Category Archives: compositing

Quick Chat: Crew Cuts’ Nancy Jacobsen and Stephanie Norris

By Randi Altman

Crew Cuts, a full-service production and post house, has been a New York fixture since 1986. Originally established as an editorial house, over the years as the industry evolved they added services that target all aspects of the workflow.

This independently-owned facility is run by executive producer/partner Nancy Jacobsen, senior editor/partner Sherri Margulies Keenan and senior editor/partner Jake Jacobsen. While commercial spots might be in their wheelhouse, their projects vary and include social media, music videos and indie films.

We decided to reach out to Nancy Jacobsen, as well as EP of finishing Stephanie Norris, to find out about trends, recent work and succeeding in an industry and city that isn’t always so welcoming.

Can you talk about what Crew Cuts provides and how you guys have evolved over the years?
Jacobsen: We pretty much do it all. We have 10 offline editors as well as artists working in VFX, 2D/3D animation, motion graphics/design, audio mix and sound design, VO record, color grading, title treatment, advanced compositing and conform. Two of our editors double as directors.

In the beginning, Crew Cuts primarily offered only editorial. As the years went by and the industry climate changed we began to cater to the needs of clients and slowly built out our entire finishing department. We started with some minimal graphics work and one staff artist in 2008.

In 2009, we expanded the team to include graphics, conform and audio mix. From there we just continued to grow and expand our department to the full finishing team we have today.

As a woman owner of a post house, what challenges have you had to overcome?
Jacobsen: When I started in this business, the industry was very different. I made less money than my male counterparts and it took me twice as long to be promoted because I am a woman. I have since seen great change where women are leading post houses and production houses and are finally getting the recognition for the hard work they deserve. Unfortunately, I had to “wait it out” and silently work harder than the men around me. This has paid off for me, and now I can help women get the credit they rightly deserve

Do you see the industry changing and becoming less male-dominated?
Jacobsen: Yes, the industry is definitely becoming less male-dominated. In the current climate, with the birth of the #metoo movement and specifically in our industry with the birth of Diet Madison Avenue (@dietmadisonave), we are seeing a lot more women step up and take on leading roles.

Are you mostly a commercial house? What other segments of the industry do you work in?
Jacobsen: We are primarily a commercial house. However, we are not limited to just broadcast and digital commercial advertising. We have delivered specs for everything from the Godzilla screen in Times Square to :06 spots on Instagram. We have done a handful of music videos and also handle a ton of B2B videos for in-house client meetings, etc., as well as banner ads for conferences and trade shows. We’ve even worked on display ads for airports. Most recently, one of our editors finished a feature film called Public Figure that is being submitted around the film festival circuit.

What types of projects are you working on most often these days?
Jacobsen: The industry is all over the place. The current climate is very messy right now. Our projects are extremely varied. It’s hard to say what we work on most because it seems like there is no more norm. We are working on everything from sizzle pitch videos to spots for the Super Bowl.

What trends have you seen over the last year, and where do you expect to be in a year?
Jacobsen: Over the last year, we have noticed that the work comes from every angle. Our typical client is no longer just the marketing agency. It is also the production company, network, brand, etc. In a year we expect to be doing more production work. Seeing as how budgets are much smaller than they used to be and everyone wants a one-stop shop, we are hoping to stick with our gut and continue expanding our production arm.

Crew Cuts has beefed up its finishing services. Can you talk about that?
Stephanie Norris: We offer a variety of finishing services — from sound design to VO record and mix, compositing to VFX, 2D and 3D motion graphics and color grading. Our fully staffed in-house team loves the visual effects puzzle and enjoys working with clients to help interpret their vision.

Can you name some recent projects and the services you provided?
Norris: We just worked on a new campaign for New Jersey Lottery in collaboration with Yonder Content and PureRed. Brian Neaman directed and edited the spots. In addition to editorial, Crew Cuts also handled all of the finishing, including color, conform, visual effects, graphics, sound design and mix. This was one of those all-hands-on-deck projects. Keeping everything under one roof really helped us to streamline the process.

New Jersey Lottery

Working with Brian to carefully plan the shooting strategy, we filmed a series of plate shots as elements that could later be combined in post to build each scene. We added falling stacks of cash to the reindeer as he walks through the loading dock and incorporated CG inflatable decorations into a warehouse holiday lawn scene. We also dramatically altered the opening and closing exterior warehouse scenes, allowing one shot to work for multiple seasons. Keeping lighting and camera positions consistent was mission-critical, and having our VFX supervisor, Dulany Foster, on set saved us hours of work down the line.

For the New Jersey Lottery Holiday spots, the Crew Cuts CG team, led by our creative director Ben McNamara created a 3D Inflatable display of lottery tickets. This was something that proved too costly and time consuming to manufacture and shoot practically. After the initial R&D, our team created a few different CG inflatable simulations prior to the shoot, and Dulany was able to mock them up live while on set. Creating the simulations was crucial for giving the art department reference while building the set, and also helped when shooting the plates needed to composite the scene together.

Ben and his team focused on the physics of the inflation, while also making sure the fabric simulations, textures and lighting blended seamlessly into the scene — it was important that everything felt realistic. In addition to the inflatables, our VFX team turned the opening and closing sunny, summer shots of the warehouse into a December winter wonderland thanks to heavy compositing, 3D set extension and snow simulations.

New Jersey Lottery

Any other projects you’d like to talk about?
Jacobsen: We are currently working on a project here that we are handling soup to nuts from production through finishing. It was a fun challenge to take on. The spot contains a hand model on a greenscreen showing the audience how to use a new product. The shoot itself took place here at Crew Cuts. We turned our common area into a stage for the day and were able to do so without interrupting any of the other employees and projects going on.

We are now working on editorial and finishing. The edit is coming along nicely. What really drives the piece here is the graphic icons. Our team is having a lot of fun designing these elements and implementing them into the spot. We are so proud because we budgeted wisely to make sure to accommodate all of the needs of the project so that we could handle everything and still turn a profit. It was so much fun to work in a different setting for the day and has been a very successful project so far. Clients are happy and so are we.

Main Image: (L-R) Stephanie Norris and Nancy Jacobsen

Avengers: Infinity War leads VES Awards with six noms

The Visual Effects Society (VES) has announced the nominees for the 17th Annual VES Awards, which recognize outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games as well as the VFX supervisors, VFX producers and hands-on artists who bring this work to life.

