what a perfect foundation this actually was. Working in a production house churning out movies at a fast pace, Tent was able to collect experience at an accelerated rate. Corman’s way of working also provided additional learning opportunities. Tent described Corman as ruthless — he would think nothing of cutting out an entire scene if it wasn’t working for him. So the challenge for all of the editors was to make every scene so interesting that Corman would leave it in the movie. They also did a lot of work that involved pulling films from the vault that hadn’t been widely seen and cutting clips from them into new movies. He wondered why the big studios don’t do this, since their vaults are also filled with movies that were rarely seen. It’s an interesting thought.

One other unexpected benefit — when his reel came across Alexander Payne’s desk, Tent’s work with Corman was one of the things Payne liked. Payne was looking for an editor for his first feature, Citizen Ruth. The studio wanted him to hire a bigger editor with more credits, but Payne wanted a partner, not a more seasoned figure telling him what to do and how to do it. And with that, a longtime creative partnership was born.

As expected from such a great partnership, there were many fascinating stories about both collaboration and conflict. One of the great moments came in cutting Election. In a pivotal scene with Matthew Broderick, Payne wanted to cut it like The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, with long shots and back and forth looks. Tent didn’t. He felt it would be too drawn out and long. So he offered to pay Payne $75 to let him cut it the way he wanted, and the test audiences loved it. So it worked.

One interesting aspect of Tent’s work is his willingness to manipulate the footage for effect. Especially these days, feature editors tend to work in a more straightforward, vérité way. Tent showed two great examples of times when manipulation created iconic scenes. In their first cut of James Mangold’s Girl Interrupted, the biggest problem was that the film was way too long. One solution was to collapse some of the scenes. The example he played was a scene showing day-in-the-life moments in the institution where the girls were. They were put in montage over one another, cross-dissolved into one another, and cut in a very stylistic way over music. Ultimately it was their plan to change it for the final film, but the preview audience print cost $12K. When they told the producer they wanted to change it, the producer said no, they couldn’t print the film again. So this incredibly beautiful scene came from a moment they thought of as a temporary fix, and cut on a whim on a Saturday.

Nebraska

He also employed a fair amount of image manipulation for Nebraska. For example, he occasionally added pauses to Bruce Dern’s performance, which worked because he didn’t move around a lot. And he admitted that, yes, he was guilty of using a lot of fluid morph in order to accomplish this. Every time he did it, Payne would say, “When you do that, you’re saying I’m a bad director.” He also showed an example, near the end of the film, when he would use strategic speed changes to draw out moments in an emotional way. He likes to experiment with those tools and techniques. He said it comes from being greedy and wanting all of the best stuff, which he sometimes does by piecing things together.

Tent won the Eddie and was nominated for the Oscar for The Descendants. They hadn’t cut a feature together in seven years because Payne had been working on writing Downsizing and trying to get it off the ground. Tent said when they first got together, there was a little nervousness in the cutting room, but once they started working they fell into their good rhythm again.

A lot of their work together had been about walking the line between comedy and drama. With The Descendants, in particular, Payne was concerned about being too melodramatic. So he wrote and shot a lot of comedy elements. But when they were in the edit, those moments kept getting in the way and felt disrespectful to what the characters were going through. Eventually they stopped trying to be funny, and found that sometimes there were funny moments anyway, simply because of the humanity of the situation.

O’Steen quoted Payne saying about Tent, “Our process is essentially cowriting the final draft together. Kevin is my audience, and I hunger to please him.” As we were treated to an overview of their work together, it was obvious that they wrote wonderful final drafts together and, ultimately, pleased their audiences a great deal.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.


Editor Paul Zucker on cutting Hotel Artemis

By Zack Wolder

The Drew Pearce-directed Hotel Artemis is a dark action-thriller set in a riot-torn Los Angeles in the not-too-distant future. What is the Hotel Artemis? It’s a secret members-only hospital for criminals run by Jodie Foster with the help of David Bautista. The film boasts an impressive cast that also includes Sterling K. Brown, Jeff Goldblum, Charlie Day, Sofia Boutella and Jennie Slate.

