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Category Archives: commercials

Visual Effects in Commercials: Chantix, Verizon

By Karen Moltenbrey

Once too expensive to consider for use in television commercials, visual effects soon found their way into this realm, enlivening and enhancing the spots. Today, countless commercials are using increasingly complex VFX to entertain, to explain and to elevate a message. Here, we examine two very different approaches to using effects in this way. In the Verizon commercial Helping Doctors Fight Cancer, augmented reality is transferred from a holographic medical application and fused into a heartwarming piece thanks to an extremely delicate production process. For the Chantix Turkey Campaign, digital artists took a completely different method, incorporating a stylized digital spokes-character — with feathers, nonetheless – into various scenes.

Verizon Helping Doctors Fight Cancer

The main goal of television advertisements — whether they are 15, 30 or 60 seconds in length — is to sell a product. Some do it through a direct sales approach. Some by “selling” a lifestyle or brand. And some opt to tell a story. Verizon took the latter approach for a campaign promoting its 5G Ultra Wideband.

Vico Sharabani

For the spot Helping Doctors Fight Cancer, directed by Christian Weber, Verizon adds a human touch to its technology through a compelling story illustrating how its 5G network is being used within a mixed-reality environment so doctors can better treat cancer patients. The 30-second commercial features surgeons and radiologists using high-fidelity holographic 3D anatomical renderings that can be viewed from every angle and even projected onto a person’s body for a more comprehensive examination, while the imagery can potentially be shared remotely in near real time. The augmented-reality application is from Medivis, a start-up medical visualization company that is using Verizon’s next-generation 5G wireless speeds to deliver the high speeds and low latencies necessary for the application’s large datasets and interactive frame rates.

The spot introduces video footage of patients undergoing MRIs and discussion by Medivis cofounder Dr. Osamah Choudhry about how treatment could be radically changed using the technology. Holographic medical imagery is then displayed showing the Medivis AR application being used on a patient.

“McGarryBowen New York, Verizon’s advertising agency, wanted to show the technology in the most accurate and the most realistic way possible. So, we studied the technology,” says Vico Sharabani, founder/COO of The-Artery, which was tasked with the VFX work in the spot. To this end, The Artery team opted to use as much of the actual holographic content as possible, pulling assets from the Medivis software and fusing it with other broadcast-quality content.

The-Artery is no stranger to augmented reality, virtual reality and mixed reality. Highly experienced in visual effects, Sharabani founded the company to solve business problems within the visual space across all platforms, from films to commercials to branding, and as such, alternate reality and story have been integral elements to achieving that goal. Nevertheless, the work required for this spot was difficult and challenging.

“It’s not just acquiring and melding together 3D assets,” says Sharabani. “The process is complex, and there are different ways to do it — some better than others. And the agency wanted it to be true to the real-life application. This was not something we could just illustrate in a beautiful way; it had to be very technically accurate.”

To this end, much of the holographic imagery consisted of actual 3D assets from the Medivis holographic AR system, captured live. At times, though, The Artery had to rework the imagery using multiple assets from the Medivis application, and other times the artists re-created the medical imagery in CG.

Initially, the ad agency expected that The-Artery would recreate all the digital assets in CG. But after learning as much as they could about the Medivis system, Sharabani and the team were confident they could export actual data for the spot. “There was much greater value to using actual data when possible, actual CT data,” says Sharabani. “Then you have the most true-to-life representation, which makes the story even more heartfelt. And because we were telling a true story about the capabilities of the network around a real application being used by doctors, any misrepresentation of the human anatomy or scans would hurt the message and intention of the campaign.”

The-Artery began developing a solution with technicians at Medivis to export actual imagery via the HoloLens headset that’s used by the medical staff to view and manipulate the holographic imagery, to coincide with the needs of the commercial. Sometimes this involved merely capturing the screen performance as the HoloLens was being used. Other times the assets from the Medivis system were rendered over a greenscreen without a background and later composited into a scene.

“We have the ability to shoot through the HoloLens, which was our base; we used that as our virtual camera whereby the output of the system is driven by the HoloLens. Every time we would go back to do a capture (if the edit changed or the camera position changed), we had to use the HoloLens as our virtual camera in order to get the proper camera angle,” notes Sharabani. Because the HoloLens is a stereoscopic device, The Artery always used the right-eye view for the representations, as it most closely reflected the experience of the user wearing the device.

Since the Medivis system is driven by the HoloLens, there is some shakiness present — an artifact the group retained in some of the shots to make it truer to life. “It’s a constant balance of how far we go with realism and at what point it is too distracting for the broadcast,” says Sharabani.

For imagery like the CT scans, the point cloud data was imported directly into Autodesk’s Maya, where it was turned into a 3D model. Other times the images were rendered out at 4K directly from the system. The Medivis imagery was later composited into the scenes using Autodesk’s Flame.

However, not every bit of imagery was extracted from the system. Some had to be re-created using a standard 3D pipeline. For instance, the “scan” of the actor’s skull was replicated by the artists so that the skull model matched perfectly with the holographic imagery that was overlaid in post production (since everyone’s skull proportions are different). The group began by creating the models in Maya and then composited the imagery within Autodesk’s Flame, along with a 3D bounding box of the creative implant.

The artists also replicated the Medivis UI in 3D to recreate and match the performance of the three-dimensional UI to the AI hand gestures by the person “using” the Medivis system in the spot — both of which were filmed separately. For the CG interface, the group used Autodesk’s Maya and Flame, as well as Adobe’s After Effects.

“The process was so integrated to the edit, we needed the proper 3D tracking and some of the assets to be built as a 3D screen element,” explains Sharabani. “It gave us more flexibility to build the 3D UI inside of Flame, enabling us to control it more quickly and easily when we changed a hand gesture or expanded the shots.”

With The-Artery’s experience pertaining to virtual technology, the team was quick to understand the limitations of the project using this particular equipment. Once that was established, however, they began to push the boundaries with small hacks that enabled them to achieve their goals of using actual holographic data to tell an amazing story.

Chantix “Turkey” Campaign

Chantix is medication to help smokers kick the habit. To get its message across in a series of television commercials, the drug maker decided to talk turkey, focusing the campaign on a CG turkey that, well, goes “cold turkey” with the assistance of Chantix.

A series of four spots — Slow Turkey, Camping, AC and Beach Day — prominently feature the turkey, created at The Mill. The spots were directed and produced in-house by Mill+, The Mill’s end-to-end production arm, with Jeffrey Dates directing.


L-R: John Montefusco, Dave Barosin and Scott Denton

“Each one had its own challenges,” says CG lead John Montefusco. Nevertheless, the initial commercial, Slow Turkey, presented the biggest obstacle: the build of the character from the ground up. “It was not only a performance feat, but a technical one as well,” he adds.

Effects artist Dave Barosin iterated Montefusco’s assessment of Slow Turkey, which, in addition to building the main asset from scratch, required the development of a feather system. Meanwhile, Camping and AC had the addition of clothing, and Beach Day presented the challenge of wind, water and simulation in a moving vehicle.

According to senior modeler Scott Denton, the team was given a good deal of creative freedom when crafting the turkey. The artists were presented with some initial sketches, he adds, but more or less had free rein in the creation of the look and feel of the model. “We were looking to tread the line between cartoony and realistic,” he says. The first iterations became very cartoony, but the team subsequently worked backward to where the character was more of a mix between the two styles.

The crew modeled the turkey using Autodesk’s Maya and Pixologic’s ZBrush. It was then textured within Adobe’s Substance and Foundry’s Mari. All the details of the model were hand-sculpted. “Nailing the look and feel was the toughest challenge. We went through a hundred iterations before getting to the final character you see in the commercial,” Denton says.

The turkey contains 6,427 body feathers, 94 flight feathers and eight scalp feathers. They were simulated using a custom feather setup built by the lead VFX artist within SideFX Houdini, which made the process more efficient. Proprietary tools also were used to groom the character.

The artists initially developed a concept sculpt in ZBrush of just the turkey’s head, which underwent numerous changes and versions before they added it to the body of the model. Denton then sculpted a posed version with sculpted feathers to show what the model might look like when posed, giving the client a better feel for the character. The artists later animated the turkey using Maya. Rendering was performed in Autodesk’s Arnold, while compositing was done within Foundry’s Nuke.

“Developing animation that holds good character and personality is a real challenge,” says Montefusco. “There’s a huge amount of evolution in the subtleties that ultimately make our turkey ‘the turkey.’”

For the most part, the same turkey model was used for all four spots, although the artists did adapt and change certain aspects — such as the skeleton and simulation meshes – for each as needed in the various scenarios.

For the turkey’s clothing (sweater, knitted vest, scarf, down vest, knitted cap, life vest), the group used Marvelous Designer 3D software for virtual clothes and fabrics, along with Maya and ZBrush. However, as Montefusco explains, tailoring for a turkey is far different than developing CG clothing for human characters. “Seeing as a lot of the clothes that were selected were knit, we really wanted to push the envelope and build the knit with geometry. Even though this made things a bit slower for our effects and lighting team, in the end, the finished clothing really spoke for itself.”

The four commercials also feature unique environments ranging from the interior and exterior of a home to a wooded area and beach. The artists used mostly plates for the environments, except for an occasional tent flap and chair replacement. The most challenging of these settings, says Montefusco, was the beach scene, which required full water replacement for the shot of the turkey on the paddle board.


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran writer, covering visual effects and post production.

Goosing the sound for Allstate’s action-packed ‘Mayhem’ spots

By Jennifer Walden

While there are some commercials you’d rather not hear, there are some you actually want to turn up, like those of Leo Burnett Worldwide’s “Mayhem” campaign for Allstate Insurance.

John Binder

The action-packed and devilishly hilarious ads have been going strong since April 2010. Mayhem (played by actor Dean Winters) is a mischievous guy who goes around breaking things that cut-rate insurance won’t cover. Fond of your patio furniture? Too bad for all that wind! Been meaning to fix that broken front porch step? Too bad the dog walker just hurt himself on it! Parked your car in the driveway and now it’s stolen? Too bad — and the thief hit your mailbox and motorcycle too!

Leo Burnett Worldwide’s go-to for “Mayhem” is award-winning post sound house Another Country, based in Chicago and Detroit. Sound designer/mixer John Binder (partner of Cutters Studios and managing director of Another Country) has worked on every single “Mayhem” spot to date. Here, he talks about his work on the latest batch: Overly Confident Dog Walker, Car Thief and Bunch of Wind. And Binder shares insight on a few of his favorites over the years.

In Overly Confident Dog Walker, Mayhem is walking an overwhelming number of dogs. He can barely see where he’s walking. As he’s going up the front stairs of a house, a brick comes loose, causing Mayhem to fall and hit his head. As Mayhem delivers his message, one of the dogs comes over and licks Mayhem’s injury.

Overly Confident Dog Walker

Sound-wise, what were some of your challenges or unique opportunities for sound on this spot?
A lot of these “Mayhem” spots have the guy put in ridiculous situations. There’s often a lot of noise happening during production, so we have to do a lot of clean up in post using iZotope RX 7. When we can’t get the production dialogue to sound intelligible, we hook up with a studio in New York to record ADR with Dean Winters. For this spot, we had to ADR quite a bit of his dialogue while he is walking the dogs.

For the dog sounds, I have added my dog in there. I recorded his panting (he pants a lot), the dog chain and straining sounds. I also recorded his licking for the end of the spot.

For when Mayhem falls and hits his head, we had a really great sound for him hitting the brick. It was wonderful. But we sent it to the networks, and they felt it was too violent. They said they couldn’t air it because of both the visual and the sound. So, instead of changing the visuals, it was easier to change the sound of his head hitting the brick step. We had to tone it down. It’s neutered.

What’s one sound tool that helped you out on Overly Confident Dog Walker?
In general, there’s often a lot of noise from location in these spots. So we’re cleaning that up. iZotope RX 7 is key!


In Bunch of Wind, Mayhem represents a windy rainstorm. He lifts the patio umbrella and hurls it through the picture window. A massive tree falls on the deck behind him. After Mayhem delivers his message, he knocks over the outdoor patio heater, which smashes on the deck.

Bunch of Wind

Sound-wise, what were some of your challenges or unique opportunities for sound on Bunch of Wind?
What a nightmare for production sound. This one, understandably, was all ADR. We did a lot of Foley work, too, for the destruction to make it feel natural. If I’m doing my job right, then nobody notices what I do. When we’re with Mayhem in the storm, all that sound was replaced. There was nothing from production there. So, the rain, the umbrella flapping, the plate-glass window, the tree and the patio heater, that was all created in post sound.

I had to build up the storm every time we cut to Mayhem. When we see him through the phone, it’s filtered with EQ. As we cut back and forth between on-scene and through the phone, it had to build each time we’re back on him. It had to get more intense.

What are some sound tools that helped you put the ADR into the space on screen?
Sonnox’s Oxford EQ helped on this one. That’s a good plugin. I also used Audio Ease’s Altiverb, which is really good for matching ambiences.


In Car Thief, Mayhem steals cars. He walks up onto a porch, grabs a decorative flagpole and uses it to smash the driver-side window of a car parked in the driveway. Mayhem then hot wires the car and peels out, hitting a motorcycle and mailbox as he flees the scene.

Car Thief

Sound-wise, what were some of your challenges or unique opportunities for sound on Car Thief?
The location sound team did a great job of miking the car window break. When Mayhem puts the wooden flagpole through the car window, they really did that on-set, and the sound team captured it perfectly. It’s amazing. If you hear safety glass break, it’s not like a glass shatter. It has this texture to it. The car window break was the location sound, which I loved. I saved the sound for future reference.

What’s one sound tool that helped you out on Car Thief?
Jeff, the car owner in the spot, is at a sports game. You can hear the stadium announcer behind him. I used Altiverb on the stadium announcer’s line to help bring that out.

What have been your all-time favorite “Mayhem” spots in terms of sound?
I’ve been on this campaign since the start, so I have a few. There’s one called Mayhem is Coming! that was pretty cool. I did a lot of sound design work on the extended key scrape against the car door. Mayhem is in an underground parking garage, and so the key scrape reverberates through that space as he’s walking away.

Deer

Another favorite is Fast Food Trash Bag. The edit of that spot was excellent; the timing was so tight. Just when you think you’ve got the joke, there’s another joke and another. I used the Sound Ideas library for the bear sounds. And for the sound of Mayhem getting dragged under the cars, I can’t remember how I created that, but it’s so good. I had a lot of fun playing perspective on this one.

Often on these spots, the sounds we used were too violent, so we had to tone them down. On the first campaign, there was a spot called Deer. There’s a shot of Mayhem getting hit by a car as he’s standing there on the road like a deer in headlights. I had an excellent sound for that, but it was deemed too violent by the network.


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. Follow her on Twitter @audiojeney.

NBCUni 7.26

Behind the Title: Spot Welders’ editor Matt Osborne

After the time-consuming and sometimes stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material.

NAME: Matt Osborne

COMPANY: Spot Welders

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Spot Welders is a creative editorial company.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Offline Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I take all the footage that production shoots, make selects on the best shots and performances, and craft it into a cohesive narrative or visually engaging film. I then work with the director, agency and client to get the best out of the material and try to make sure everyone is happy with the final result.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably the amount of footage that editors get these days. The average person might think we just cut out the bad bits or choose the best takes and string them together, but we might get up to 30 hours of footage or more for a single 60-second commercial with no storyboard. It’s our job to somehow make sense of it all.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with directors. After the time-consuming and sometimes quite stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I really enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material. I like making sure we have the best moments and are telling the story in the most interesting way possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sitting for long hours. I really want to try out one of those standing desks! Also, trying to wrangle 100 different opinions into the edit without butchering it.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Probably the morning after sleeping on an edit. There’s something about coming in with fresh eyes and marveling at your wondrous edit from the previous night. Or, conversely, crying about the disaster you have in front of you that needs immediate fixing. Either way, I find this is the best time to get in the flow with new ideas and work very quickly at improving the edit.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
After high school, I spent about five years working at various ski resorts in Australia and Canada and snowboarding every day, so I guess I’d still be doing that.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
It sounds cheesy but in hindsight I was probably destined to be an editor. I was always drawn to puzzles and figuring out how things go together, and editing is a lot like a giant puzzle with no correct answers.

I made skate videos with two VHS decks as a teenager, and then I realized a few years later that you could do it on a computer and could get paid to basically do the same thing. That’s when I knew it was the job for me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Audi, Nike, BMW and a couple of very cool passion projects, which will hopefully be released soon.

DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
Not really. It almost always comes down to storytelling. Whether that’s narrative or purely visual, you want to make the viewer feel something, so that’s always the goal. The methods to get there are usually pretty much the same.

Cayenne

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Commercially, probably the Porsche film, Cayenne, with Rob Chiu at Iconoclast. It was a big project for the global release of a new car. They shot in amazing locations, and the footage was incredible, so I felt a lot of pressure on that one I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

Personally, the Medicine music video I did with Salomon Ligthelm and Khalid Mohtaseb was a humbling experience and something I’m very proud of. It’s actually more of a narrative short film than a music video and tells the fictionalized story of a real-life couple, in which the wife is blind.

It was a very sensitive story, shot beautifully and using non-actors. It might be the only time I’ve cried watching the rushes. I think we successfully managed to instill that raw emotion into the final edit.

Medicine

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I grew up on Final Cut Pro. I taught myself to edit back on Version 2 by reading the manual while working in a factory packing carrots. I was pretty upset when they ditched it but moved over to Avid Media Composer and haven’t looked back. I love it now. Well, maybe except for the effects tool.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Yes, it’s sometimes expected these days that the offline will look and sound like the final product, so color grading, sound design, music editing, comping, etc.

Personally, if I have time, I’ll try and do some of these things on a basic level to get the edit approved, but it’s all going to be taken over by very talented professionals in their own craft who will do a much better job than I ever could. So I prefer to focus on the actual nuts and bolts — am I using the best shots? Am I telling this story in the most compelling, engaging and entertaining way possible? But sometimes you’ve got to throw a whoosh in to make people happy.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, Garmin, MacBook. Although I spent a couple weeks on beaches last year and learned we don’t really need any of it, well, at least while you’re on the beach, and not working!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’ve gotten completely addicted to running the past couple of years. I find there’s nothing better than a run at 5am to clear the mind.