Avengers: Infinity War garners the most feature film nomination with six. Incredibles 2 is the top animated film contender with five nominations and Lost in Space leads the broadcast field with six nominations.

Nominees in 24 categories were selected by VES members via events hosted by 11 of the organizations Sections, including Australia, the Bay Area, Germany, London, Los Angeles, Montreal, New York, New Zealand, Toronto, Vancouver and Washington.

The VES Awards will be held on February 5th at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. As previously announced, the VES Visionary Award will be presented to writer/director/producer and co-creator of Westworld Jonathan Nolan. The VES Award for Creative Excellence will be given to award-winning creators/executive producers/writers/directors David Benioff and D.B. Weiss of Game of Thrones fame. Actor-comedian-author Patton Oswalt will once again host the VES Awards.

Here are the nominees:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War

Daniel DeLeeuw

Jen Underdahl

Kelly Port

Matt Aitken

Daniel Sudick

 

Christopher Robin

Christopher Robin

Chris Lawrence

Steve Gaub

Michael Eames

Glenn Melenhorst

Chris Corbould

 

Ready Player One

Roger Guyett

Jennifer Meislohn

David Shirk

Matthew Butler

Neil Corbould

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story

Rob Bredow

Erin Dusseault

Matt Shumway

Patrick Tubach

Dominic Tuohy

 

Welcome to Marwen

Kevin Baillie

Sandra Scott

Seth Hill

Marc Chu

James Paradis

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature 

12 Strong

Roger Nall

Robert Weaver

Mike Meinardus

 

Bird Box

Marcus Taormina

David Robinson

Mark Bakowski

Sophie Dawes

Mike Meinardus

 

Bohemian Rhapsody

Paul Norris

Tim Field

May Leung

Andrew Simmonds

 

First Man

Paul Lambert

Kevin Elam

Tristan Myles

Ian Hunter

JD Schwalm

 

Outlaw King

Alex Bicknell

Dan Bethell

Greg O’Connor

Stefano Pepin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch

Pierre Leduc

Janet Healy

Bruno Chauffard

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Brad Bird

John Walker

Rick Sayre

Bill Watral

 

Isle of Dogs

Mark Waring

Jeremy Dawson

Tim Ledbury

Lev Kolobov

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet

Scott Kersavage

Bradford Simonsen

Ernest J. Petti

Cory Loftis

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Joshua Beveridge

Christian Hejnal

Danny Dimian

Bret St. Clair

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon; Out of the Past

Everett Burrell

Tony Meagher

Steve Moncur

Christine Lemon

Joel Whist

 

Krypton; The Phantom Zone

Ian Markiewicz

Jennifer Wessner

Niklas Jacobson

Martin Pelletier

 

LOST IN SPACE

Lost in Space; Danger, Will Robinson

Jabbar Raisani

Terron Pratt

Niklas Jacobson

Joao Sita

 

The Terror; Go For Broke

Frank Petzold

Lenka Líkařová

Viktor Muller

Pedro Sabrosa

 

Westworld; The Passenger

Jay Worth

Elizabeth Castro

Bruce Branit

Joe Wehmeyer

Michael Lantieri

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan; Pilot

Erik Henry

Matt Robken

Bobo Skipper

Deak Ferrand

Pau Costa

 

The Alienist; The Boy on the Bridge

Kent Houston

Wendy Garfinkle

Steve Murgatroyd

Drew Jones

Paul Stephenson

 

The Deuce; We’re All Beasts

Jim Rider

Steven Weigle

John Bair

Aaron Raff

 

The First; Near and Far

Karen Goulekas

Eddie Bonin

Roland Langschwert

Bryan Godwin

Matthew James Kutcher

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June

Brendan Taylor

Stephen Lebed

Winston Lee

Leo Bovell

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Realtime Project

Age of Sail

John Kahrs

Kevin Dart

Cassidy Curtis

Theresa Latzko

 

Cycles

Jeff Gipson

Nicholas Russell

Lauren Nicole Brown

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

 

Dr Grordbort’s Invaders

Greg Broadmore

Mhairead Connor

Steve Lambert

Simon Baker

 

God of War

Maximilian Vaughn Ancar

Corey Teblum

Kevin Huynh

Paolo Surricchio

 

Marvel’s Spider-Man

Grant Hollis

Daniel Wang

Seth Faske

Abdul Bezrati

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial 

Beyond Good & Evil 2

Maxime Luere

Leon Berelle

Remi Kozyra

Dominique Boidin

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Philip Whalley

Anthony Bloor

Andy Steele

 

McDonald’s; #ReindeerReady

Ben Cronin

Josh King

Gez Wright

Suzanne Jandu

 

U.S. Marine Corps; A Nation’s Call

Steve Drew

Nick Fraser

Murray Butler

Greg White

Dave Peterson

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident

Carsten Keller

Anandi Peiris

Dan Sanders

Fabian Frank

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

Beautiful Hunan; Flight of the Phoenix

R. Rajeev

Suhit Saha

Arish Fyzee

Unmesh Nimbalkar

 

Childish Gambino’s Pharos

Keith Miller

Alejandro Crawford

Thelvin Cabezas

Jeremy Thompson

 

DreamWorks Theatre Presents Kung Fu Panda

Marc Scott

Doug Cooper

Michael Losure

Alex Timchenko

 

Osheaga Music and Arts Festival

Andre Montambeault

Marie-Josee Paradis

Alyson Lamontagne

David Bishop Noriega

 

Pearl Quest

Eugénie von Tunzelmann

Liz Oliver

Ian Spendloff

Ross Burgess

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Thanos

Jan Philip Cramer

Darren Hendler

Paul Story

Sidney Kombo-Kintombo

 

Christopher Robin; Tigger

Arslan Elver

Kayn Garcia

Laurent Laban

Mariano Mendiburu

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Indoraptor

Jance Rubinchik

Ted Lister

Yannick Gillain

Keith Ribbons

 

Ready Player One; Art3mis

David Shirk

Brian Cantwell

Jung-Seung Hong

Kim Ooi

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; The Grinch

David Galante

Francois Boudaille

Olivier Luffin

Yarrow Cheney

 

Incredibles 2; Helen Parr

Michal Makarewicz

Ben Porter

Edgar Rodriguez

Kevin Singleton

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Ralphzilla

Dong Joo Byun

Dave K. Komorowski

Justin Sklar

Le Joyce Tong

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse; Miles Morales

Marcos Kang

Chad Belteau

Humberto Rosa

Julie Bernier Gosselin

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Realtime Project

Cycles; Rae

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

Jose Luis -Weecho- Velasquez

 

Lost in Space; Humanoid

Chad Shattuck

Paul Zeke

Julia Flanagan

Andrew McCartney

 

Nightflyers; All That We Have Found; Eris

Peter Giliberti

James Chretien

Ryan Cromie

Cesar Dacol Jr.