Hotel Artemis editor Paul Zucker, ACE, has varied credits that toggle between TV and film, including Trainwreck, This is 40, Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind, Girls, Silicon Valley and many others.

We recently reached out to Zucker, who worked alongside picture editor Gardner Gould, to talk about his process on the film.

Paul Zucker and adorable baby.

How did you get involved in this film?
This was kind of a blind date set-up. I wasn’t really familiar with Drew, and it was a project that came to me pretty late. I think I joined about a week, maybe two, before production began. I was told that they were in a hurry to find an editor. I read the script, I interviewed with Drew, and that was it.

How long did it take to complete the editing?
About seven months.

How involved were you throughout the whole phase of production? Were you on set at all?
I wasn’t involved in pre-production, so I wasn’t able to participate in development of the script or anything like that, but as soon as the camera started rolling I was cutting. Most of the film was shot on stages in downtown LA, so I would go to set a few times, but most of the time there was enough work to do that I was sequestered in the edit room and trying to keep up with camera.

I’m an editor who doesn’t love to go to set. I prefer to be uninfluenced by whatever tensions, or lack of tensions, are happening on set. If a director has something he needs me for, if it’s some contribution he feels I can make, I’m happy, able and willing to participate in shot listing, blocking and things like that, but on this movie I was more valuable putting together the edit.

Did you have any specific deadlines you had to meet?
On this particular movie there was a higher-than-average number of requests from director Drew Pearce. Since it was mostly shot on stages, he was able to re-shoot things a little easier than you would if we were on location. So it became important for him to see the movie sooner rather than later.

A bunch of movies ago, I adopted a workflow of sending the director whatever I had each Friday. I think it’s healthy for them to see what they’re working on. There’s always the chance that it will influence the work they’re doing, whether it’s performance of the actors or the story or the script or really anything.

As I understand it from the directors I’ve worked for, seeing the editor’s cut can be the worst day of the process for them. Not because of the quality of the editing, but because it’s hard in that first viewing to look past all the things that they didn’t get on set. Its tough to not just see the mistakes. Which is totally understandable. So I started this strategy of easing them into it. I just send scenes; I don’t send them in sequence. By the time they get to the editors cut, they’ve seen most of the scenes, so the shock is lessened and hopefully that screening is more productive

Do you ever get that sense that you may be distracting them or overwhelming them with something?
Yes, sometimes. A couple of pictures ago, I did my normal thing — sending what I had on a Friday — and the director told me he didn’t want to watch them. For him, issues of post were a distraction while he was in production. So to each his own.

Drew Pearce certainly benefitted. Drew was the type of director who, if I sent it at 9pm, he would be watching it at 9:05pm, and he would be giving me notes at 10:05pm.

Are you doing temp color and things like that?
Absolutely. I do as much as the footage I’m given requires. On this particular movie, the cinematographer, the DIT and the lab were so dialed in that these were the most perfect-looking dailies I think I’ve ever gotten. So I had to do next to nothing. I credit DP Chung-Hoon Chung for that. Generally, if I’m getting dailies that are mismatched in color tone, I’m going to do whatever it takes to smooth it out. Nothing goes in front of the director until it’s had a hardcore sound and color pass. I am always trying to leave as little to the imagination as possible. I try to present something that is as close to the experience that the audience will have when they watch the movie. That means great color, great sound, music, all of that.

Do you ever provide VFX work?
Editorial is typically always doing simple VFX work like split-screens, muzzle-flashes for guns, etc. Those are all things that we’re really comfortable doing.

On this movie, theres a large VFX component, so the temp work was more intense. We had close to 500 VFX shots, and there’s some very involved ones. For example, a helicopter crashes into a building after getting blasted out of the sky with a rocket launcher. There are multiple scenes where characters get operated on by robotic arms. There’s a 3D printer that prints organs and guns. So we had to come up with a large number of temp shots in editorial.

Editor Gardner Gould and assistant editors Michael Costello and Lillian Dawson Bain were instrumental in coming up with these shots.

What about editing before the VFX shots are delivered?
From the very beginning, we are game-planning — what are the priorities for the movie vis-a-vis VFX? Which shots do we need early for story reasons? Which shots are the most time consuming for the VFX department? All of these things are considered as the entire post production department collaborates to come up with a priorities list.