Editing for Short Form

By Karen Moltenbrey

Unlike features or even series, short-form projects such as commercials give the editor the opportunity for a fresh start with each new job. Indeed, some brands have a specific style that they adhere to, but even so, there is a good deal of creative flexibility placed in the hands of the editor.

The challenge here is to condense a story into 30, 60 or 90 seconds. And more and more, there are other deliverables associated with a job aside from the traditional commercial, as editors also may be asked to provide social media spots, cinema spots and more. And as some editors point out, it’s no longer enough to excel at solely working with video; today, it is helpful to have a wider range of skills, such as audio editing and basic animation, to support the workflow.

Here we examine the editing work on a trio of spots and the approach each editor took to deliver a compelling piece.

Nespresso: The Quest
George Clooney has been the brand ambassador for coffee-machine maker Nespresso since 2006, and his commercials have been featured in Europe and around the world. In a recent spot airing in North America, Clooney embarks on a quest for the perfect cup of coffee, and does so with true Hollywood flair.

In The Quest, the actor plays a medieval knight who throws the head of a dragon he has just slain at the feet of his queen. Thankful, she asks what he desires as his reward. He pauses, then steps through a movie screen and enters the modern world, where he wanders the streets in his armor until he finds a coffee shop and his long-sought-after cup of Nespresso coffee. Satisfied, he heads back, walks down the theater aisle, through the movie screen once again and is back in the medieval world. When the queen asks if he has enough coffee for the kingdom, the actor gives a sheepish look, and soon we see the queen and court riding in a double-decker city bus, merrily on their way to get their own cup of Nespresso coffee.

Clooney’s producing partner, Grant Heslov, directed the spot, which was filmed against greenscreen on a backlot in Los Angeles. The background plates were shot in New York City, and compositing was done by VFX supervisor Ryan Sears from Big Sky Edit. The spot was edited by Chris Franklin, who launched New York-based Big Sky Edit in 1992.

Chris Franklin

“Ryan and I were working as a team on this. As I’m cutting, he’s compositing scenes so we can really get an idea of what everything looks like, and then I properly sound-designed it,” says Franklin. “He dealt with everything in terms of George on the movie screen and popping out of the screen and walking through New York, while I dealt with the sound design and the editing. It helped keep the job efficient, so Grant could come in and see everything pretty much completed.”

Having the various departments under one roof at Big Sky Edit enables Franklin to show work to clients, agencies or directors with effects integrated into the cut, so they do not have to rely on their imaginations to visualize the spot. “They’re judging the story as opposed to the limitations of the footage if effects work isn’t done yet,” he explains.

This is not Franklin’s first Nespresso ad, having worked on the very first one for the US market, and all of them have been directed by Heslov (who also directed Clooney in the Hulu series Catch-22). “He has shorthand with George, so the shoots go beautifully,” Franklin says, noting there is also a feeling of trust with everyone who has a responsibility on the post side.

When asked to describe the editing style he used for The Quest, Franklin was hard-pressed to pinpoint one specifically, saying “sometimes you just go by instinct in terms of what feels right. The fact that this was a movie within a movie, you’re kind of looking at it like an epic. So, you deal with it as a bigger type of thing. And then once [the story] got to New York, we were feeding off the classic man-on-the-street vibe.” So, rather than using a specific editing style on the spot, Franklin says he concentrated on making sure the piece was put together well, had a good storytelling aspect and that everything clicked.

The footage was delivered to Big Sky Edit as transcoded dailies, which were downloaded overnight from LA. Franklin cut the spot on an Avid Media Composer, and the completed spot was delivered in standard HD for 60- and 30-second versions, as well as pullouts and social media material. “There are so many deliverables attached to things now, and a job tends to be longer than it used to be due to all the elements and pieces of content you’re delivering to finish the job,” Franklin says. While time-consuming, these demands also force him to tell the story in different ways for the various deliverables.

Franklin describes his general workflow as fairly straightforward. He will string the entire shoot together – “literally every piece of film that was exposed” — and go through the material, then whittle that down and review it a second time. After that, he starts breaking it down in terms of sequences for all the pieces he needs, and then he starts building the edit. Without question, this process takes a substantial amount of time on the front end, as it takes an editor roughly four hours to go through one hour of footage in order to screen it properly, learn it, understand the pieces in it, break it apart, label it and prepare it — all before any assembly can be done. “It’s not unusual to have 10 or 12 hours of footage, so it’s going to take 40 hours to go through that material and break it down before I can start assembling,” he says.

As Franklin points out, he does his own sound design — his favorite part of the process — while editing. In fact, he started out as an audio engineer years ago, and doing both the audio and editing simultaneously “helps me see the story,” he says. “If I wasn’t doing sound design while I am working, I would get totally lost.” (Tom Jucarone at Sound Lounge mixed The Quest.)

Franklin has edited features, documentaries and even short films, and his workflow remains fairly constant across the genres. “It’s just longer sometimes. You have to learn the footage, so you’ve got to watch everything. It’s a lot of watching and thinking,” he notes. “Deadlines give you an end that you have to shoot for, but you can’t rush things. It takes time to do the work properly.”

Despite his experience with other genres, commercials have been Franklin’s bread and butter for the past 30 years. He says he likes the challenge of whittling down 10 hours of footage into 30 or 60 seconds of storytelling.

M&M’s ‘Hazelnut Spread’ Campaign
Over the years, audiences have been treated to commercial spots featuring the various spokescandies for Mars Incorporated’s M&M’s, from the round-bodied regular flavored character to the egg-shaped yellow peanut character. And, there have been other new flavor characters, too. Most recently, the company introduced its latest addition: hazelnut spread M&M’s. And helping to launch the product is PS260 owner/editor Maury Loeb and assistant editor Sara Sachs, who “divided and conquered” on the campaign, which features three spots to promote the new flavor and the ever-popular M&M’s chocolate bar, which came out in 2018.

The first spot, New Spokescandy, is currently airing. The two other spots, which will be launching next year, are called Injury Attorney and Psychiatrist. Sachs focused on the latter, a comical session between a therapist and the yellow M&M, who is “feeling stuck.” The therapist points out that it’s because he is stuck in a chocolate bar. “We played around a lot with the humor of that moment. It was scripted with three progressively wider shots to ultimately reveal the candy bar, but in the edit, we decided the humor was more impactful if it was just one single reveal at the end,” says Sachs.

Helping to unite the three spots, aside from the brand’s humor and characters, is a consistent editing style. “The pacing is consistent. M&M’s as a whole doesn’t really do very music-heavy spots; they are more real-world in nature,” Sachs notes.

At PS260, the editors often collaborate on client campaigns, so as ideas are being worked out and implemented in one suite, revisions are made in another, allowing the clients to move from space to space to view the work progression.

Sara Sachs

To edit the spot, Sachs worked primarily in Adobe Premiere, using After Effects and Photoshop for some of the quick graphics, as PS260’s graphics department did the heavy lifting for the bigger moving elements, such as the M&M’s characters. The biggest challenge came from getting the tonality of the actor just right. “When a person is talking on camera to an empty couch or stage, you really have to think about both sides of the emotion,” she explains. “VO talent comes in after you have a cut in place, so even though these things are recorded a month apart, it still needs to feel like the characters are talking to each other and come across emotionally true.”

Having to do some minor graphics work is not so unusual these days; Sachs points out that editors today are becoming multitalented and handling other aspects of a project aside from cutting. “It’s not enough to just know the edit side; you also need a base in graphics, audio fine-tuning and color correction. More and more we try to get the rough cut closer to what the final picture will actually look like,” she says. “In this campaign, they even took a lot of the graphics that we applied in the rough and used them directly for air.”

Most of Sachs’ experience has come from commercials, but she has also done shorts, features, documentaries, music videos, promotional and internal videos, pitch and instructional videos, web series and so on. Of those, she prefers short-form projects because they afford her the opportunity to painstakingly watch every frame of a video “900 times and put some love into every 24th of a second,” she adds.

That level of focus is usually not practical or applicable on longer-form projects, which often require scene-to-scene organization with 15- and 30-second spots. “Shorter content maintains the same basic project structure but tends to get more attention on the little things like line-by-line sequences, which are every time a character says something in any situation,” she explains.

Nike Choose Phenomenal
Charlie Harvey recently finished a unique spot for Nike Korea for the South Korean market titled Choose Phenomenal, an empowering ad for women created by Wieden + Kennedy Tokyo that has over 10 million views on YouTube. The spot opens on a young girl dressed in traditional Korean clothing before evolving into a fast-paced, split-screen succession of images — video, animation, graphic elements, pictures and more, mainly of women in action — set to an inspiring narration.

“The agency always wanted it to be split-screen,” says Harvey of Whitehouse Post, who edited the spot. The DP shot the majority of the “moments” in a few different ways and from different angles, giving her the ability to find the elements that complemented each other from a split-screen standpoint. Yet it was up to Harvey to sort through the plethora of clips and images and select the most appropriate ones.

“There’s a Post-it note moment in there, too. That’s a big thing in South Korea, where people write messages on Post-its and stick them on a wall, so it’s culturally significant,” Harvey explains. Foremost in her mind while editing the spot was that it was culturally significant and inspiring to young women, resulting in her delving deep into that country’s traditions to find elements that would resonate best with the intended audience.

Charlie Harvey

Harvey initially began cutting the spot in Los Angeles but then traveled to Tokyo to do the majority of the edit.

In fact, when Harvey began the project, she didn’t have an opportunity to work one-on-one with the director – something that would always be her preference. “I always want to create what the director has envisioned. I always like to make that [vision] come to life while adding my own point of view, too,” she says.

Working with split screens or multiple screens is always trickier because you need to work with multiple layers while maintaining the rhythm of the film, Harvey says. “Making what seems like a small change in one shot will affect not only the shot that comes before and after it, but also the shots next to those. It’s more a puzzle you are solving,” she adds.

The visual element, however, was just one aspect of the project; here, like on many other projects, finding the right music accompaniment is not easy. “You end up going around and around trying to find exactly what you are looking for, and music is always a challenge. If you find the right track, it makes all the difference. It elevates a spot, or impacts it negatively,” Harvey points out. “Music is so important.”

In addition, the split-screen concept forced Harvey to concentrate on both sides of the screen – akin to concentrating on two shorts playing at the same time. “You have to make sure they work together and they link to the next page, where you have another two shorts,” she explains. “You need that harmonious relationship, and there needs to be a rhythm. Otherwise, it could get choppy, and then you are looking at one side or the other, not both together in unison.”

Indeed, dealing with the multiple split-screen images was difficult, but perhaps even more daunting was ensuring that the spot respected the culture of the young women to whom it was directed. To this end, Harvey incorporated as much reference as she could that would resonate with the audience, as opposed to using more generic references geared for audiences outside of that country. “I’m sure it meant a lot to these girls,” she says of the inspirational spot and the effort put into it.

Harvey performed the edit on an Avid system, preferring the simplistic interface to other systems. “It has everything for what I want to do,” she says. “There are no extra tabs here and there. It’s just really easy to use, and it’s very stable and steady.”

For the most part, Harvey sticks with shorter-form projects like commercials, though she has experience with longer formats. “I think you get into a routine with commercials, so you know you have a certain number of days to do what you need to do. I know where I need to be at certain points, and where I need to get to by the time I see the director or the agency,” she explains. “I have a very specific routine. I have a way that I work, and I am comfortable with it. It works for me.”


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran writer/editor covering VFX and post production.


RPS editors talk workflow, creativity and Michelob Ultra’s Robots

By Randi Altman

Rock Paper Scissors (RPS) is a veteran editing house specializing in commercials, music videos and feature films. Founded by Oscar-winning editor Angus Wall (The Social Network, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo), RPS has a New York office as well as a main Santa Monica location that it shares with sister companies A52, Elastic and Jax.

We recently reached out to RPS editor Biff Butler and his assistant editor Alyssa Oh (both Adobe Premiere users) to find out about how they work, their editing philosophy and their collaboration on the Michelob Ultra Robots spot that premiered during this year’s Super Bowl.

Let’s find out more about their process…

Rock Paper Scissors, Santa Monica

What does your job entail?
Biff Butler: Simply put, someone hands us footage (and a script) and we make something out of it. The job is to act as cheerleader for those who have been carrying the weight of a project for weeks, maybe months, and have just emerged from a potentially arduous shoot.

Their job is to then sell the work that we do to their clients, so I must hold onto and protect their vision, maintaining that initial enthusiasm they had. If the agency has written the menu, and the client has ordered the meal, then a director is the farmer and the editor the cook.

I frequently must remind myself that although I might have been hired because of my taste, I am still responsible for feeding others. Being of service to someone else’s creative vision is the name of the game.

What’s your workflow like?
Alyssa Oh: At the start of the project, I receive the footage from production and organize it to Biff’s specs. Once it’s organized, I pass it off and he watches all the footage and assembles an edit. Once we get deeper into the project, he may seek my help in other aspects of the edit, including sound design, pulling music, creating graphics, temporary visual effects and creating animations. At the end of the project, I prep the edits for finishing color, mix, and conform.

What would surprise people about being an editor?
Oh: When I started, I associated editorial with “footage.” It surprised me that, aside from editing, we play a large part in decision-making for music and developing sound design.

Butler: I’ve heard the editor described as the final writer in the process. A script can be written and rewritten, but a lot happens in the edit room once shots are on a screen. The reality of seeing what actually fits within the allotted time that the format allows for can shape decisions as can the ever-evolving needs of the client in question. Another aspect we get involved with is the music — it’s often the final ingredient to be considered, despite how important a role it plays.

Robots

What do you enjoy the most about your job?
Oh: By far, my favorite part is the people that I work with. We spend so much time together; I think it’s important to not just get along, but to also develop close relationships. I’m so grateful to work with people who I look forward to spending the day with.

At RPS, I’ve gained so many great friendships over the years and learn a lot from everyone around me —- not just in the aspect of editorial, but also from the people at companies that work alongside us — A52, Elastic and Jax.

Butler: At the risk of sounding corny, what turns me on most is collaboration and connection with other creative talents. It’s a stark contrast to the beginning of the job, which I also very much adore — when it’s just me and my laptop, watching footage and judging shots.

Usually we get a couple days to put something together on our own, which can be a peaceful time of exploration and discovery. This is when I get to formulate my own opinions and points of view on the material, which is good to establish but also is something I must be ready to let go of… or at least be flexible with. Once the team gets involved in the room — be it the agency or the director — the real work begins.

As I said before, being of service to those who have trusted me with their footage and ideas is truly an honorable endeavor. And it’s not just those who hire us, but also talents we get to join forces with on the audio/music side, effects, etc. On second thought, the free supply of sparkly water we have on tap is probably my favorite part. It’s all pretty great.

What’s the hardest part of the job?
Oh: For me, the hardest part of our job are the “peaks and valleys.” In other words, we don’t have a set schedule, and with each project, our work hours will vary.

Robots

Butler: I could complain about the late nights or long weekends or unpredictable schedules, but those are just a result of being employed, so I count myself fortunate that I even get to moan about that stuff. Perhaps one of the trickiest parts is in dealing with egos, both theirs and mine.

Inevitably, I serve as mediator between a creative agency and the director they hired, and the client who is paying for this whole project. Throw in the mix my own sense of ownership that develops, and there’s a silly heap of egos to manage. It’s a joy, but not everyone can be fully satisfied all the time.

If you couldn’t edit for a living, what would you do?
Oh: I think I would definitely be working in a creative field or doing something that’s hands-on (I still hope to own a pottery studio someday). I’ve always had a fondness for teaching and working with kids, so perhaps I’d do something in the teaching field.

Butler: I would be pursuing a career in directing commercials and documentaries.

Did you know from a young age that you would be involved in this industry?
Oh: In all honesty, I didn’t know that this would be my path. Originally, I wanted to go into
broadcast, specifically sports broadcasting. I had an interest in television production since
high school and learned a bit about editing along the way.

However, I had applied to work at RPS as a production assistant shortly after graduating and quickly gained interest in editing and never looked back!
Butler : I vividly recall seeing the movie Se7en in the cinema and being shell-shocked by the opening title sequence. The feeling I was left with was so raw and unfiltered, I remember thinking, “That is what I want to do.” I wasn’t even 100 percent sure what that was. I knew I wanted to put things together! It wasn’t even so much a mission to tell stories, but to evoke emotion — although storytelling is most often the way to get there.

Robots

At the same time, I was a kid who grew up under the spell of some very effective marketing campaigns — from Nike, Jordan, Gatorade — and knew that advertising was a field I would be interesting in exploring when it came time to find a real job.

As luck would have it, in 2005 I found myself living in Los Angeles after the rock band I was in broke up, and I walked over to a nearby office an old friend of mine had worked at, looking for a job. She’d told me it was a place where editors worked. Turns out, that place was where many of my favorite ads were edited, and it was founded by the guy who put together that Se7en title sequence. That place was Rock Paper Scissors, and it’s been my home ever since.

Can you guys talk about the Michelob Ultra Robots spot that first aired during the Super Bowl earlier this year? What was the process like?
Butler: The process involved a lot of trust, as we were all looking at frames that didn’t have any of the robots in — they were still being created in CG — so when presenting edits, we would have words floating on screen reading “Robot Here” or “Robot Runs Faster Now.”

It says a lot about the agency in that it could hold the client’s hand through our rough edit and have them buy off on what looked like a fairly empty edit. Working with director Dante Ariola at the start of the edit helped to establish the correct rhythm and intention of what would need to be conveyed in each shot. Holding on to those early decisions was paramount, although we clearly had enough human performances to rest are hats on too.

Was there a particular cut that was more challenging than the others?
Butler: The final shot of the spot was a battle I lost. I’m happy with the work, especially the quality of human reactions shown throughout. I’m also keen on the spot’s simplicity. However, I had a different view of how the final shot would play out — a closer shot would have depicted more emotion and yearning in the robot’s face, whereas where we landed left the robot feeling more defeated — but you can’t win them all.

Robots

Did you feel extra stress knowing that the Michelob spot would air during the Super Bowl?
Butler: Not at all. I like knowing that people will see the work and having a firm airdate reduces the likelihood that a client can hem and haw until the wheels fall off. Thankfully there wasn’t enough time for much to go wrong!

You’ve already talked about doing more than just editing. What are you often asked to do in addition to just editing?
Butler: Editors are really also music supervisors. There can be a strategy to it, also knowing when to present a track you really want to sell through. But really, it’s that level of trust between myself and the team that can lead to some good discoveries. As I mentioned before, we are often tasked with just providing a safe and nurturing environment for people to create.

