Audionamix – 7.1.20

Category Archives: COVID 19

Deluxe sells distribution biz, former CEO Cyril Drabinsky returns

Platinum Equity has acquired Deluxe Entertainment Services Inc.’s distribution business (Deluxe). Financial terms were not disclosed. Deluxe Entertainment’s creative businesses are not included in the acquisition.

Former Deluxe CEO Cyril Drabinsky, who left the company in 2016 to found CineVizion, is returning to lead the business as CEO under Platinum Equity’s ownership. As part of the transition, CineVizion’s assets will be integrated into Deluxe.

“The entertainment industry, like many others, has been seriously disrupted by the coronavirus crisis,” says Tom Gores, chairman/CEO of Platinum Equity. “It will take both experience and tenacity to make it through to the other side, but we are confident that good companies with strong fundamentals and capable leadership will not only survive this crisis, but thrive.”

Drabinsky was an executive at Deluxe for nearly 20 years and led the company’s transformation from an analog film processing business into a leading digital post production technology and distribution service provider.

Former Deluxe executive Mike Gunter is joining Drabinsky’s leadership team as CFO. Warren Stein, who served as COO of Deluxe until 2016, is also returning as COO. Former Deluxe president of post production William Sherak advised Platinum Equity on the acquisition and will remain in an advisory role with the company going forward.

Founded as a film processing lab in 1915 as part of the Fox Film Corporation, today Deluxe provides a full suite of solutions to content production studios and distributors. The company has approximately 3,400 employees globally, with key hubs in Los Angeles, Bangalore, London and Sydney.

Deluxe comprises four segments: localization (subtitling and dubbing), digital cinema (mastering, key generation and distribution to theaters), home entertainment (compression, encoding and authorizing) and fulfillment (encryption, transcoding and distribution of movies and TV content).

Leon Silverman to chair HPA Industry Recovery Task Force

Industry veteran and former Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) president Leon Silverman will lead the HPA Industry Recovery Task Force (IRTF). He is a founder of HPA and continues to serve on its board. Over the course of his decades long career, he has held executive roles at major studios and entertainment companies including Netflix, The Walt Disney Studios, Kodak and LaserPacific. In these roles, he has focused on the intersection of technology and creativity, working closely with a number of key industry organizations.

The HPA’s Industry Recovery Task Force is focused on the sustainable resumption of the production and post industry with the aim of understanding how to enable content creation in an evolving world impacted by the pandemic crisis. The task force’s upcoming virtual Town Hall events will share the latest health and safety, technical and creative best practices.

“We are at a pivotal moment at an important and challenging time in our industry,” says Silverman. “While the pandemic forces us to evolve the way we work to effectively create and deliver content, we also have a real opportunity to not just get back to work, but to move our industry forward. This Task Force will mobilize experts, artists and technological visionaries from a range of disciplines to thoughtfully collaborate on industry evolution and innovation. The HPA is well suited to help create a common ground and forum for this conversation, and while we may not be in the same room, we can still help bring our industry together. I sincerely believe we can emerge from this current crisis stronger and focused on enhancing creativity and content creation itself.”

The first IRTF Town Hall will be held in July and will be moderated by Hollywood Reporter tech editor Carolyn Giardina. HPA plans to continue this format over the following months as the impact of the pandemic evolves. These events will present the latest knowledge and processes for individuals and companies at work on sets, in post-on-set environments, visual effects companies, studios, production companies and post companies. The first event will feature a panel that includes medical experts, scientists, political leaders, post artists and members of guilds. Video case studies will take pros behind the scenes to learn how facilities and companies have managed the challenges of the pandemic.

“It is extremely important,” notes Silverman, “to collaborate with the key individuals who have scientific knowledge as well as those who have already set standards for returning to work to make sure we are in sync with their guidelines and can educate our HPA community. Ultimately, our aim is to build an incredibly collaborative, creative and technically sound future.”

The specific schedule and speakers for the upcoming town halls will be announced shortly.

Audionamix – 7.1.20

Editor Liza Cardinale, ACE, is MEWShop’s artist-in-residence

Dead to Me editor Liza Cardinale, ACE, will be the next artist-in-residence at Manhattan Edit Workshop (MEWShop) and advise during the next Six-Week Intensive editing workshop starting July 6. Cardinale is a television editor who works across many  genres and is drawn to stories with complex female characters and juicy relationships. She earned an Eddie nomination for the Dead to Me pilot. Some of her credits include Outlander and Orange Is the New Black.

Cardinale got her start studying film theory at UC Berkeley, where she edited on the school’s tape-to-tape system without any formal training. Later, she visited a friend on the set of The Truth About Charlie and met the legendary editor Carol Littleton, ACE. After that encounter, Cardinale decided editing would be her career of choice.

The next installment of MEWShop’s workshop will be taught live exclusively online Monday through Friday from 10am to 6pm beginning July 6. More information and registration are available here.

The Six-Week Intensive in the art and technique of editing is a comprehensive jump-start for anyone thinking about a career in post. The course consists of foundational training in the most used video editing programs — Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe After Effects. Each day, time is dedicated to film theory, covering the history and evolution of editing techniques as well as the aesthetics of narrative, short-form

Cardinale will be taking part remotely during the last couple of segments to look at students’ work and critique what the class has been working on. The class will also screen her work. She will then talk to students about being a working editor and how she started, and she’ll give advice.

“We have successfully replicated our workshop and experience online since March,” says MEWShop president Jason Banke. “What is really thrilling to us now is being able to offer our signature workshop outside of the New York area for students anywhere in the world.”


How CBS’ All Rise went remote for season finale

By Daniel Restuccio

When the coronavirus forced just about everything to shut down back in mid-March, many broadcast television series had no choice but to make their last-shot episodes their season finales. Others got creative.

Producer Dantonio Alvarez

While NBC’s The Blacklist opted for a CG/live-action hybrid to end its season, CBS’ courtroom drama, All Rise, chose to address the shutdown head-on with a show that was shot remotely. When CBS/Warner Bros. shut down production on All Rise, EPs Michael M. Robin and Len Goldstein — along with EP/co-showrunners Greg Spottiswood and Dee Harris-Lawrence — began brainstorming the idea of creating an episode that reflected the current pandemic crisis applied to the justice system.

Co-producer Dantonio Alvarez was deep into remote post on the already-shot episodes 19 and 20 when Robin called him. He and consultant Gil Garcetti had looked into how the court system was handling the pandemic and decided to pitch an idea to Warner Bros.: a remote episode of All Rise done via a Zoom-like setup. Alvarez was relieved; it meant a lot of the crew — 50 from the usual 90-person team — could keep working.

In a week’s time, Spottiswood and co-executive producer Greg Nelson wrote the 64-page script that focused on the complications around a virtual bench trial and the virus-jammed court system.

The Logistics
Producer Ronnie Chong reached out to Jargon Entertainment’s Lucas Solomon to see how he could help. Jargon, which provides on-set playback and computer graphics, had been working with network solutions company Straight Up Technologies (SUT) on other projects. Solomon brought SUT into the mix. “We figured out a way to do everything online and to get it to a point where Mike Robin could be at home directing everybody,” he explains.

Straight Up Technologies offers a secure and proprietary broadband network with a broadcast-quality ISP backbone that can accommodate up to 200 simultaneous video feeds at 1920×1080 at 30fps and do 4K (3840×2160 or 4096×2160). For All Rise to record at 1920×1080, each actor needed a network upload speed of 5Mb/s for no lag or packet loss. If the producers had decided to go 4K, it would have needed to be triple that.

Prep started the week of April 10, with Solomon, Alvarez, DP David Harp, Robin and the SUT IT team doing Zoom or WebEx scouts of the actors’ homes for suitable locations. They also evaluated each home’s bandwidth, making a list of what computers and mobile devices everyone had.

“You’re only as good as the connection out of your house and the traffic around your house,” explains SUT’s John Grindley. They used what was in the actors’ houses and enhanced the connection to their network when necessary. This included upgrading the basic download/upload data plan, going from 4G to 5G, putting in signal boosters, adding hard lines to computers and installing “cradle points” — high-end Wi-Fi hotspots — if needed.

The cast got small battery-powered ring lights for their devices.

Cinematographer Harp set out to find what area of the casts’ houses helped tell the story. He asked things like, “What was the architecture? What kind of lights did they have in the room? Were they on dimmers? Where were the windows, and what are the window treatments like?” The answers to those questions determined Harp’s lighting package. He sent small battery-powered ring lights to the cast along with tripods for their iPhones, but mostly they worked with what they had. “We decided that we’re not going to get cameras out to anybody,” explains Alvarez. “We were going to use people’s phones and their home computers for capture.”

As a result, all 22 cast members became camera operators, grips and essentially one-person guerrilla film crews. Their gear was MacBook Pros, MacBook Airs, iPhones, and Cisco DX70s. Harp controlled exposure on the computers by moving lights around and positioning the actors.

Solomon set up his video assist system, QTake, at his shop in Valencia. It was equipped with a bandwidth of 400Mb/s download and 20Mb/s upload to record all the feeds. “We set up two other recording locations — one in Hollywood and one in Chatsworth — as redundancy.”

Production Begins
On Friday, April 17, day one of the six-day shoot, a five-person engineering crew at the COVID-safe SUT offices in San Francisco, Seattle and El Segundo fired up the network, checked the call sheet and connected to the crew.

Actors, Jessica Camacho (Emily Lopez) and Lindsay Mendez (Sara Castillo) logged into the join.sutvideo.com on their MacBook Pro laptop and iPhone, respectively. Their signal strength was good, so they shot their scene.

According to Straight Up Technologies CTO Reinier Nissen, the engineers set up virtual spaces, or “talent rooms,” for each actor and a “main stage” room where “talent rooms” were nested and scenes were played out. Every actor’s camera and mic feeds were married and recorded as individual signals. The “main stage” could be configured into a split-screen “Zoom-like” grid with inputs from any of the actors’ feeds. Some of the virtual spaces were control rooms, like a video village, where crew and IT could see all the actors, give technical and creative direction, monitor the signals, manage network traffic and control whose video and audio were on or muted.

The Cisco DX70s natively output 1920×1080 at 30fps. The MacBook Pro and Air 1280×720 camera feeds were upscaled in the sutvideo.com system to 1920×1080 30fps. The iPhones, 4K capable, were set to 1920×1080 30fps. Solomon recorded both the split-screen main stage and individual actor talent room streams to his QTake system in QuickTime ProRes 1920×1080, recalibrated the frame rate to 23.97 and added timecode.

DP David Harp

Each take was slated just like a normal shoot. From his LA home, director Robin could see everyone in the scene on the main stage and decide how to arrange them in the grid, set their eyelines and even pop into the grid during rehearsal and between takes to give notes.

Staging the scene, you would think that the actor should look straight at the camera so you could see their eyes. However, they noticed that there was “less of a connection when looking at the lens,” says Harp. “When they’re looking around the screen, you can feel a connection because they’re looking at each other.”

In addition to the virtual first unit footage, Harp shot eight days of second unit footage of Los Angeles streets during COVID. With four suction cups, he attached his Sony A7 to the roof of his son’s car and drove around for four or five hours a day shooting essentially a stock library of Los Angeles during a pandemic.

Post Production
Alvarez used the remote post infrastructure he set up for Episodes 19 and 20 for the new show. All of the editors, assistant editors, visual effects artists and audio team were working from home on their own systems or ones provided by Warner Bros. Since there was no Avid Unity shared storage, they did old-school shuttling of drives from location to location.

“We had three teams tackling this thing because our schedule was ridiculously short,” says Alvarez. “Every single day, feeding everybody material, we were able to get everyone cutting. We’d send live feeds or links to producers to get their eyes on editorial approvals on scenes in real time. We just moved.”