If I need temp versions of shots to help me edit the scene, the assistants help me make them. If we can do them, we’ll do them. These aid in determining final VFX shot length, tempo, action, anything. As the process goes on, they get replaced by shots we get from the VFX department.

One thing I’m always keeping in mind is that shots can be created out of thin air oftentimes. If I have a story problem, sometimes a shot can be created that will help solve it. Sometimes the entire meaning of a scene can change.

What do you expect from your assistant editors?
The first assistant had to have experience with visual effects. The management of workflow for 500 shots is a lot, and on this job, we did not have a dedicated VFX editor. That fell upon (my co-editor) editor Gardner Gould.

I generally kick a lot of sound to the assistant, as I’m kind of rapidly moving through cutting picture. But I’m also looking for someone who’s got that storytelling bone that great editors have. Not everybody has it, not every great assistant has it.

There is so much minutiae on the technical side of being an assistant editor that you run the risk of forgetting that you’re working on a movie for an audience. And, indeed, some assistants just do the assistant work. They never cut scenes, they never do creative work, they’re not interested or they just don’t. So I’m always encouraging them to think like an editor at every point.

I ask them for their opinions. I invite them into the process, I don’t want them to be afraid to tell me what they think. You have to express yourself artistically in every decision you make. I encourage them to think critically and analytically about the movie that we’re working on.

I came up as an assistant and I had a few people who really believed in me. They invited me into the room with the director and they gave me that early exposure that really helped me learn my trade. I’m kind of looking to pay back that favor to my assistants.

Why did you choose to edit this film on Avid? Are you proficient in any other NLEs?
Oh, I’d say strictly Avid. To me, a tool, a technology, should be as transparent as possible. I want to have the minimum of time in between thought and expression. Which means that if I think of an edit, I want to automatically, almost without thinking, be able to do a keystroke and have that decision appear on the monitor. I’m so comfortable with Avid that I’m at that point.

How is your creative process different when editing a film versus a TV show?
Well first, a TV show is going to have a pre-determined length. A movie does not have a pre-determined length. So in television you’re always wrangling with the runtime. The second thing that’s different is in television schedules are a little tighter and turnaround times are a little tighter. You’re constantly in pre-production, production and post at the same time.

Also, television is for a small screen. Film, generally speaking, is for the big screen. The venue matters for a lot of reasons, but it matters for pacing. You’re sitting in a movie theater and maybe you can hold shots a little bit longer because the canvas is so wide and there’s so much to look at. Whereas with the small screen, you’re sitting closer to the television, the screen itself is smaller, maybe the shots are typically not as wide or you cut a little quicker.

You’re a very experienced comedic editor. Was it difficult to be considered for a different type of film?
I guess the answer is yes. The more famous work I’ve done in the last couple of years has been for people like Lena Dunham and Judd Apatow. So people say, “Well, he’s a comedy editor.” But if you look at my resume dating back to the very first thing I did in 2001, I edited my first movie — a pretty radical film for Gus Van Sant called Gerry, and it was not a comedy. Eternal Sunshine was not a comedy. Before Girls, I couldn’t get hired on comedies.

Then I got pulled on by Judd to work on some of his movies, and he’s such a brand name that people see that on your resume and they say, “Well, you must be a comedy editor.” So, yes, it does become harder to break out of that box, but that’s the box that other people put you in, I don’t put myself in that. My favorite filmmakers work across all types of genre.

Where do you find inspiration? Music? Other editors? Directors?
Good question. I mean… inspiration is everywhere. I’m a movie fan, I always have been, that’s the only thing I’ve ever wanted to do. I’m always going to the movies. I watch lots of trailers. I like to keep up with what people are doing. I go back and re-watch the things that I love. Listening to other editors or reading other editors speak about their process is inspiring to me. Listening and speaking with people who love what they do is inspiring.

For Hotel Artemis, I went back and watched some movies that were an influence on this one to get in the tone-zone. I would listen to a lot of the soundtracks that were soundtracks to those movies. As far as watching movies, I watched Assault on Precinct 13, for instance. That’s a siege movie, and Hotel Artemis is kind of a siege movie. Some editors say they don’t watch movies while they’re making a movie, they don’t want to be influenced. It doesn’t bother me. It’s all in the soup.