Truly, anybody can sit and hit copy and paste all day. I think it’s my job to hold on to that initial seed or idea or vision, and protect it through the final stages of post production. This includes ensuring the color correction, finishing and sound mix all reflect intentions established days or weeks ahead when we were still fresh enough in our thinking to be acting on instinct.

I believe that as creative professionals, we are who we are because of our instincts, but as a job drags on and on, we are forced to act more with our heads than our hearts. There is a stamina that is required, making sure that what ends up on the TV is representative of what was initially coming out of that instinctual artistic expression.

Does your editing hat change depending on the type of project you are cutting?
Butler: No, not really. An edit is an edit. All sessions should involve laughter and seriousness and focus and moments to unwind and goof off. Perhaps the format will determine the metaphorical hat, or to be more specific, the tempo.

Selecting shots for a 30- or 60-second commercial is very different than chasing moments for a documentary or long-form narrative. I’ll often remind myself to literally breathe slower when I know a shot needs to be long, and the efficiency with which I am telling a story is of less importance than the need to be absorbed in a moment.

Can you name some of your favorite technology?
Oh: My iPhone and all the apps that come with it; my Kindle, which allows me to be as indecisive as I want when it comes to picking a book and traveling; my laptop; and noise-cancelling headphones!

Butler: The carbonation of water, wireless earphones and tiny solid-state hard drives.


Behind the Title: Ntropic Flame artist Amanda Amalfi

NAME: Amanda Amalfi

COMPANY: Ntropic (@ntropic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Ntropic is a content creator producing work for commercials, music videos and feature films as well as crafting experiential and interactive VR and AR media. We have offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City and London. Some of the services we provide include design, VFX, animation, color, editing, color grading and finishing.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Flame Artist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being a senior Flame artist involves a variety of tasks that really span the duration of a project. From communicating with directors, agencies and production teams to helping plan out any visual effects that might be in a project (also being a VFX supervisor on set) to the actual post process of the job.

Amanda worked on this lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

It involves client and team management (as you are often also the 2D lead on a project) and calls for a thorough working knowledge of the Flame itself, both in timeline management and that little thing called compositing. The compositing could cross multiple disciplines — greenscreen keying, 3D compositing, set extension and beauty cleanup to name a few. And it helps greatly to have a good eye for color and to be extremely detail-oriented.

WHAT MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT YOUR ROLE?
How much it entails. Since this is usually a position that exists in a commercial house, we don’t have as many specialties as there would be in the film world.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
First is the artwork. I like that we get to work intimately with the client in the room to set looks. It’s often a very challenging position to be in — having to create something immediately — but the challenge is something that can be very fun and rewarding. Second, I enjoy being the overarching VFX eye on the project; being involved from the outset and seeing the project through to delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
We’re often meeting tight deadlines, so the hours can be unpredictable. But the best work happens when the project team and clients are all in it together until the last minute.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
The evening. I’ve never been a morning person so I generally like the time right before we leave for the day, when most of the office is wrapping up and it gets a bit quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably a tactile art form. Sometimes I have the urge to create something that is tangible, not viewed through an electronic device — a painting or a ceramic vase, something like that.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I loved films that were animated and/or used 3D elements growing up and wanted to know how they were made. So I decided to go to a college that had a computer art program with connections in the industry and was able to get my first job as a Flame assistant in between my junior and senior years of college.

ANA Airlines

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Most recently I worked on a campaign for ANA Airlines. It was a fun, creative challenge on set and in post production. Before that I worked on a very interesting project for Facebook’s F8 conference featuring its AR functionality and helped create a lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

IS THERE A PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked on a spot for Vaseline that was a “through the ages” concept and we had to create looks that would read as from 1880s, 1900, 1940s, 1970s and present day, in locations that varied from the Arctic to the building of the Brooklyn Bridge to a boxing ring. To start we sent the digitally shot footage with our 3D and comps to a printing house and had it printed and re-digitized. This worked perfectly for the ’70s-era look. Then we did additional work to age it further to the other eras — though my favorite was the Arctic turn-of-the-century look.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Flame… first and foremost. It really is the most inclusive software — I can grade, track, comp, paint and deliver all in one program. My monitors — the 4K Eizo and color-calibrated broadcast monitor, are also essential.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mostly Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
I generally have music on with clients, so I will put on some relaxing music. If I’m not with clients, I listen to podcasts. I love How Did This Get Made and Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hiking and cooking are two great de-stressors for me. I love being in nature and working out and then going home and making a delicious meal.


Sound Lounge ups Becca Falborn to EP 

New York’s Sound Lounge, an audio post house that provides sound services for advertising, television and feature films, has promoted Becca Falborn to executive producer.

In her new role, Falborn will manage the studio’s advertising division and supervise its team of producers. She will also lead client relations and sales. Additionally, she will manage Sound Lounge Everywhere, the company’s remote sound services offering, which currently operates in Boston and Boulder, Colorado.

“Becca is a smart, savvy and passionate producer, qualities that are critical to success in her new role,” said Sound Lounge COO and partner Marshall Grupp. “She has developed an excellent rapport with our team of mixers and clients and has consistently delivered projects on time and on budget, even under the most challenging circumstances.”

Falborn joined Sound Lounge in 2017 as a producer and was elevated to senior producer last year. She has produced voiceover recordings, sound design, and mixing for many advertising projects, including seven out of the nine spots produced by Sound Lounge that debuted during this year’s Super Bowl telecast.

A graduate of Manhattan College, Falborn has a background in business affairs, client services and marketing, including past positions with the post house Nice Shoes and the marketing agency Hogarth Worldwide.


Behind the Title: MPC creative director Rupert Cresswell

This Brit is living in New York while working on spots, directing and playing dodgeball.

NAME: Rupert Cresswell

COMPANY: MPC

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
MPC has been one of the global leaders in VFX for nearly 50 years, with industry-leading facilities in London, Vancouver, Los Angeles, Bangalore, New York, Montréal, Shanghai, Amsterdam and Paris. Well-known for adding visuals for advertising, film and entertainment industries, some of our most famous projects include blockbuster movies such as The Jungle Book, The Martian, the Harry Potter franchise, the X-Men movies and the upcoming The Lion King, not to mention famous advertising campaigns for brands such as Samsung, BMW, Hennessy and Apple. I am based in New York.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director (and Director)

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Lots of things, depending on the project. I am repped by MPC to direct commercials, so my work often mixes live action with some form of visual effects or animation. I’m constantly pitching for jobs; if I am successful, I direct the subsequent shoot, then oversee a team of artists at MPC through the post process until delivery.

VeChain 

When I’m not directing, I work as a creative director, leading teams on animation and design projects within MPC. It’s mostly about zeroing in on a client’s needs and offering a creative solution. I critique large teams of artists’ work — sometimes up to 60 artists across our global network — ensuring a consistent creative vision. At MPC we are expected to keep the highest standards of work and make original contributions to the industry. It’s my job to make sure we do.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I feel like the lines between agency, production company and VFX studio can be blurred these days. In my job, I’m often called on for a wide range of disciplines such as writing the creative, directing actors, and even designing large-scale print and OOH (out of the home) advertising campaigns.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There’s always a purity to the concepts at the pitch stage, which I tend to get really enthusiastic about, but the best bit is to get to travel to shoot. I’ve been super-lucky to film in some awesome places like the south of France, Montreal, Cape Town and the Atacama Desert in Chile.

Additionally, the industry is full of funny, cool, creative characters, and if you can take a beat to remind yourself of that, it’s always a blast working with them. The usual things can bother you, like stress and long hours; also, no one likes it when ideas with great potential get compromised. But more often than not, I’m thankful for what I get to do.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
There’s a sweet spot in the morning after I’ve had some caffeine and before I get hungry for lunch — that’s when the heavy lifting happens.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I always knew I wanted to go to art school but never really knew what to do after that. It took years to figure out how to turn my interests into a career. There’s a lot to be said for stubbornly refusing to do something less interesting.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I finished a big campaign for Timberland, which was a great experience. I worked directly with the client, first on the creative, then I directed the shoot in Montreal. I then I oversaw the post and the print campaign, which seemed to go up everywhere I went in the city. It was a huge technical and creative challenge, but great to be involved from the very start to the very end of the process.

I also worked on one of the first brand campaigns for the blockchain currency, VeChain. That was a huge VFX undertaking and lots of fun — we created a love letter to some classic sci-fi films like Star Wars and Blade Runner, which turned out pretty sweet.

In complete contrast, my most favorite recent experience was to work on the branding for the cult Hulu comedy Pen15. The show is so funny, it was a bit of a dream project. It was refreshing to go from such a large technical endeavor as Timberland with a big VFX team to working almost solo, and mostly just illustrating. There was something really cathartic about it. The job required me to spend most of the day doodling childish pictures — I got a real kick out of the puzzled faces around the office wondering if I’d had some kind of breakdown.

Pen15

WHAT OTHER PROJECTS STAND OUT?
Some of my stuff won glittery awards, but I am super-proud that I made a short film, called Charlie Cloudhead, that got picked up by many festivals. I always wanted to try writing and directing narrative work, and I wanted something that could showcase more of my live-action direction.

It was an unusually personal film, which I still feel a little awkward about, but I am really proud that I put in the effort to make it. It was amazing to work with two fantastic actors (Paul Higgins and Daisy Haggard), and I’m still humbled by all the hard work a big team of people put in just for some kooky little idea that I dreamed up.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The idea of no phone and no Internet gives me anxiety. Add to the horror by taking away AC during a New York summer and I’d be a weeping mess.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m pretty much addicted to scrolling through Instagram, but I’m lazy at posting stuff. Maybe it’ll become Myspace 2.0 and we’ll all laugh at all those folks with thousands of followers. Until then, it’s very useful for seeing inspiring new work out there.

I’m also a Brit living abroad in the US, so I’m rather masochistically glued to any news of the whole Brexit thing going down.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I do. Music is incredibly influential. Most of the time when I’m working on a project, it will be inspired by a song. It helps me create a mood for the film and I’ll listen to it repeatedly while I’m working on script or walking around thinking about it. For example, my short film was inspired by a song by Cate Le Bon.

My taste is pretty random to be honest. Recently I’ve been re-visiting Missy Elliott and checking out Rosalia, John Maus and the new Karen O stuff. I’m also a bit obsessed with an artist from Mali called Oumou Sangaré. I was introduced to her by a late-night Lyft driver recently, and she’s been helping set the mood for this Q&A right now.

I should add, I work in an open-plan studio and access to the Bluetooth speaker takes a certain restraint and responsibility to prevent arguments — I’m not necessarily the right guy for that. I usually try and turn the place into Horse Meat Disco.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I recently joined a dodgeball league. I had no idea how to play at first, and I’m actually very bad at it. I’m treating it as a personal challenge — learning to embrace being a laughable failure. I’m sure it’ll do me good.


Fox Sports promotes US women’s World Cup team with VFX-heavy spots

Santa Monica creative studio Jamm worked with Wieden+Kennedy New York on the Fox Sports campaign “All Eyes on US.” Directed by Joseph Kahn out of Supply & Demand, the four spots celebrate the US Women’s soccer team as it gears up for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in June.

The newest 60-second spot All Eyes on US, features tens of thousands of screaming fans thanks to Jamm’s CG crowd work. On set, Jamm brainstormed with Kahn on how to achieve the immersive effect he was looking for. Much of the on-the-ground footage was shot using wide-angle lenses, which posed a unique set of challenges by revealing the entire environment as well as the close-up action. With pacing, Jamm achieved the sense of the game occurring in realtime, as the tempo of the camera keeps in step with the team moving the ball downfield.

The 30-second spot Goliath features the first CG crowd shot by the Jamm team, who successfully filled the soccer stadium with a roaring crowd. In Goliath, the entire US women’s soccer team runs toward the camera in slow motion. Captured locked off but digitally manipulated via a 3D camera to create a dolly zoom technique replicating real-life parallax, the altered perspective translates the unsettling feeling of being an opponent as the team literally runs straight into the camera.

On set, Jamm got an initial Lidar scan of the stadium as a base. From there, they used that scan along with reference photos taken on set to build a CG stadium that included accurate seating. They extended the stadium where there were gaps as well to make it a full 360 stadium. The stadium seating tools tie in with Jamm’s in-house crowd system (based on Side Effects Houdini) and allowed them to easily direct the performance of the crowd in every shot.

The Warrior focuses on Megan Rapinoe standing on the field in the rain, with a roaring crowd behind her. Whereas CG crowd simulation is typically captured with fast-moving cameras, the stadium crowd remains locked in the background of this sequence. Jamm implemented motion work and elements like confetti to make the large group of characters appear lively without detracting from Rapinoe in the foreground. Because the live-action scenes were shot in the rain, Jamm used water graphing to seamlessly blend the real-world footage and the CG crowd work.

The Finisher centers on Alex Morgan, who earned the nickname because “she’s the last thing they’ll see before it’s too late.”  The team ran down the field at a slow motion pace, while the cameraman rigged with a steady cam sprinted backwards through the goal. Then the footage was sped up by 600%, providing a realtime quality, as Morgan kicks a perfect strike to the back of the net.

Jamm used Autodesk Flame for compositing the crowds and CG ball, camera projections to rebuild and clean up certain parts of the environment, refining the skies and adding in stadium branding. They also used Foundry Nuke and Houdini for 3D.

The edit was via FinalCut and editor Spencer Campbell. The color grade was by Technicolor’s Tom Poole.

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Ned Borgman

This editor’s path began early. “I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials,” he says.

Name: Ned Borgman

Company: PS260

Can you describe your company?
PS260 is a post house built for ideas, creative solutions and going beyond the boards. We have studios in New York, Venice, California and Boston. I am based in New York.

What’s your job title?
Film editor, problem solver, cleaner of messes.

What does that entail?
My job is to make everything look great. Every project takes an entire team of super-talented people who bring their expertise to bear to tell a story. They create all of the puzzle pieces that end up in the dailies, and I put them together in such a way that they can all shine their best.

Facebook small business campaign

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think it would be the sheer amount of stuff that can become an editor’s responsibility. So many details go into crafting a successful edit, and an editor needs to be well-versed in all of it. Color grading, visual effects, design, animation, music, sound design, the list goes on. The point isn’t to be a master of all of those things, (that’s why we work with other amazing people when it comes to finishing), but to know the needs of each of those parts and how to make sure every detail can get properly addressed.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
It’s the middle part. When we’re all in the middle of the edit, up to our necks in footage and options and ideas. Out of all of that exploration the best bits start to stand out. The sound design element from that cut and the music track from that other version and a take we tried last night. It all starts to make sense, and from there it’s about making sure the best bits can work well together.

What’s your least favorite?
Knowing there are always some great cuts that will only ever exist inside a Premiere Pro bin. Not every performance or music track or joke can make it into the final cut and out into the world and that’s ok. Maybe those cuts are airing in some other parallel universe.

What is your most productive time of the day?
Whenever the office is empty. So either early in the morning or late at night.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Probably something with photography. I’m too attached to visual storytelling, and I’m a horrible illustrator.

Why did you choose this profession? How early on did you know this would be your path? 
I’ve always been enamored with commercials. I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials. I remember making my first in-camera edit in third grade when I was messing around with the classroom camcorder set up on a tripod. I had recorded myself in front of the camera and then recorded a bit of the empty classroom. Playing it back, it looked like I had vanished into thin air. It blew my eight-year-old mind.

Burger King

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Let’s see, Burger King’s flame-broiled campaign with MullenLowe was great. It has a giant explosion, which is always nice. Facebook’s small business campaign with 72andSunny was a lot of fun with an amazing team of people. And some work for the Google Home Hub launch with Google Creative Labs was fun because launching stuff is exciting.

Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre? 
Not exactly. Every genre has its specific needs, but I think the fundamentals remain the same. I need to pay attention to rhythm, to performances, to music, to sound design, to VO — all of that stuff. It’s about staying in tune with how all of these ingredients interact with each other to create a reaction from the audience, no matter the reaction you’re striving for.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
I grew up obsessed with practical effects in movies, so I’d have to say Burger King “Gasoline Shuffle”. It has a massive explosion that was shot in camera and it looks incredible. I wish I was on set that day.

What do you use to edit?
Adobe Premiere Pro all the way. I like to think that one day I’ll be back on Avid Media Composer though.

What is your favorite plugin?
I don’t have one. Just give me that basic install.

Are you often asked to do more than edit? If so, what else are you asked to do?
Sure. I’ll often record the scratch VO when there’s one needed. My voice is…serviceable. What that means is that as soon as the real VO talent gets placed in the cut, everyone’s thrilled with how much better everything sounds. That’s cool by me.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPhone, my Shure in-ear headphones, and an extra long charging cable.

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Change some diapers. My wife and I just had our first kid last August, and she’s incredible. A game of peek-a-boo can really change your perspective.

Timber finishes Chipotle ‘Fresh Food’ campaign

In Chipotle’s new Fresh Food campaign, directed by Errol Morris for Moxie Pictures out of agency Venables Bell & Partners, real-life employees of the food chain talk about the pride they take in their work while smashing guacamole and cutting peppers, cilantro and other fresh ingredients.

The food shots are designed to get all five of your senses moving by grabbing the audience with the visually appealing, fresh food served and leading them to taste, smell, and hear the authentic ingredients.

The four spots — Bre – Just BraggingCarson – Good Food Good Person, Krista – Fresh Everyday
Robbie – Microwaves Not Welcome — are for broadcast and the web.

For Chipotle, Santa Monica’s Timber handled online, finishing and just a splash of cleanup. They used Flame on the project. According to Timber head of production Melody Alexander, “The Chipotle project was based on showcasing the realness of the products the restaurants use in their food. Minimal clean-up was required as the client was keen to keep the naturalness of the footage. We, at Timber, use a combination of finishing tools when working on online projects. The Chipotle project was completely done in Flame.”

Behind the Title: ATK PLN Technical Supervisor Jon Speer

NAME: Jon Speer

COMPANY: ATK PLN (@atkpln_studio) in Dallas

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a strategic creative group that specializes in design and animation for commercials and short-form video productions.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Technical Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
In general, a technical supervisor is responsible for leading the technical director team and making sure that the pipeline enables our artists’ effort of fulfilling the client’s vision.