 

Spider-Man; Doc Ock

Brian Wyser

Henrique Naspolini

Sophie Brennan

William Salyers

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

McDonald’s; Bobbi the Reindeer

Gabriela Ruch Salmeron

Joe Henson

Andrew Butler

Joel Best

 

Overkill’s The Walking Dead; Maya

Jonas Ekman

Goran Milic

Jonas Skoog

Henrik Eklundh

 

Peta; Best Friend; Lucky

Bernd Nalbach

Emanuel Fuchs

Sebastian Plank

Christian Leitner

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident; Bam

David Bryan

Chris Welsby

Fabian Frank

Chloe Dawe

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

Ant-Man and the Wasp; Journey to the Quantum Realm

Florian Witzel

Harsh Mistri

Yuri Serizawa

Can Yuksel

 

Aquaman; Atlantis

Quentin Marmier

Aaron Barr

Jeffrey De Guzman

Ziad Shureih

 

Ready Player One; The Shining, Overlook Hotel

Mert Yamak

Stanley Wong

Joana Garrido

Daniel Gagiu

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Vandor Planet

Julian Foddy

Christoph Ammann

Clement Gerard

Pontus Albrecht

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Whoville

Loic Rastout

Ludovic Ramiere

Henri Deruer

Nicolas Brack

 

Incredibles 2; Parr House

Christopher M. Burrows

Philip Metschan

Michael Rutter

Joshua West

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Social Media District

Benjamin Min Huang

Jon Kim Krummel II

Gina Warr Lawes

Matthias Lechner

 

Spider-Man; Into the Spider-Verse; Graphic New York City

Terry Park

Bret St. Clair

Kimberly Liptrap

Dave Morehead

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Cycles; The House

Michael R.W. Anderson

Jeff Gipson

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

 

Lost in Space; Pilot; Impact Area

Philip Engström

Kenny Vähäkari

Jason Martin

Martin Bergquist

 

The Deuce; 42nd St

John Bair

Vance Miller

Jose Marin

Steve Sullivan

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June; Fenway Park

Patrick Zentis

Kevin McGeagh

Leo Bovell

Zachary Dembinski

 

The Man in the High Castle; Reichsmarschall Ceremony

Casi Blume

Michael Eng

Ben McDougal

Sean Myers

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

Aquaman; Third Act Battle

Claus Pedersen

Mohammad Rastkar

Cedric Lo

Ryan McCoy

 

Echo; Time Displacement

Victor Perez

Tomas Tjernberg

Tomas Wall

Marcus Dineen

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Gyrosphere Escape

Pawl Fulker

Matt Perrin

Oscar Faura

David Vickery

 

Ready Player One; New York Race

Daniele Bigi

Edmund Kolloen

Mathieu Vig

Jean-Baptiste Noyau

 

Welcome to Marwen; Town of Marwen

Kim Miles

Matthew Ward

Ryan Beagan

Marc Chu

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project 

Avengers: Infinity War; Nidavellir Forge Megastructure

Chad Roen

Ryan Rogers

Jeff Tetzlaff

Ming Pan

 

Incredibles 2; Underminer Vehicle

Neil Blevins

Philip Metschan

Kevin Singleton

 

Mortal Engines; London

Matthew Sandoval

James Ogle

Nick Keller

Sam Tack

 

Ready Player One; DeLorean DMC-12

Giuseppe Laterza

Kim Lindqvist

Mauro Giacomazzo

William Gallyot

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Millennium Falcon

Masa Narita

Steve Walton

David Meny

James Clyne

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Gerardo Aguilera

Ashraf Ghoniem

Vasilis Pazionis

Hartwell Durfor

 

Avengers: Infinity War; Wakanda

Florian Witzel

Adam Lee

Miguel Perez Senent

Francisco Rodriguez

 

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Dominik Kirouac

Chloe Ostiguy

Christian Gaumond

 

Venom

Aharon Bourland

Jordan Walsh

Aleksandar Chalyovski

Federico Frassinelli

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Snow, Clouds and Smoke

Eric Carme

Nicolas Brice

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Paul Kanyuk

Tiffany Erickson Klohn

Vincent Serritella

Matthew Kiyoshi Wong

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Virus Infection & Destruction

Paul Carman

Henrik Fält

Christopher Hendryx

David Hutchins

 

Smallfoot

Henrik Karlsson

Theo Vandernoot

Martin Furness

Dmitriy Kolesnik

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Ian Farnsworth

Pav Grochola

Simon Corbaux

Brian D. Casper

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Altered Carbon

Philipp Kratzer

Daniel Fernandez

Xavier Lestourneaud

Andrea Rosa

 

Lost in Space; Jupiter is Falling

Denys Shchukin

Heribert Raab

Michael Billette

Jaclyn Stauber

 

Lost in Space; The Get Away

Juri Bryan

Will Elsdale

Hugo Medda

Maxime Marline

 

The Man in the High Castle; Statue of Liberty Destruction

Saber Jlassi

Igor Zanic

Nick Chamberlain

Chris Parks

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Sabine Laimer

Tim Walker

Tobias Wiesner

Massimo Pasquetti

 

First Man

Joel Delle-Vergin

Peter Farkas

Miles Lauridsen

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

John Galloway

Enrik Pavdeja

David Nolan

Juan Espigares Enriquez

 

Welcome to Marwen

Woei Lee

Saul Galbiati

Max Besner

Thai-Son Doan

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon

Jean-François Leroux

Reece Sanders

Stephen Bennett

Laraib Atta

 

Handmaids Tale; June

Winston Lee

Gwen Zhang

Xi Luo

Kevin Quatman

 

Lost in Space; Impact; Crash Site Rescue

David Wahlberg

Douglas Roshamn

Sofie Ljunggren

Fredrik Lönn

 

Silicon Valley; Artificial Emotional Intelligence; Fiona

Tim Carras

Michael Eng

Shiying Li

Bill Parker

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

Apple; Unlock

Morten Vinther

Michael Gregory

Gustavo Bellon

Rodrigo Jimenez

 

