OWC 12.4

Category Archives: Displays

A post engineer’s thoughts on Adobe MAX, new offerings

By Mike McCarthy

Last week, I had the opportunity to attend Adobe’s MAX conference at the LA Convention Center. Adobe showed me, and 15,000 of my closest friends, the newest updates to pretty much all of its Creative Cloud applications, as well as a number of interesting upcoming developments. From a post production perspective, the most significant pieces of news are the release of Premiere Pro 14 and After Effects 17 (a.ka., the 2020 releases of those Creative Cloud apps).

The main show ran from Monday to Wednesday, with a number of pre-show seminars and activities the preceding weekend. My experience started off by attending a screening of the new Terminator Dark Fate film at LA Live, followed by Q&A with the director and post team. The new Terminator was edited in Premiere Pro, sharing the project assets between a large team of editors and assistants, with extensive use of After Effects, Adobe’s newly acquired Substance app and various other tools in the Creative Cloud.

The post team extolled the improvements in shared project support and project opening times since their last Premiere endeavor on the first Deadpool movie. Visual effects editor Jon Carr shared how they used the integration between Premiere and After Effects to facilitate rapid generation of temporary “postvis” effects. This helped the editors tell the story while they were waiting on the VFX teams to finish generating the final CGI characters and renders.

MAX
The conference itself kicked off with a keynote presentation of all of Adobe’s new developments and releases. The 150-minute presentation covered all aspects of the company’s extensive line of applications. “Creativity for All” is the primary message Adobe is going for, and they focused on the tension between creativity and time. So they are trying to improve their products in ways that give their users more time to be creative.

The three prongs of that approach for this iteration of updates were:
– Faster, more powerful, more reliable — fixing time-wasting bugs, improving hardware use.
– Create anywhere, anytime, with anyone — adding functionality via the iPad, and shared Libraries for collaboration.
– Explore new frontiers — specifically in 3D with Adobe’s Dimension, Substance and Aero)

Education is also an important focus for Adobe, with 15 million copies of CC in use in education around the world. They are also creating a platform for CC users to stream their working process to viewers who want to learn from them, directly from within the applications. That will probably integrate with the new expanded Creative Cloud app released last month. They also have released integration for Office apps to access assets in CC libraries.

The first application updates they showed off were in Photoshop. They have made the new locked aspect ratio scaling a toggle-able behavior, improved the warp tool and improved ways to navigate deep layer stacks by seeing which layers effect particular parts of an image. But the biggest improvement is AI-based object selection. This makes detailed maskings based on simple box selections or rough lassos. Illustrator now has GPU acceleration, improving performance of larger documents and a path simplifying tool to reduce the number of anchor points.

They released Photoshop for the iPad and announced that Illustrator will be following that path as well. Fresco is headed the other direction and now available on Windows. That is currently limited to Microsoft Surface products, but I look forward to being able to try it out on my ZBook-X2 at some point. Adobe XD has new features, and apparently is the best way to move complex Illustrator files into After Effects, which I learned at one of the sessions later.

Premiere
Premiere Pro 14 has a number of new features, the most significant one being AI-driven automatic reframe to allow you to automatically convert your edited project into other aspect ratios for various deliverables. While 16×9 is obviously a standard size, certain web platforms are optimized for square or tall videos. The feature can also be used to reframe content for 2.35 to 16×9 or 4×3, which are frequent delivery requirements for feature films that I work on. My favorite aspect of this new functionality is that the user has complete control over the results.

Unlike other automated features like warp stabilizer, which only offers on/off of applying the results, the auto-frame function just generates motion effect keyframes that can be further edited and customized by the user… once the initial AI pass is complete. It also has a nesting feature for retaining existing framing choices, that results in the creation of a new single-layer source sequence. I can envision this being useful for a number of other workflow processes — such as preparing for external color grading or texturing passes, etc.

They also added better support for multi-channel audio workflows and effects, improved playback performance for many popular video formats, better HDR export options and a variety of changes to make the motion graphics tools more flexible and efficient for users who use them extensively. They also increased the range of values available for clip playback speed and volume, and added support for new camera formats and derivations.

The brains behind After Effects have focused on improving playback and performance for this release and have made some significant improvements in that regard. The other big feature that actually may make a difference is content-aware fill for video. This was sneak previewed at MAX last year and first implemented in the NAB 2019 release of After Effects, but it should be greatly refined and improved in this version since it’s now twice as fast.