Day-to-day responsibilities include:
– Reviewing upcoming jobs and making sure we have the necessary hardware resources to complete them
– Working with our producers and VFX supervisors to bid and plan future work
– Working with our CG/VFX supervisors to develop and implement new technologies that make our pipeline more efficient
– When problems arise in production, I am there to determine the cause, find a solution and help implement the fix
– Developing junior technical directors so they can be effective in mitigating pipeline issues that crop up during production

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I would say the most surprising thing that falls under the title is the amount of people and personality management that you need to employ.

As a technical supervisor, you have to represent every single person’s different perspectives and goals. Making everyone from artists, producers, management and, most importantly, clients happy is a tough balancing act. That balancing act needs to be constantly evaluated to make sure you have both the short-term and long-term interests of the company, clients and artists in mind.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Maya, Houdini and Nuke are the main tools we support for shot production. We have our own internal tracking software that we also integrate with.

From text editors for coding, to content creation programs and even budgeting programs, I typically use it all.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Starting the next project. Each new project offers the chance for us to try out a new or revamped pipeline tool that we hope will make things that much better for our team. I love efficiencies, so getting to try new tools, whether they are internally or externally developed, is always fun.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I know it sounds cliché, but I don’t really have one. My entire job is based on figuring out why things don’t work or how they could work better. So when things are breaking or getting technically difficult, that is why I am here. If I had to pick one thing, I suppose it would be looking at spreadsheets of any kind.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early morning when no one else is in. This is the time of day that I get to see what new tools are out there and try them. This is when I get to come up with the crazy ideas and plans for what we do next from a pipeline standpoint. Most of the rest of my day usually includes dealing with issues that crop up during production, or being in meetings.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I think I would have to give teaching a try. Having studied architecture in school, I always thought it would be fun to teach architectural history.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We just wrapped on a set of Lego spots for the new Lego 2 movie.

Fallout 76

We also did an E3 piece for Fallout 76 this year that was a lot of fun. We are currently helping out with a spot for the big game this year that has been a blast.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I think I am most proud of our Lego spots we have created over the last three years. We have really experimented with pipeline on those spots. We saw a new technology out there — rendering in Octane — and decided to jump in head first. While it wasn’t the easiest thing to do, we forced ourselves to become even more efficient in all aspects of production.

NAME PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Houdini really makes the difficult things simple to do. I also love Nuke. It does what it does so well, and is amazingly fast and simple to program in.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Mainly I’ll listen to soundtracks when I am working, the lack of words is best when I am programming.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Golf is something I really enjoy on the weekends. However, like a lot of people, I find travel is easily the best way to for me to hit the reset button.

Quick Chat: Digital Arts’ Josh Heilbronner on Audi, Chase spots

New York City’s Digital Arts provided audio post on a couple of 30-second commercial spots that presented sound designer/mixer Josh Heilbronner with some unique audio challenges. They are Audi’s Night Watchman via agency Venables Bell & Partners in New York and Chase’s Mama Said Knock You Out, featuring Serena Williams from agency Droga5 in New York.

Josh Heilbronner

Heilbronner, who has been sound designing and mixing for broadcast and film for almost 10 years, has worked on large fashion brands like Nike and J Crew to Fortune 500 Companies like General Electric, Bank of America and Estee Lauder. He has also mixed promos and primetime broadcast specials for USA Network, CBS and ABC Television. In addition to commercial VO recording, editing and mixing, Heilbronner has a growing credit list of long-form documentaries and feature films, including The Broken Ones, Romance (In the Digital Age), Generation Iron 2, The Hurt Business and Giving Birth in America (a CNN special series).

We recently reached out to Heilbronner to find out more about these two very different commercial projects and how he tackled each.

Both Audi and Chase are very different assignments from an audio perspective. How did these projects come your way?
On Audi, we were asked to be part of their new 2019 A7 campaign, which follows a security guard patrolling the Audi factory in the middle of night. It’s sort of James Bond meets Night at the Museum. The factory is full of otherworldly rooms built to put the cars through their paces (extreme cold, isolation etc.). Q Department did a great job crafting the sounds of those worlds and really bringing the viewer into the factory. Agency Venables & Bell were looking to really pull everything together tightly and have the dialogue land up-front, while still maintaining the wonderfully lush and dynamic music and sound design that had been laid down already.

The Chase Serena campaign is an impact-driven series of spots. Droga5 has a great reputation for putting together cinematic spots and this is no exception. Drazen Bosnjak from Q Department originally reached out to see if I would be interested in mixing this one because one of the final deliverables was the Jumbotron at the US Open in Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Digital Arts has a wonderful 7.1 Dolby approved 4K theater, so we were able to really get a sense of what the finals would sound and look like up on the big screen.

Did you have any concerns going into the project about what would be required creatively or technically?
For Audi our biggest challenge was the tight deadline. We mixed in New York but we had three different time zones in play, so getting approvals could sometimes be difficult. With Chase, the amount of content for this campaign was large. We needed to deliver finals for broadcast, social media (Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter), Jumbotron and cinema. Making sure they played back as loud and crisp as they could on all those platforms was a major focus.

What was the most challenging aspect for you on the project?
As with a lot of production audio, the noise on set was pretty extreme. For Audi they had to film the night watchman walking in different spaces, delivering the copy at a variety of volumes. It all needed to gel together as if he was in one smaller room talking directly to the camera, as if he were a narrator. We didn’t have access to re-record him, so we had to use a few different denoise tools, such as iZotope RX6, Brusfri and Waves WNS to clear out the clashing room tones.

The biggest challenge on Chase was the dynamic range and power of these spots. Serena beautifully hushed whisper narration is surrounded by impactful bass drops, cinematic hits and lush ambiences. Reigning all that in, building to a climax and still having her narration be the focus was a game of cat and mouse. Also, broadcast standards are a bit restrictive when it comes to large impacts, so finding the right balance was key.

Any interesting technology or techniques that you used on the project?
I mainly use Avid Pro Tools Ultimate 2018. They have made some incredible advancements — you can now do everything on one machine, all in the box. I can have 180 tracks running in a surround session and still print every deliverable (5.1, stereo, stems etc.) without a hiccup.

I’ve been using Penteo 7 Pro for stereo 5.1 upmixing. It does a fantastic job filling in the surrounds, but also folds down to stereo nicely (and passes QC). Spanner is another useful tool when working with all sorts of channel counts. It allows me to down-mix, rearrange channels and route audio to the correct buses easily.

Avengers: Infinity War leads VES Awards with six noms

The Visual Effects Society (VES) has announced the nominees for the 17th Annual VES Awards, which recognize outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games as well as the VFX supervisors, VFX producers and hands-on artists who bring this work to life.

Avengers: Infinity War garners the most feature film nomination with six. Incredibles 2 is the top animated film contender with five nominations and Lost in Space leads the broadcast field with six nominations.

Nominees in 24 categories were selected by VES members via events hosted by 11 of the organizations Sections, including Australia, the Bay Area, Germany, London, Los Angeles, Montreal, New York, New Zealand, Toronto, Vancouver and Washington.

The VES Awards will be held on February 5th at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. As previously announced, the VES Visionary Award will be presented to writer/director/producer and co-creator of Westworld Jonathan Nolan. The VES Award for Creative Excellence will be given to award-winning creators/executive producers/writers/directors David Benioff and D.B. Weiss of Game of Thrones fame. Actor-comedian-author Patton Oswalt will once again host the VES Awards.

Here are the nominees:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War

Daniel DeLeeuw

Jen Underdahl

Kelly Port

Matt Aitken

Daniel Sudick

 

Christopher Robin

Christopher Robin

Chris Lawrence

Steve Gaub

Michael Eames

Glenn Melenhorst

Chris Corbould

 

Ready Player One

Roger Guyett

Jennifer Meislohn

David Shirk

Matthew Butler

Neil Corbould

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story

Rob Bredow

Erin Dusseault

Matt Shumway

Patrick Tubach

Dominic Tuohy

 

Welcome to Marwen

Kevin Baillie

Sandra Scott

Seth Hill

Marc Chu

James Paradis

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature 

12 Strong

Roger Nall

Robert Weaver

Mike Meinardus

 

Bird Box

Marcus Taormina

David Robinson

Mark Bakowski

Sophie Dawes

Mike Meinardus

 

Bohemian Rhapsody

Paul Norris

Tim Field

May Leung

Andrew Simmonds

 

First Man

Paul Lambert

Kevin Elam

Tristan Myles

Ian Hunter

JD Schwalm

 

Outlaw King

Alex Bicknell

Dan Bethell

Greg O’Connor

Stefano Pepin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch

Pierre Leduc

Janet Healy

Bruno Chauffard

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Brad Bird

John Walker

Rick Sayre

Bill Watral

 

Isle of Dogs

Mark Waring

Jeremy Dawson

Tim Ledbury

Lev Kolobov

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet

Scott Kersavage

Bradford Simonsen

Ernest J. Petti

Cory Loftis

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Joshua Beveridge

Christian Hejnal

Danny Dimian

Bret St. Clair

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon; Out of the Past

Everett Burrell

Tony Meagher

Steve Moncur

Christine Lemon

Joel Whist

 

Krypton; The Phantom Zone

Ian Markiewicz

Jennifer Wessner

Niklas Jacobson

Martin Pelletier

 

LOST IN SPACE

Lost in Space; Danger, Will Robinson

Jabbar Raisani

Terron Pratt

Niklas Jacobson

Joao Sita

 

The Terror; Go For Broke

Frank Petzold

Lenka Líkařová

Viktor Muller

Pedro Sabrosa

 

Westworld; The Passenger

Jay Worth

Elizabeth Castro

Bruce Branit

Joe Wehmeyer

Michael Lantieri

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan; Pilot

Erik Henry

Matt Robken

Bobo Skipper

Deak Ferrand

Pau Costa

 

The Alienist; The Boy on the Bridge

Kent Houston

Wendy Garfinkle

Steve Murgatroyd

Drew Jones

Paul Stephenson

 

The Deuce; We’re All Beasts

Jim Rider

Steven Weigle

John Bair

Aaron Raff

 

The First; Near and Far

Karen Goulekas

Eddie Bonin

Roland Langschwert

Bryan Godwin

Matthew James Kutcher

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June

Brendan Taylor

Stephen Lebed

Winston Lee

Leo Bovell

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Realtime Project

Age of Sail

John Kahrs

Kevin Dart

Cassidy Curtis

Theresa Latzko

 

Cycles

Jeff Gipson

Nicholas Russell

Lauren Nicole Brown

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

 

Dr Grordbort’s Invaders

Greg Broadmore

Mhairead Connor

Steve Lambert

Simon Baker

 

God of War

Maximilian Vaughn Ancar

Corey Teblum

Kevin Huynh

Paolo Surricchio

 

Marvel’s Spider-Man

Grant Hollis

Daniel Wang

Seth Faske

Abdul Bezrati

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial 

Beyond Good & Evil 2

Maxime Luere

Leon Berelle

Remi Kozyra

Dominique Boidin

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Philip Whalley

Anthony Bloor

Andy Steele

 

McDonald’s; #ReindeerReady

Ben Cronin

Josh King

Gez Wright

Suzanne Jandu

 

U.S. Marine Corps; A Nation’s Call

Steve Drew

Nick Fraser

Murray Butler

Greg White

Dave Peterson

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident

Carsten Keller

Anandi Peiris

Dan Sanders

Fabian Frank

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

Beautiful Hunan; Flight of the Phoenix

R. Rajeev

Suhit Saha

Arish Fyzee

Unmesh Nimbalkar

 

Childish Gambino’s Pharos

Keith Miller

Alejandro Crawford

Thelvin Cabezas

Jeremy Thompson

 

DreamWorks Theatre Presents Kung Fu Panda

Marc Scott

Doug Cooper

Michael Losure

Alex Timchenko

 

Osheaga Music and Arts Festival

Andre Montambeault

Marie-Josee Paradis

Alyson Lamontagne

David Bishop Noriega

 

Pearl Quest

Eugénie von Tunzelmann

Liz Oliver

Ian Spendloff

Ross Burgess

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Thanos

Jan Philip Cramer

Darren Hendler

Paul Story

Sidney Kombo-Kintombo

 

Christopher Robin; Tigger

Arslan Elver

Kayn Garcia

Laurent Laban

Mariano Mendiburu

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Indoraptor

Jance Rubinchik

Ted Lister

Yannick Gillain

Keith Ribbons

 

Ready Player One; Art3mis

David Shirk

Brian Cantwell

Jung-Seung Hong

Kim Ooi

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; The Grinch

David Galante

Francois Boudaille

Olivier Luffin

Yarrow Cheney

 

Incredibles 2; Helen Parr

Michal Makarewicz

Ben Porter

Edgar Rodriguez

Kevin Singleton

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Ralphzilla

Dong Joo Byun

Dave K. Komorowski

Justin Sklar

Le Joyce Tong

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse; Miles Morales

Marcos Kang

Chad Belteau

Humberto Rosa

Julie Bernier Gosselin

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Realtime Project

Cycles; Rae

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

Jose Luis -Weecho- Velasquez

 

Lost in Space; Humanoid

Chad Shattuck

Paul Zeke

Julia Flanagan

Andrew McCartney

 

Nightflyers; All That We Have Found; Eris

Peter Giliberti

James Chretien

Ryan Cromie

Cesar Dacol Jr.

 

Spider-Man; Doc Ock

Brian Wyser

Henrique Naspolini

Sophie Brennan

William Salyers

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

McDonald’s; Bobbi the Reindeer

Gabriela Ruch Salmeron

Joe Henson

Andrew Butler

Joel Best

 

Overkill’s The Walking Dead; Maya

Jonas Ekman

Goran Milic

Jonas Skoog

Henrik Eklundh

 

Peta; Best Friend; Lucky

Bernd Nalbach

Emanuel Fuchs

Sebastian Plank

Christian Leitner

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident; Bam

David Bryan

Chris Welsby

Fabian Frank

Chloe Dawe

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

Ant-Man and the Wasp; Journey to the Quantum Realm

Florian Witzel

Harsh Mistri

Yuri Serizawa

Can Yuksel

 

Aquaman; Atlantis

Quentin Marmier

Aaron Barr

Jeffrey De Guzman

Ziad Shureih

 

Ready Player One; The Shining, Overlook Hotel

Mert Yamak

Stanley Wong

Joana Garrido

Daniel Gagiu

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Vandor Planet

Julian Foddy

Christoph Ammann

Clement Gerard

Pontus Albrecht

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Whoville

Loic Rastout

Ludovic Ramiere

Henri Deruer

Nicolas Brack

 

Incredibles 2; Parr House

Christopher M. Burrows

Philip Metschan

Michael Rutter

Joshua West

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Social Media District

Benjamin Min Huang

Jon Kim Krummel II

Gina Warr Lawes

Matthias Lechner

 

Spider-Man; Into the Spider-Verse; Graphic New York City

Terry Park

Bret St. Clair

Kimberly Liptrap

Dave Morehead

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Cycles; The House

Michael R.W. Anderson

Jeff Gipson

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

 

Lost in Space; Pilot; Impact Area

Philip Engström

Kenny Vähäkari

Jason Martin

Martin Bergquist

 

The Deuce; 42nd St

John Bair

Vance Miller

Jose Marin

Steve Sullivan

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June; Fenway Park

Patrick Zentis

Kevin McGeagh

Leo Bovell

Zachary Dembinski

 

The Man in the High Castle; Reichsmarschall Ceremony

Casi Blume

Michael Eng

Ben McDougal

Sean Myers

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

Aquaman; Third Act Battle

Claus Pedersen

Mohammad Rastkar

Cedric Lo

Ryan McCoy

 

Echo; Time Displacement

Victor Perez

Tomas Tjernberg

Tomas Wall

Marcus Dineen

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Gyrosphere Escape

Pawl Fulker

Matt Perrin

Oscar Faura

David Vickery

 

Ready Player One; New York Race

Daniele Bigi

Edmund Kolloen

Mathieu Vig

Jean-Baptiste Noyau

 

Welcome to Marwen; Town of Marwen

Kim Miles

Matthew Ward

Ryan Beagan

Marc Chu

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project 

Avengers: Infinity War; Nidavellir Forge Megastructure

Chad Roen

Ryan Rogers

Jeff Tetzlaff

Ming Pan

 

Incredibles 2; Underminer Vehicle

Neil Blevins

Philip Metschan

Kevin Singleton

 

Mortal Engines; London

Matthew Sandoval

James Ogle

Nick Keller

Sam Tack

 

Ready Player One; DeLorean DMC-12

Giuseppe Laterza

Kim Lindqvist

Mauro Giacomazzo

William Gallyot

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Millennium Falcon

Masa Narita

Steve Walton

David Meny

James Clyne

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Gerardo Aguilera

Ashraf Ghoniem

Vasilis Pazionis

Hartwell Durfor

 

Avengers: Infinity War; Wakanda

Florian Witzel

Adam Lee

Miguel Perez Senent

Francisco Rodriguez

 

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Dominik Kirouac

Chloe Ostiguy

Christian Gaumond

 

Venom

Aharon Bourland

Jordan Walsh

Aleksandar Chalyovski

Federico Frassinelli

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Snow, Clouds and Smoke

Eric Carme

Nicolas Brice

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Paul Kanyuk

Tiffany Erickson Klohn

Vincent Serritella

Matthew Kiyoshi Wong

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Virus Infection & Destruction

Paul Carman

Henrik Fält

Christopher Hendryx

David Hutchins

 

Smallfoot

Henrik Karlsson

Theo Vandernoot

Martin Furness

Dmitriy Kolesnik

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Ian Farnsworth

Pav Grochola

Simon Corbaux

Brian D. Casper

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Altered Carbon

Philipp Kratzer

Daniel Fernandez

Xavier Lestourneaud

Andrea Rosa

 

Lost in Space; Jupiter is Falling

Denys Shchukin

Heribert Raab

Michael Billette

Jaclyn Stauber

 

Lost in Space; The Get Away

Juri Bryan

Will Elsdale

Hugo Medda

Maxime Marline

 

The Man in the High Castle; Statue of Liberty Destruction

Saber Jlassi

Igor Zanic

Nick Chamberlain

Chris Parks

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Sabine Laimer

Tim Walker

Tobias Wiesner

Massimo Pasquetti

 

First Man

Joel Delle-Vergin

Peter Farkas

Miles Lauridsen

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

John Galloway

Enrik Pavdeja

David Nolan

Juan Espigares Enriquez

 

Welcome to Marwen

Woei Lee

Saul Galbiati

Max Besner

Thai-Son Doan

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon

Jean-François Leroux

Reece Sanders

Stephen Bennett

Laraib Atta

 

Handmaids Tale; June

Winston Lee

Gwen Zhang

Xi Luo

Kevin Quatman

 

Lost in Space; Impact; Crash Site Rescue

David Wahlberg

Douglas Roshamn

Sofie Ljunggren

Fredrik Lönn

 

Silicon Valley; Artificial Emotional Intelligence; Fiona

Tim Carras

Michael Eng

Shiying Li

Bill Parker

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

Apple; Unlock

Morten Vinther

Michael Gregory

Gustavo Bellon

Rodrigo Jimenez

 

Apple; Welcome Home

Michael Ralla

Steve Drew

Alejandro Villabon

Peter Timberlake

 

Genesis; G90 Facelift

Neil Alford

Jose Caballero

Joseph Dymond

Greg Spencer

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Pratyush Paruchuri

Kalle Kohlstrom

Daniel Benjamin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

Chocolate Man

David Bellenbaum

Aleksandra Todorovic

Jörg Schmidt

Martin Boué

 

Proxima-b

Denis Krez

Tina Vest

Elias Kremer

Lukas Löffler

 

Ratatoskr

Meike Müller

Lena-Carolin Lohfink

Anno Schachner

Lisa Schachner

 

Terra Nova

Thomas Battistetti

Mélanie Geley

Mickael Le Mezo

Guillaume Hoarau

Ben Corfield promoted to editor at Stitch in London

Ben Corfield is now a full-fledged editor on the Stitch roster. Having joined the edit house as a Homespun editor a year ago, the London-based Corfield has been working hard on a range of projects. Homespun is the sister company to Stitch. Assistants start editing through Homespun on music videos and short films and then “graduate” to Stitch to work on commercials.