MTI Film EP Barbara Marshall reports that all the footage was ingested into the post house’s Signiant server system. From those masters, they made DNxHD 36 dailies using the MTI Cortex v5 software and sent them to the editors and assistant editors.

The edit team included Craig Bench, Leah Breuer and Chetin Chabuk, who worked with three assistants: Bradford Obie, Diana Santana and Douglas Staffield. They edited from home on six Avid Media Composers. They worked 13-hour days for 14 days in a row, says Bench.

Everyone on the editorial team got the same pool of dailies and started editing Saturday morning, April 18. Once they reviewed the footage, the team decided to rebuild the split-screen grids from scratch to get the pace of the show right. They wanted to retain, as much as possible, both the cadence of the dialog and the syncopated cutting style that Spottiswood and Bench had set in the pilot.

Rebuilding the grids, explains Bench, “gave us the freedom to treat everyone’s coverage separately. Even though the grid appears to be one take, it’s really not. We were creating our own world.” Rough cuts were sent every night to Robin.

During the first couple of production days, all three teams would jump on cutting the dailies as well as working through the previous day’s notes. As the show came together, Bench worked on the teaser and Act 1, Chabuk did Acts 2 and 3, and Breuer did Act 4 and the party scene at the end.

“There was a lot of experimenting,” explains Bench. “In the grid, should the actors be side by side or one on top of the other? There was also a lot of back and forth about grid background colors and textures.”

The assistants had their bins full setting up grid templates. This would allow them to drop an iso shot on a track so it would go to that spot on the grid and keep it consistent. They also built all the sound effects of the frames animating on and off.

Editorial gave MTI online editor Andrew Miller a “soft lock” of the episode early on April 30. Miller got the Avid project file that was “a big stack of split screens” and a reference video from Bench.

MTI colorist Greg Strait

Miller worked over the weekend with post supervisor Cat Crimins putting the episode together remotely. They replaced all the proxies with the high-res masters in the timeline and made necessary last-minute adjustments.

MTI colorist Greg Strait got a baked, uncompressed 10-bit MXF mixdown of the Avid timeline from Miller. Strait, who graded virtually the entire season of All Rise in Digital Vision’s Nucoda, had a good idea where the look was going. “I tried to keep it as familiar as possible to the other 20 episodes,” he says. “Sharpening some things, adding contrast and putting a lot of power windows around things had the best result.”

After laying in the audio stems, post was wrapped Sunday night at 11pm. Alvarez did a quality-control review of the episode. On Monday, May 4, they output XDCAM as the network deliverable.

Despite the tight time crunch, things went pretty smoothly, which MTI Film’s Marshall attributes to the trust and longtime relationship MTI has with Robin and the show. “That’s the cool thing about Mike. He definitely likes to push the envelope,” she says.

All Rise has been renewed for Season 2, and the team promises the innovations will continue.


VFX school for those with autism graduates class of 2020 via zoom

Exceptional Minds, an LA-based school that teaches young adults with autism how to create visual effects, motion graphics and other digital arts, has announced that the Class of 2020 has graduated after finishing courses remotely.

The graduation was a Zoom event attended by parents and friends, among them guest speaker Rob Paulsen, best known as the voice of Yakko in Animaniacs and Pinky from Pinky and the Brain. “People will look at Exceptional Minds as pioneers and they will be inspired by it, and that inspiration will help them find their own gifts,” he said.

When COVID-19 hit, hit, Exceptional Minds shut down its school and sent its students home. Overnight, its entire training model — the place where students met; the way instructors taught, socialized and interacted with this special population; and the lifeblood of what Exceptional Minds does and how it does it, right down to funding — was gone. And as anyone with a child, sibling or friend with autism knows, sudden change is a huge challenge.

No one was entirely sure if they could replicate this model in a remote, virtual environment, for a population that was already isolated and challenged in so many other ways. Remote learning carried Exceptional Minds 2020 graduates through the last critical months of their three-year training, not an easy feat for those on the autism spectrum.

According to Exceptional Minds’ Dee McVicker, what took the most time was figuring out how to format the classes. “We closed the school just as the rest of Los Angeles closed down. Our instructors spent a week working out the details of remote learning, and we were online with our students the following week. That was really quite amazing considering we are working with many in our population who do best with one-on-one learning. One thing our instructors decided right away is that instead of sending students home with homework and checking online from time to time, they would conduct their classes online in an all-day format. Our instructors also tried to instill a sense of community that is so important to any group of students, and especially students on the spectrum. We conducted Dungeons and Dragons games online, had movie nights (remotely) and did as much as we could online to keep those relationships engaged with us and each other.

“It was a wonderful way to develop an online program,” she says, “even if it was done quickly, and to learn about what works and doesn’t work online with our student population. As we move into summer, we are able to extend those learnings to our summer workshops. And going forward, we will be able to provide more of a hybrid approach to training our students, so we are no longer tied to the classroom as before.”

“From COVID-19 to Protest 2020, we have faced challenges the likes of which most of us have never seen before. But as we are learning, challenges test us in unexpected ways, and you all have demonstrated incredible flexibility and resilience in this new remote learning space that will serve you so well as you continue on an amazing journey that has just begun,” said Exceptional Minds executive director David Siegel to the class of 12 during Friday’s Zoom graduation.

For those who aren’t familiar with Exceptional Minds, the organization opened its doors in 2011 as a training school for individuals with autism and, in 2014, added a professional studio to bring in contract work for graduates of its three-year program.

Exceptional Minds 2020 graduates join alumni who have gone on to careers at Marvel Studios and Cartoon Network, worked on Oscar-nominated movies and produced animations for Sesame Street, among others. Exceptional Minds academy and working studio’s mission is to create opportunities for individuals with autism, with a new online summer program to help ensure the learning continues.


Estudios GGM to resume production, open new soundstages

Estudios GGM in Mexico is unveiling three new soundstages as it prepares to resume production activity later this month. Ranging from 10,000 to 13,000 square feet, the new stages will be the studio’s largest and give it a total of nine shooting spaces. Construction of one stage is already complete, while work on the other two will be finished by November, when the studio expects to be supporting a full slate of television and feature productions.

Planned before the coronavirus outbreak, the new stages are meant to serve Mexico’s accelerating boom in television and film production. Launched in 2016, Estudios GGM was operating at capacity prior to the lockdown, providing stages, production offices, casting, editing, visual effects and other services to projects from Telemundo, Netflix, Amazon, Viacom, MGM and other producers. Enemigo Intimo, Falsa Identidad, El Club, Luis Miguel: The Series and Ingobernable are among the streaming series recently shot in whole or in part at the studio.

Francisco Bonilla

“We expect production activity to pick up rapidly beginning in June,” says Estudios GGM CTIO Francisco Bonilla. “We built these stages to increase capacity and meet the needs of producers from around the world who are want to shoot in Mexico. They are large shooting spaces, have high ceilings and are supported by many other resources to accommodate a cinematic style of production.”

Adding to the social distancing guidelines mandated by the Mexican government, the studio will apply a variety of health and safety measures to protect cast and crew, including culture changes and hygienic training for work and everyday life; thermal CCTV monitoring; periodic chemical, ozone and UV sanitization; and restricted access to facilities, sets and offices. The new stages are complemented by modular, multi-purpose space that will allow directors, cinematographers, control room crew and other personnel to work in isolation. Other steps will include regular sanitizing of cameras, lighting, wardrobe and props; the use of masks and gloves; and modifications to craft and catering services. All the studio’s stages are equipped with HVAC systems that draw fresh air from outdoors to reduce the risk of spreading infection.

“We are working with local health officials and medical advisors to develop appropriate protocols,” notes Bonilla. “We are also monitoring the situations in Spain, Italy, Germany, Iceland, Australia and other countries where production has resumed. We are gathering as much information as possible to allow production to ramp up quickly but safely.”

While production has been curtailed during the lockdown, other work has continued. The studio has been using Bebop remote collaboration technology and Adobe tools to allow sound and picture editors, visual effects artists and others to carry on their work remotely. It has also been serving as a beta site for Avid On-Demand, a cloud-based editing platform. Similarly, post finishing has continued at Cinematic Media, the post facility located within the studio complex, with most staff working off site.

Estudios GGM is also expanding its visual effects department. It is hiring artists and adding new capabilities, including high-end motion capture and virtual set technology. Demand for visual effects services has risen dramatically along with the broader push to elevate production value. The studio expects the need for sophisticated visual effects to grow as productions look to limit travel and location production.

For producers eager to get back to production, Estudios GGM wants to make the process simple by providing one-stop solutions. “We provide everything necessary to produce premium television and cinema,” Bonilla says. “That includes experienced talent and crew to reduce the need to travel or bring people from outside the country.”


Jellyfish Pictures uses cloud to grow global talent pool

Animation and VFX studio Jellyfish Pictures has expanded its operating model to access talent across the world. The move is the company’s next stage of development after opening a large virtual studio at the end of last year.

This new way of working allows Jellyfish Pictures to access talent anywhere in the world without having to invest in brick and mortar or on-premises hardware. Artists can work from their own homes and have the same experience as teammates located 6,000 miles away, thanks to Teradici Cloud Access Software and Microsoft Azure. This new model has been implemented with artists joining the company from Israel, India, North America, Finland, Canada, Spain and Réunion.

With Jellyfish Pictures’ IT infrastructure already housed off site and completely virtual, the company uses Azure’s backbone to set up hubs all over the world, which connect back to the Jellyfish Pictures’ tier-one data center in the UK.

Cristina Ortega working from home in the UK.

All content resides on PixStor, Pixit Media’s software-defined storage solution. Using Pixit Media’s dynamic data manager, Ngenea, integrated with pipeline tools and Azure, Jellyfish Pictures distributes files across creative hubs quickly and securely. Artists access their content from PixStor running in the cloud hub, which guarantees their performance requirements are always met. When completed, files automatically move back to the UK data center.

Data never leaves the secure Azure hub, with pixels streamed to artists’ monitors via an encrypted streaming session over Teradici PCoIP technology. Data cannot be downloaded, shared or accessed, remaining fully compliant with TPN protocols and the stringent security measures withheld in the physical studios.

To further strengthen the global operation, Jellyfish Pictures’ review tool, which extends to the public cloud, allows clients to review content seamlessly in 4K. No matter where they are based in the world, both client and artist can share the same screen, updating and annotating in real time.

According to Jellyfish CEO Phil Dobree, “From the very beginning, when I first started looking at cloud and virtual technologies with Jellyfish CTO Jeremy Smith, it was always my vision to be able to go to where the artists are. We introduced cloud rendering and virtual desktops so we could break out of our four walls. Now in 2020, with events no one could have foreseen, we have over 280 artists working from home with no loss in productivity. Moving our staff to this environment was a relatively simple; connecting to the data center from home is the same as if they were connecting from the studio.

“It was always our intention to roll out this way of working on a global scale. We have merely accelerated our plan due to current circumstances.”

Main Image: Art director Katri Valkamo working out of her home in Finland. 


Alkemy X: VFX supervisors share work from home process

By Bilali Mack and Erin Nash

On the heels of joining Alkemy X’s VFX team, what we expected of our first few weeks was quickly interrupted by a global crisis. After getting to know the company and settling in, we were tasked with responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and transitioning the staff to remote work as quickly and efficiently as possible. As a headcount, that would be 42 artists, three supervisors, three pipeline engineers, three in editorial and the I/O department, and eight production management personnel.

Erin Nash’s WFH setup

We were fortunate that Alkemy X already had systems and processes in place and ready for these virtual workflows. It was just a matter of making the decision to get ahead of state mandates and make the shift early to set ourselves up for success. Our pivot to a remote workflow was structured and executed the week prior to March 16. We began to build our plan starting Tuesday, March 10, and by that Friday, the engineering and pipeline team had built on its pre-existing security-compliant processes to roll out to the entire staff of artists and production.