They also greatly improved support for OpenEXR frame sequences, especially with multiple render pass channels. The channels can be labeled; it creates a video contact sheet for viewing all the layers in thumbnail form. EXR playback performance is supposed to be greatly improved as well.

Character Animator is now at 3.0, and they have added keyframing of all editable values, trigger-able reposition “cameras” and trigger-able audio effects, among other new features. And Adobe Rush now supports publishing directly to TikTok.

Content Authenticity Initiative
Outside of individual applications, Adobe has launched the Content Authenticity Initiative in partnership with the NY Times and Twitter. It aims to fight fake news and restore consumer confidence in media. Its three main goals are: trust, attribution and authenticity. It aims to present end users with who created an image and who edited or altered it and, if so, in what ways. Seemingly at odds with that, they also released a new mobile app that edits images upon capture, using AI empowered “lenses” for highly stylized looks, even providing a live view.

This opening keynote was followed by a selection of over 200 different labs and sessions available over the next three days. I attended a couple sessions focused on After Effects, as that is a program I know I don’t use to its full capacity. (Does anyone, really?)

Partners
A variety of other partner companies were showing off their products in the community pavilion. HP was pushing 3D printing and digital manufacturing tools that integrate with Photoshop and Illustrator. Dell has a new 27-inch color accurate monitor with built-in colorimeter, presumably to compete with HP’s top end DreamColor displays. Asus also has some new HDR monitors that are Dolby Vision compatible. One is designed to be portable, and is as thin and lightweight as a laptop screen. I have always wondered why that wasn’t a standard approach for desktop displays.

Keynotes
Tuesday opened with a keynote presentation from a number of artists of different types, speaking or being interviewed. Jason Levine’s talk with M. Night Shyamalan was my favorite part, even though thrillers aren’t really my cup of tea. Later, I was able to sit down and talk with Patrick Palmer, Adobe’s Premiere Pro product manager about where Premiere is headed and the challenges of developing HDR creation tools when there is no unified set of standards for final delivery. But I am looking forward to being able to view my work in HDR while I am editing at some point in the future.

One of the highlights of MAX is the 90-minute Sneaks session on Tuesday night, where comedian John Mulaney “helped” a number of Adobe researchers demonstrate new media technologies they are working on. These will eventually improve audio quality, automate animation, analyze photographic authenticity and many other tasks once they are refined into final products at some point in the future.

This was only my second time attending MAX, and with Premiere Rush being released last year, video production was a key part of that show. This year, without that factor, it was much more apparent to me that I was an engineer attending an event catering to designers. Not that this is bad, but I mention it here because it is good to have a better idea of what you are stepping into when you are making decisions about whether to invest in attending a particular event.

Adobe focuses MAX on artists and creatives as opposed to engineers and developers, who have other events that are more focused on their interests and needs. I suppose that is understandable since it is not branded Creative Cloud for nothing. But it is always good to connect with the people who develop the tools I use, and the others who use them with me, which is a big part of what Adobe MAX is all about.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with over 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

Updated Apple Final Cut Pro features new Metal engine

Apple has updated Final Cut Pro X with a new Metal engine designed to provide performance gains across a wide range of Mac systems. It takes advantage of the new Mac Pro and the high-resolution, high-dynamic-range viewing experience of Apple Pro Display XDR. The company also optimized Motion and Compressor with Metal as well.

The Metal-based engine improves playback and accelerates graphics tasks in FCP X, including rendering, realtime effects and exporting on compatible Mac computers. According to Apple, video editors with a 15-inch MacBook Pro will benefit from performance that’s up to 20 percent faster, while editors using an iMac Pro will see gains up to 35 percent.

Final Cut Pro also works with the new Sidecar feature of macOS Catalina, which allows users to extend their Mac workspace by using an iPad as a second display to show the browser or viewer. Video editors can use Sidecar with a cable or they can connect wirelessly.

Final Cut Pro will now support multiple GPUs and up to 28 CPU cores. This means that rendering is up to 2.9 times faster and transcoding is up to 3.2 times faster than on the previous-generation 12-core Mac Pro. And Final Cut Pro uses the new Afterburner card when working with ProRes and ProRes Raw. This allows editors to simultaneously play up to 16 streams of 4K ProRes 422 video or work in 8K resolution with support for up to three streams of 8K ProRes Raw video.