Apple; Welcome Home

Michael Ralla

Steve Drew

Alejandro Villabon

Peter Timberlake

 

Genesis; G90 Facelift

Neil Alford

Jose Caballero

Joseph Dymond

Greg Spencer

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Pratyush Paruchuri

Kalle Kohlstrom

Daniel Benjamin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

Chocolate Man

David Bellenbaum

Aleksandra Todorovic

Jörg Schmidt

Martin Boué

 

Proxima-b

Denis Krez

Tina Vest

Elias Kremer

Lukas Löffler

 

Ratatoskr

Meike Müller

Lena-Carolin Lohfink

Anno Schachner

Lisa Schachner

 

Terra Nova

Thomas Battistetti

Mélanie Geley

Mickael Le Mezo

Guillaume Hoarau

DigitalGlue 2.5

Rodeo VFX supe Arnaud Brisebois on the Fantastic Beasts sequel

By Randi Altman

Fantastic Beasts: Crimes of Grindelwald, directed by David Yates and written by J.K. Rowling, is a sequel to 2016’s Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. It follows Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) and a young Albus Dumbledore (Jude Law) as they attempt to take down the dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald (Johnny Depp).

Arnaud_Brisebois

As you can imagine, the film features a load of visual effects, and once again the team at Rodeo FX was called on to help. Their work included establishing the period in which the film is set and helping with the history of the Obscurus, Credence Barebone, and more.

Rodeo FX visual effects supervisor Arnaud Brisebois and team worked with the film’s VFX supervisors — Tim Burke and Christian Manz — to create digital environments, including detailed recreations of Paris in the 1920s and iconic wizarding locations like the Ministry of Magic.

Beyond these settings, the Montreal-based Brisebois was also in charge of creating the set pieces of the Obscurus’ destructive powers and a scene depicting its backstory. In all, they produced approximately 200 shots over a dozen sequences. While Brisebois visited the film’s set in Leavesden to get a better feel of the practical environments, he was not involved in principal photography.

Let’s find out more…

How early did you get involved, and how much input did you have?
Rodeo got involved in May 2017, at the time mainly working on pre-production creatures, design and concept art. I had a few calls with the film’s VFX supervisors, Tim Burke and Christian Manz, to discuss creatures and main directive lines for us to play with. From there we tried various ideas.
At that moment in pre-production, the essence of what the creatures were was clear, but their visual representation could really swing between extremes. That was the time to invent, study and propose directions for design.

Can you talk about creating the Ministry of Magic, which was partially practical, yes?
Correct, the London Ministry of Magic was indeed partially practically built. The partial set in this case meant a simple incurved corridor with a ceramic tiled wall. We still had to build the whole environment in CG in order to directly extend that practical set, but, most importantly, we extended the environment itself, with its immense circular atrium filled with thousands of busy offices.

For this build, we were provided with original Harry Potter set plans from production designer Stuart Craig, as well as plan revisions meant specifically for Crimes of Grindelwald. We also had access to LIDAR scans and cross-polarized photography from areas of the Harry Potter tour in Leavesden, which was extremely useful.

Every single architectural element was precisely built as individual units, and each unit composed of individual pieces. The single office variants were procedurally laid out on a flat grid over the set plan elevations and then wrapped as a cylinder using an expression.

The use of a procedural approach for this asset allowed for faster turnarounds and for changes to be made, even in the 11th hour. A crowd library was built to populate the offices and various areas of the Ministry, helping give it life and support the sense of scale.

So you were able to use assets from previous films?
What really links these movies together is production designer Stuart Craig. This is definitely his world, at least in visual terms. Also, as with all the Potter films, there are a large number of references and guidelines available for inspiration. This world has its own mythology, history and visual language. One does not need to look for long before finding a hint, something to link or ground a new effect in the wizarding world.

What about the scenes involving the Obscurus? Was any of the destruction it caused practical?
Apart from a few fans blowing a bit of wind on the actors, all destruction was full-frontal CG. A complex model of Irma’s house was built with precise architectural details required for its destruction. We also built a wide library of high-resolution hero debris, which was scattered on points and simulated for the very close-up shots. In the end, only the actors were preserved from live photography.

What was the most challenging sequence you worked on?
It was definitely Irma’s death. This sequence involved such a wide variety of effects — ranging from cloth and RBD levitation, tearing cloth, huge RBD simulations and, of course, the Obscurus itself, which is a very abstract and complex cloth setup driving flip simulations. The challenge also came from shot values, which meant everything we built or simulated had to hold up for tight close-ups, as well as wide shots.

Can you talk about the tools you used for VFX, management and review and approval?
All our tracking and review is done in Autodesk Shotgun. Artists worked up versions that they would then submit for dailies. All these submissions got in front of me at one point or another, and I then reviewed them and entered notes and directives to guide artists in the right direction.
For a project the size of Crimes of Grindelwald, over the course of 10 months, I reviewed and commented on approximately 6,000 versions for about 500 assets and 200 shots.

We are working on a Maya-based pipeline mainly, using it for modeling, rigging and shading. Zbrush is of course our main tool for organic modeling. We mostly use Mari and Substance Designer for textures. FX and CFX is handled in Houdini and our lighting pipeline is Katana based using Arnold as renderer. Our compositing pipeline is Nuke with a little use of Flame/Flare for very specific cases. We obviously have proprietary tools which help us boost these great softwares potential and offer custom solutions.

How did the workflow differ on this film from previous films?
It didn’t really differ. Working with the same team and the same crew, it really just felt like a continuation of our collaboration. These films are great to work on, not only because of their subject matter, but also thanks to the terrific people involved.


Roy H. Wagner, ASC, to speak at first Blackmagic Collective event

By Randi Altman

The newly formed Blackmagic Collective, a group founded by filmmakers for filmmakers, is holding the first of its free monthly meetings on Saturday, January 12 at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Hollywood.

The group, headed up by executive director Brett Harrison, says they are dedicated to sharing info on the art of filmmaking as well as education. “With Blackmagic Design’s support, the group will feature ‘TED Talk’-like presentations from media experts, panels covering post and production topics and film festivals, as well as networking opportunities.”

In addition, Blackmagic Design is offering free Resolve training attached to the meetings. While Blackmagic is a sponsor, this is not a Blackmagic-run group. According to Harrison, “The Blackmagic Collective is an independent group created to support the art of filmmaking as a whole. We are also a 501(c)(3) charity, with plans to find ways to give back to the community.” Membership is free, with no application process. Members can simply sign-up on the site. Despite the name, Harrison insists that the group, while inspired by Blackmagic’s filmmaking tools, is focused on filmmaking as a whole. “You do not need to use BMD tools to be a member,” adds Harrison.