The company uses RGS to connect artists to a low-latency screen-sharing session on their work computers. Since the remote artists are working off the computer they normally use at work, they still have access to all of the software, licenses and tools they have when at the office. Agile and innovative responses have made our jobs easier, despite these circumstances.

Alkemy X built an openVPN server to allow secure, encrypted, multi-factor authentication and remote access to our internal network. By working remotely, we are able to maintain security and keep assets contained within our secure network. Artists have access to their files via high-speed file servers, with no need for time-consuming file transfers.

Bilali Mack working from home

Alkemy X uses Shotgun to manage our shows and workflow, but we are leaning on it more heavily now as a first-line review tool before heading to high-resolution reviews through HP RGS. Our traditional dailies have been replaced by rolling spot checks in Shotgun followed by more exhaustive reviews of full-resolution media.

We use Google Meet for meetings, screen sharing, video chat and telephone calls. We use Slack extensively on non-networked computers for team communication, keeping everyone connected and up to date and to quickly get assistance with any technical problems.

Priority is still placed on building and maintaining the company’s culture in addition to the quality of creative work, but we’re doing so behind the top of a dining room table or bedroom-stationed desk and within steps from our kitchens.

Erin Nash

As we move from our former posts, here’s how we are individually navigating working from home:

Erin Nash: Although managing a team remotely is a new experience for me, I can’t say I have found it very difficult to transition. While the team as a whole is new to me, I have known many of the artists for years. Being able to guide their creative process and help them solve difficult technical problems from afar isn’t as different as I would have expected. Now instead of saying “Can I drive your box?” it has become “Let’s do a screen share.”

People by and large do all the same things from home that they would do in the office, with the main difference being that now nobody can tell if I’ve gone for a workout over lunch.

Bilali Mack: Starting out at any company takes time to get up to speed. Add something like a global pandemic, and you would think it would be nearly impossible not only to get up to speed, but also to manage teams, collaborate on creative and retain our company’s culture. We adapted by preparing artist and production remote on-boarding documents and deploying necessary hardware and software to any and all artists on our team.

On a cultural note, we’re still holding company happy hours and open Google Meet “office” hours, just because it’s nice to be able to jump on and chat with each other about how things are different now.

Bilali Mack

Alkemy X built an openVPN server to allow secure, encrypted, multi-factor authentication, remote access to our internal network. Alkemy X uses RGS to connect artists to a low-latency screen sharing session on their work computers. Since the artists working remotely are working off of the computer that they normally use at work, they still have access to all of the software, licenses, tools that they have when at the office. By working remotely, we are able to maintain security and keep assets contained within our secure network. Artists have access to their files via high-speed file servers and with no need to do time consuming file transfers.

Alkemy X uses Shotgun as usual to manage our shows and workflow but are leaning on it heavier now as a first line review tool before heading to high resolution reviews through HP RGS. Our traditional dailies have been replaced by rolling spot checks in Shotgun followed by more exhaustive reviews of full resolution media.

We use Google Meet for meetings, screen sharing, video chat, and telephone calls. We use Slack extensively on non-networked computers for team communication, keeping everyone connected and up to date, and to quickly get assistance with any technical problems. All regular company meetings, and Friday night happy hours are done with Google Meet.

Main Image: Bilali Mack WFH.


VFX supervisor Bilali Mack comes to Alkemy X from MPC, where he supervised and executed VFX for brands including Adidas, Google and BMW. Erin Nash joined the team from FuseFX was head of 2D/VFX supervisor, leveraging his experience across television, film and commercial work.


Cloud workflow vets launch M&E cloud migration company

A team of cloud workflow experts have launched Fusion Workflows, a new media-workflow design company designed to help M&E companies migrate their infrastructures to scalable cloud platforms.

The company says that moving to cloud-based workflows represents an opportunity to improve the inefficiencies in current systems. However, many companies struggle to understand what is involved in cloud migrations, the costs entailed and how it will affect the demands of their workforce, processes and tools. Fusion Workflows aims to remedy these issues by providing clients a customized “Workflow Migration Guide,” which acts as their design blueprint to rebuild their operations on scalable cloud infrastructure and software-defined processes.

Mark Turner

Fusion provides a holistic approach — working with their clients from inception through to deployment. Fusion provides a comprehensive initial analysis of workflow process and customizes business operations during the migration. The work continues post-migration to include training and onboarding, new software, security and documentation. This one-stop-shop approach is designed so internal teams and systems are working in sync and without interruption.

“The COVID crisis has forced media companies to create temporary hacks and interim cloud workflows but also exposed the need for them to develop a long-term cloud migration vision,” says Mark Turner, Fusion Workflows’ managing partner. “Every company now needs a plan to effectively operate their business without ties to physical locations, on-premises storage or hardware processing. At Fusion we look forward to helping companies design their own cloud migrations.”

Fusion’s team comprises domain experts from the US and Europe, who have designed and implemented cloud-based workflows and created first-in-market re-engineering standards. Fusion’s team has worked across all media industries including major movie and TV production, visual FX, animation, sports, live broadcast, digital cinema, music and OTT streaming.

In addition to Turner, who co-authored the 2020 MovieLabs paper “The Evolution of Media Creation: a 10 year vision for the future of Media Production, Post and Creative Technologies, the team includes ITV vet Emma Clifford, OTT engineer Andrew Ioannou, Lionsgate vet Thomas Hughes, former chief digital strategy officer at Sony Pictures Mitch Singer, recent Techicolor data systems engineer Daryll Strauss, former Sony Pictures CTO Spencer Stephens, Autodesk vet Chris Vienneau and ETC’s Erik Weaver.

Production begins again on New Zealand’s Shortland Street series

By Katie Hinsen

The current global pandemic has shut down production all over the world. Those who can have moved to working from home, and there’s speculation about how and when we’ll get back to work again.

New Zealand, a country with a significant production economy, has announced that it will soon reopen for shoots. The most popular local television show, Shortland Street, was the first to resume production after an almost six-week break. It’s produced by Auckland’s South Pacific Pictures.

Dylan Reeve

I am a native New Zealander who has worked in post there on and off over the years. Currently I live in Los Angeles, where I am an EP for dailies and DI at Nice Shoes, so taking a look at how New Zealand is rolling things out interests me. With that in mind, I reached out to Dylan Reeve, head of post production at Shortland Street, to find out how it looked the week they went back to work under Level 3 social distancing restrictions.

Shortland Street is a half-hour soap that runs five nights a week on prime-time television. It has been on air for around 28 years and has been consistently among the highest-rated shows in the nation. It’s a cultural phenomenon. While the cast and crew take a single three-week annual break from production during the Christmas holiday season, the show has never really stopped production … until the pandemic hit.

Shortland Street’s production crew is typically made up of about 100 people; the post department consists of two editors, two assistants, a composer and Reeve, who is also the online editor. Sound mixes and complex VFX are done elsewhere, but everything else for the production is done at the studio.

New Zealand responded to COVID-19 early, instituting one of the harshest lockdowns in the world. Reeve told me that they went from alert Level 1 — basic social distancing, more frequent handwashing — to Level 3 as soon as the first signs of community transmission were detected. They stayed at this level for just two days before going to Level 4: complete lockdown. New Zealanders had 48 hours to get home to their families, shop for supplies and make sure they were ready.

“On a Monday afternoon at about 1:30pm, the studio emptied out,” explains Reeve. “We were shut down, but we were still on air, and we had about five or six weeks’ worth of episodes in various stages of production and post. I then had two days to figure out and prepare for how we were going to finish all of those and make sure they got delivered so that the show could continue to be on air.”

Shortland Street’s main production building dressed as the exterior of the hospital where the show is set, with COVID workplace safety materials on the doors.

The nature of the show’s existing workflow meant that Reeve had to copy all the media to drives and send Avids and drives home with the editors. The assistant editors logged in remotely for any work they needed to do, and Reeve took what he needed home as well to finish onlining, prepping and delivering those already-shot episodes to the broadcaster. They used Frame.io for review and approval with the audio team and with the directors, producers and network.

“Once we knew we were coming back into Level 3, and the government put out more refined guidelines about what that required, we had a number of HoD meetings — figuring out how we could produce the show while maintaining the restrictions necessary.”

I asked Reeve whether he and his crew felt safe going back to work. He reminded me that New Zealand only went back down to Level 3 once there had been a period with no remaining evidence of community transmission. Infection rates in New Zealand had spent two weeks in single digits, including two days when no new cases had been reported.

Starting Up With Restrictions
My conversation with Reeve took place on May 4, right after his first few days back at work. I asked him to explain some of the conditions under which the production was working while the rest of the country was still in isolation. Level 3 in New Zealand is almost identical to the lockdown restrictions put in place in US cities like New York and Los Angeles.

“One of the key things that has changed in terms of how we’re producing the show is that we physically have way less crew in the building. We’re working slower, and everyone’s having to do a bit more, maybe, than they would normally.

Shortland Street director Ian Hughes and camera operator Connagh Heath discussing blocking with a one-metre guide.

“When crew are in a controlled workspace where we know who everyone is,” he continues, “that allows us to keep track of them properly — they’re allowed to work within a meter of one another physically (three feet). Our policy is that we want staff to stay two meters (six feet) apart from one another as much as possible. But when we’re shooting, when it’s necessary, they can be a meter from one another.”

Reeve says the virus has certainly changed the nature of what can be shot. There are no love scenes, no kissing and no hugs. “We’re shooting to compensate for that; staging people to make them seem closer than they are.

Additionally, everything stays within the production environment. Parts of our office have been dressed; parts of our building have been dressed. We’ll do a very low-profile exterior shoot for scenes that take place outside, but we’re not leaving the lot.”

Under Level 3, everyone is still under isolation at home. This is why, explains Reeve, social distancing has to continue at work. That way any infection that comes into the team can be easily traced and contained and affect as few others as possible. Every department maintains what they call a “bubble,” and very few individuals are allowed to cross between them.

Actors are doing their own hair and makeup, and there are no kitchen or craft services available. The production is using and reusing a small number of regular extras, with crew stepping in occasionally as well. Reeve noted that Australia was also resuming production on Neighbours, with crew members acting as extras.

“Right now in our studio, our full technical complement consists of three camera operators at the moment, just one boom operator and one multi-skilled person who can be the camera assist, the lighting assist and the second boom op if necessary. I don’t know how a US production would get away with that. There’s no chance that someone who touches lights on a union production can also touch a boom.”

Post Production
Shortland Street’s post department is still working from home. Now that they are back in production, they are starting to look at more efficient ways to work remotely. While there are a lot of great tools out there for remote post workflows, Reeve notes that for them it’s not that easy, especially when hardware and support are halfway across the world, borders are closed and supply chains are disrupted.

There are collaboration tools that exist, but they haven’t been used “simply because the pace and volume of our production means it’s often hard to adapt for those kinds of products,” he says. “Every time we roll camera, we’re rolling four streams of DNxHD 185, so nearly 800Mb/s each time we roll. We record that media directly into the server to be edited within hours, so putting that in the cloud or doing anything like that was never the best workflow solution. When we wanted feedback, we just grabbed people from the building and dragged them into the edit suite when we wanted them to look at something.”

Ideally, he says, they would have tested and invested in these tools six months ago. “We are in what I call a duct tape stage. We’re taking things that exist, that look useful, and we’re trying to tape them together to make a solution that works for us. Coming out of this, I’m going to have to look at the things we’ve learned and the opportunities that exist and decide whether or not there might be some ways we can change our future production. But at the moment, we’re just trying to make it through.”