Working on an Avid Media Composer Corfield recently cut a spot for a film for Leica, directed by Barney Cokeliss, involving editing 105 hours of footage for a two-minute spot. At the end of last year, he cut the Sam Smith and Calvin Harris Promises documentary which explores the art of voguing. It was directed by Emil Nava.

Corfield’s initial interest in editing was piqued in the early ’90s while he was watching Terminator 2 on VHS. Inspired after seeing the T 1000 melt through a metal prison gate, he knew then that he somehow wanted to get into film.

“I get to work on the best part of the process as I put it all together to create the finished piece,” says Corfield on the process of editing. “It’s always a privilege to work closely with the director during the edit and see his or her vision in its final form. I’ve already been lucky enough to work with numerous inspirational editors and directors, much of the way I work now is down to what I’ve learnt from them.”

VFX studio Electric Theatre Collective adds three to London team

London visual effects studio Electric Theatre Collective has added three to its production team: Elle Lockhart, Polly Durrance and Antonia Vlasto.

Lockhart brings with her extensive CG experience, joining from Touch Surgery where she ran the Johnson & Johnson account. Prior to that she worked at Analog as a VFX producer where she delivered three global campaigns for Nike. At Electric, she will serve as producer on Martini and Toyota.

Vlasto joins Electric working on clients such Mercedes, Tourism Ireland and Tui. She joins from 750MPH where, over a four-year period, she served as producer on Nike, Great Western Railway, VW and Amazon to name but a few.

At Electric, Polly Durrance will serve as producer on H&M, TK Maxx and Carphone Warehouse. She joins from Unit where she helped launched their in-house Design Collective, worked with clients such as Lush, Pepsi and Thatchers Cider. Prior to Unit Polly was at Big Buoy where she produced work for Jaguar Land Rover, giffgaff and Redbull.

Recent projects at the studio, which also has an office in Santa Monica, California, include Tourism Ireland Capture Your Heart and Honda Palindrome.

Main Image: (L-R) Elle Lockhart, Antonia Vlasto and Polly Durrance.

Asahi beer spot gets the VFX treatment

A collaboration between The Monkeys Melbourne, In The Thicket and Alt, a newly released Asahi campaign takes viewers on a journey through landscapes built around surreal Japanese iconography. Watch Asahi Super Dry — Enter Asahi here.

From script to shoot — a huge operation that took place at Sydney’s Fox Studios — director Marco Prestini and his executive producer Genevieve Triquet (from production house In The Thicket) brought on the VFX team at Alt to help realize the creative vision.

The VFX team at Alt (which has offices in Sydney, Melbourne and Los Angeles) worked with Prestini to help design and build the complex “one shot” look, with everything from robotic geishas to a gigantic CG squid in the mix, alongside a seamless blend of CG set extensions and beautifully shot live-action plates.

“VFX supervisor Dave Edwards and the team at Alt, together with my EP Genevieve, have been there since the very beginning, and their creative input and expertise were key in every step of the way,” explains Prestini. “Everything we did on set was the results of weeks of endless back and forth on technical previz, a process that required pretty much everyone’s input on a daily basis and that was incredibly inspiring for me to be part of.”

Dave Edwards, VFX supervisor at Alt, shares: “Production designer Michael Iacono designed sets in 3D, with five huge sets built for the shoot. The team then worked out camera speeds for timings based on these five sets and seven plates. DP Stefan Duscio would suggest rigs and mounts, which our team was able to then test it in previs to see if it would work with the set. During previs, we worked out that we couldn’t get the resolution and the required frame rate to shoot the high frame rate samurais, so we had to use Alexa LF. Of course, that also helped Marco, who wanted minimal lens distortion as it allowed a wide field of view without the distortion of normal anamorphic lenses.”

One complex scene involves a character battling a gigantic underwater squid, which was done via a process known as “dry for wet” — a film technique in which smoke, colored filters and/or lighting effects are used to simulate a character being underwater while filming on a dry stage. The team at Alt did a rough animation of the squid to help drive the actions of the talent and the stunt team on the day, before spending the final weeks perfecting the look of the photoreal monster.

In terms of tools, for concept design/matte painting Alt used Adobe Photoshop while previs/modeling/texturing/animation was done in Autodesk Maya. All of the effects/lighting/look development was via Side Effects Houdini; the compositing pipeline was built around Foundry Nuke; final online was completed in Autodesk Flame; and for graphics, they used Adobe After Effects.
The final edit was done by The Butchery.

Here is the VFX breakdown:

Enter Asahi – VFX Breakdown from altvfx on Vimeo.

Behind the Title: Exile Editor Kyle Brown

With recent spot work that includes jobs for Comcast, AT&T, T-Mobile and Trojan, this editor jokes, “A good Netflix and chill Tinder date was made possible thanks to the results of my commercial work.”

Name: Kyle Brown

Company: New York- and Santa Monica-based Exile

Can you describe your company?
Exile is a bicoastal editorial and finishing boutique with spaces on both coasts.

What’s your job title?
Offline editor, with a splash of camp counselor.

What does that entail? 
As an offline editor, I take the footage that was shot and assemble it based on the script and creative vision honed on set, adding in tone and texture, rhythm and pacing. Basically, editors are given all the raw material that has been created and we turn it into a visual experience.

What’s great about editorial is you have to be honest — the footage is shot, you have what you have and nothing more, and now you have to take what’s there and stitch it together. If something does not work, you move on and make something else work. You can’t hide in the edit. You can’t say we will fix it in post. You are post! It’s the finish line, and all the preparation and hard work on the front end pays off in the edit bay. It has to.

Kyle Brown cut this Bud Light spot.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Editor can be a catch-all title — we cut music, add sound effects, edit story and script. We do rough effects, we scratch voiceover and build title lock-ups. It really feels like DIY filmmaking at times, when you’re adding lines or building some crazy comp of two scenes to get the desired reaction or pause.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Problem solving, seeing an edit work and happy accidents. I still get a kick out of an edit working, feeling a joke land or a punch connect. To be a part of movie magic is still a dream come true. I like to rough cut with my gut. I slam things together to have something to react to, and sometimes the best happy accidents come from that. I also enjoy all of the creative challenges that I’m faced with. A client might have a note that seems like a far-out ask, but the answer is always there. Edits can be a puzzle, and I like that.

What’s your least favorite?
This answer, I’m sure will not be popular… but watching dailies. I watch every frame, I swear. Part of my job is knowing all that is there and being able to recall and find it quickly. But nine times out of 10, when I’m watching dailies I have to take a break halfway through and edit a sequence or scene. It’s hard to see something you get excited by and not just start cutting it. Dailies look different after you have done a rough cut; they mean different things and usually give better solutions. So a lot of times, I cut, then I go back and review.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Double agent. Ok, I’m not that cool. Let’s say, schoolteacher.

Why did you choose this profession?
I think I love editing because I did not choose it. I actually stumbled into it. I’ve learned so much through it, as cheesy as it sounds. It’s helped me grow and achieve my goals, not only in work but in life, and it still does. I think is crazy and exciting that I do it for a living. Through necessity and curiosity, something that I fell into — without ever going through the traditional route of assistant editor — has given me a career that allows me to scratch my creative itch. I’m very lucky.

Trojan

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Lately, I’ve mostly been doing commercials: spots for Comcast, AT&T, T-Mobile and Trojan. So, basically, a good Netflix and chill Tinder date was made possible thanks to the results of my commercial work.

You have worked on all sorts of projects. Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre?
I have been lucky enough to have worked in a wide variety of genres — from comedy to docs to music videos — but I try to tackle all storytelling the same way: I work around a key moment or idea and fill in the blanks on how to get there. The best example I can use is music videos. I like to find that great part of the track, cut the visual to it, then work backwards to get to that point. This allows me to use each edit to get to the intent of that key moment. The same can be said for a good physical gag or joke. Getting that moment to land, then using what’s around it to make it work harder.

What do you use to edit?
I was a diehard Final Cut Pro guy, but then when the bottom fell out, so I switched to Avid Media Composer for the challenge. I also use Adobe Premiere, on occasion. Over the years, I’ve found that whatever I’m fastest on, meaning getting my thoughts to the screen quickest, is what works best for me. I am sure a new workflow or program will come along, and I make sure that I’m always able to adapt.

You mentioned earlier, that sometimes you provide more than just the cut. Can you talk about that?
I’ve rewritten scripts, done some finishing work, done After Effects work, been the VO artist and, sometimes, I even act as the account person to help sell something through to a client. Of course, there are people that do all these things professionally and are experts at their job, but I feel like in an edit bay we’re all there together trying to hit the deadlines with the best piece in hand, and that means we all dive in. No one can be precious about their roles; we have to be precious about our goals.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Copy and paste (seriously whoever invented that is a god), Spell Check and coffee makers.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Cook. I can’t think of editing when I’m burning stuff.

Director Lee J. Ford joins Interrogate

Director Lee J. Ford has joined LA/NY/Sydney-based production house Interrogate. A British native, Ford worked as a creative in the advertising industry for years before pivoting to directing. Ford’s agency experience allows him to “understand the politics and daily struggles the creatives are facing throughout the process and will continue to face” long after he’s done directing the piece.

Ford’s interest in film started early. He grew up next to a video store and would stay up late re-watching The Hills Have Eyes, The Exorcist, Exterminator and other banned-in-the-UK movies until he failed his classes. This led him to drop out and go to art school to study graphic design. Studying at The University of Brighton and the Central Saint Martins school of art helped inform Ford’s preferred minimalist aesthetic, and gave him his first hands-on experience with art direction.

After graduation, Ford worked his way through the advertising industry as a creative, with stints at various ad agencies, including 180 Amsterdam, Ogilvy London, TBWA London and Saatchi & Saatchi London, to name a few. While he ended up as a creative director, Ford never forgot his dream of directing, so when the opportunity to direct Top Gear came his way while working at an agency in Amsterdam, Ford jumped at the chance.

His work includes a New African Icons for SportsPesa, a spot for Audi, and a short film for fashion designer Roland Mouret based on Mouret’s childhood memories of watching his father, who was a butcher.

Ford, who was previously repped by Prettybird in the US and UK, knew Interrogate was the right home for him when he met executive producers and partners George Meeker and Jeff Miller. Their first project together was a spot for Blizzard Games’ Diablo III out of Omelet LA.

Promoting a Mickey Mouse watch without Mickey

Imagine creating a spot for a watch that celebrates the 90th anniversary of Mickey Mouse — but you can’t show Mickey Mouse. Already Been Chewed (ABC), a design and motion graphics studio, developed a POV concept that met this challenge and also tied in the design of the actual watch.

Nixon, a California-based premium watch company that is releasing a series of watches around the Mickey Mouse anniversary, called on Already Been Chewed to create the 20-second spot.

“The challenge was that the licensing arrangement that Disney made with Nixon doesn’t allow Mickey’s image to be in the spot,” explains Barton Damer, creative director at Already Been Chewed. “We had to come up with a campaign that promotes the watch and has some sort of call to action that inspires people to want this watch. But, at the same time, what were we going to do for 20 seconds if we couldn’t show Mickey?”

After much consideration, Damer and his team developed a concept to determine if they could push the limits on this restriction. “We came up with a treatment for the video that would be completely point-of-view, and the POV would do a variety of things for us that were working in our favor.”

The solution was to show Mickey’s hands and feet without actually showing the whole character. In another instance, a silhouette of Mickey is seen in the shadows on a wall, sending a clear message to viewers that the spot is an official Disney and Mickey Mouse release and not just something that was inspired by Mickey Mouse.

Targeting the appropriate consumer demographic segment was another key issue. “Mickey Mouse has long been one of the most iconic brands in the history of branding, so we wanted to make sure that it also appealed to the Nixon target audience and not just a Disney consumer,” Damer says. “When you think of Disney, you could brand Mickey for children or you could brand it for adults who still love Mickey Mouse. So, we needed to find a style and vibe that would speak to the Nixon target audience.”

The Already Been Chewed team chose surfing and skateboarding as dominant themes, since 16-to 30-year-olds are the target demographic and also because Disney is a West Coast brand.
Damer comments, “We wanted to make sure we were creating Mickey in a kind of 3D, tangible way, with more of a feature film and 3D feel. We felt that it should have a little bit more of a modern approach. But at the same time, we wanted to mesh it with a touch of the old-school vibe, like 1950s cartoons.”

In that spirit, the team wanted the action to start with Mickey walking from his car and then culminate at the famous Venice Beach basketball courts and skate park. Here’s the end result.

“The challenge, of course, is how to do all this in 15 seconds so that we can show the logos at the front and back and a hero image of the watch. And that’s where it was fun thinking it through and coming up with the flow of the spot and seamless transitions with no camera cuts or anything like that. It was a lot to pull off in such a short time, but I think we really succeeded.”

Already Been Chewed achieved these goals with an assist from Maxon’s Cinema 4D and Adobe After Effects. With Damer as creative lead, here’s the complete cast of characters: head of production Aaron Smock; 3D design was via Thomas King, Barton Damer, Bryan Talkish, Lance Eckert; animation was provided by Bryan Talkish and Lance Eckert; character animation was via Chris Watson; soundtrack was DJ Sean P.

Rex Recker’s mix and sound design for new Sunoco spot

By Randi Altman

Rex Recker

Digital Arts audio post mixer/sound designer Rex Recker recently completed work on a 30-second Sunoco spot for Allen & Gerritsen/Boston and Cosmo Street Edit/NYC. In the commercial a man is seen pumping his own gas at a Sunoco station and checking his phone. You can hear birds chirping and traffic moving in the background when suddenly a robotic female voice comes from the pump itself, asking about what app he’s looking at.

He explains it’s the Sunoco mobile app and that he can pay for the gas directly from his phone, saving time while earning rewards. The voice takes on an offended tone since he will no longer need her help when paying for his gas. The spot ends with a voiceover about the new app.

To find out more about the process, we reached out to New York-based Recker, who recorded the VO and performed the mix and sound design.

How early did you get involved, and how did you work with the agency and the edit house?
I was contacted before the mix by producer Billy Near about the nature of the spot. Specifically, about the filtering of the music coming out of the speakers at the gas station.  I was sent all the elements from the edit house before the actual mix, so I had a chance to basically do a premix before the agency showed up.

Can you talk about the sound design you provided?
The biggest hurdle was to settle on the sound texture of the woman coming out of the speaker of the gas pump. We tried about five different filtering profiles before settling on the one in the spot. I used McDSP FutzBox for the effect. The ambience was your basic run-of-the mill birds and distant highway sound effects from my SoundMiner server. I added some Foley sound effects of the man handling the gas pump too.

Any challenges on this spot?
Besides designing the sound processing on the music and the woman’s voice, the biggest hurdle was cleaning up the dialogue, which was very noisy and not matching from shot to shot. I used iZotope 6 to clean up the dialogue and also used the ambience match to create a seamless backround of the ambience. iZotope 6 is the biggest mix-saver in my audio toolbox. I love how it smoothed out the dialogue.

Behind the Title: Carbon senior colorist Julien Biard

NAME: Julien Biard

COMPANY: Carbon in Chicago

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Carbon is a full-service creative studio specializing in design, color, visual effects and motion graphics, with offices in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m responsible for grading the work to get the most out of the material. Color has a lot of potential to assist the storytelling in conveying the emotion of a film. I also oversee the running of the Chicago color department.

National Trust

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Most of the time people are surprised this job actually exists, or they think I’m a hair colorist. After many years this still makes me smile every time!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There are many aspects of the job I enjoy. The main part of the job is the creative side, giving my input and taste to a piece makes the job personally and emotionally involving. I get a lot of satisfaction from this process, working with the team and using color to set the mood and tone of the spot or film.

Finally, by far the best part of the job is to educate and train the next generation of colorists. Having been part of the same process at the beginning of my career, I feel very proud to be able to pass on my knowledge, what I have learned from peers and worked out for myself, and to help as many youngsters to get into color grading as possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I miss 35mm…

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning type of guy, so getting on my bike nice and early, taking photographs or getting straight to work. Mornings are always productive for me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be an art buyer! Realistically, I’d probably be a mountain guide back home in the French Alps where I grew up.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
In all honesty, this was very unexpected as I originally trained to become a professional football player until quite an advanced age — which I’m now glad wasn’t meant to be my path. It was only when I moved to London after graduating that I fell into the post world where I started as a tea boy. I met the colorist there, and within the first day I knew this would be something I’d enjoy doing and could be good at. I trained hard and worked alongside some of the best colorists in the industry, learning from them while finding my own tune and it worked out pretty well.