On creating the Collective, Harrison says, “After producing the Blackmagic Design Conference + Expo in LA early in 2018, I realized that a monthly group in Hollywood for filmmakers to learn from other professionals and share with and inspire each other would be well-received and vital, particularly for Blackmagic users in the industry. BMD allows for an end-to-end workflow that encompasses the spectrum of production and post, with endless topics for our group to focus on, though we will be speaking on a range of topics and not strictly BMD gear and software.”

At their first meeting, esteemed film and television cinematographer Roy H. Wagner, ASC, will be interviewed by Christian Sebaldt, ASC, with a focus on Roy’s new feature film Stand!. There will be a panel discussing the art and experiences of young colorists from Efilm, Apache and Company 3. Also, the Blackmagic Collective will be announcing a film festival that will start in April and end in November with a final competition. Filmmakers can submit films each month. Selected films will be streamed on the group website, with a select few shown at the monthly meetings starting in April. Members will have the opportunity to vote for the best each month, with a final competition for the top five films at the November event.

In case you were wondering, and we know you are, the current plan for the film festival is this:
“Our film festival submissions must use BMD technology to be eligible to enter the contest. That may include cameras, software or both, depending on the category,” explains Harrison.

The Collective will also be hosting job fairs at every other meeting.

“We are thrilled to be supporting the Blackmagic Collective,” says Blackmagic president Dan May. “Our company shares a passion with filmmakers by creating hardware and software that make their craft easier and more cost effective. We feel the Collective will provide the added resource of bringing a focus to the art form of filmmaking, as well as helping share new ideas and technology among creatives at all skill levels, from student to professional.”

You can sign up for the Resolve editing class or the event (or both) at the website.


Foundry Nuke 11.3’s performance, collaboration updates

Foundry has launched Nuke 11.3, introducing new features and updates to the company’s family of compositing and review tools. The release is the fourth update to the Nuke 11 Series and is designed to improve the user experience and to speed up heavy processing tasks for pipelines and individual users.

Nuke 11.3 lands with major enhancements to its Live Groups feature. It introduces new functionality along with corresponding Python callbacks and UI notifications that will allow for greater collaboration and offer more control. These updates make Live Groups easier for larger pipelines to integrate and give artists more visibility over the state of the Live Group and flexibility when using user knobs to override values within a Live Group.

The particle system in NukeX has been optimized to produce particle simulations up to six times faster than previous versions of the software, and up to four times faster for playback, allowing for faster iteration when setting up particle systems.

New Timeline Multiview support provides an extension to stereo and VR workflows. Artists can now use the same multiple-file stereo workflows that exist in Nuke on the Nuke Studio, Hiero and HieroPlayer timeline. The updated export structure can also be used to create multiple-view Nuke scripts from the timeline in Nuke Studio and Hiero.

Support for full-resolution stereo on monitor out makes review sessions even easier, and a new export preset helps with rendering of stereo projects.

New UI indications for changes in bounding box size and channel count help artists troubleshoot their scripts. A visual indication identifies nodes that increase bounding box size to be greater than the image, helping artists to identify the state of the bounding box at a glance. Channel count is now displayed in the status bar, and a warning is triggered when the 1024-channel limit is exceeded. The appearance and threshold for triggering the bounding box and channel warnings can be set in the preferences.

The selection tool has also been improved in both 2D and 3D views, and an updated marquee and new lasso tool make selecting shapes and points even easier.

Nuke 11.3 is available for purchase — alongside full release details — on Foundry’s website and via accredited resellers.


Review: Foundry’s Athera cloud platform

By David Cox

I’ve been thinking for a while that there are two types of post houses — those that know what cloud technology can do for them, and those whose days are numbered. That isn’t to say that the use of cloud technology is essential to the survival of a post house, but if they haven’t evaluated the possibilities of it they’re probably living in the past. In such a fast-moving business, that’s not a good place to be.

The term “cloud computing” suffers a bit from being hijacked by know-nothing marketeers and has become a bit vague in meaning. It’s quite simple though: it just means a computer (or storage) owned and maintained by someone else, housed somewhere else and used remotely. The advantage is that a post house can reduce its destructive fixed overheads by owning fewer computers and thus save money on installation and upkeep. Cloud computers can be used as and when they are needed. This allows scaling up and down in proportion to workload.

Over the last few years, several providers have created global datacenters containing upwards of 50,000 servers per site, entirely for the use of anyone who wants to “remote in.” Amazon and Google are the two biggest providers, but as anyone who has tried to harness their power for post production can confirm, they’re not simple to understand or configure. Amazon alone has hundreds of different computer “instance” types, and accessing them requires navigating through a sea of unintelligible jargon. You must know your Elastic Beanstalks from your EC2, EKS and Lambda. And make sure you’ve worked out how to connect your S3, EFS and Glacier. Software licensing can also be tricky.

The truth is, these incredible cloud installations are for cleverer people than those of us that just like to make pretty pictures. They are more for the sort that like to build neural networks and don’t go outside very much. What our industry needs is some clever company to make a nice shiny front end that allows us to harness that power using the tools we know and love, and just make it all a bit simpler. Enter Athera, from Foundry. That’s exactly what they’ve done.

What is Athera?

Athera is a platform hosted on Google Cloud infrastructure that presents a user with icons for apps such as Nuke and Houdini. Access to each app is via short-term (30-day) rental. When an available app icon is clicked, a cloud computer is commanded into action, pre-installed with the chosen app. From then on, the app is used just as if locally installed. Of course, the app is actually running on a high-performance computer located in a secure and nicely cooled datacenter environment. Provided the user has a vaguely decent Internet connection, they’re good to go, because only the user interface is being transmitted across the network, not the actual raw image data.

Apps available on Athera include Foundry’s products, plus a few others. Nuke is represented in its base form, plus a Nuke X variant, Nuke Studio, and a combination of Nuke X and Cara VR. Also available are the Mari texture painting suite, Katana look-creating app and Modo CGI modeling software.

Athera also offers access to non-Foundry products like CGI software Houdini and Blender, as well as the Gaffer management tool.