Because Shortland Street has only just resumed shooting, they haven’t reached the point yet where they need to do what Reeve calls “the first collaborative director/editor thing” from start to finish. “But there are two plans that we’re working toward. The easy, we-know-it-works plan is that we do an output, we stick it on Frame.io, the director watches it, puts notes on it, sends it back to us. We know that works, and we do that sometimes with directors anyway.

“The more exciting idea is that we have the directors join us on a remote link and watch the episodes as they would if they were in the room. We’ve experimented with a few things and haven’t found a solution that makes us super-happy. It’s tricky because we don’t have an existing hardware solution in place that’s designed specifically for streaming a broadcast output signal over an internet connection. We can do a screen-share, and we’ve experimented with Zoom and AnyDesk, but in both those cases, I’ve found that sometimes the picture will break up unacceptably, or sync will drift — especially using desktop-sharing software that’s not really designed to share full-screen video.”

Reeve and crew are just about to experiment with a tool used for gaming called Parsec. It’s designed to share low-latency, in-sync, high-frame-rate video. “This would allow us to share an entire desktop at, theoretically, 60fps with half-second latency or less. Very brief tests looked good. Plan A is to get the directors to join us on Parsec and screen-share a full-screen output off Avid. They can watch it down and discuss with the editor in real time or just make their own notes and work through it interactively. If that experience isn’t great, or if the directors aren’t enjoying it, or if it’s just not working for some reason, we’ll fall back to outputting a video, uploading it to Frame.io and waiting for notes.

What’s Next?
What are the next steps for other productions returning to work? Shortland Street is the only production that chose to resume under Level 3. The New Zealand Film Commission has said that filming will resume eventually under Level 2, which is being rolled out in several stages beginning this week. Shortland Street’s production company has several other shows, but none have plans to resume yet.

“I think it’s a lot harder for them to stay contained because they can’t shoot everything in the studio,” explains Reeve. “Our production has an added advantage because it is constantly shooting and the core cast and crew are mostly the same every day. I think these types of productions will find it easiest to come back.”

Reeve says that anyone coming into their building has to sign in and deliver a health declaration — recent travel, contact with any sick person, other work they’ve been engaged in. “I think if you can do some of that reasonable contact tracing with the people in your production, it will be easier to start again. The more contained you can keep it, the better. It’s going to be hard for productions that are on location, have high turnover or a large number of extras — anything where they can’t keep within a bubble.

“From a post point of view, I think we’re going to get a lot more comfortable working remotely,” he continues. “And there are lots of editors who already do that, especially in New Zealand. If that can become the norm, and if there are tools and workflows that are well established to support that, it could be really good for post production. It offers a lot of great opportunities for people to essentially broaden their client essentially or the geographic regions in which they can work.

Productions are going to have to make their own sort of health and safety liability decisions, according to Reeve. “All of the things we are doing are effectively responding to New Zealand government regulation, but that won’t be the case for everyone else.”

He sees some types of production finding an equilibrium. “Love Island might be the sort of reality show you can make. You can quarantine everyone going into that show for 14 days, make sure they’re all healthy, and then shoot the show because you’re basically isolated from the world. Survivor as well, things like that. But a reality show where people are running around the streets isn’t happening anymore. There’s no Amazing Race, that’s for sure.”


After a 20-year career talent-side, Katie Hinsen turned her attention to building, developing and running post facilities with a focus on talent, unique business structures and innovative use of technology. She has worked on over 90 major feature and episodic productions, founded the Blue Collar Post Collective, and currently leads the dailies & DI department at Nice Shoes.

Soundwhale app intros new editing features for remote audio collaboration

Soundwhale, which makes a Mac and iOS-based remote audio collaboration app, has introduced a new suite of editing capabilities targeting teams working apart but together during this COVID crisis. It’s a virtual studio that lets engineers match sound to picture and lets actors, with no audio experience, record their lines. The company says this is done with minimal latency and no new hardware or additional specialized software required. The app also allows pro-quality mixing, recording and other post tasks, and can work alongside a user’s DAW of choice.
“Production teams are scattered and in self-isolation all around the world,” says Soundwhale founder Ameen Abdulla, who is an audio engineer. “They can’t get expensive hardware to everyone. They have to get people without any access to, or knowledge of, a digital audio workspace like Pro Tools to collaborate. That’s why we felt some urgency to launch more stand-alone editing options within Soundwhale, specifically designed for tasks like ADR.”



Soundwhale allows users to:
– Record against picture
– Control another user’s timeline and playback
– Manage recorded takes
– Cope with slow connections thanks to improved compression
– Optimize stream settings
– Share takes in timeline of other users
– Customize I/O for different setups
– Do basic copy, paste, and moving of audio files
– Share any file by drag and drop
– Share screens and video chat

Soundwhale stems from Abdulla’s own challenges trying to perfect the post process from his recording studio, Mothlab, in Minneapolis. His clients were often on the West Coast and he needed to work with them remotely. Nothing available at the time worked very well, and drawing on his technical background, he set out to fix the issues, which included frustrating lags.

“Asynchronous edits and feedback are hell,” Abdulla notes. “As the show goes on, audio professionals need ways to edit and work with talent in real time over the Internet. Everybody’s experiencing this same thing. Everyone needs the same thing at the same time.”

Sound Devices producing 30,000 face shields per day

During times of crisis, people and companies step up. One of those companies is Wisconsin-based pro audio equipment manufacturer Sound Devices, wnhich is producing more than 30,000 face shields each day to help keep frontline workers safe in the fight against COVID-19. The company has pulled together a coalition of local manufacturers in the Reedsburg, Wisconsin, area to achieve this number, including Columbia Parcar, VARC, Cellox and Hankscraft AJS.

Sound Devices realized it could simultaneously play a direct role in helping protect health care workers and keep local area production-line workers employed. Around 100 people in the Reedsburg area are working daily to bring in material, assemble and ship the FS-1 face shields. Sound Devices sells the shields at a nonprofit price and has already shipped nearly a quarter million shields around Wisconsin and the rest of the US.

“The real heroes in this operation have been our line workers,” says Lisa Wiedenfeld, VP of finance and operations at Sound Devices. “They have been coming in day after day and cranking out these face shields while maintaining strict safety standards including wearing face masks, 10-foot distancing and extensive sanitation procedures. Under normal circumstances, ramping up manufacturing on a high volume of a new product is challenging enough, let alone avoiding a dangerous virus at the same time. My hat is off to all of our workers.”

“We started production of our FS-1 and FS-1NL face shields on March 24th, producing about 400 per day. As we’ve increased production to 30,000 per day, one of the most difficult aspects has been procuring enough parts to build consistently,” said Matt Anderson, CEO /president of Sound Devices. “Luckily, we have an extremely resourceful purchasing team. They have tapped our excellent network of Wisconsin-based suppliers. When our production levels outstripped what our suppliers here could do, our overseas suppliers pitched in to augment the supply of parts. But getting parts sent to us has been extremely difficult due to the reduced capacity of shippers. This whole experience has been very challenging but rewarding.”

Sound Devices now has FS-1 (original) and FS-1NL (latex-free) shields in stock. Face shields may be purchased by anyone in the US directly from store.sounddevices.com or by contacting sales@sounddevices.com.

COVID-19: How our industry is stepping up

We’ve been using this space to talk about how companies are discounting products, raising money and introducing technology to help with remote workflows, as well as highlighting how pros are personally pitching in.

Here are the latest updates, followed by what we’ve gathered to date:

Adobe
Adobe has made a $4.5 million commitment to trusted organizations that are providing vital assistance to those most in need.

• Adobe is joining forces with other tech leaders in the Bay Area to support the COVID-19 Coronavirus Regional Response Fund of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a trusted foundation that serves a network of local nonprofits. Adobe’s $1 million donation will help provide low-income people in Santa Clara County through The Santa Clara County Homelessness Prevention System Financial Assistance Program  with immediate financial assistance to help pay rent or meet other basic needs. Additionally, Adobe is donating $250,000 to the Valley Medical Center Foundation to purchase life-saving ventilators for Bay Area hospitals.
• Adobe has donated $1 million to the COVID-19 Fund of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the recognized global leader in providing rapid disaster relief and basic human and medical services. Adobe’s support will help aid vulnerable communities impacted by COVID-19 around the world. This is in addition to the $250,000 the company is donating to Direct Relief as a part of Adobe’s #HonorHeroes campaign.
• To support the community in India, Adobe is donating $1 million towards the American India Foundation (AIF) and the Akshaya Patra Foundation. The donation will help AIF source much-needed ventilators for hospitals, while the grant for Akshaya Patra will provide approximately 5 million meals to impacted families.

Harbor
Harbor is releasing Inspiration in Isolation, a new talk series that features filmmakers in candid conversation about their creative process during this unprecedented time and beyond. The web series aims to reveal the ideas and rituals that contribute to their creative process. The premiere episode features celebrated cinematographer Bradford Young and senior colorist Joe Gawler. The two, who are collaborators and friends, talk community, family, adapting to change and much more.

The full-length episodes will be released on Harbor’s new platform, HarborPresents, with additional content on Harbor’s social media (@HarborPictureCo).

HPA
The HPA has formed the HPA Industry Recovery Task Force, which will focus on sustainably resuming production and post services, with the aim of understanding how to enable content creation in an evolving world impacted by the pandemic.

The task force’s key objectives are:
• To serve as a forum for collaboration, communication and thought leadership regarding how to resume global production and post production in a sustainable fashion.
• To understand and influence evolving technical requirements, such as the impact of remote collaboration, work from home and other workflows that have been highlighted by the current crisis.
• To provide up-to-date information and access to emerging health and safety guidelines that will be issued by various governments, municipalities, unions, guilds, industry organizations and content creators.
• To provide collaborative support and guidance to those impacted by the crisis.

Genelec
Genelec is donating a percentage of every sale of its new Raw loudspeaker range to the Audio Engineering Society (AES) for the remainder of this year. Additionally, Genelec will fund 10 one-year AES memberships for those whose lives have been impacted by the COVID-19 crisis. A longtime sustaining member of AES, Genelec is making the donation to help sustain the society’s cash flow, which has been significantly affected by the coronavirus situation.

OWC
OWC has expanded its safety protocols, as they continue to operate as an essential business in Illinois. They have expanded their already strong standard operating practice in terms of cleanliness with additional surface disinfection actions, as well as both gloves and masks being used by their warehouse and build teams. Even before recent events, manufacturing teams used gloves to prevent fingerprinting units during build, but those gloves have new importance now. In addition, OWC has both MERV air filters in place and a UV air purifier, which combined are considered to be 99.999% effective in killing/capturing all airborne bacteria and viruses.

Red

For a limited time, existing DSMC2 and Red Ranger Helium and Gemini customers can purchase a Red Extended Warranty at a discounted price. Existing customers who are into their second year of warranty can pay the standard pricing they would receive within their first year instead of the markup price. For example, instead of paying $1,740 (the 20% markup), a DSMC2 Gemini owner who is in within the second year of warranty can purchase an Extended Warranty for $1,450.

This promotion has been extended to June 30. Adding the Red Extended Warranty not only increases the warranty coverage period but also provides benefits such as priority repair, expedited shipping, and premium technical support directly from Red. Customers also have access to the Red Rapid Replacement Program. Extended Warranty is also transferable to new owners if completing a Transfer of Ownership with Red.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft has extended its offering of giving editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses — it now goes through the end of June. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow. DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Assimilate
Assimilate is offering all of its products — including Scratch 9.2, Scratch VR 9.2, PlayPro 9.2, Scratch Web and the recently released Live Looks and Live Assist — for free through October 31. Users can register for free licenses. Online tutorials are here and free access to Lowepost online Scratch training is here.