Ted Baker

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
National Trust
Run the Jewels
Royal Blood
Rapha
Ted Baker

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
There are many projects I’m proud of, and picking only one is probably not possible. I think what I’m the most proud of is the relationship I have built with some of the industry’s most creative talents — people like Crowns and Owls, David Wilson, Thomas Bryant, Andrew Telling and Ninian Doff, to name a few. Also, being able to bring my contribution to the edifice in this stimulating world is what I’m the proudest of.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My sound system, my camera, a corkscrew and my bike, of course!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mainly Instagram; it’s all about the visuals.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Is there such thing as grading without music?! I need my music when I work. It helps me get in the zone and also helps me with timings. An album is around the hour mark, so I know where I am.

Taste wise? Oh dear, the list could be long. If the beat is good and there are instruments, I’m in. I do struggle with pop music a lot. But I’m open to anything else.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I ride my bike, anywhere I can. I climb. I enjoy photography very much too. Since I’m in a dark room most of the time at work, I spend as much of my spare time outside as possible

Using VFX to bring the new Volkswagen Jetta to life

LA-based studio Jamm provided visual effects for the all-new 2019 Volkswagen Jetta campaign Betta Getta Jetta. Created by Deutsch and produced by ManvsMachine, the series of 12 spots bring the Jetta to life by combining Jamm’s CG design with a color palette inspired by the car’s 10-color ambient lighting system.

“The VW campaign offered up some incredibly fun and intricate challenges. Most notably was the volume of work to complete in a limited amount of time — 12 full-CG spots in just nine weeks, each one unique with its own personality,” says VFX supervisor Andy Boyd.

Collaboration was key to delivering so many spots in such a short span of time. Jamm worked closely with ManvsMachine on every shot. “The team had a very strong creative vision which is crucial in the full 3D world where anything is possible,” explains Boyd.

Jamm employed a variety of techniques for the music-centric campaign, which highlights updated features such as ambient lighting and Beats Audio. The series includes spots titled  Remix, Bumper-to-Bumper, Turb-Whoa, Moods, Bass, Rings, Puzzle and App Magnet, along with 15-second teasers, all of which aired on various broadcast, digital and social channels during the World Cup.

For “Remix,” Jamm brought both a 1985 and a 2019 Jetta to life, along with a hybrid mix of the two, adding a cool layer of turntablist VFX, whereas for “Puzzle,” they cut up the car procedurally in Houdini​, which allowed the team to change around the slices as needed.

For Bass, Jamm helped bring personality to the car while keeping its movements grounded in reality. Animation supervisor Stew Burris pushed the car’s performance and dialed in the choreography of the dance with ManvsMachine as the Jetta discovered the beat, adding exciting life to the car as it bounced to the bassline and hit the switches on a little three-wheel motion.

We reached out to Jamm’s Boyd to find out more.

How early did Jamm get involved?
We got involved as soon as agency boards were client approved. We worked hand in hand with ManvMachine to previs each of the spots in order to lay the foundation for our CG team to execute both agency and directors’ vision.

What were the challenges of working on so many spots at once.
The biggest challenge was for editorial to keep up with the volume of previs options we gave them to present to agency.

Other than Houdini, what tools did they use?
Flame, Nuke and Maya were used as well.

What was your favorite spot of the 12 and why?
Puzzle was our favorite to work on. It was the last of the bunch delivered to Deutsch which we treated with a more technical approach, slicing up the car like a Rubix’s Cube.

 

Behind the Title: Jogger Studios’ CD Andy Brown

This veteran creative director can also often be found at the controls of his Flame working on a new spot.

NAME: Andy Brown

COMPANY: Jogger Studios (@joggerstudios)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a boutique post house with offices in the US and UK providing visual effects, motion graphics, color grading and finishing. We are partnered with Cut + Run for editorial and get to work with their editors from around the world. I am based in our Jogger Los Angeles office, after having helped found the company in London.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Overseeing compositing, visual effects and finishing. Looking after staff and clients. Juggling all of these things and anticipating the unexpected.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m still working “on the box” every day. Even though my title is creative director, it is the hands-on work that is my first love as far as project collaborations go. Also I get to re-program the phones and crawl under the desks to get the wires looking neater when viewed from the client couch.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The variety, the people and the challenges. Just getting to work on a huge range of creative projects is such a privilege. How many people get to go to work each day looking forward to it?

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The hours, occasionally. It’s more common to have to work without clients nowadays. That definitely makes for more work sometimes, as you might need to create two or three versions of a spot to get approval. If everyone was in the room together you reach a consensus more quickly.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the start of the day best, when everyone is coming into the office and we are getting set up for whatever project we are working on. Could be the first coffee of the day that does it.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I want to say classic car dealer, but given my actual career path the most likely alternative would be editor.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
There were lots of reasons, when I look at it. It was either the Blue Peter Book of Television (the longest running TV program for kids, courtesy of the BBC) or my visit to the HTV Wales TV station with my dad when I was about 12. We walked around the studios and they were playing out a film to air, grading it live through a telecine. I was really struck by the influence that the colorist was having on what was seen.

I went on to do critical work on photography, film and television at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at Birmingham University. Part of that course involved being shown around the Pebble Mill BBC Studios. They were editing a sequence covering a public enquiry into the Handsworth riots in 1985. It just struck me how powerful the editing process was. The story could be told so many different ways, and the editor was playing a really big part in the process.

Those experiences (and an interest in writing) led me to think that television might be a good place to work. I got my first job as a runner at MPC after a friend had advised me how to get a start in the business.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We worked on a couple of spots for Bai recently with Justin Timberlake creating the “brasberry.” We had to make up some graphic animations for the newsroom studio backdrop for the shoot and then animate opening title graphics to look just enough like it was a real news report, but not too much like a real news report.

We do quite a bit of food work, so there’s always some burgers, chicken or sliced veggies that need a bit of love to make them pop.

There’s a nice set extension job starting next week, and we recently finished a job with around 400 final versions, which made for a big old deliverables spreadsheet. There’s so much that we do that no one sees, which is the point if we do it right.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Sometimes the job that you are most proud of isn’t necessarily the most amazing thing to look at. I used to work on newspaper commercials back in the UK, and it was all so “last minute.” A story broke, and all of a sudden you had to have a spot ready to go on air with no edit, no footage and only the bare bones of a script. It could be really challenging, but we had to get it done somehow.

But the best thing is seeing something on TV that you’ve worked on. At Jogger Studios, it is primarily commercials, so you get that excitement over and over again. It’s on air for a few weeks and then it’s gone. I like that. I saw two of our spots in a row recently on TV, which I got a kick out of. Still looking for that elusive hat-trick.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The Flame, the Land Rover Series III and, sadly, my glasses.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Just friends and family on Instagram, mainly. Although like most Flame operators, I look at the Flame Learning Channel on YouTube pretty regularly. YouTube also thinks I’m really interested in the Best Fails of 2018 for some reason.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
More often than not it is podcasts. West Wing Weekly, The Adam Buxton Podcast, Short Cuts and Song Exploder. Plus some of the shows on BBC 6 Music, which I really miss.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I go to work every day feeling incredibly lucky to be doing the job that I do, and it’s good to remember that. The 15-minute walk to and from work in Santa Monica usually does it.

Living so close to the beach is fantastic. We can get down to the sand, get the super-brella set up and get in the sea with the bodyboards in about 15 minutes. Then there’s the Malibu Cars & Coffee, which is a great place to start your Sunday.

Luke Morrison joins Electronic Theatre Collective as head of color

Electric Theatre Collective has added Luke Morrison to its London of office as head of color. He will lead a team that already includes Jason Wallis, Lewis Crossfield, Kaitlyn Battistelli, Ruth Wardell, Mathieu Caplanne and Tim Smith.

During his decade-plus career, Morrison has won multiple AICE Awards, including a win in the Color Grading: Over 90 Seconds category for his 2018 Canadian Olympic Committee “Be Olympic” spot directed by Ian Pons Jewell.

Morrison joins Electric Theatre Collective from The Mill, where he spent the past few years setting up the color department at their Chicago office. While there, he led their color team and nurtured up-and-coming talent.

When asked what excited him about joining Electric, Luke had this to say: “Working with and nurturing talent is something that I’m really passionate about, so seeing how Electric holds this as one of their core values is exciting. The opportunity to add my experience and help shape the company whilst building upon their impressive work is inspiring. Having known and worked with many Electric members in the past, I’m looking forward to working alongside them again.”

To date Luke has worked with brands the like of Jeep, Mercedes-Benz, Beats and, most recently, Dollar Shave Club. He has graded for directors such as Wally Pfister, Pete Riski and Mark Romanek.

MPC directs, provides VFX, color for Fiji Water spot

To launch the new Fiji Sports Cap bottle, Wonderful Agency came up with the concept of a drop of rain from the clouds high above Fiji making its way down through the pristine environment to showcase the source of their water. The story then transitions to the Fiji Water Sports Cap bottle being used by athletes during a tough workout.

To bring that idea to life, Wonderful Agency turned to MPC with creative director Michael Gregory, who made making his MPC directorial debut, helming both spots while also leading his VFX team. These spots will air on primetime television.

Gregory’s skills in visual effects made him the perfect fit as director of the spots, since it was essential to seamlessly depict the raindrop’s fast-paced journey through the different environments. MPC was tasked with building the CG water droplet that falls from the sky, while reflecting and magnifying the beauty of the scenes shot in Fiji.

“It was key to film in low light, cloudy conditions in Fiji,” explains Gregory. “We shot over five days with a drone in the most remote parts of the main island, taking the drone above the clouds and shooting many different angles on the descent, so we had all the textures and plates we needed.”

For the Fiji section, Gregory and team used the Zenmuse X7 camera that sits on a DJI Inspire 2 drone. “We chose this because logistically it was easier to get it to Fiji by plane. It’s a much smaller drone and isn’t as battery-hungry. You can only travel with a certain amount of batteries on a plane, and the larger drones that carry the Reds and Alexas would need the batteries shipped by sea. Being smaller meant it had much longer flying times. That meant we could have it in the air at height for much longer periods. The footage was edited in Adobe Premiere.”

MPC’s VFX team then got to work. According to lead compositor Oliver Caiden, “The raindrop itself was simulated CG geometry that then had all of the different textures refracted through the UV map. This process was also applied to the droplet reflections, mapping high dynamic range skies onto the outside, so we could achieve a more immersive and richer effect.”

This process enabled the compositors to animate the raindrops and have full control over motion blur, depth of focus, refraction and reflections, making them as realistic and multifaceted as possible. The shots were a mixture of multiple plates, matte painting, 2D and CG clouds, which ultimately created a sequence that felt seamless with reality. The spot was graded by MPC’s colorist Ricky Gausis.

The tools used by MPC were Autodesk Maya, Side Effects Houdini, Adobe Photoshop as well as Foundry Nuke for the VFX and FilmLight Baselight for color.

The latest Fiji campaign marks a continued partnership between MPC and Wonderful Agency — they previously handled VFX for Wonderful Pistachios and Wonderful Halos spots — but this latest campaign sees MPC managing the production from start to finish.

Therapy Studios provided the final audio mix.

 

Behind the Title: Uppercut Editor Alvaro del Val

NAME: Alvaro del Val

COMPANY: Uppercut

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Uppercut is an editing boutique based in Manhattan. It was founded three years ago by editor Micah Scarpelli and now has five editors who have been carefully selected to create a collaborative atmosphere.

We share a love for creating emotionally driven stories and challenging each other to get the most out of our creativity. It’s important to us that our clients, as well as staff, experience the camaraderie and familial vibe at our office. We want them to feel at home here.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Editing is storytelling. Generally, we jump into a project once the shoot is finished. We get the dailies and start thinking about how to get the best out of the footage, and what’s the best way is to tell the story. It’s a very creative process with endless possibilities, and it’s non-stop decision making. You have to decide which elements create a memorable piece, not only visually, but also in the way the story unfolds.

Kicking Yoda

It is often said that a film is written three times: When it is written, when it is shot and when it is edited. Editing can completely change the direction of a film, commercial or music video. It establishes the way we understand a plot, it sets the rhythm and, most importantly, it delivers the emotions felt by the audience — this is what they ultimately remember. A year after watching a film, you may forget details of plot, or the name of the director, but you’ll remember how it made you feel.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Many people think that editing is just putting images together, that we follow a storyboard that has been done previously, but it is much more nuanced than that. The script is a starting point, a reference, but from there, the possibilities are endless. You can give the same footage to a hundred editors and they will give you a hundred different stories.

People are also surprised by the amount of footage you have for a 30-second commercial, which can easily be five or six hours. Once, I was given fifteen hours of footage for a sixty second commercial.

As Walter Murch said, “Every frame you see in front of you is auditioning to make it into the final piece.” You are making millions of decisions every day, selecting only the best few frames to tell the story the way you want.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
In some ways, editing is like a sculptor carving a block of marble and discovering the figure that has been contained inside, working little by little, knowing where they are going, but at same time, letting the story unfold before them. That creative process is my favorite part. It is so exciting in the moment when you are alone in the room and everything starts to make sense; you can feel it all coming together. It’s a really special and beautiful moment.

I also love that every project is a new experience. It’s amazing to work at something you love that brings you a new challenge every day. What you can offer creatively changes along with your evolution as a person. It’s a field that demands that you learn and evolve constantly.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part is that it can be hard to balance your personal life with your professional life. As an editor, you often need to work long nights and weekends or change plans unexpectedly, which affects the people in your life. But it’s part of the job, and I have to accept it to be able to do what I do.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
It depends on where I am in the project. If I’m starting to build a story, the evening is definitely my most creative and focused time. There are less distractions in terms of phone calls and emails, and I’ve always been a night person. But I love mornings in order to judge something I’ve done the night before. Coming to the edit room with fresh eyes gives me more objective vision.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would definitely work as a photographer. I got my first camera when I was seven years old and haven’t stopped taking pictures since. I used to work as a photographer in Madrid, years ago. I loved it, but I didn’t have time to do both, and I loved editing too much to let it go.

Editing is what brought me to the most creative city in the world, so I’m really thankful for that. Walking around the city with my camera is definitely one of my favorite things to do.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Since I was a kid I’ve been obsessed with visuals, photography and films. I had a natural connection with that way of communicating. My camera was a way to express myself… my diary. In college, I started studying cinema, working on TV and making my own films, which is when I discovered the magic of editing and knew that it was my place. I felt that editing was the most special, creative part of the process and felt so lucky to be the one doing it. I couldn’t believe that not everyone wanted to be the editor.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
One of my more recent projects is a short documentary film called Kicking Yoda, which is doing the festival circuit and received a Los Angeles Film Award for Best Documentary. It’s the story of Doug Blevins who, after being born with cerebral palsy, became an NFL kicking coach nominated to the Hall of Fame. I love stories of overcoming obstacles because they are relatable to everyone in one way or another.

Fitbit

I recently worked on a Fitbit campaign called Find Your Reason, which was comprised of true stories about people finding their path in life through athletics. It has been nominated for best editing in the 2018 AICE Awards, which are coming up this month.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
Absolutely. To begin with, it’s completely different to edit a 30-second commercial than a short film or a music video. What drives the story changes; the rhythm and the structure differ so much.

In long pieces, you have more time to create a different, more profound kind of interest. I think advertising is moving more toward longer format pieces because they create a stronger connection with the audience. Television commercials are becoming the teaser, allowing you to discover the whole story online later.

The visual language also has to adapt to the genre. The audience needs to understand what kind of story you are telling, or you’ll lose them. You always need to have the audience in mind, understanding to whom your piece is addressed and on which platform it will be released. Your attention span differs depending on whether you are eating dinner in front of the TV, sitting at your computer or watching in a theater. You need to adapt with those circumstances in mind.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The project I’m most proud of is Volvo S90, Song of the Open Road. It’s a beautiful campaign that was awarded Best Editing in Automotive in the 2017 AICE Awards (Association of Independent Commercial Editors). It was very special for me, not only because I was able to be part of a team with world-class artists, like composer Dan Romer, DP Jeff Cronenweth and actor Josh Brolin, but also because of the freedom I had in the creative process. I think that collaboration, as well as the nonlinear storytelling I was able to use, is why the campaign has the poetry and emotion I always pursue in my edits. Additionally, the story inspires you to live freely and pursue your chosen path. I feel it’s a story that makes you think and stays with you after watching it.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
It depends on the needs of the project, but typically I use Avid Media Composer. I sometimes use Premiere, but I really prefer editing in Avid. I find it’s faster, deals better with large amounts of footage and is generally a much more stable software. It’s true that if you want to end your project in the edit suite, Premiere does a much better job in terms of using effects and exporting. But in a workflow with external color grading and conforming later (in a Flame for example), I would definitely go with Avid.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLUGIN?
It’s not strictly a plugin, but the Motion Effect Editor is fantastic in Avid. The freedom and control you have over the speed curves when creating time warps is really outstanding. The tool is really visual, which helps me in terms of creating nice speed changes. For me, it’s an important tool, as I love editing sports commercials. For action scenes with a lot of movement, it’s a key resource to have.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Nowadays, mostly in the American market, the editor has become kind of the director in post. We are involved in the sound design, the mix, the color grading, the conform and the final deliverables; we have to be in control of the whole process. This happens because the director is normally not around, which doesn’t happen in Europe. But here, the market asks for quick turnarounds and editors work hand in hand with agencies to get things done in the right amount of time for the client.

Due to this model, I increasingly prefer to be involved in preproduction when the idea is conceived. That way, I have a better understanding of the project and I can get the director’s insight so I am able to maintain the essence of his vision later on. It is also a good opportunity to share ideas that will help later in the editing and post process.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Of course, we all feel nowadays that we cannot live without our phone and our computer. All our music, films, photos and social world are contained there. It is amazing to think that we used to live without all that in the ‘90s, but technology has changed the game.

Besides those, my cameras are my main pieces of technology. I love my versatile Fuji X-T10 that I bring everywhere, but also my Canon 5D, which I use for portraits and trips.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
We all need to disconnect from time to time, and sports are my first escape from stress. I do rock climbing and cycling and I love to ride my bicycle to my beloved Prospect Park. And as a good Spaniard, soccer and tennis are my main sports. I’m a big Rafa Nadal fan.