Zack Wolder is a video editor based in NYC. He is currently the senior video editor at Billboard Magazine.  Follow him on Instagram at @thezackwolder.

Behind the Title: Deluxe Senior Finishing Editor Samantha Uber

NAME: Samantha Uber (@samanthauber)

COMPANY: Deluxe NY

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Deluxe NY is the New York City branch of the classic film lab founded in 1915. Today, we are a huge multimedia international empire for all types of content creation and delivery. My favorite part of working for this company is that we manage to serve our clients in a personalized, boutique environment but with the support of a worldwide network of both technology and ideas.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Finishing Editor

CAN YOU EXPLAIN WHAT YOU DO?
I am a Flame finishing editor/VFX artist, and I come from an Avid online and offline editorial background. I also use Blackmagic Resolve, Adobe Premiere and Apple FCP for their various abilities for different projects. While I always fully finish (conform/online) episodic and film projects in Flame, I also always use a unique mix of those applications listed above for each project to get me to that point in the highest quality and most efficient way possible. I am very interested in the building of the computer I am working on, the specialized scripts to make data organized, the debayer/color science process and, of course, the actual editing and delivery of the project.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
In my job as a finishing editor, I am surprisingly super-involved in dailies, mainly because I know what will make the job easier on the finishing editor if certain metadata is retained and organized in dailies. Seeing how the metadata coming from the dailies process is actually implemented in finishing allows me to have a unique perspective, and I teach dailies techs about this to give them a better understanding of how their work is being used.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Everyone who knows me, knows my favorite thing is a reconform. I love them. They are challenging, like giant Tetris puzzles — my favorite game growing up was Tetris. I love getting in the zone for hours and hours, moving the pieces of the timeline around, relying on the metadata the Flame gives me to do it more efficiently, and sometimes, not even looking at the actual picture until the end.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
For me, my least favorite thing is working on something that doesn’t challenge me. I like to constantly be thinking about ways to process new camera formats and new workflows, and understanding/being involved in the entire online process from start to finish. I love the “hard” jobs… the tough ones to figure out, even if that means I lose quite a bit of sleep (she laughs). There is always a limit to that, of course, but if I’m not involved in research and development on a project, I’m not happy. For this reason, I love working in episodic television the most because I can R&D a workflow and then use it and perfect it over time, all while building a close relationship with my clients and feeling ownership of my show.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’d say mid-afternoon and around 9pm at night. After the morning fires are put out and everything gets going, the middle of the afternoon gets a lot of work done. Also, around 9pm I enjoy working because the formal working day has pretty much ended and I can just zero in on a project and work quietly, without distractions.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I really love restoring antiques, whether it’s furniture or the 100-year-old Victorian home I live in. I am always working with my hands — either at work or at home — building, painting, grooming dogs, veggie-gardening, cooking, sculpting, etc. I appreciate the craftsmanship that went into antique pieces. I feel that type of work is lost in today’s disposable world.

What I do for films as a finishing editor is quite like the restoration work I do at home — taking something and realizing it to its full potential and giving it a new life. For these reasons I think I could possibly be an architect/designer, specializing in the mostly period-accurate restoration of antique homes. I still may end up doing this many years from now.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew very early on that I wanted to be a film editor of some sort. I was 16 yrs old when the film Moulin Rouge came out, and my best friend Michelle and I saw it in the theater. We both knew we wanted to do something technical and creative from that point. She became a computer engineer, and I became a senior finishing editor. I loved the editing and pacing of that film, how it was so much like the music videos I grew up watching, and I wanted to be able to tell a story with VFX and editing. I actually practiced on the Moulin Rouge DVD extras re-editing the scenes on the ISOs of the cameras they provided.

I was 16 when I applied to NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. It was my only choice for college. I initially went for a summer between my junior and senior year of high school and continued after high school for three more years until I graduated. I was working as a freelance editor for students, working at MTV as a junior editor, and teaching Avid editing at NYU during that time — always working!