B&H
B&H is partnering with suppliers to donate gear to the teams at Mount Sinai and other NYC hospitals to help health care professionals and first responders stay in touch with their loved ones. Some much-needed items are chargers, power sources, battery packs and mobile accessories. B&H is supporting the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and Direct Relief.

FXhome
FXhome last month turned the attention of its “Pay What You Want” initiative to direct proceeds to help fight Covid-19. This month, in an effort to teach the community new skills, and inspire them with new ideas to help them reinvent themselves, FXhome has today launched a new, entirely free Master Class series designed to teach everything from basic editing, to creating flashy title sequences, to editing audio and of course, learning basic VFX and compositing.

Nugen Audio 
Nugen Audio has a new “Staying Home, Staying Creative” initiative aimed at promoting collaboration and creativity in a time of social distancing. Included are a variety of videos, interviews and articles that will inspire new artistic approaches for post production workflows. The company is also providing temporary replacement licenses for any users who do not have access to their in-office workstations.

Already available on the Staying Creative web page is a special interview with audio post production specialist Keith Alexander. Building from his specialty in remote recording and sound design for broadcast, film and gaming, Alexander shares some helpful tips on how to work efficiently in a home-based setting and how to manage audio cleanup and broadcast-audio editing projects from home. There’s also an article focused on three ways to improve lo-fi drum recording in a less-than-ideal space.

Nugen is also offering temporary two-month licenses for current iLok customers, along with one additional Challenge Response license code authorization. The company has also reduced the prices of all products in its web store.

Tovusound 
Tovusound has extended its 20% discount until the end of the month and has added some new special offers.

The Spot Edward Ultimate Suite expansion, regularly $149, is now $79 with coupon. It adds the Spot creature footstep and movement instrument to the Edward footstep, cloth and props designer. Customers also get free WAV files with the purchase of all Edward instruments and expansions and with all Tovusound bundles. Anyone who purchased one of the applicable products after April 1 also has free access to the WAV files.

Tovusound will continue to donate an additional 10% of the sales price to the CleanOceanProject.org. Customers may claim their discounts by entering STAYHOME in the “apply coupon” field at checkout. All offers end on April 30.

 

Previous Updates

Object Matrix and Cinesys-Oceana
Object Matrix and Cinesys-Oceana are hosting a series of informal online Beer Roundtable events in the coming months. The series will discuss the various challenges with implementing hybrid technology for continuity, remote working and self-serve access to archive content.You can register for the next Beer Roundtable here. The sessions will be open, fun and relaxed. Participants are asked to grab themselves a drink and simply raise their glass when they wish to ask a question.

During the first session, Cinesys-Oceana CTO Brent Angle and Object Matrix CEO Jonathan Morgan will introduce what they believe to be the mandatory elements of the ultimate hybrid technology stack. This will be followed by a roundtable discussion hosted by Harry Skopas, director M&E solutions architecture and technical sales at Cinesys-Oceana, with guest appearances from the media and sports technology communities.

MZed
MZed, an online platform for master classes in filmmaking, photography and visual storytelling, is donating 20% of all sales to the Los Angeles Food Bank throughout April. For every new MZed Pro membership, $60 is donated, equating to 240 meals to feed hungry children, seniors and families. MZed serves the creative community, a large portion of which lives in the LA area and is being hit hard by the lockdown due to the coronavirus. MZed hopes to help play a role in keeping high-risk members of the community fed during a time of extreme uncertainty.

MZed has also launched a “Get One, Gift One” initiative. When someone purchases an MZed Pro membership, that person will not only be supporting the LA Food Bank but will instantly receive a Pro membership to give to someone else. MZed will email details upon purchase.

MZed offers hundreds of hours of training courses covering everything from photography and filmmaking to audio and lighting in courses like “The Art of Storytelling” with Alex Buono and Philip Bloom’s Cinematic Masterclass.

NAB Show
NAB Show’s new digital experience, NAB Show Express, will take place May 13-14. The platform is free and offers 24-hour access to three educational channels, on-demand content and a Solutions Marketplace featuring exhibitor product information, announcements and demos. Registration for the event will open on April 20 at NABShowExpress.com. Each channel will feature eight hours of content streamed daily and available on-demand to accommodate the global NAB Show audience. NAB Show Express will also offer NAB Show’s signature podcast, exploring relevant themes and featuring prominent speakers.

Additionally, NAB Show Express will feature three stand-alone training and executive leadership events for which separate registrations will be available soon. These include:
• Executive Leadership Summit (May 11), produced in partnership with Variety
• Cybersecurity & Content Protection Summit (May 12), produced in partnership with Content Delivery & Security Association (CDSA) and Media & Entertainment Services Alliance (MESA) – registration fees apply
• Post | Production World Online (May 17-19), produced in partnership with Future Media Conferences (FMC) – registration fees apply.

Atto 
Atto Technology is supporting content producers who face new workflow and performance challenges by making Atto Disk Benchmark for macOS more widely available and by updating Atto 360 tuning, monitoring and analytics software. Atto 360 for macOS and Linux have been updated for enhanced stability and include an additional tuning profile. The current Windows release already includes these updates. The software is free and can be downloaded directly from Atto.

Sigma
Sigma has launched a charitable giving initiative in partnership with authorized Sigma lens dealers nationwide. From now until June 30, 2020, 5% of all Sigma lens sales made through participating dealers will be donated to a charitable organization of the dealers’ choice. Donations will be made to organizations working on COVID-19 relief efforts to help ease the devastation many communities are feeling as a result of the global crisis. A full list of participating Sigma dealers and benefiting charities can be found here.

FXhome 
To support those who are putting their lives on the line to provide care and healing to those impacted by the global pandemic, FXhome is adding Partners In Health, Doctors Without Borders and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy as new beneficiaries of the FXhome “Pay What You Want” initiative.

Pay What You Want is a goodwill program inspired by the HitFilm Express community’s desire to contribute to the future development of HitFilm Express, the company’s free video editing and VFX software. Through the initiative, users can contribute financially, and those funds will be allocated for future development and improvements to HitFilm. Additionally, FXhome is contributing a percentage of the proceeds to organizations dedicated to global causes important to the company and its community. The larger the contribution from customers, the more FXhome will donate.

Besides adding the three new health-related beneficiaries, FXhome has extended its campaign to support each new cause from one month to three months, beginning in April and running through the end of June. A percentage of all proceeds of revenues generated during this time period will be donated to each cause.

Covid-19 Film and TV Emergency Relief Fund
Created by The Film and TV Charity in close partnership with the BFI, the new COVID-19 Film and TV Emergency Relief Fund provides support to the many thousands of active workers and freelancers who have been hit hardest by the closure of productions across the UK. The fund has received initial donations totaling £2.5 million from Netflix, the BFI, BBC Studios, BBC Content, WarnerMedia and several generous individuals.

It is being administered by The Film and TV Charity, with support from BFI staff. The Film and TV Charity and the BFI is covering all overheads, enabling donations to go directly to eligible workers and freelancers across film, TV and cinema. One-off grants of between £500 and £2,500 will be awarded based on need. Applications for the one-off grants can be made via The Film and TV Charity’s website. The application process will remain open for two weeks.

The Film and TV Charity also has a new COVID-19 Film and TV Repayable Grants Scheme offering support for industry freelancers waiting for payments under the Government’s Self-employment Income Support Scheme. Interest-free grants of up to £2,000 will be offered to those eligible for Self-employment Income Support but who are struggling with the wait for payments in June. The Covid-19 Film and TV Repayable Grants Scheme opens April 15. Applicants will have one week to make a claim via The Film and TV Charity’s website.

Lenovo
Lenovo is offering a free 120-day license of Mechdyne’s TGX Remote Desktop software, which uses Nvidia Quadro GPUs and a built-in video encoder to compress and send information from the host workstation to the end-point device to decode. This eliminates lag on complex and detailed application files.

Teams can share powerful, high-end workstation resources across the business, easily dialing up performance and powerful GPUs from their standard workstation to collaborate remotely with coworkers around the world.

Users keep data and company IP secure on-site while reducing the risk of data breaches and remotely administering computer hardware assets from anywhere, anytime.
Users install the trial on their host workstations and install the receiver software on their local devices to access their applications and projects as if they were in the office.

Ambidio 
To help sound editors, mixers and other post pro who suddenly find themselves working from home, Ambidio is making its immersive sound technology, Ambidio Looking Glass, available for free. Sound professionals can apply for a free license through Ambidio’s website. Ambidio is also waiving its per-title releasing fee for home entertainment titles during the current cinema shutdown. It applies to new titles that haven’t previously been released through Blu-ray, DVD, digital download or streaming. The free offer is available through May 31.

Ambidio Looking Glass can be used as a monitoring tool for theatrical and television projects requiring immersive sound. Ambidio Looking Glass produces immersive sound that approximates what can be achieved on a studio mix stage, except it is playable through standard stereo speaker systems. Editors and mixers working from home studios can use it to check their work and share it with clients, who can also hear the results without immersive sound playback systems.

“The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing sound editors and mixers to work remotely,” says Ambidio founder Iris Wu. “Many need to finish projects that require immersive sound from home studios that lack complex speaker arrays. Ambidio Looking Glass provides a way for them to continue working with dimensional sound and meet deadlines, even if they can’t get to a mix stage.”

Qumulo
Through July 2020, Qumulo is offering its cloud-native file software for free to public and private-sector medical and health care research organizations that are working to minimize the spread and impact of the COVID-19 virus.

“Research and health care organizations across the world are working tirelessly to find answers and collaborate faster in their COVID-19 vaccine mission,” said Matt McIlwain, chairman of the board of trustees of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and managing partner at Madrona Venture Group. “It will be through the work of these professionals, globally sharing and analyzing all available data in the cloud, that a cure for COVID-19 will be discovered.”

Qumulo’s cloud-native file and data services allows organizations to use the cloud to capture, process, analyze and share data with researchers distributed across geographies. Qumulo’s software works seamlessly with the applications medical and health care researchers have been using for decades, as well as with artificial intelligence and analytics services more recently developed in the cloud.

Medical organizations can register to use Qumulo’s file software in the cloud, which will be deployable through the Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud marketplaces.

Goldcrest Post
Goldcrest Post has established the capability to conduct most picture and sound post production work remotely. Colorists, conform editors and other staff are now able to work from home or a remote site and connect to the facility’s central storage and technical resources via remote collaboration software. Clients can monitor work through similar secure, fast and reliable desktop connections.

The service allows Goldcrest to ensure theatrical and television projects remain on track while allowing clients to oversee work in as normal a manner as possible under current circumstances.

Goldcrest has set up a temporary color grading facility at a remote site convenient for its staff colorists. The site includes a color grading control panel, two color-calibrated monitors and a high-speed connection to the main Goldcrest facility. The company has also installed desktop workstations and monitors in the homes of editors and other staff involved in picture conforming and deliverables. Sound mixing is still being conducted on-site, but sound editorial and ancillary sound work is being done from home.In taking these measures, the facility has reduced its on-site staff to a bare minimum while keeping workflow disruption to a minimum.

Ziva Dynamics
Ziva Dynamics is making Ziva VFX character simulation software free for students and educators. The same tools used on Game of Thrones, Hellboy and John Wick: Chapter 3 are now available for noncommercial projects, offering students the chance to learn physics-based character creation before they graduate. Ziva VFX Academic licenses are fully featured and receive the same access and support as other Ziva products.

In addition to the software, Ziva Academic users will now receive free access to Ziva Dynamics’ simulation-ready assets Zeke the Lion (previously $10,000) and Lila the Cheetah. Thanks to Ziva VFX’s Anatomy Transfer feature, the Zeke rig has helped make squirrels, cougars, dogs and more for films like John Wick 3, A Dog’s Way Home and Primal.