NukeIn my first test, I rustled up an instance of Nuke Studio and one of Blender. The first thing I wanted to test was the GPU speed, as this can be somewhat variable for many cloud computer types (usually between zero and not much). I was pleasantly surprised as the rendering speed was close to that of a local Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080, which is pretty decent. I was also pleased to see that user preferences were maintained between sessions.

One thing that particularly impressed me was how I could call up multiple apps together and Athera would effectively build a network in the background to link them all up. Frames rendered out of Blender were instantly available in the cloud-hosted Nuke Studio, even though it was running on a different machine. This suggests the Athera infrastructure is well thought out because multi-machine, networked pipelines with attached storage are constructed with just a few clicks and without really thinking about it.

Access to the Athera apps is either by web browser or via a local client software called “Orbit.” In web browser mode, each app opens in its own browser tab. With Orbit, each app appears in a dedicated local window. Orbit boasts lower latency and the ability to use local hardware such as multiple monitors. Latency, which would show itself as a frustrating delay between control input and visual feedback, was impressively low, even when using the web browser interface. Generally, it was easy to forget that the app being used was not installed locally.

Getting files in and out was also straightforward. A Dropbox account can be directly linked, although a Google or Amazon S3 storage “bucket” is preferred for speed. There is also a hosted app called “Toolbox,” which is effectively a file browser to allow the management of files and folders.

The Athera platform also contains management and reporting features. A manager can set up projects and users, setting out which apps and projects a user has access to. Quotas can be set, and full reports are given as to who did what, when and with which app.

Athera’s pricing is laid out on their website and it’s interesting to drill into the costs and make comparisons. A user buys access to apps in 30-day blocks. Personally, I would like to see shorter blocks at some point to increase up/down scale flexibility. That said, render-only instances for many of the apps can be accessed on a per-second billing basis. The 30-day block comes with a “fair use” policy of 200 hours. This is a hard limit, which equates to around nine and a half hours per day for five-day weeks (which is technically known in post production as part time).

Figuring Out Cost
Blender is a good place to start analyzing cost because it’s open source (free) software, so the $244 Athera cost to run for 30 days/200 hours must be for hardware only. This equates to $1.22 per hour, which, compared to direct cloud computer usage, is pretty good value for the GPU-backed machine on offer.

Modo

Another way of comparing the amount of $244 a month would be to say that a new computer costing $5,800 depreciates at roughly this monthly rate if depreciated over two years. That is to say, if a computer of that value is kept for two years before being replaced, it effectively loses roughly $241 per month in value. If depreciated over three years, the figure is $80 per month less. Of course, that’s just comparing the cost of depreciation. Cost of ownership must also include the costs of updating, maintaining, powering, cooling, insuring, housing and repairing if (when!) it breaks down. If a cloud computer breaks down, Google has a few thousand waiting in the wings. In general, the base hardware cost seems quite competitive.

Of course, Blender is not really the juicy stuff. Access to a base Nuke, complete with workstation, is $685 per 30 days / 200 hours. Nuke X is $1,025. There are also “power” options for around 20% more, where a significantly more powerful machine is provided. Compared to running a local machine with purchased or rented software, these prices are very interesting. But when the ability to scale up and down with workload is factored in, especially being able to scale down to nothing during quiet times, the case for Athera becomes quite compelling.

Another helpful factor is that a single 30-day access block to a particular app can be shared between multiple users — as long as only one user has control of the app at a time. This is subject to the fair use limitation.

There is an issue if commercial (licensed) plug-ins are needed. For the time being, these can’t be used on Athera due to the obvious licensing issues relating to their installation on a different cloud machine each time. Hopefully, plugin developers will become alive to the possibilities of pay-per-use licensing, as a platform like Athera could be the perfect storefront.

Mari

Security
One of the biggest concerns about using remote computing is that of security. This concern tends to be more perceptual than real. The truth is that a Google datacenter is likely to have significantly more security than an average post company’s machine room. Also, they will be employing the best in the security business. But if material being worked on leaks out into the public, telling a client, “But I just sent it to Google and figured it would be fine,” isn’t going to sound great. Realistically, the most likely concern for security is the sending of data to and from a datacenter. A security breach inside the datacenter is very unlikely. As ever, a post producer has to remain vigilant.

Summing Up
I think Foundry has been very smart and forward thinking to create a platform that is able to support more than just Foundry products in the cloud. It would have been understandable if they just made it a storefront for alternative ways of using a Nuke (etc), but they clearly see a bigger picture. Using a platform like Athera, post infrastructure can be assembled and disassembled on demand to allow post producers to match their overheads to their workload.

Athera enables smart post producers to build a highly scalable post environment with access to a global pool of creative talent who can log in and contribute from anywhere with little more than a modest computer and internet connection.

I hate the term game-changer — it’s another term so abused by know-nothing marketeers who have otherwise run out of ideas — but Athera, or at least what this sort of platform promises to provide, is most certainly a game-changer. Especially if more apps from different manufacturers can be included.


David Cox is a VFX compositor and colorist with 20-plus years of experience. He started his career with MPC and The Mill before forming his own London-based post facility. Cox recently created interactive projects with full body motion sensors and 4D/AR experiences.


Behind the Title: Jogger Studios’ CD Andy Brown

This veteran creative director can also often be found at the controls of his Flame working on a new spot.

NAME: Andy Brown

COMPANY: Jogger Studios (@joggerstudios)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a boutique post house with offices in the US and UK providing visual effects, motion graphics, color grading and finishing. We are partnered with Cut + Run for editorial and get to work with their editors from around the world. I am based in our Jogger Los Angeles office, after having helped found the company in London.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Overseeing compositing, visual effects and finishing. Looking after staff and clients. Juggling all of these things and anticipating the unexpected.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m still working “on the box” every day. Even though my title is creative director, it is the hands-on work that is my first love as far as project collaborations go. Also I get to re-program the phones and crawl under the desks to get the wires looking neater when viewed from the client couch.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The variety, the people and the challenges. Just getting to work on a huge range of creative projects is such a privilege. How many people get to go to work each day looking forward to it?

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The hours, occasionally. It’s more common to have to work without clients nowadays. That definitely makes for more work sometimes, as you might need to create two or three versions of a spot to get approval. If everyone was in the room together you reach a consensus more quickly.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the start of the day best, when everyone is coming into the office and we are getting set up for whatever project we are working on. Could be the first coffee of the day that does it.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I want to say classic car dealer, but given my actual career path the most likely alternative would be editor.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
There were lots of reasons, when I look at it. It was either the Blue Peter Book of Television (the longest running TV program for kids, courtesy of the BBC) or my visit to the HTV Wales TV station with my dad when I was about 12. We walked around the studios and they were playing out a film to air, grading it live through a telecine. I was really struck by the influence that the colorist was having on what was seen.