Pro Display XDR
The Pro Display XDR features a 32-inch Retina 6K display, P3 wide color and extreme dynamic range. Final Cut Pro users can view, edit, grade and deliver HDR video with 1,000 nits of full screen sustained brightness, 1,600 nits peak brightness and a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio. Pro Display XDR connects to the Mac through a single Thunderbolt cable, and pros using Final Cut Pro on Mac Pro can simultaneously use up to three Pro Display XDR units — two for the Final Cut Pro interface and one as a dedicated professional reference monitor.

Final Cut Pro 10.4.7 is available now as a free update for existing users and for $299.99 for new users on the Mac App Store. Motion 5.4.4 and Compressor 4.4.5 are also available today as free updates for existing users and for $49.99 each for new users on the Mac App Store.

OWC 12.4

Review: Dell’s Precision T5820 workstation

By Brady Betzel

Multimedia creators are looking for faster, more robust computer systems and seeing an increase in computing power among all brands and products. Whether it’s an iMac Pro with a built-in 5K screen or a Windows-based, Nvidia-powered PC workstation, there are many options to consider. Many of today’s content creation apps are operating-system-agnostic, but that’s not necessarily true of hardware — mainly GPUs. So for those looking at purchasing a new system, I am going to run through one of Dell’s Windows-based offerings: the Dell Precision T5820 workstation.

The most important distinction between a “standard” computer system and a workstation is the enterprise-level quality and durability of internal parts. While you might build or order a custom-built system for less money, you will most likely not get the same back-end assurances that “workstations” bring to the party. Workstations aren’t always the fastest, but they are built with zero downtime and hardware/software functionality in mind. So while non-workstations might use high-quality components, like an Nvidia RTX 2080 Ti (a phenomenal graphics card), they aren’t necessarily meant to run 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. On the other hand, the Nvidia Quadro series GPUs are enterprise-level graphics cards that are meant to run constantly with low failure rates. This is just one example, but I think you get the point: Workstations run constantly and are warrantied against breakdowns — typically.

Dell Precision T5820
Dell has a long track record of building everyday computer systems that work. Even more impressive are its next-level workstation computers that not only stand up to constant use and abuse but are also certified with independent software vendors (ISVs). ISV is a designation that suggests Dell has not only tested but supports the end-user’s primary software choices. For instance, in the nonlinear editing software space I found out that Dell had tested the Precision T5820 workstation with Adobe Premiere Pro 13.x in Windows 10 and has certified that the AMD Radeon Pro WX 2100 and 3100 GPUs with 18.Q3.1 drivers are approved.

You can see for yourself here. Dell also has driver suggestions from some recent versions of Avid Media Composer, as well as other software packages. That being said, Dell not only tests but will support hardware configurations in the approved software apps.

Beyond the ISV certifications and the included three-year hardware warranty with on-site/in-home service after remote diagnostics, how does the Dell Precision T5820 perform? Well, it’s fast and well-built.

The specs are as follows:
– Intel Xeon W-2155 3.3GHz, 4.5GHz Turbo, 10-core, 13.75MB cache with hyperthreading
– Windows 10 Pro (four cores plus for workstations — this is an additional cost)
– Precision 5820 Tower with 950W chassis
– Nvidia Quadro P4000, 8GB, four DisplayPorts (5820T)
– 64GB (8x8GB) 2666MHz DDR and four RDIMM ECC
– Intel vPro technology enabled
– Dell Ultra-Speed Drive Duo PCIe SSD x8 Card, 1 M.2 512GB PCIe NVMe class 50 Solid State Drive (boot drive)
– 3.5-inch 2TB 7200rpm SATA hard drive (secondary drive)
– Wireless keyboard and mouse
– 1Gb network interface card
– USB 3.1 G2 PCIe card (two Type C ports, one DisplayPort)
– Three years hardware warranty with onsite/in-home service after remote diagnosis

All of this costs around $5,200 without tax or shipping and not including any sale prices.