Ziva Dynamics will also be providing a free Ziva Academic floating lab license to universities so students can access the software in labs across campuses whenever they want. Ziva VFX Academic licenses are free and open to any fully accredited institution, student, professor or researcher (an $1,800 value). New licenses can be found in the Ziva store and are provided following a few eligibility questions. Academic users on the original paid plan can now increase their license count for free.

OpenDrives 
OpenDrives’ OpenDrives Anywhere is an in-place private cloud model that enables customers with OpenDrives to work on the same project from multiple locations without compromising performance. With existing office infrastructure, teams already have an in-place private cloud and can extend its power to each of their remote professionals. No reinvestment in storage is needed.

Nothing changes from a workflow perspective except physical proximity. With simple adjustments, remote control of existing enterprise workstations can be extended via a secure connection. HP’s ZCentral Remote Boost (formerly RGS) software will facilitate remote access over secure connection to your workstations, or Teradici can provide both dedicated external hardware and software solutions for this purpose, giving teams the ability to support collaborative workflows at low cost. OpenDrives can also get teams quickly set up in under two hours on a corporate VPN and in under 24 hours without.

Prime Focus Technologies 
Prime Focus Technologies (PFT), the technology arm of Prime Focus, has added new features and advanced security enhancements to Clear to help customers embrace the virtual work environment. In terms of security, Clear now has a new-generation HTML 5 player enabled with Hollywood-grade DRM encryption. There’s also support for just-in-time visual watermarking embedded within the stream for streaming through Clear as a secure alternative to generating watermarking on the client side.

Clear also has new features that make it easier to use, including direct and faster download from S3 and Azure storage, easier partner onboarding and an admin module enhancement with condensed permissions to easily handle custom user roles. Content acquisition is made easier with a host of new functionalities to simplify content acquisition processes and reduce dependencies as much as possible. Likewise, for easier content servicing, there is now automation in content localization, to make it easier to perform and review tasks on Clear. For content distribution, PFT has enabled on-demand cloud distribution on Clear through the most commonly used cloud technologies.

Brady and Stephenie Betzel
Many of you know postPerspective contributor and online video editor Brady Betzel from his great reviews and tips pieces. During this crisis, he is helping his wife, Stephenie, make masks for her sister (a nurse) and colleagues working at St. John’s Regional Medical Center in Oxnard, California, in addition to anyone else who works on the “front lines.” She’s sewn over 300 masks so far and is not stopping. Creativity and sewing is not new to her. Her day job is also creating. You can check out her work on Facebook and Instagram.

Object Matrix 
Object Matrix co-founder Nick Pearce has another LinkedIn dispatch, this time launching Good News Friday, where folks from around the globe check in with good news!  You can also watch it on YouTube. Pearce and crew are also offering video tips for surviving working from home. The videos, hosted by Pearce, and are updated weekly. Check them out  here.

Conductor
Conductor is waiving charges for orchestrating renders in the cloud. Updated pricing is reflected in the cost calculator on Conductor’s Pricing page. These changes will last at least through May 2020. To help expedite any transition needs, the Conductor team will be on call for virtual render wrangling of cloud submissions, from debugging scenes and scripts to optimizing settings for cost, turnaround time, etc. If you need this option, then email support@conductortech.com.

Conductor is working with partners to set up online training sessions to help studios quickly adopt cloud strategies and workflows. The company will send out further notifications as the sessions are formalized. Conductor staff is also available for one-on-one studio sessions as needed for those with specific pipeline considerations.

Conductor’s president and CEO Mac Moore said this: “The sudden onset of this pandemic has put a tremendous strain on our industry, completely changing the way studios need to operate virtually overnight. Given Conductor was built on the ‘work from anywhere’ premise, I felt it our responsibility to help studios to the greatest extent possible during this critical time.”

Symply
Symply is providing as many remote workers in the industry as possible with a free 90-day license to SymplyConveyor, its secure, high-speed transfer and sync software. Symply techs will be available to install SymplyConveyor remotely on any PC, Mac or Linux workstation pair or server and workstation.

The no-obligation offer is available at gosymply.com. Users sign up, and as long as they are in the industry and have a need, Symply techs will install the software. The number of free 90-day licenses is limited only by Symply’s ability to install them given its limited resources.

Foundry
Foundry has reset its trial database so that users can access a new 30-day trial for all products regardless of the date of their last trial. The company continues to offer unlimited non-commercial use of Nuke and Mari. On the educational side, students who are unable to access school facilities can get a year of free access to Nuke, Modo, Mari and Katana.

They have also announced virtual events, including:

• Foundry LiveStream – a series of talks around projects, pipelines and tools.
• Foundry Webinars – A 30 to 40-minute technical deep dive into Foundry products, workflows and third-party tools.
• Foundry Skill-Ups – A 30-minute guide to improving your skills as a compositor/lighter/texture artist to get to that next level in your career.
• Foundry Sessions – Special conversations with our customers sharing insights, tips and tricks.
• Foundry Workflow Wednesdays –10-minute weekly videos posted on social media showing tips and tricks with Nuke from our experts.

Alibi Music Library
Alibi Music Library is offering free whitelisted licensing of its Alibi Music and Sound FX catalogs to freelancers, agencies and production companies needing to create or update their demo reels during this challenging time.

Those who would like to take advantage of this opportunity can choose Demo Reel 2020 Gratis from the shopping cart feature on Alibi’s website next to any desired track(s). For more info, click here.

2C Creative
Caleb & Calder Sloan’s Awesome Foundation, the charity of 2C Creative founders Chris Sloan and Carla Kaufman Sloan, is running a campaign that will match individual donations (up to $250 each) to charities supporting first responders, organizations and those affected by COVID-19. 2C is a creative agency & production company serving the TV/streaming business with promos, brand integrations, trailers, upfront presentations and other campaigns. So far, the organization’s “COVID-19 Has Met Its Match” campaign has raised more than $50,000. While the initial deadline date for people to participate was April 6, this has now been extended to April 13. To participate, please visit ccawesomefoundation.org for a list of charities already vetted by the foundation or choose your own. Then, simply email a copy of your donation receipt to: cncawesomefoundation@gmail.com and they will match it!

Red Giant 
For the filmmaking education community, Red Giant is offering Red Giant Complete — the full set of tools including Trapcode Suite, Magic Bullet Suite, Universe, VFX Suite and Shooter Suite — free for students or faculty members of a university, college or high school. Instead of buying separate suites or choosing which tools best suits one’s educational needs or budget, students and teachers can get every tool Red Giant makes completely free of charge. All that’s required is a simple verification.

How to get a free Red Giant Complete license if you are a student, teacher or faculty member:
1. Use school or organization ID or any proof of current employment or enrollment for verification. More information on academic verification is available here.
2. Send your academic verification to academic@redgiant.com.
3. Wait for approval via email before purchasing.
4. Once you get approval, go to the Red Giant Complete Product Page and “buy” your free version. You will only be able to buy the free version if you have been pre-approved.

The free education subscription will last 180 days. When that time period ends, users will need to reverify their academic status to renew their free subscription.

Flanders Scientific
Remote collaboration and review benefits greatly from having the same type of display calibrated the same way in both locations. To help facilitate such workflow consistency, FSI is launching a limited time buy one, get one for $1,000 off special on its most popular monitor, the DM240.

Nvidia
For those pros needing to power graphics workloads without local hardware, cloud providers, such as Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud, offer Nvidia Quadro Virtual Workstation instances to support remote, graphics-intensive work quickly without the need for any on-prem infrastructure. End-users only need a connected laptop or thin client, as the virtual workstations support the same Nvidia Quadro drivers and features as the physical Quadro GPUs used by pro artists and designers in local workstations.

Additionally, last week, Nvidia has expanded its free virtual GPU software evaluation to 500 licenses for 90 days to help companies support their remote workers with their existing GPU infrastructure. Nvidia vGPU software licenses — including Quadro Virtual Workstation — enable GPU-accelerated virtualization so that content creators, designers, engineers and others can continue their work. More details are available here.  Nvidia has also posted a separate blog on virtual GPUs to help admins who are working to support remote employees

Harman
Harman is offering a free e-learning program called Learning Sessions in conjunction with Harman Pro University.

The Learning Sessions and the Live Workshop Series provide a range of free on-demand and instructor-led webinars hosted by experts from around the world. The Industry Expert workshops feature tips and tricks from front of house engineers, lighting designers, technicians and other industry experts, while the Harman Expert workshops feature in-depth product and solution webinars by Harman product specialists.

• April 7—Lighting for Churches: Live and Video with Lucas Jameson and Chris Pyron
• April 9—Audio Challenges in Esports with Cameron O’Neill
• April 15—Special Martin Lighting Product Launch with Markus Klüesener
• April 16—Lighting Programming Workshop with Susan Rose
• April 23—Performance Manager: Beginner to Expert with Nowell Helms

Apple
Apple is offering free 90-day trials of Final Cut Pro X and Logic Pro X apps for all in order to help those working from home and looking for something new to master, as well as for students who are already using the tools in school but don’t have the apps on their home computers.

Avid
For its part, Avid is offering free temp licenses for remote users of the company’s creative tools. Commercial customers can get a free 90-day license for each registered user of Media Composer | Ultimate, Pro Tools, Pro Tools | Ultimate and Sibelius | Ultimate. For students whose school campuses are closed, any student of an Avid-based learning institution that uses Media Composer, Pro Tools or Sibelius can receive a free 90-day license for the same products.

Aris
Aris, a full-service production and post house based in Los Angeles, is partnering with ThinkLA to offer free online editing classes for those who want to sharpen their skills while staying close to home during this worldwide crisis. The series will be taught by Aris EP/founder Greg Bassenian, who is also an award-winning writer and director. He has also edited numerous projects for clients including Coca-Cola, Chevy and Zappos.

mLogic
mLogic is offering a 15% discount on its mTape Thunderbolt 3 LTO-7 and LTO-8 solutions The discount applies to orders placed on the mTape website through April 20th. Use discount code mLogicpostPerspective15%.

Xytech
Xytech has launched “Xytech After Dark,” a podcast focusing on trends in the media and broadcasting industries. The first two episodes are now available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcasting platforms.

Xytech’s Greg Dolan says the podcast “is not a forum to sell, but instead to talk about why create the functionality in MediaPulse and the types of things happening in our industry.”

Hosted by Xytech’s Gregg Sandheinrich, the podcast will feature Xytech staff, along with special guests. The first two episodes cover topics including the recent HPA Tech Retreat (featuring HPA president Seth Hallen), as well as the cancellation of the NAB Show, the value of trade shows and the effects of COVID-19 on the industry.

Adobe
Adobe shared a guide to best practices for working from home. It’s meant to support creators and filmmakers who might be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide here.

Adobe’s principal Creative Cloud evangelist, Jason Levine, hosted a live stream — Video Workflows With Team Projects that focus on remote workflows.

Additionally, Karl Soule, Senior Technical Business Development Manager, hosed a stream focusing on Remote video workflows and collaboration in the enterprise. If you sign up on this page, you can see his presentation.

Streambox
Streambox has introduced a pay-as-you-go software plan for video professionals who use its Chroma 4K, Chroma UHD, Chroma HD and Chroma X streaming encoder/decoder hardware. Since the software has been “decoupled” from the hardware platform, those who own the hardware can rent the software on a monthly basis, pause the subscription between projects and reinstate it as needed. By renting software for a fixed period, creatives can take on jobs without having to pay outright for technology that might have been impractical

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage .capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

 

 

How VFX house Phosphene has been working remotely

By Randi Altman

In our ongoing coverage of how studios are working remotely, we reached out to New York City-based visual effects house Phosphene. Founded in 2010 by Vivian Connolly and John Bair, Phosphene specializes in photorealistic VFX for film and television, and is particularly known for their detailed CG environments and set extensions.