I went on to do critical work on photography, film and television at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at Birmingham University. Part of that course involved being shown around the Pebble Mill BBC Studios. They were editing a sequence covering a public enquiry into the Handsworth riots in 1985. It just struck me how powerful the editing process was. The story could be told so many different ways, and the editor was playing a really big part in the process.

Those experiences (and an interest in writing) led me to think that television might be a good place to work. I got my first job as a runner at MPC after a friend had advised me how to get a start in the business.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We worked on a couple of spots for Bai recently with Justin Timberlake creating the “brasberry.” We had to make up some graphic animations for the newsroom studio backdrop for the shoot and then animate opening title graphics to look just enough like it was a real news report, but not too much like a real news report.

We do quite a bit of food work, so there’s always some burgers, chicken or sliced veggies that need a bit of love to make them pop.

There’s a nice set extension job starting next week, and we recently finished a job with around 400 final versions, which made for a big old deliverables spreadsheet. There’s so much that we do that no one sees, which is the point if we do it right.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Sometimes the job that you are most proud of isn’t necessarily the most amazing thing to look at. I used to work on newspaper commercials back in the UK, and it was all so “last minute.” A story broke, and all of a sudden you had to have a spot ready to go on air with no edit, no footage and only the bare bones of a script. It could be really challenging, but we had to get it done somehow.

But the best thing is seeing something on TV that you’ve worked on. At Jogger Studios, it is primarily commercials, so you get that excitement over and over again. It’s on air for a few weeks and then it’s gone. I like that. I saw two of our spots in a row recently on TV, which I got a kick out of. Still looking for that elusive hat-trick.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The Flame, the Land Rover Series III and, sadly, my glasses.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Just friends and family on Instagram, mainly. Although like most Flame operators, I look at the Flame Learning Channel on YouTube pretty regularly. YouTube also thinks I’m really interested in the Best Fails of 2018 for some reason.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
More often than not it is podcasts. West Wing Weekly, The Adam Buxton Podcast, Short Cuts and Song Exploder. Plus some of the shows on BBC 6 Music, which I really miss.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I go to work every day feeling incredibly lucky to be doing the job that I do, and it’s good to remember that. The 15-minute walk to and from work in Santa Monica usually does it.

Living so close to the beach is fantastic. We can get down to the sand, get the super-brella set up and get in the sea with the bodyboards in about 15 minutes. Then there’s the Malibu Cars & Coffee, which is a great place to start your Sunday.


Review: Blackmagic’s Resolve 15

By David Cox

DaVinci Resolve 15 from Blackmagic Design has now been released. The big news is that Blackmagic’s compositing software Fusion has been incorporated into Resolve, joining the editing and audio mixing capabilities added to color grading in recent years. However, to focus just on this would hide a wide array of updates to Resolve, large and small, across the entire platform. I’ve picked out some of my favorite updates in each area.

For Colorists
Each time Blackmagic adds a new discipline to Resolve, colorists fear that the color features take a back seat. After all, Resolve was a color grading system long before anything else. But I’m happy to say there’s nothing to fear in Version 15, as there are several very nice color tweaks and new features to keep everyone happy.

I particularly like the new “stills store” functionality, which allows the colorist to find and apply a grade from any shot in any timeline in any project. Rather than just having access to manually saved grades in the gallery area, thumbnails of any graded shot can be viewed and copied, no matter which timeline or project they are in, even those not explicitly saved as stills. This is great for multi-version work, which is every project these days.

Grades saved as stills (and LUTS) can also be previewed on the current shot using the “Live Preview” feature. Hovering the mouse cursor over a still and scrubbing left and right will show the current shot with the selected grade temporarily applied. It makes quick work of finding the most appropriate look from an existing library.

Another new feature I like is called “Shared Nodes.” A color grading node can be set as “shared,” which creates a common grading node that can be inserted into multiple shots. Changing one instance, changes all instances of that shared node. This approach is more flexible and visible than using Groups, as the node can be seen in each node layout and can sit at any point in the process flow.

As well as the addition of multiple play-heads, a popular feature in other grading systems, there is a plethora of minor improvements. For example, you can now drag the qualifier graphics to adjust settings, as opposed to just the numeric values below them. There are new features to finesse the mattes generated from the keying functions, as well as improvements to the denoise and face refinement features. Nodes can be selected with a single click instead of a double click. In fact, there are 34 color improvements or new features listed in the release notes.

For Editors
As with color, there are a wide range of minor tweaks all aimed at improving feel and ergonomics, particularly around dynamic trim modes, numeric timecode entry and the like. I really like one of the major new features, which is the ability to open multiple timelines on the screen at the same time. This is perfect for grabbing shots, sequences and settings from other timelines.

As someone who works a lot with VFX projects, I also like the new “Replace Edit” function, which is aimed at those of us that start our timelines with early drafts of VFX and then update them as improved versions come along. The new function allows updated shots to be dragged over their predecessors, replacing them but inheriting all modifications made, such as the color grade.

An additional feature to the existing markers and notes functions is called “Drawn Annotations.” An editor can point out issues in a shot with lines and arrows, then detail them with notes and highlight them with timeline markers. This is great as a “note to self” to fix later, or in collaborative workflows where notes can be left for other editors, colorists or compositors.

Previous versions of Resolve had very basic text titling. Thanks to the incorporation of Fusion, the edit page of Resolve now has a feature called Text+, a significant upgrade on the incumbent offering. It allows more detailed text control, animation, gradient fills, dotted outlines, circular typing and so on. Within Fusion there is a modifier called “Follower,” which enables letter-by-letter animation, allowing Text+ to compete with After Effects for type animation. On my beta test version of Resolve 15, this wasn’t available in the Edit page, which could be down to the beta status or an intent to keep the Text+ controls in the Edit page more streamlined.

For Audio
I’m not an audio guy, so my usefulness in reviewing these parts is distinctly limited. There are 25 listed improvements or new features, according to the release notes. One is the incorporation of Fairlight’s Automated Dialog Replacement processes, which creates a workflow for the replacement of unsalvageable originally recorded dialog.