The Dell Precision T5820 is the mid-level workstation offering from Dell that finds the balance between affordability, performance and reliability — kind of the “better, Cheaper, faster” concept. It is one of the quietest Dell workstations I have tested. Besides the spinning hard drive that was included on the model I was sent, there aren’t many loud cards or fans that distract me when I turn on the system. Dell is touting the new multichannel thermal design for advanced cooling and acoustics.

The actual 5820 case is about the size of a mid-sized tower system but feels much slimmer. I even cracked open the case to tinker around with the internal components. The inside fans and multichannel cooling are sturdy and even a little hard to remove without some force — not necessarily a bad thing. You can tell that Dell made it so that when something fails, it is a relatively simple replacement. The insides are very modular. The front of the 5820 has an optical drive, some USB ports (including two USB-C ports) and an audio port. If you get fancy, you can order the systems with what Dell calls “Flex Bays” in the front. You can potentially add up to six 2.5-inch or five 3.5-inch drives and front-accessible storage of up to four M.2 or U.2 PCIe NVMe SSDs. The best part about the front Flex Bays is that, if you choose to use M.2 or U.2 media, they are hot-swappable. This is great for editing projects that you want to archive to an M.2 or save to your Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve cache and remove later.

In the back of the workstation, you get audio in/out, one serial port, PS/2, Ethernet and six USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type A ports. This particular system was outfitted with an optional USB 3.1 Gen 2 10GB/s Type C card with one DisplayPort passthrough. This is used for the Dell UltraSharp 32-inch 4K (UHD) USB-C monitor that I received along with the T5820.

The large Dell UltraSharp 32-inch monitor (U3219Q) offers a slim footprint and a USB-C connection that is very intriguing, but they aren’t giving them away. They cost $879.99 if ordered through Dell.com. With the ultra-minimal Infinity Edge bezel, 400 nits of brightness for HDR content, up to UHD (3840×2160) resolution, 60Hz refresh rate and multiple input/output connections, you can see all of your work in one large IPS panel. For those of you who want to run two computers off one monitor, this Dell UltraSharp has a built-in KVM switch function. Anyone with a MacBook Pro featuring USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports can in theory use one USB-C cable to connect and charge. I say “in theory” only because I don’t have a new MacBook Pro to test it on. But for PCs, you can still use the USB-C as a hub.

The monitor comes equipped with a DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI, four USB 3.0 Type A ports and a USB-C port. Because I use my workstation mainly for video and photo editing, I am always concerned with proper calibration. The U3219Q is purported by Dell to be 99% Adobe sRGB-, 95% DCI-P3- and 99% Rec. 709-accurate, so if you are using Resolve and outputting through a DeckLink, you will be able to get some decent accuracy and even use it for HDR. Over the years, I have really fallen in love with Dell monitors. They don’t break the bank, and they deliver crisp and accurate images, so there is a lot to love. Check out more of this monitor here.

Performance
Working in media creation I jump around between a bunch of apps and plugins, from Media Composer to Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve and even from Adobe After Effects to Maxon’s Cinema 4D. So I need a system that can not only handle CPU-focused apps like After Effects but GPU-weighted apps like Resolve. With the Intel Xeon and Nvidia Quadro components, this system should work just fine. I ran some tests in Premiere Pro, After Effects and Resolve. In fact, I used Puget Systems’ benchmarking tool with Premiere and After Effects projects. You can find one for Premiere here. In addition, I used the classic 3D benchmark Cinebench R20 from Maxon, and even did some of my own benchmarks.

In Premiere, I was able to play 4K H.264 (50MB and 100MB 10-bit) and ProRes files (HQ and 4444) in realtime at full resolution. Red Raw 4K was able to playback in full-quality debayer. But as the Puget Systems’ Premiere Benchmark shows, 8K (as well as heavily effected clips) started to bog the system down. With 4K, the addition of Lumetri color correction slowed down playback and export a little bit — just a few frames under realtime. It was close though. At half quality I was essentially playing in realtime. According to the Puget Systems’ Benchmark, the overall CPU score was much higher than the GPU score. Adobe uses a lot of single core processing. While certain effects, like resizes and blurs, will open up the GPU pipes, I saw the CPU (single-core) kicking in here.

In the Premiere Pro tests, the T5820 really shined bright when working with mezzanine codec-based media like ProRes (HQ and 4444) and even in Red 4K raw media. The T5820 seemed to slow down when multiple layers of effects, such as color correction and blurs, were added on top of each other.