This four-time Emmy-nominated (Mildred Pierce and Boardwalk Empire Season 3, Season 5, Escape at Dannemora) studio’s more recent work includes The Plot Against America, The Hunters, A Beautiful Day in The Neighborhood and Motherless Brooklyn.

The Plot Against America

Like many others, Phosphene tasked with developing secure remote workflows, so we reached out to director of IT Jimmy Marrero and head of operations and strategy Beck Dunn to find out more.

How is Phosphene weathering this storm? Do you have most of your folks working remotely?
Beck Dunn: We were fortunate to be able to switch to remote work very quickly and are extremely grateful for our team who had been preparing for this major change. We are grateful we are in a position to support staff and productions who are able to continue working remotely.

Can you talk about what it took to get artists setup from their homes and walk us through that workflow?
Jimmy Marrero: Luckily, we’ve had experience with using PCOIP technology in the past and were in a good place to transition smoothly to remote work. We had a good number of workstations already set up with PCOIP remote workstation cards. We also leveraged AWS to create cloud workstations that are connected to our office via a VPC (virtual private cloud). This gives us the capability to securely increase our capacity for work way beyond any physical hardware limitations.

What tools are you using to make sure these folks stay connected?
Marrero: We all communicate with each other via chat using an open-source tool called Rocket.Chat. Producers connect via BlueJeans video conference.

For anyone setting up a remote pipeline, I would also recommend taking advantage of cloud-based software like Slack for communication, Trello for organization, and AnyDesk to allow IT to help troubleshoot any issues that might occur during the setup process.

What about security and working remotely?
Marrero: Security was the driving force for us to investigate the advantages of PCOIP technology. Having remote workstation cards installed at the office allows us to stream encrypted screen information directly to the artists monitors and eliminates the need for any data to be hosted outside of Phosphene’s internal network.

Using PCOIP combined with only being able to access our network via VPN with two-factor authentication, we were able to address many security concerns from our clients, which was a key factor in our being able to work remotely.

PCOIP technology also allows us to easily use all the tools on our internal network, with no change in set up, or compromise to security. Once logged in, artists are able to access Nuke, Hiero, 3dsMax, Houdini and Deadline as though they are in the office.

What types of work are you guys doing at the moment?
Dunn: We can’t talk about any of our current work, but one project we recently finished is HBO’s The Plot Against America, created by Ed Burns and David Simon. The show is based on Philip Roth’s 2004 novel depicting the lives of US citizens in an alternate history where Franklin D.Roosevelt loses the 1940 presidential election to Charles Lindbergh.

Phosphene worked with show-side VFX supervisor Jim Rider on a wide range of visual effects for the show, including creating period-accurate aerial views of 1940’s Manhattan, exteriors of Newark Airport and a British Navy base, and extensive crowd duplication shots inside Madison Square Garden. In total, Phosphene delivered 274 shots for the limited series.

The Plot Against America

Any tips for those companies who are just starting to get set up remotely or even those who are currently working remotely?
Marrero: Be nice to your IT department. (Smiles) Working remotely has many moving parts that need to all work perfectly for things to go smoothly. Expect delays in the beginning as all the kinks are worked out.

What has helped staffers get settled into working from home?
Dunn: I’ll let them speak for themselves.

VFX producer Matthew Griffin: I found it really helpful to set up a dedicated mini-office rather than just working on a laptop from the couch. When I sit down at my workspace, I feel like I am still “going into” the office. Holding team meetings via video chat and maintaining rituals like having my morning coffee at the same time also helps me to stay in a familiar rhythm. We also have a dog, so walking him at the end of the day makes the workday feel complete. I close the laptop, walk the dog, and once I’m home, it’s like my commute is over and it’s time to relax.

VFX producer Steven Weigle: Producers are used to working remotely for short stints, so this hasn’t been an entirely foreign experience. I did recently add a KVM switch to my home setup, to use my full-sized keyboard, mouse and monitor to control my work laptop but be able to switch back to my personal machine with the click of a button. It’s a small, basic upgrade but it helps me maximize my desk space while still separating my “work brain” from my “home brain.”


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

RuckSackNY: Branding, targeted videos and high-quality masks

By Randi Altman

Fred Ruckel got his start in post at New York’s Post Perfect in the ‘90s. From there he grew his skills and experience before opening his own shop, Stitch. While spending his days as a Flame artist, in his spare time Ruckel and his wife Natasha invented something called the Ripple Rug. They’ve since moved to upstate New York, where they built an extensive post suite and studio under the name RuckSackNY.

Fred Ruckel at work.

What is the Ripple Rug, you ask? It’s essentially a cat playground in a rug, but their site describes it as “a multifunction pet enrichment system mainly geared toward house cats.”

Fred and Natasha (whose own career includes stints at creative agencies as well as Autodesk) felt strongly about manufacturing the Ripple Rug in the US, and they wanted to use recycled materials. After a bit of research, they found a factory in Georgia and used recycled plastic water bottles in the process. To date they have recycled over 3 million bottles.

To help promote the Ripple Rug, the Ruckels leveraged their creative capabilities from years of working in advertising and post to create a brand from scratch.

When the COVID-19 crisis hit, the Ruckels realized they were in a unique position — they could repurpose the Georgia factory to make masks and face shields for health workers and the general population. While reformatting the factory to this type of manufacturing is still ongoing, the Ruckels wanted to make sure that, in the meantime, people would have access to high-quality face masks. So they sourced masks via their textile production partners, had them tested in a US lab, and have already sold over 40,000 masks under their new brand, SnugglyMask.

Many have taken to making their own masks, so the factory will also be making filters to help beef up that protection, which will allow people to buy filter packs for their homemade masks. Check out their video showing people how to make their own masks.  “We should have that part functional this week or next. Our mask supplier is quickly trying to put together the production pipeline so we can make masks here, but those machines are automated and take a bit of engineering to make them work properly.”

These materials will be both sold to the general public and donated to those on the frontlines. The Ruckels have once again used their creative backgrounds to build a brand and tell a story. Let’s find out more from Fred…

With the recent COVID-19 crisis, you realized that your factory could be used to make masks — both for civilians and for medical professionals and those on the frontline. How did you come to that realization, and what were your first steps?
When the pandemic broke out, we immediately took action to help the cause. Our factory makes many textile products, and we knew we could set up an assembly line to make masks, shields and gowns, and with some funding, we could pretty much make anything. We have the know-how and ability, as well as 60,000 square feet of space, which we are cutting a chunk out of to make a clean room to handle the process in as sterile an environment as possible.

I reached out to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office, our local congressman and Empire State Development. At the same time, I was communicating with Georgia (we are a registered business in both states) and worked with the Department of Economic Development and the National Association of Manufacturers. That led us to the Global Center for Medical Innovation.

Natasha Ruckel

So while that was happening, you decided to sell and donate masks?
Yes. While waiting for responses to help us retool our factory, we had to do something to be an immediate help. We did not want to wait on the sidelines for red tape to be cut; we had to come up with Plan B while waiting for government help.

Plan B meant using our resources to allow us to purchase masks without several levels of middlemen raising the prices. We still ended up with two levels of middlemen, but it’s better than five! In manufacturing, it is all about pennies. This is a lesson I learned from a mentor early on with our Ripple Rug project. Middlemen make pennies, a nickel becomes $50,000 in profit on 1 million units, so pennies add up, and middlemen capitalize on that. My goal is to remove middlemen and get directly sourced goods to people in need at the best price possible.

Can you describe both masks and the materials used?
In our PSA, we demonstrate the use of a cloth bandana versus a basic medical mask. We are looking to filter particulate matter down to the micron level, smaller than the human eye can see. For reference, the human eye can only see particles as small as 50 to 60 microns (think about a fleck of dust caught in sunlight). The particles we are looking to “arrest” are down to .3 microns, smaller than red blood cells.

The mechanical weaving of cloth masks makes them porous. This allows particulate matter to pass right through, as the holes are enormous in scale. The key component is the middle layer is called “melt-blown.” The outer layer is a polypropylene spun-bond fiber, and the inside layer is an acrylic spun-bond fiber. Sandwiched between is the melt -blown layer, which is the fine particulate catcher. Each layer captures a different size particle. Think of it as a video production — it would be like adding multiple scrims to lights to block light, except we are blocking particles in this case.

You recently created a PSA detailing the differences in the masks people are using to protect themselves. What did you use to shoot and post?
The PSA was shot using a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV. We have some great Fiilex LED lighting kits with a ring light and a 7-foot white shooting tent. My intent wasn’t to make a full-on video. I was shooting elements to make animating gifs to show the testing process. When I loaded the footage into Adobe Premiere and made a selects reel, I realized we had the elements of a PSA … and so a spot was born.

Natasha looked at my selects and quickly switched into producer mode and pieced together a storyline. We then had to shoot more elements. Fortunately, our shooting studio is in our home, so there were no delays. I shot an element, loaded it, shot another and so on until we had the pieces to make it work.

Natasha created graphic elements in Adobe Illustrator while I worked on the edit in Premiere. We also took product pics in raw mode for the packaging and demos, which we developed in camera raw within Photoshop. We shot the video portion in 4K, which allowed us to punch in for closeups and pull back to reframe as if it were a multi-cam shoot.

We filmed on a stainless steel table to give it a clinical feel while blowing it out a little bit to feel ethereal and hazy. My favorite shot is the water dripping on the table; the lighting and table make it feel like mercury.

Why was it so important for you to turn your business into the mask business?
There are so many reasons that it is hard to pinpoint. I knew we had the capability, and our pipeline was efficient enough to pull it off from start to finish. As an inventor I’ve seen people take advantage of situations for financial gain — like knocking off products — and that means making fake masks, which cause more harm than good.

I saw an opportunity to protect everyone I know by supplying quality masks they can trust. On internet sites, fake masks can look identical. In fact, the pics might be of the real mask, but they ship you a cheap version that’s missing some key elements.

I do not cut corners. As a Flame artist, I continually dealt with clients saying, ‘It’s good enough, let’s move to the next shot.” Good enough is not what I do; I do not have a halfway button. I’d look like a bad Flame artist if I didn’t go all the way.

Knowing that we can play an active part in protecting my friends and family and colleagues in the post community by taking on this single effort made me pull the trigger. With that, SnugglyMask.com was born.

Are you guys selling and donating masks? How is that working?
We are both selling and donating masks. One of our RuckSackNY clients is a philanthropist named Josh Malone. As his marketing agency, we created a mask donation program. The first hospitals we shipped to were Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx and Westchester Medical Center. We will be donating to hospitals nationwide and also selling masks to hospitals and the public via our site, https://www.snugglymask.com/. This is a place people can go for a mask they can trust and that has been lab tested. We built a brand in just a week, and sales simply exploded due to our honest content and demand.

Why is it important for you to make sure your products are being made in the US?
We make the Ripple Rug in the US to provide jobs for US workers. There are more than 100 people working at 10 companies in five states for Ripple Rug. I order carpet 100,000 square feet at a time and cannot imagine shipping it from overseas with the demand we must meet. Shipping from China takes weeks, if not months.

Making it in the USA means continual production to meet demand while reinvesting to grow along the way. Sure, I could produce my products in China and make a lot more money, but I am proud to say American workers put food on the table and children go to school because we make our products in the USA. That alone makes it worth it to me.

Do you feel the videos you create help get more people to pay attention to the product?
We feel effective videos engage viewers and build intrigue about our product. We create a range of videos, not just the regular polished spots. Consumers appreciate the feeling of user-generated content, as it adds to the authenticity of the product. If every spot is beautiful, it feels staged.