There are also 13 new built-in audio effects plugins, such as Chorus, Echo and Flanger, as well as de-esser and de-hummer clean-up tools.
Another useful addition both for audio mixers and editors is the ability to import entire audio effects libraries, which can then be searched and star-rated from within the Edit and Fairlight pages.

Now With Added Fusion
So to the headline act — the incorporation of Fusion into Resolve. Fusion is a highly regarded node-based 2D and 3D compositing software package. I reviewed Version 9 in postPerspective last year [https://postperspective.com/review-blackmagics-fusion-9/]. Bringing it into Resolve links it directly to editing, color grading and audio mixing to create arguably the most agile post production suite available.

Combining Resolve and Fusion will create some interesting challenges for Blackmagic, who say that the integration of the two will be ongoing for some time. Their challenge isn’t just linking two software packages, each with their own long heritage, but in making a coherent system that makes sense to all users.

The issue is this: editors and colorists need to work at a fast pace, and want the minimum number of controls clearly presented. A compositor needs infinite flexibility and wants a button and value for every function, with a graph and ideally the ability to drive it with a mathematical expression or script. Creating an interface that suits both is near impossible. Dumbing down a compositing environment limits its ability, whereas complicating an editing or color environment destroys its flow.

Fusion occupies its own “page” within Resolve, alongside pages for “Color,” “Fairlight” (audio) and “Edit.” This is a good solution in so far that each interface can be tuned for its dedicated purpose. The ability to join Fusion also works very well. A user can seamlessly move from Edit to Fusion to Color and back again, without delays, rendering or importing. If a user is familiar with Resolve and Fusion, it works very well indeed. If the user is not accustomed to high-end node-based compositing, then the Fusion page can be daunting.

I think the challenge going forward will be how to make the creative possibilities of Fusion more accessible to colorists and editors without compromising the flexibility a compositor needs. Certainly, there are areas in Fusion that can be made more obvious. As with many mature software packages, Fusion has the occasional hidden right click or alt-click function that is hard for new users to discover. But beyond that, the answer is probably to let a subset of Fusion’s ability creep into the Edit and Color pages, where more common tasks can be accommodated with simplified control sets and interfaces. This is actually already the case with Text+; a Fusion “effect” that is directly accessible within the Edit section.

Another possible area to help is Fusion Macros. This is an inbuilt feature within Fusion that allows a designer to create an effect and then condense it down to a single node, including just the specific controls needed for that combined effect. Currently, Macros that integrate the Text+ effect can be loaded directly in the Edit page’s “Title Templates” section.

I would encourage Blackmagic to open this up further to allow any sort of Macro to be added for video transitions, graphics generators and the like. This could encourage a vibrant exchange of user-created effects, which would arm editors and colorists with a vast array of immediate and community sourced creative options.

Overall, the incorporation of Fusion is a definite success in my view, whether used to empower multi-skilled post creatives or to provide a common environment for specialized creatives to collaborate. The volume of updates and the speed at which the Resolve software developers address the issues exposed during public beta trials, remains nothing short of impressive.


David Cox is a VFX compositor and colorist with 20-plus years of experience. He started his career with MPC and The Mill before forming his own London-based post facility. Cox recently created interactive projects with full body motion sensors and 4D/AR experiences.


Framestore Chicago adds compositing lead Chris Beers

Framestore Chicago has added Chris Beers as compositing lead. He will be working across a variety of clients with the Chicago team, as well as diving into Nuke projects of his own.

Beers attended The Illinois Institute of Art, where he earned a BFA in visual effects and motion graphics. After graduation he honed his skills as a junior motion graphics artist at Leviathan in Chicago, and has since worked on projects of all sizes.

Beers’ career highlights include working as an After Effects artist on an expansive projection mapping project for Brazilian musician Amon Tobin’s ISAM world tour, and as a Nuke compositor for the title sequences on Marvel films Ant-Man, Captain America: Civil War and Doctor Strange. Beers was lead compositor on the series finale of Netflix science-fiction drama Sense8, having worked with the team as a Nuke compositor across both seasons of the show.

“As we recently celebrated our office’s official first year and continue to expand, it’s talent like Chris that makes our studio what it is: a creative hub with a strong sense of community, but the firepower of an integrated, global studio,” says Framestore Chicago’s MD Krystina Wilson.

Creative editorial and post boutique Hiatus opens in Detroit

Hiatus, a full-service, post production studio with in-house creative editorial, original music composition and motion graphics departments, has opened in Detroit. Their creative content offerings cover categories such as documentary, narrative, conceptual, music videos and advertising media for all video platforms.

Led by founder/senior editor Shane Patrick Ford, the new company includes executive producer/partner Catherine Pink, and executive producer Joshua Magee, who joins Hiatus from the animation studio Lunar North. Additional talents feature editor Josh Beebe, composer/editor David Chapdelaine and animator James Naugle.

The roots of Hiatus began with The Factory, a music venue founded by Ford while he was still in college. It provided a venue for local Detroit musicians to play, as well as touring bands. Ford, along with a small group of creatives, then formed The Work – a production company focused on commercial and advertising projects. For Ford, the launch of Hiatus is an opportunity to focus solely on his editorial projects and to expand his creative reach and that of his team nationally.

Leading up to the launch of Hiatus, the team has worked on projects for brands such as Sony, Ford Motor Company, Acura and Bush’s, as well as recent music videos for Lord Huron, Parquet Courts and the Wombats.

The Hiatus team is also putting the finishing touches on the company’s first original feature film Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win. The film uncovers a Detroit Police decoy unit named STRESS and the efforts made to restore civil order in 1970s post-rebellion Detroit. Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win makes its debut at the Indy Film Festival on Sunday April 29th and Tuesday May 1st in Indianapolis, before it hits the film festival circuit.

“Launching Hiatus was a natural evolution for me,” says Ford. “It was time to give my creative team even more opportunities, to expand our network and to collaborate with people across the country that I’ve made great connections with. As the post team evolved within The Work, we outgrew the original role it played within a production company. We began to develop our own team, culture, offerings and our own processes. With the launch of Hiatus, we are poised to better serve the visual arts community, to continue to grow and to be recognized for the talented creative team we are.”

“Instead of having a post house stacked with people, we’d prefer to stay small and choose the right personal fit for each project when it comes to color, VFX and heavy finishing,” explains Hiatus EP Catherine Pink. “We have a network of like-minded artists that we can call on, so each project gets the right creative attention and touch it deserves. Also, the lower overhead allows us to remain nimble and work with a variety of budget needs and all kinds of clients.”