Besides sports, I love taking advantage of all this city has to offer culturally. I love going to the Bowery Ballroom or Brooklyn Steel for live music, checking out what’s going on at The New Museum or The Whitney and enjoying the opera at The Met every time I have the chance. BAM is also one of my go-tos, as their program is outstanding all year long, from cinema to dance and theater.

Behind the Title: Lucky Post editor Elizabeth V. Moore

NAME: Elizabeth V. Moore

COMPANY: Lucky Post

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
The studio combines creative editorial, graphic design, sound design, mixing, color, compositing,VFX and finish

I feel very lucky to call Lucky my home for the past five and a half years. It’s a collection of driven co-workers who truly interact like a team. Together, we infuse art and care into the projects that come through our office.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I am one of the four editors here.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with clients to take their concept and make it a reality. With the footage I’m provided, I get to be a storyteller. I add my creative perspective and collaborate with clients to craft a story or message that is hopefully even better than what they had envisioned possible.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
A big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a cut we’re all happy with. It’s not just me in a room by myself, editing. There’s a responsibility to your clients not just to edit something for them, but also to help facilitate a space where they feel comfortable and are happy to come to every day. My goal is to have them leave Lucky Post at the end of the day confident in the cut and feeling good in general… with smiles on their faces.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is seeing the edit take shape… to get to the end of a project and see the final resul, and reflect on what it took for that to manifest. That is a very satisfying feeling.

This CostaDelMar Slam spot is a recent project edited by Moore.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I try not to focus too much on my least favorite aspects of anything, but if pressed I’d have to say going through footage and making selects. I feel anxious to start my favorite part of the job — seeing the edit take shape — but in order to get the best result you have to focus and find the best pieces amidst all the content.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I wouldn’t consider myself a morning person, so I’d have to say early afternoon. When I have a deadline to hit, however, late at night is when I can really surprise myself with the amount and quality of work I can produce under pressure.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve asked myself that question, and I honestly can’t think of a better answer than what I’m doing now. Even though I had no idea when I was younger that this is where I’d end up, in retrospect, it makes the most sense.

My personal set of talents and interests throughout my development have helped give me the arsenal of skills it takes to enjoy editing and do it well.

SO YOU DIDN’T KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I didn’t have any idea I would end up in this career until college. I was originally a business major with a minor in film, because I always loved movies. Quickly into my first semester it dawned on me that I could actually pursue a career in something I was passionate about, not just what I thought was expected of me. I switched to film and, as I learned more about all the different departments, I knew editing was where my talents and skills could thrive. And the more I did it, the more I fell in love with the art.

AS A WOMAN EDITOR, WHO DID YOU LOOK UP TO WHEN STARTING OUT?
I didn’t think too much about who I looked up to based on being a woman. I had my films and editors that inspired me and I aspired to emulate editorially. However, I would say that my biggest female inspiration was editor Sally Menke (who died in an accident in 2010). Pulp Fiction was one of my favorite movies at the time, and the way the story was edited and structured was a large part of that.

Once I looked deeper into her career, I realized she was the editor for all of Quentin Tarantino’s films. It inspired me greatly that she was able to not only be an editor during a time that was very much a male-dominated field, but also maintain an ongoing, collaborative relationship that shaped both of their careers. I wanted to be the kind of editor that was not only worth working with, but worth working with again and again.

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE MEDIA CHAMPIONING MORE FEMALE CREATIVES AND LEADERS IN OUR INDUSTRY?
I think it’s extremely important. To continue to push our industry to greater heights, new and different perspectives are needed to keep things evolving and growing. Media plays a big role in our society and culture, and women need to be well represented and their voices heard. Similar to my own story, a lot of opportunities are missed if they’re unknown or seem impossible. More women in leadership and creative positions will help young women see themselves in these roles.

WHAT SHOULD OR CAN WE DO TO ENCOURAGE MORE WOMEN TO BECOME EDITORS?
To be an editor, you have to be passionate about it and love the process. We can’t make women be interested in the art, but we can reinforce the confidence in the ones who are. We have to be the ones to say, “There’s no reason to be intimidated by pursuing this career path. This industry is always looking for fresh, original perspectives and we, as women, have a unique voice to offer. The quality of your craft will speak for itself and that is what will draw clients to work with you.”

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Within the past year I’ve worked on campaigns for Crate & Barrel, Charles Schwab, AT&T and Soraa.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I wouldn’t say that I wear a different hat when working on different genres, because at the end of the day the goal is the same: to tell a good story in as creative a way as the content allows.

However, what I’m looking for out of the footage will change depending on the type of project. So much of my select-making process is based on feelings that arise while viewing a scene. I select the pieces that give me the reaction I want the audience to feel based on the genre of the piece.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I have a different sense of pride for all the projects I work on. Sometimes it’s because of the level of quality of the work, and sometimes it’s because of the challenges that had to be overcome. But I’d say that I’m still most proud of one of my first pieces I did at Lucky Post. It was back when I was an assistant editor; I was given access to footage for a music video for a musician named Jesse Woods and was told to just have fun with it and use it as an opportunity to practice.

Even though I wasn’t the official editor on it, I took the challenge seriously and spent hours exploring possibilities, pushing my craft farther than I ever had to that point. The director was impressed enough that it became the final cut he and the artist used. I still look back on that as one of the most beautiful pieces I’ve produced. It was the turning point in my career, where not only did others see and recognize my talent, but I saw what I was capable of and this gave me the confidence that led me to where I am now.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I’ve used a few different editing software programs throughout my career and my favorite, and what I currently use, is Adobe Premiere Pro.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Even though I’m only asked to edit, a big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a final cut. Sometimes that means being a good listener or a positive force for them when things get stressful.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A computer is number one, since I can’t edit without it. I’d like to believe I’d still be interested in the art of editing if I had to do it via the cut and splice method, but it would be a very different process and experience for me. Second would be my television. I love watching great movies, shows and well-done commercials, so it’s both a leisure activity and it inspires me as an editor. Lastly, my cell phone because we now live in a society where it’s becoming hard to work and stay connected without it.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Besides my passion for the visual arts, like movies, my favorite escape is music. I love to go to shows to see live bands or get lost in music being played by DJs and dance. When I’m in those moments, all the stress from the week is forgotten and I’m living in the present.

NYC’s Wax adds editor Kate Owen

Kate Owen, an almost 20-year veteran who has cut both spots and films, has joined the editorial roster of New York’s Wax. The UK-born but New York-based Owen has edited projects across fashion, beauty, lifestyle and entertainment for brands such as Gucci, Victoria Beckham, Vogue, Adidas, Sony, Showtime and Virgin Atlantic.

Owen started editing in her teens and subsequently worked with top-tier agencies like Mother, Saatchi NY, McGarryBowen, Grey Worldwide and Y&R. She has also worked at editing houses Marshall Street Editors and Whitehouse Post.

In terms of recognition, Owen had been BAFTA-nominated for her short film Turning and has won multiple industry awards, including One Show, D&AD, BTAA as well as a Gold Cannes Lions for her work on the “The Man Who Walked Around the World” campaign for Johnnie Walker.

Owen believes editing is a “fluid puzzle. I create in my mind a somewhat Minority Report wall with all the footage in front of me, where I can scroll through several options in my mind to try out and create fluid visual mixes. It’s always the unknown journey at the start of every project and the fascination that comes with honing and fine tuning or tearing an edit upside down and viewing it from a totally different perspective that is so exciting to me”.

Regarding her new role, she says, “There is a unique opportunity to create a beauty, fashion and lifestyle edit arm at Wax. The combination of my edit aesthetic and the company’s legacy of agency beauty background is really exciting to me.”

Owen calls herself “a devoted lifetime Avid editor.” She says, for her, it’s the most elegant way to work. “I can build walls of thumbnails in my Selects Bins and create living mood boards. I love how I can work in very detailed timelines and speed effects without having to break my workflow.”

She also gives a shout out to the Wax design and VFX team. “If we need to incorporate After Effects or Maxon Cinema 4D, I am able to brief and work with my team and incorporate those elements into my offline. I also love to work with the agency or director to work out a LUT before the shoot so that the offline looks premium right from the start.”

Director Olivier Gondry returns to Partizan

Director Olivier Gondry has once again joined the roster at production house Partizan. Gondry, known for his commercial and music video work, made his first major mark with his commercials for HP, featuring his brother Michel and Vera Wang. Since then, this Paris-based director has gone on to collaborate with brands such as Audi, YouTube, Fiat, Microsoft, Starbucks, Nissan, Canon, Gillette, True Religion, Etsy and Trip Advisor.

Originally known as a visual effects artist, it was at Partizan where Gondry first established himself as a director. The renewed connection is a happy homecoming for Gondry and Partizan, which maintains offices in Paris, London, New York, Los Angeles, Berlin, São Paulo and in the Middle East.

Olivier’s endeavors in the music world include work with such artists as Daft Punk, OK Go and The Vines. Most recently, Olivier created a slightly disturbing and compelling visual exultation of facial flux and melding bodies for Joywave’s Doubt.

“Partizan has been part of my life since forever,” says Gondry. “First as a brother watching Michel climbing the steps. I can still remember him telling me, ‘I met this producer [Georges Bermann].’ I was proud and curious already! It was here that I first transitioned from special effects to directing. I’m so happy to return to Partizan, to be back home and back with my brother.”

Gondry is also currently in development on a long-form narrative project.

Video: Red Sparrow colorist David Hussey talks workflow

After film school, and working as an assistant editor, David Hussey found himself drawn to color grading. He then became an assistant to a colorist and his path was set.

In a recent video interview with the now senior colorist at LA’s Company 3, Hussey talks about the differences of coloring a short-form project versus a long-form film and walks us through his workflow on Red Sparrow, which stars Jennifer Lawrence as a Russian ballerina-turned-spy.

Please watch…

Behind the Title: Arcade Edit’s Ali Mao

NAME: Ali Mao

COMPANY: Arcade Edit in New York City

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Arcade is a film and television editorial house with offices located in Los Angeles and New York City.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being an editor is all about storytelling. Whether that means following the script and boards as designed or playing outside the parameters of those guidelines, we set the pace and tone of a piece in hopes that our audience reacts to it. Sometimes it’s super easy and everything just falls into place. Other times it requires a bit more problem solving on my end, but I’m always striving to tell the story the best I can.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
For a lot of people who don’t work in the industry, they think editors just sit in a dark room alone all the time, and we do sometimes! But what I love most about editing is how collaborative a process it is. So much of what we do is working with the director and the creatives to find just the right pieces that help tell their story the most effectively.

Aflac

Once in awhile the best cuts are not even what was originally boarded or conceived, but what was found through the exploration of editing. When you fall in love with a character, laugh at a joke, or cry at an emotional moment it’s a result of the directing, the acting and the editing all working perfectly in sync with one another.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love going through dailies for the first time and seeing how the director and the cinematographer compose a particular scene or how an actor interprets lines, especially when you pick up on something in a take that you as an editor love – a subtle twitching of an eye or the way the light captures some element of the image – that everyone forgot about until they see it in your edit.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Not having enough time to really sit with the footage before I start working with the director or agency.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early in the morning even though I’m not really a morning person…but in our industry, that’s probably the quietest time of the day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Bumming it at the beach back home in Hawaii.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
During the summer before my junior year of high school, I stumbled upon Vivacious Lady (with Jimmy Stewart and Ginger Rogers) on AMC. I don’t know what it was about that movie, but I stayed up until 2am watching the whole thing.

For the next two years, every Sunday I’d grab the TV guide from the morning newspaper and review the AMC and TCM lineups for the week. Then I’d set my VCR to record every movie I wanted to see, which at the time were mostly musicals and rom-coms. When my dad asked me what I wanted to study in college I said film because at 5’4” getting paid to play basketball probably wasn’t going to happen, and those old AMC and TMC movies were my next favorite thing.

When I got to college, I was taught the basics of FCP in a digital filmmaking class and fell in love with editing instantly. I liked how there was a structure to the process of it, while simultaneously having a ton of creative freedom in how to tell the story.

Tide

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
In January I worked with Saatchi on their Tide Super Bowl Campaign, editing the television teasers and 15s. This was the second year in a row that I got to work with them for the Super Bowl, and it’s one of my favorite jobs every year. They do some really fun and creative work for their teasers, and there’s so much opportunity to experiment and get a little weird

There was the Aflac Ski Patrol spot, and I also just finished a Fage Campaign with Leo Burnett, which went incredibly well. Matt Lenski from Arts & Science did such an incredible job with the shoot and provided me with so many options of how to tell the story for each spot.

DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I think you put on a different hat whenever you start any project, regardless of genre. Every comedy piece or visual piece is unique in its story, rhythm, etc. I definitely try to put myself in the right head space for editing a specific genre, whether that be from chatting with the director/agency or doing a deep dive on the Internet looking for inspiration from films, ads, music videos — anything really.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked as an editor on a documentary called Undroppable. It was about the school dropout rate across the US and followed students from different parts of the country, focusing on the challenges of graduating high school.

The film had already been edited by the time I got involved, but the producer felt it needed fresh eyes. I loved a lot of what the previous editors had done, and felt like the one thing I could bring to the film was focus. There were so many compelling stories that it sometimes felt like you never had a chance to really take any of it in. I wanted the audience to not just fall in love with these students and root for them, but to also leave the theater in active pursuit of ways they could be involved in our country’s education system.

As someone who was cutting mostly commercials and short films in Final Cut Pro at the time, doing a feature length documentary on Avid Media Composer was daunting, but so very, very exciting and gratifying.

WHAT DO YOU EDIT ON THESE DAYS?
Avid Media Composer.

ARE YOU EVER ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Every once in awhile I get a job where I’m asked to create an edit that is not in line with the footage that was shot. In those instances, I’ll have to comp takes together in order to get a desired set of performances or a desired shot. I try not to make the comps too clean because I don’t want to put our Flame artist out of a job.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, computer, Roomba

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I just had a baby, so coming home to my son and my baby daddy is a great way to end the day. I also play on an all-women’s flag football team in a co-ed league on the weekends. The first game we ever won I QB’d while I was eight weeks pregnant; it was my Serena Williams moment!

David Walton Smith joins digital agency Grow as head of film

Norfolk, Virginia-based digital agency Grow has expanded its film and production capabilities with the addition of David Walton Smith, who will take on the newly created role of head of film. Walton Smith will be charged with overseeing all content development and video production for the agency’s clients, which include Google, Spotify, Adidas and Adult Swim.

A multidisciplinary filmmaker and creative, Walton Smith has produced commercials, as well as branded and documentary content, for brands like Google, Volvo, Mass Mutual, Hyundai and Aleve. Prior to joining Grow, he was a director and producer at CNN’s branded content division, Courageous Studio, where he created broadcast and web content for CNN’s global audiences. He was also editor of Born to Explore with Richard Wiese, an Emmy Award-winning show that aired on ABC, as well as creative lead/director at London and Brooklyn-based LonelyLeap, where he spearheaded campaigns for Google and Tylenol.

Grow works with brands including Google, Spotify, NBC, Adidas, Homes.com, Oxygen Network and Adult Swim, to create digital experiences, products and interactive installations. Notable recent projects include Window Wonderland for Google Shopping, Madden Giferator for EA Sports, as part of Google’s Art, Copy & Code initiative, as well as The Pursuit, an interactive, crime thriller game created with Oxygen Media.

Super Bowl: Sound Lounge’s audio post for Pepsi, NFL and more

By Jennifer Walden

Super Bowl Sunday is an unofficial national holiday in this country, with almost as much excitement for the commercials that air as for the actual game. And regardless of which teams are playing, New York’s advertising and post communities find themselves celebrating, because they know the work they are providing will be seen by millions and talked about repeatedly in offices and on social media. To land a Super Bowl ad is a pretty big deal, and audio post facility Sound Lounge has landed seven!

Tom Jucarone

In this story, president/mixer/sound designer Tom Jucarone, mixer/sound designer Rob DiFondi and mixer/sound designer Glen Landrum share details on how they helped to craft the Super Bowl ads for Pepsi, E*Trade, the NFL and more.

Pepsi This is the Pepsi via Pepsi’s in-house creative team
This spot looks at different Pepsi products through the ages and features different pop-culture icons — like Cindy Crawford — who have endorsed Pepsi over the years. The montage-style ad is narrated by Jimmy Fallon.

Sonically, what’s unique about this spot?
Jucarone: What’s unique about this spot is the voiceover — it’s Jimmy Fallon. Sound-wise, the spot was about him and the music more than anything else. The sound effects were playing a very secondary role.

Pepsi had a really interesting vision of how they wanted Jimmy to sound. We spent a lot of time making his voice work well against the music. The Pepsi team wanted Fallon’s voice to have a fullness yet still be bright enough to cut through the heavy-duty music track. They wanted his voice to sound big and full, but without losing the personality.

What tools helped?
I used a few plug-ins on his voice. Obviously, there was some EQ but I also used one plug-in called MaxxBass by Waves, which is a bass enhancement plug-in. With that, I was able to manipulate where on the low-end I could affect his voice with more fullness. Then we added a touch of reverb to make it a bit bigger. For that, I used Audio Ease’s Altiverb but it’s very slight.

Persil Game-Time Stain-Time via DDB New York
In this spot, there’s a time-out during the big game and an announcer on TV taps on the television’s glass — from the inside. He points out a guacamole stain on one viewer’s shirt, then comes through the TV and offers up a jug of laundry detergent. The man’s shirt flies off, goes into the washer and comes out perfect. Suddenly, the shirt is back on the viewer’s body and the announcer returns to inside the TV.

Sonically, what’s unique about this spot?
Jucarone: It’s an interesting spot because it’s so totally different from what you’d expect to see during the Super Bowl. It’s this fun, little quirky spot. This guy comes out of the TV and turns all these people onto this product that cleans their clothes. There was no music, just a few magical sound effects. It’s a dialogue-driven spot, so the main task there was to clean up the dialogue and make it clear.

iZotope is my go-to tool for dialogue clean up. I love that program. There are so many different ways to attack the clean up. I’m working on a spot now that has dialogue that is basically not savable, but I think I can save it with iZotope. It’s a great tool — one of the best ones to have. I used RX 6 a lot on the Persil spot, particularly for this one guy who whispers, “What is going on?” The room tone was pretty heavy on that line, and it was one of the funniest lines, so we really wanted that one to be clear.