Moulin Rouge is still my favorite film, and my dream is to work with director Baz Lurhmann one day.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I have worked as senior finishing editor on Paterno, High Maintenance, Girls, Vinyl and Boardwalk Empire for HBO, The Knick for Cinemax, Blue Bloods for CBS, The Americans for FX, Jesus Christ Superstar for NBC and Mr. Robot for USA. I worked on the film All These Small Moments for the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival, as well as the films Beasts of No Nation and Moonrise Kingdom in recent years.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I certainly put on a different workflow hat for the different parts of my job. It actually feels like different jobs sometimes —  painting a visual effect, building a computer, making a finishing workflow, conforming a show, debayering footage, designing a dailies workflow, etc. I think that keeps it interesting; doing something different every day.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The project I am most proud of is The Knick. I was involved in the process of creating the workflow of the show with Steven Soderbergh’s team for one year before it actually began. I believe it was the first show to use the Red Dragon camera at 5K, finishing at UHD. I worked intensely with the Red team to develop the software, color workflow and computer for debayering the footage.

I also worked closely with colorist Martin Zeichner and Steven’s team to retain the exact onset look of color immediately and efficiently, while also giving them the full latitude of the Red format in the DI. The result was beautiful, and I really enjoyed the show. I felt like the plot of the show — innovation in the surgical field — was being mirrored in the innovation in the actual finishing of the show, which was super awesome!

CAN YOU TALK MORE ABOUT THE TOOLS YOU USE?
For all final finishing, I use Autodesk Flame. I am proficient in nearly all platforms, but to me, nothing is better than the unique timeline in Flame, where layers see each other and tracks do not. This allows you to have many versions of a cut in one timeline, and is ideal for finishing. Also, the VFX capability of the Flame is unparalleled in an editing system, and it allows me to start working on anything in moments at the client’s request. However, Avid will always be my favorite for metadata and database management, and I usually start every project with a peek at the metadata in the Avid, and frequently a full reorganization.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLUGIN?
My favorite and most frequently used plugin is Re:Vision’s Twixtor, for the tons and tons of timewarps I do. This plugin helps me paint less frames than most. Close runners-up are Autodesk’s Autostabilize, which is actually highly customizable, and Furnace’s F-WireRemoval for all sorts of purposes.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT? 
Being a finishing editor means you are the last person to touch the project before it airs, so you are the last stop in everything. For that reason, I am often asked to anything and everything in session — re-mix sound, creatively re-edit, give advice on VFX shots and deliverables, do VFX shots, make masters, QC masters. You name it and I do it in session. I think that’s what the job really entails; being able to give the client what they are looking for at the last possible moment, especially now that they are seeing the final product in high-resolution and color corrected.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I could not live without my iPhone, as it connects me to the outside world as well as my job. It’s like my whole life is on my phone. I could also not live without my Wacom tablet. Finishing an edit is a whole lot easier on a tablet. Also, my super-fast cylinder Mac, outfitted so that every application and high-resolution footage can be processed extremely quickly. I still do wish my Mac was square, however, (she laughs), for more equipment compatibility, but I cannot complain about its high-speed processing ability. Engineering has kindly given me a Mac that I can play on and try new software, often before it is rolled into production throughout the facility. Th is keeps me in the know on new developments in our industry. This computer is totally separate from my super powerful Linux Flame system.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Yes, this is a high-stress job! I feel very responsible for all of the people who have put their hard work into a project to make sure it is shown in its best light and everything is as perfect as possible on often-tight deadlines. After a project leaves my hands it goes to QC, and my final work is what they see and what airs.

Because everything I do is on computers, I try to spend as little time on a computer outside of work as possible. As I mentioned before, I live in a 100-year-old house that I am restoring myself. What is nice is that I feel like I’m using the same part of my brain as I do at my job, however it is usually outdoors and involving physical labor. That is a great de-stressor from working on a computer in a windowless and darkened room all week.

I live far outside the city by the beach, and when I’m home, I’m really home and work seems a world away. I have two beautiful Afghan Hound sister dogs, Ginny and Trill, and a 1974 VW bus named Buddy. I honestly don’t like to rest. I always like to be working on my projects and pushing forward in my life, and I am just your typical Jersey girl at heart.