In After Effects, I again used Puget Systems’ benchmark — this time the After Effects-specific version. Overall, the After Effects scoring was a B or B-, which isn’t terrible considering it was up against the prosumer powerhouse Nvidia RTX 2080. (Puget Systems used the 2080 as the 100% score). It seemed the tracking on the Dell T5820 was a 90%, while Render and Preview scores were around 80%. While this is just what it says — a benchmark — it’s a great way to see comparisons between machines like the benchmark standard Intel i9, RTX 2080 GPU, 64GB of memory and much more.

In Resolve 16 Beta 7, I ran multiple tests on the same 4K (UHD), 29.97fps Red Raw media that Puget Systems used in its benchmarks. I created four 10-minute sequences:
Sequence 1: no effects or LUTs
Sequence 2: three layers of Resolve OpenFX Gaussian blurs on adjustment layers in the Edit tab
Sequence 3: five serial nodes of Blur Radius (at 1.0) created in the Color tab
Sequence 4: in the Color tab, spatial noise reduction was set at 25 radius to medium, blur set to 1.0 and sharpening in the Blur tab set to zero (it starts at 0.5).

Sequence 1, without any effects, would play at full debayer quality in real time and export at a few frames above real time, averaging about 33fps. Sequence 2, with Resolve’s OpenFX Gaussian blur applied three times to the entire frame via adjustment layers in the Edit tab, would play back in real time and export at between 21.5fps and 22.5fps. Sequence 3, with five serial nodes of blur radius set at 1.0 in the Blur tab in the Color tab, would play realtime and export at about 23fps. Once I added a sixth serial blur node, the system would no longer lock onto realtime playback. Sequence 4 — with spatial noise reduction set at 25 radius to medium, blur set to 1.0 and sharpening in the Blur tab set to zero in the Color tab — would play back at 1fps to 2fps and export at 6.5fps.

All of these exports were QuickTime-based H.264s exported using the Nvidia encoder (the native encoder would slow it down by 10 frames or so). The settings were UHD resolution; “automatic — best” quality; disabled frame reordering; force sizing to highest quality; force debayer to highest quality and no audio. Once I stacked two layers of raw Red 4K media, I started to drop below realtime playback, even without color correction or effects. I even tried to play back some 8K media, and I would get about 14fps on full-res. Premium debayer, 14 to 16 on half res. Premium 25 on half res. good, and 29.97fps (realtime) on quarter res. good.

Using the recently upgraded Maxon Cinebench R20 benchmark, I found the workstation to be performing adequately around the fourth-place spot. Keep in mind, there are thousands of combinations of results that can be had depending on CPU, GPU, memory and more. These are only sample results that you could verify against your own for 3D artists. The Cinebench R20 results were CPU: 4682, CPU (single-core): 436, and MP ratio: 10.73x. If you Google or check out some threads for Cinebench R20 result comparisons, you will eventually find some results to compare mine against. My results are a B to B+. A much higher-end Intel Xeon or i9 or an AMD Threadripper processor would really punch this system up a weight class.

Summing Up
The Dell Precision T5820 workstation comes with a lot of enterprise-level benefits that simply don’t come with your average consumer system. The components are meant to be run constantly, and Dell has tested its systems against current industry applications using the hardware in these systems to identify the best optimizations and driver packages with these ISVs. Should anything fail, Dell’s three-year warranty (which can be upgraded) will get you up and running fast. Before taxes and shipping, the Dell T5820 I was sent for review would retail for just under $5,200 (maybe even a little more with the DVD drive, recovery USB drive, keyboard and mouse). This is definitely not the system to look at if you are a DIYer or an everyday user who does not need to be running 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

But in a corporate environment, where time is money and no one wants to be searching for answers, the Dell T5820 workstation with accompanying three-year ProSupport with next-day on-site service will be worth the $5,200. Furthermore, it’s invaluable that optimization with applications such as the Adobe Creative Suite is built-in, and Dell’s ProSupport team has direct experience working in those professional apps.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producer’s Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

 


Atomos offering Shinobi SDI camera-top monitor

On the heels of its successful Shinobi launch in March, Atomos has introduced Atomos Shinobi SDI, a
super-lightweight, 5-inch HD-SDI and 4K HDMI camera-top monitor. Its color-accurate calibrated display makes makes it suitable compact HDR and SDR reference monitor. It targets the professional video creator who uses or owns a variety of cameras and camcorders and needs the flexibility of SDI or HDMI, accurate high bright and HDR, while not requiring external recording capability.