We have a series called “Cats Gone Wild” in which all of the videos are made solely of user-generated content sourced from YouTube, Facebook and Instagram. I edit them to a stock music track and create a theme for each video. We add titles to call out the social media names to give credit to the person who posted the video and to give them a little spotlight on our show reel. This, in turn, creates engagement, as it encourages them to share the video on their social media channels.

I keep my edits to around a minute for this series to “get in and get out” before losing the viewer’s attention. The original content is cut to a whimsical track and is fun to watch — who doesn’t love cute cat videos? We share these on social media, and that helps grow our sales. Our customers love it, they get acknowledgement, our brand grows, and we are able to show our product in action.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

More words of wisdom from editor Jesse Averna, ACE

We are all living in a world we’ve never had to navigate before. People’s jobs are in flux, others are working from home, and anxiety is a regular part of our lives. Through all the chaos, Jesse Averna has been a calming voice on social media, so postPerspective reached out to ask him once again to address our readership directly. You can see his last column here.

Jesse is a five-time Emmy-winning ACE editor living in LA and working in the animation feature world.


Hey,

How are you holding up? I just wanted to check in and offer a few more words.

This sucks. It isn’t good for anyone. And it’s okay to admit that. It’s healthy. This isn’t an opportunity you’ve been given. It’s a crisis. Sure, you’re at home, if you’re one of the lucky ones, but your life has been rocked.

Sometimes the best thing you can do is simply survive. In case no one else in your life is telling you this: Give yourself a break. Please take a pause before you carve new ruts to fall into, and realize that your mental health is of the upmost importance.

How are you? Are you adapting? Are you alone and lonely? Are you having live video meetings and editing from home while juggling kids? No matter your personal situation, it’s uncomfortable, full of unexpected challenges and likely wearing you out.

If you need a hand, ask for it. If you need to talk to someone, reach out. If you need a moment of peace, go jump in the shower. Do whatever you need to do to find peace in your day. You deserve that. While you’re setting these new patterns to fall into, please keep yourself a priority. Because here’s the truth: You are very important to the other people in the home you’re now in all the time.

You’re important to your friends and family. You’re important to your coworkers. You are a wonderful, one-of-a-kind jewel that’s under pressure at the moment. This moment will pass. You will go on. This is a horrible tragedy. There is no downplaying that. Nor should we. Just know that we need you. We need you next month. We need you next year. Please take good care of yourself. You are looked up to. You are loved. You are missed. You are valued. You are the only “you” we are going to get. So, please, check in with yourself. Prioritize yourself. Be kind to yourself. You’re doing great. Hang in there.

Jesse
@dr0id


Jesse Averna, who was co-founder of the popular Twitter chat and Facebook group @PostChat, works at Disney Animation Studio and is a member of the American Cinema Editors.He recently edited is a primetime special for Sesame Street, which first aired on April 14. If you missed the special’s debut, you can catch Sesame Street’s “Elmo’s Playdate” on HBO and PBS streaming apps.

Aris EP offering free editing courses during COVID crisis

Aris, a full-service production and post house based in Los Angeles, is partnering with ThinkLA to offer free online editing classes for those who want to sharpen their skills while staying close to home during this worldwide crisis. The series will be taught by Aris EP/founder Greg Bassenian, who is also an award-winning writer and director. He has also edited numerous projects for clients including Coca-Cola, Chevy and Zappos.

“As the production industry has come to a rapid halt, these are challenging times for everyone. Thankfully, our post artists are able to continue their work remotely,” says Bassenian. “But we began to think about a way we could give back during these extraordinarily difficult times, and how we could offer something of assistance to both industry and non-industry professionals. We hope that this can provide people with some assistance and benefit, and hopefully some inspiration as we all try to get through this situation together.”

ThinkLA is a nonprofit organization with a mission to connect, inspire and educate the Los Angeles marketing community. The course is the first in a three-course series throughout the two companies are offering through the month of April. The Fundamentals of Editing covers how to set up a project, the basics of working with footage, and finishing and exporting your completed piece. The virtual course is a primer for those interested in learning the principles of video editing unfolding over three one-hour lessons held on consecutive Fridays – April 3rd, 10th, and 17th – at 11 am PDT.

The only prerequisite is that students have an Adobe Premiere Pro subscription before the classes begin. You can download a free 30-day trial here. The course is limited to 50 members per session — on a first come first serve basis — and no prior editing experience is necessary. You can sign up for the classes here.

Apple and Avid offer free temp licenses during COVID-19 crisis

Apple is offering free 90-day trials of Final Cut Pro X and Logic Pro X apps for all in order to help those working from home and looking for something new to master, as well as for students who are already using the tools in school but don’t have the apps on their home computers.

Apple Final Cut X

Apple is extending what is normally a 30-day trial for Final Cut Pro X, while a free trial is new to Logic Pro X. The extension to 90 days is for a limited time and will revert to 30 days across both apps in the future.

Trials for both Final Cut Pro X and Logic Pro X are now available. Customers can download the free trials on the web pages for Final Cut Pro X  and Logic Pro X. The 90-day extension is also available to customers who have already downloaded the free 30-day trial of Final Cut Pro X.

For its part, Avid is offering free temp licenses for remote users of the company’s creative tools. Commercial customers can get a free 90-day license for each registered user of Media Composer | Ultimate, Pro Tools, Pro Tools | Ultimate and Sibelius | Ultimate. For students whose school campuses are closed, any student of an Avid-based learning institution that uses Media Composer, Pro Tools or Sibelius can receive a free 90-day license for the same products.

The offer is open through April 17.

Main Image: Courtesy of Avid

Words of wisdom from editor Jesse Averna, ACE

We are all living in a world we’ve never had to navigate before. People’s jobs are in flux, others are working from home, and anxiety is a regular part of our lives. Through all the chaos, Jesse Averna has been a calming voice on social media, so postPerspective reached out to ask him to address our readership directly.

Jesse, who was co-founder of the popular Twitter chat and Facebook group @PostChat, works at Disney Animation Studio and is a member of the American Cinema Editors.


Hey,

How are you doing? This isn’t an ad. I’m not going to sell you anything or try to convince you of anything. I just want to take the opportunity to check in. Like many of you, I’m a post professional (an editor) currently working from home. If we don’t look out for each other, who will? Please know that it’s okay not to be okay right now. I have to be honest, I’m exhausted. I’m just endlessly reading news and searching for new news and reading posts about news I’ve already read and searching again for news I might have missed …

I want to remind you of a couple things that I think might bring some peace, if you let me. I fear it’s about to get much darker and much scarier, so we need to anchor ourselves to some hope.

You are valuable. The world is literally different because you are here. You have intrinsic value, and that will never change. No matter what. You are thought about and loved, despite whatever the voice in your head says. I’m sure your first reaction to reading that is to blow it off, but try to own it. Even for just a moment. It’s true.

You don’t deserve what’s going on, but let it bring some peace that the whole world is going through it together. You might be isolated, but you’re not alone. We are forced to look out for one another by looking out for ourselves. It’s interesting; I feel so separate and vulnerable, but the truth is that the whole planet is feeling and reacting to this as one. We are in sync, whether we know it or not — and that’s encouraging to me. We ALL want to be well and be safe, and we want our neighbors to be well also. We have a rare moment of feeling like a people, like a planet.

If you are feeling anxious, do me a favor tonight. Go outside and look at the stars. Set a timer for five minutes. No entertainment or phone or anything else. Just five minutes. Reset. Feel yourself on a cosmic scale. Small. A blink of an eye. But so, so valuable.

And please give yourself a break. A sanity check. If you need help, please reach out. If you need to nest, do it. You need to tune out, do it. Take care of yourself. This is an unprecedented moment. It’s okay not to be okay. Once you can, though, see who you can help. This complete shift of reality has made me think about legacy. This is a unique legacy-building moment. That student who reached out to you on LinkedIn asking for advice? You now have time to reply. That nonprofit you thought about volunteering your talents to? Now’s your chance. Even just to make the connection. Who can you help? Check in on? You don’t need any excuse in our current state to reach out.

I know I’m just some rando you’re reading on the internet, but I believe you are going to make it through this. You are wonderful. Do everything you can to be safe. The world needs you. It’s a better place because you are here. You know things, have ideas to share and will make things that none of the rest of us do or have.

Hang in there, my friends, and let me know if you have any thoughts, encouragements or tips for staying sane during this time. I’ll try to compile them into another article to share.

Jesse
@dr0id


Jesse Averna  — pictured on his way to donate masks — is a five-time Emmy-winning ACE editor living in LA and working in the animation feature world. 

Updated: Product makers offer support to cope with COVID-19 disruption

This is a weird time for our industry and the world. The best we can do is try to keep working and stay safe. For our part, postPerspective will continue to report industry news and tell stories about workflows, artists and tools, in addition to running pieces about how pros are working remotely… and keeping sane.

In fact, if you have a story about how you are working remotely and keeping on keeping on, please share it with us (info@postPerspective.com). Even though we can’t see each other face to face right now, keeping a sense of community has never been more important.

A number of companies are releasing updates, offering discounts, and even making their remote services free for a limited time in order to help everyone keep working through this pandemic. Here is a bit of news from some of those companies, and we will add more companies to this list as the news comes in, so watch this space.

mLogic
mLogic is offering a 15% discount on its mTape Thunderbolt 3 LTO-7 and LTO-8 solutions The discount applies to orders placed on the mTape website through April 20th. Use discount code mLogicpostPerspective15%.

Xytech
Xytech has launched “Xytech After Dark,” a podcast focusing on trends in the media and broadcasting industries. The first two episodes are now available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcasting platforms.

Xytech’s Greg Dolan says the podcast “is not a forum to sell, but instead to talk about why create the functionality in MediaPulse and the types of things happening in our industry.”

Hosted by Xytech’s Gregg Sandheinrich, the podcast will feature Xytech staff, along with special guests. The first two episodes cover topics including the recent HPA Tech Retreat (featuring HPA president Seth Hallen), as well as the cancellation of the NAB Show, the value of trade shows and the effects of COVID-19 on the industry.

Nvidia
Nvidia is expanding its free virtual GPU software evaluation to 500 licenses for 90 days to help companies support their remote workers with their existing GPU infrastructure. Nvidia vGPU software licenses — including Quadro Virtual Workstation — enable GPU-accelerated virtualization so that content creators, designers, engineers and others can continue their work. More details are available here.  Nvidia has also posted a separate blog on virtual GPUs to help admins who are working to support remote employees

Object Matrix 
Object Matrix is offering video tips for surviving working from home. The videos, hosted by co-founder Nicholas Pearce, are here.

Adobe
Adobe shared a guide to best practices for working from home. It’s meant to support creators and filmmakers who might be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide here.

Adobe’s principal Creative Cloud evangelist, Jason Levine, hosted a live stream — Video Workflows With Team Projects ±that focus on remote workflows.

Additionally, Karl Soule, Senior Technical Business Development Manager, hosed a stream focusing on Remote video workflows and collaboration in the enterprise. If you sign up on this page, you can see his presentation.

Streambox
Streambox has introduced a pay-as-you-go software plan for video professionals who use its Chroma 4K, Chroma UHD, Chroma HD and Chroma X streaming encoder/decoder hardware. Since the software has been “decoupled” from the hardware platform, those who own the hardware can rent the software on a monthly basis, pause the subscription between projects and reinstate it as needed. By renting software for a fixed period, creatives can take on jobs without having to pay outright for technology that might have been impractical.

And last week’s offerings as well

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Adobe

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Adobe
Adobe has shared a guide to best practices for working from home, created in support of creators and filmmakers who may be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide below and here.

Adobe’s Jason Levine and Karl Soule will also be hosting two livestreams this week that focus on remote workflows, in the hopes of offering helpful tips during this uncertain time – details are below.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Frame.io