Shinobi SDI features a compact, durable body combined with an ultra-clear, ultra-bright, daylight viewable 1000-nit display. The anti-reflection, anti-fingerprint screen has a pixel density of 427PPI (pixels per inch) and is factory calibrated for color accuracy, with the option for in-field calibration providing ongoing accuracy. Thanks to the
HD-SDI input and output, plus a 4K HDMI input, it can be used in most productions.

This makes Shinobi SDI a useful companion for high-end cinema and production cameras, ENG cameras, handheld camcorders and any other
HD-SDI equipped source.

“Our most requested product in recent times has been a stand-alone SDI monitor. We are thrilled to be bringing the Atomos Shinobi SDI to market for professional video and film creators,” says Jeromy Young, CEO of Atomos.


Review: HP z38c ultra-wide curved display

By Dariush Derakhshani

Dude, seriously, who needs a 38-inch display? The obvious answer is me. HP’s z38c is a 38-inch ultra-wide curved professional monitor sporting good color accuracy and an effortless display. But ultra-wide? Isn’t that better for gaming? At first, I wasn’t sure what to think of this new form factor on my desk. I’m used to two screens, a large 32-inch 4K and a color-accurate 27-inch at 1440p, side by side. That’s a lot of screen space to be sure, so changing it up for me to a single ultra-wide was a little odd at first.

You might be asking yourself, “Didn’t that display premiere months and months ago?” Well, it did. Yes. Instead of rushing a review, I decided to live with this monitor for a while to get an even better feel for how it would fit in with my graphics work.

I knew this display was quite different to how I have worked for many years now, so I felt it was really important to be comfortable with this new idea: a single, ultra-wide curved display. Ultra-wide was a little odd at first.

The first thing I noticed is the fact that my desktop is practically as wide as my dual-screen setup, but there is no gap, no air, in between. Seamless and unbroken, I can easily stretch a single window out and not worry that it kinks in the middle where the bezels rub up against each other on my desk. This is supremely satisfying!

With an aspect ratio of 21:9, as opposed to the 16:9 we are used to with HD displays, the ultra-wide real estate gives me a comfortable workspace to stack apps side by side. With a 4K resolution horizontally (3840×1600), you could get 4k (UHD) content on the screen, though it would crop about 500 pixels off the top and bottom (full UHD is 3840×2160). So, for editing 4K content, you’d be looking at your footage scaled down, unless you cast it to another screen entirely.

One of my professional responsibilities is to read and cross-compare several technical documents to assess accurate content and suggest improvements, as well as write new content to increase educational reach. I used to just hang a couple windows on my main screen and a third window on my side monitor, and I never thought twice about looking back and forth between the screens.

But something psychologically makes this workflow easier when I have all three docs on the same screen; it is less fatiguing to read and go back and forth writing, highlighting and editing. This is the first workflow improvement I noticed, and quite likely what HP means when they proudly declare that their goal is to immerse the user.

When I fire up Autodesk Maya for some CG work, it’s nice having a little more horizontal elbow room in my view panels. My shelves display more tool icons, and I can fatten up the Attribute Editor on the side of the UI to see more information in one sitting. This becomes even more helpful when I jump in After Effects for compositing work. This is where the z38c’s aspect ratio really shines for me: my timeline/comp view makes it much easier to see what’s going on.

As a matter of fact, hopping into Adobe Premiere to cut some sequences together, which I do for educational videos on CG, is a joy! Seriously, this is an instant winner. I always tore off panels in Premiere to my side screen to work my edits, but with this ultra-wide view the timeline feels free and unfettered in 21:9. That is for sure my number one workflow improvement, and undoubtedly will be for anyone needing to edit or composite using timelines.

I have to admit, I had to fight back the urge to install Rainbow Six Siege on my workstation and play it with this wide aspect ratio. It was practically begging me to, and who am I to ignore my basest instincts? So I did! Playing a first-person shooter in this aspect ratio is pretty awesome, though I still suck at the game, and my 11-year-old easily trounces me every round.

Having said that, this is a professional-minded screen. It’s response time of 5ms is actually not too bad, but hard-core gamers want faster and the ability to sync, which is fine as I’m not a gamer per se. Only when I’m rendering and have nothing better to do. As a graphics professional, what interests me is in color accuracy first and foremost.

To that end, the z38c sports 10-bit color using frame rate control (FRC), which is basically a dithered 10-bit color — not quite as hardcore as a non-dithered, full 10-bit DreamColor, but pretty excellent for color-accurate work, though perhaps not color-critical work. Either way, it displays color much better than typical 8-bit displays to be sure, giving you far more than the typical 16.7 million colors in 8-bit. This makes color banding a thing of the past, allowing you to push your colors more comfortably.

Tuned to sRGB by default, the IPS screen is really beautiful to look at, and represents imagery extremely well without being overly saturated or too bright. The screen is eminently comfortable to look at, and I feel comfortable that I am looking at accurate colors, even when comparing it side by side to my full 10-bit screen. Though I admit it does have ever-so-slightly better contrast than the z38c.

The unit has a DisplayPort, HDMI and USB-C connectivity, as well as a headphone audio jack and three regular USB ports and one USB-C port for peripherals. The bezel is pleasingly thin around the top and sides, and a bit thicker along the bottom, giving it an elegant overall look. Don’t forget, this is 38-inch diagonal: this is a large screen. But the thin bezels keep it all about the images on the screen, so the unit doesn’t feel heavy on my desk, despite the 30 pounds weight and its solid build-quality. Adjustments to angle and height are easy with the sturdy base that is over 10 pounds, and I’m sure I could eventually mount this to a monitor arm without much trouble.

Summing Up
I really enjoy the minimalist look; not having to stare at a slew of buttons and LED lights and dials. For control, the on-screen menus are easy to operate with nested menus, and get you to switch between sRGB and Rec709 presets easily enough, as well as switching inputs between multiple sources. You’ll also be able to calibrate the screen as you need, making it all the more valuable to professional users.

Now, did I mention the screen is curved? Yup, there is a nice curve to the screen that is meant to immerse the user in their work, which I can certainly appreciate. I was skeptical of the curve at first, prejudging that it would distort the image, which would be very unsightly in wireframe views of CG models. But I am pleasantly surprised to say that is not the case. It does limit undistorted viewing angles a little bit when off-axis, but it’s really meant for someone burying their head into their work. As it is now, my dual-screen setup is in a V shape, angled around my head anyway, trying to make an immersive curve of sorts to make viewing back and forth easier.

The curve of the z38c makes that side-to-side viewing and working, honestly, effortless. Working in Maya in wireframe feels a bit odd to be blunt; I need more time to get used to working with a curve with CG. But with stretched-out timelines and multiple side-by-side windows for my writing and editing duties, I have to hand it to the z38c. The curved ultra-wide screen doesn’t necessarily revolutionize the way I work at my desk, but it does make it effortless and seamless to have a lot on my screen, and that is something I got used to pretty quick.


 


Display maker TVLogic buys portable backup storage company Nexto DI

TVLogic, a designer and manufacturer of LCD and OLED high-definition displays, has acquired Nexto DI, a provider of portable field backup storage for digital cameras. They are located in South Korea.

Nexto DI uses the company’s patented “X-copy” technology, while M-copy (copy to multiple drives simultaneously), according to the company, guarantees 100% data safety, even in worst-case circumstances.

We reached out to TVLogic’s Denny An to find out more…

Why did it make sense for TVLogic to acquire Nexto DI?
TVLogic develops and manufactures broadcast and pro monitors that work in concert with other equipment. Because we compete on a global scale with large organizations that supply other products, such as cameras, switchers and more in addition to monitors, we realized we had to extend our offerings to better serve our customers and stay competitive. After a thorough search for companies that provide complementary products we found the perfect technology partner with Nexto DI.

We will continue our efforts to become a comprehensive broadcast and professional equipment company by searching for products and companies that can create synergy with our monitor technology.

How do you feel this fits in with what you already provide for the industry?
TVLogic has over 90 distributors and service networks around the world that can now also promote, sell and provide the same great quality service for the Nexto DI product line. Although the data backup is the main feature of the Nexto DI products, they also support image and video preview features. We’re confident that the combined technologies of TVLogic and Nexto DI will result in new monitor products with built-in recording features in the near future.