The approach to all these spots was to find out what unique sonic pieces are important to the story, and those are the ones you want to highlight. Back before the CALM Act, everyone was trying to make their commercial louder than everybody else’s. Now that we have that regulation, we’re a bit more open to making a spot more cinematic. We have a greater opportunity for storytelling.

E*Trade This is Getting Old via MullenLowe
In this spot, a collection of senior citizens sing about still being in the workforce — “I’m eighty-five, and I want to go home.” It’s set to the music of Harry Belafonte’s song “Day-O.” From lifeguard to club DJ, their careers are interesting, sure, but they really want nothing more than to retire.

Sonically, what’s unique about this spot?
Jucarone: That spot was difficult because of all the different voices involved, all the different singers. The agency worked with mixer Rob DiFondi and me on this one. Rob did the final mix.

The spot has a music track with solo and group performances. They had recorded the performers at a recording studio and then brought those tracks to us as a playlist of roughly 20 different versions. There were multiple people with multiple different versions, and the challenge was going through all of those to find the most unique and funniest voices for each person. So that took some time. Then, we had to match all of those voices so they sounded similar in tone. We had to re-mix each voice as we found it and used it because it wasn’t already processed. Then we had to also craft the group.
I worked with the agency to get the solo performances finalized and then Rob, the other mixer on it, took over and created the group performances. He had to combine all of these singular voices to make it sound like they were all singing together in a group, which was pretty difficult. It turned out to be a very complex session. We had multiple versions because they wanted to have choices after the fact.

What tools did you use?
There were a couple of different reverbs that really helped on this spot. We used the Waves Renaissance Reverb, and Avid’s Reverb One. We used a fun analog modeling EQ called Waves V-EQ4, which is modeled after a Neve 1081 console EQ. We wanted the individual voices to sound like they were singing together, one after another.

Any particular challenge?
DiFondi: My big job was the background chorus. We had to make a group of eight elderly background singers sound much larger. The problem there was layering the same eight people four times doesn’t net you the same as having 32 individuals. So what I did was treat each track separately. I varied the timing of each layer and I put each one in a separate room using different reverb settings and in the end that gave us the sound of a much larger chorus though we had only eight people.

Super Bowl NFL Celebrations to Come via Grey New York
NY Giants players Eli Manning and Odell Beckham, Jr. re-enact the famous last dance from Dirty Dancing, including the legendary lift at the end. The spot starts out realistic with on-camera dialogue for Eli and Odell during a team practice, but then it transitions into more of a music video as the players get wrapped up in the dance.

Sonically, what’s unique about this spot?
Landrum: There was lots of mastering on the main music track to get it to pop and be loud on-air. I used the iZotope Neutron for my music track mastering. I love that plug-in and have been using it and learning more about it. It has great multi-band compression, and the exciter is a cool addition to really finesse frequencies.

I think the most interesting part of the process was working with the director and agency creatives and producers to edit the music to match the storyboard they had before the actual shoot. We cut a few versions of varying lengths to give some flexibility. They used the music edits on-set so the guys could dance to it. I thought this was so smart because they would know what’s working and what isn’t while on-set and could adjust accordingly. I know they had a short shoot day so this had to help.

Everything worked out perfectly. I think they edited in less than a week (editor Geoff Hounsell from Arcade Edit, NY) and we mixed in a day or less. The creatives and producers involved with this spot and the NFL account are an awesome group. They make decisions and get it done and the result was amazing. Also, our expert team of producers here made the process smooth as silk during the stressful Super Bowl time.


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer.  Follow her on Twitter @AudioJeney.

The 16th annual VES Award winners

The Visual Effects Society (VES) celebrated artists and their work at the 16th Annual VES Awards, which recognize outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials, video games and special venues.

Seven-time host, comedian Patton Oswalt, presided over more than 1,000 guests at the Beverly Hilton. War for the Planet of the Apes was named photoreal feature film winner, earning four awards. Coco was named top animated film, also earning four awards. Games of Thrones was named best photoreal episode and garnered five awards — the most wins of the night. Samsung; Do What You Can’t; Ostrich won top honors in the commercial field, scoring three awards. These top four contenders collectively garnered 16 of the 24 awards for outstanding visual effects.

President of Marvel Studios Kevin Feige presented the VES Lifetime Achievement Award to producer/writer/director Jon Favreau. Academy Award-winning producer Jon Landau presented the Georges Méliès Award to Academy Award-winning visual effects master Joe Letteri, VES. Awards presenters included fan-favorite Mark Hamill, Coco director Lee Unkrich, War for the Planet of the Apes director Matt Reeves, Academy Award-nominee Diane Warren, Jaime Camil, Dan Stevens, Elizabeth Henstridge, Sydelle Noel, Katy Mixon and Gabriel “Fluffy” Iglesias.

Here is a list of the winners:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes

Joe Letteri

Ryan Stafford

Daniel Barrett

Dan Lemmon

Joel Whist

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

Dunkirk

Andrew Jackson

Mike Chambers

Andrew Lockley

Alison Wortman

Scott Fisher

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

Coco

Lee Unkrich

Darla K. Anderson

David Ryu

Michael K. O’Brien

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall

Joe Bauer

Steve Kullback

Chris Baird

David Ramos

Sam Conway

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Black Sails: XXIX

Erik Henry

Terron Pratt

Yafei Wu

David Wahlberg

Paul Dimmer

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Real-Time Project

Assassin’s Creed Origins

Raphael Lacoste

Patrick Limoges

Jean-Sebastien Guay

Ulrich Haar

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial

Samsung Do What You Can’t: Ostrich

Diarmid Harrison-Murray

Tomek Zietkiewicz

Amir Bazazi

Martino Madeddu

 

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

Avatar: Flight of Passage

Richard Baneham

Amy Jupiter

David Lester

Thrain Shadbolt

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes: Caesar

Dennis Yoo

Ludovic Chailloleau

Douglas McHale

Tim Forbes

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

Coco: Hèctor

Emron Grover

Jonathan Hoffman

Michael Honsel

Guilherme Sauerbronn Jacinto

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Real-Time Project

Game of Thrones The Spoils of War: Drogon Loot Train Attack

Murray Stevenson

Jason Snyman

Jenn Taylor

Florian Friedmann

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

Samsung Do What You Can’t: Ostrich

David Bryan

Maximilian Mallmann

Tim Van Hussen

Brendan Fagan

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

Blade Runner 2049; Los Angeles

Chris McLaughlin

Rhys Salcombe

Seungjin Woo

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

Coco: City of the Dead

Michael Frederickson

Jamie Hecker

Jonathan Pytko

Dave Strick

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project

Game of Thrones; Beyond the Wall; Frozen Lake

Daniel Villalba

Antonio Lado

José Luis Barreiro

Isaac de la Pompa

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Groot Dance/Opening Fight

James Baker

Steven Lo

Alvise Avati

Robert Stipp

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project

Blade Runner 2049: LAPD Headquarters

Alex Funke

Steven Saunders

Joaquin Loyzaga

Chris Menges

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes

David Caeiro Cebrián

Johnathan Nixon

Chet Leavai

Gary Boyle

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

Coco

Kristopher Campbell

Stephen Gustafson

Dave Hale

Keith Klohn

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project 

Game of Thrones; The Dragon and the Wolf; Wall Destruction

Thomas Hullin

Dominik Kirouac

Sylvain Nouveau

Nathan Arbuckle

  

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes

Christoph Salzmann

Robin Hollander

Ben Warner

Beck Veitch

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

Game of Thrones The Spoils of War: Loot Train Attack

Dom Hellier

Thijs Noij

Edwin Holdsworth

Giacomo Matteucci

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

Samsung Do What You Can’t: Ostrich

Michael Gregory

Andrew Roberts

Gustavo Bellon

Rashabh Ramesh Butani

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

Hybrids

Florian Brauch

Romain Thirion

Matthieu Pujol

Kim Tailhades 

 

 

 

Super Bowl: Heard City’s audio post for Tide, Bud and more

By Jennifer Walden

New York audio post house Heard City put their collaborative workflow design to work on the Super Bowl ad campaign for Tide. Philip Loeb, partner/president of Heard City, reports that their facility is set up so that several sound artists can work on the same project simultaneously.

Loeb also helped to mix and sound design many of the other Super Bowl ads that came to Heard City, including ads for Budweiser, Pizza Hut, Blacture, Tourism Australia and the NFL.

Here, Loeb and mixer/sound designer Michael Vitacco discuss the approach and the tools that their team used on these standout Super Bowl spots.

Philip Loeb

Tide’s It’s a Tide Ad campaign via Saatchi & Saatchi New York
Is every Super Bowl ad really a Tide ad in disguise? A string of commercials touting products from beer to diamonds, and even a local ad for insurance, are interrupted by David Harbour (of Stranger Things fame). He declares that those ads are actually just Tide commercials, as everyone is wearing such clean clothes.

Sonically, what’s unique about this spot?
Loeb: These spots, four in total, involved sound design and mixing, as well as ADR. One of our mixers, Evan Mangiamele, conducted an ADR session with David Harbour, who was in Hawaii, and we integrated that into the commercial. In addition, we recorded a handful of different characters for the lead-ins for each of the different vignettes because we were treating each of those as different commercials. We had to be mindful of a male voiceover starting one and then a female voiceover starting another so that they were staggered.

There was one vignette for Old Spice, and since the ads were for P&G, we did get the Old Spice pneumonic and we did try something different at the end — with one version featuring the character singing the pneumonic and one of him whistling it. There were many different variations and we just wanted, in the end, to get part of the pneumonic into the joke at the end.

The challenge with the Tide campaign, in particular, was to make each of these vignettes feel like it was a different commercial and to treat each one as such. There’s an overall mix level that goes into that but we wanted certain ones to have a little bit more dynamic range than the others. For example, there is a cola vignette that’s set on a beach with people taking a selfie. David interrupts them by saying, “No, it’s a Tide ad.”

For that spot, we had to record a voiceover that was very loud and energetic to go along with a loud and energetic music track. That vignette cuts into the “personal digital assistant” (think Amazon’s Alexa) spot. We had to be very mindful of these ads flowing into each other while making it clear to the viewer that these were different commercials with different products, not one linear ad. Each commercial required its own voiceover, its own sound design, its own music track, and its own tone.

One vignette was about car insurance featuring a mechanic in a white shirt under a car. That spot isn’t letterbox like the others; it’s 4:3 because it’s supposed to be a local ad. We made that vignette sound more like a local ad; it’s a little over-compressed, a little over-equalized and a little videotape sounding. The music is mixed a little low. We wanted it to sound like the dialogue is really up front so as to get the message across, like a local advertisement.

What’s your workflow like?
Loeb: At Heard City, our workflow is unique in that we can have multiple mixers working on the same project simultaneously. This collaborative process makes our work much more efficient, and that was our original intent when we opened the company six years ago. The model came to us by watching the way that the bigger VFX companies work. Each artist takes a different piece of the project and then all of the work is combined at the end.

We did that on the Tide campaign, and there was no other way we could have done it due to the schedule. Also, we believe this workflow provides a much better product. One sound artist can be working specifically on the sound design while another can be mixing. So as I was working on mixing, Evan was flying in his sound design to me. It was a lot of fun working on it like that.

What tools helped you to create the sound?
One plug-in we’re finding to be very helpful is the iZotope Neutron. We put that on the master bus and we have found many settings that work very well on broadcast projects. It’s a very flexible tool.

Vitacco: The Neutron has been incredibly helpful overall in balancing out the mix. There are some very helpful custom settings that have helped to create a dynamic mix for air.

Tourism Australia Dundee via Droga5 New York
Danny McBride and Chris Hemsworth star in this movie-trailer-turned-tourism-ad for Australia. It starts out as a movie trailer for a new addition to the Crocodile Dundee film franchise — well, rather, a spoof of it. There’s epic music featuring a didgeridoo and title cards introducing the actors and setting up the premise for the “film.” Then there’s talk of miles of beaches and fine wine and dining. It all seems a bit fishy, but finally Danny McBride confirms that this is, in fact, actually a tourism ad.

Sonically, what’s unique about this spot?
Vitacco: In this case, we were creating a fake movie trailer that’s a misdirect for the audience, so we aimed to create sound design that was both in the vein of being big and epic and also authentic to the location of the “film.”

One of the things that movie trailers often draw upon is a consistent mnemonic to drive home a message. So I helped to sound design a consistent mnemonic for each of the title cards that come up.

For this I used some Native Instruments toolkits, like “Rise & Hit” and “Gravity,” and Tonsturm’s Whoosh software to supplement some existing sound design to create that consistent and branded mnemonic.

In addition, we wanted to create an authentic sonic palette for the Australian outback where a lot of the footage was shot. I had to be very aware of the species of animals and insects that were around. I drew upon sound effects that were specifically from Australia. All sound effects were authentic to that entire continent.

Another factor that came into play was that anytime you are dealing with a spot that has a lot of soundbites, especially ones recorded outside, there tends to be a lot of noise reduction taking place. I didn’t have to hit it too hard because everything was recorded very well. For cleanup, I used the iZotope RX 6 — both the RX Connect and the RX Denoiser. I relied on that heavily, as well as the Waves WNS plug-in, just to make sure that things were crisp and clear. That allowed me the flexibility to add my own ambient sound and have more control over the mix.

Michael Vitacco

In RX, I really like to use the Denoiser instead of the Dialogue Denoiser tool when possible. I’ll pull out the handles of the production sound and grab a long sample of noise. Then I’ll use the Denoiser because I find that works better than the Dialogue Denoiser.

Budweiser Stand By You via David Miami
The phone rings in the middle of the night. A man gets out of bed, prepares to leave and kisses his wife good-bye. His car radio announces that a natural disaster is affecting thousands of families who are in desperate need of aid. The man arrives at a Budweiser factory and helps to organize the production of canned water instead of beer.

Sonically, what’s unique about this spot?
Loeb: For this spot, I did a preliminary mix where I handled the effects, the dialogue and the music. We set the preliminary tone for that as to how we were going to play the effects throughout it.

The spot starts with a husband and wife asleep in bed and they’re awakened by a phone call. Our sound focused on the dialogue and effects upfront, and also the song. I worked on this with another fantastic mixer here at Heard City, Elizabeth McClanahan, who comes from a music background. She put her ears to the track and did an amazing job of remixing the stems.

On the master track in the Pro Tools session, she used iZotope’s Neutron, as well as the FabFilter Pro-L limiter, which helps to contain the mix. One of the tricks on a dynamic mix like that — which starts off with that quiet moment in the morning and then builds with the music in the end — is to keep it within the restrictions of the CALM Act and other specifications that stipulate dynamic range and not just average loudness. We had to be mindful of how we were treating those quiet portions and the lower portions so that we still had some dynamic range but we weren’t out of spec.


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. Follow her on Twitter @AudioJeney.

Behind the Title: Unheard/Of Director Chris Volckmann

NAME: Chris Volckmann

COMPANY: Unheard/Of

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re a production company. We make commercials. It’s a small group, which is fantastic, and a tight-knit community of directors. They do a great job of thinking outside the box and supporting the roster.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Typically, I’m provided scripts from an agency or brand and collaborate with them to develop a visual and narrative voice. I then creatively guide a production through the live-action process and often through completion.

Groupon

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Well, nearly all decisions on a production run through the director, whether it’s a direct decision or via your department heads. You might be surprised how much time is spent on things that the audience wouldn’t really think about. Like the color of a vase, or the cut of a t-shirt. We like to think these things add up to an overall tone and aesthetic that aids the story, but often we’re probably over-considering.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Finding the story. Sometimes it’s right in front of you, sometimes you really have to dig. But when you find it, the rest falls away. It becomes your North Star.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Tough question. I suppose budgets — though sometimes a smaller sandbox aids in originality. But more often than not, these days we’re just trying to do too much in a day. The value in advertising has become quantity, and that just makes our jobs harder.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I have no idea. I’ve worked in most phases of production, from producing live-action to VFX, design and interactive… I would probably be making something, and probably within the advertising community.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I wanted to make movies about as early as I can remember. I actually wanted to be an archeologist when I was young because of Indiana Jones, until someone explained that that’s not what archeology is really like — that’s just in the movies. Since then, it’s pretty much been tunnel vision.

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT DIRECTING THAT ATTRACTED YOU?
It sounds cliché, but just telling stories. Like all art, it’s emotional expression. I try to find an emotional connection within myself to whatever we’re doing. Often with advertising you’re telling someone else’s story, or trying to connect to an audience that might differ from yourself. It can be easy to keep it all at an arm’s length.

Similar to acting, you need to reach back for that emotional foundation within yourself and live there for a bit so that you’re seeing the world through that lens. If you can do that, then the work comes from an honest place and that can be as rewarding as any other artistic medium.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT DIRECTING THAT CONTINUES TO KEEP YOU INTERESTED?
Commercial work is actually incredibly experimental. Oftentimes, you’re doing something for the first time with each job. Whether it’s a narrative approach or an effect, there’s constant problem solving and experimentation. I started out in longer form work, independent film, etc., but I find that work extremely limiting with red tape all over the place and extraordinarily time consuming (duh). Commercial work keeps you on your toes.

Amazon Music

HOW DO YOU PICK THE PEOPLE YOU WORK WITH ON A PARTICULAR PROJECT?
I like working with the same crew as much as possible. Sometimes specific stories need specific talents, and the project always takes first priority — but the more you work with people, the more you get a sense for each other and your collective strengths and weaknesses.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
That’s kind of an impossible question — probably something nobody has seen (ha!). Sometimes, I’ll just make a thing without much of a plan and let it unfold in the process. No client or anything, just trying to keep things spontaneous and avoid over-considering everything. Sometimes, I’ll put those out into the world, but oftentimes not. It’s just constant experimentation. I think that type of work stirs up different stuff that keeps me sharp for client work, and it’s more the process of that work that I’m proud of than the final product itself.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My fucking phone. Adobe InDesign, even though it’s one of the most frustrating applications around. Adobe Premiere (RIP Final Cut).

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Good work isn’t stressful, it’s actually a stress release. If the process with a client becomes really difficult, and a production is stressful, the best way for me to pull myself out of it isn’t to take time away, it’s actually to make something else. Sometimes, that’s just a new job or sometimes, it’s something personal like what I described before.

Otherwise, spending time with my wife and kids — and sports. Oh, and exercise is huge. That probably should have been my first answer!

Cutters Chicago ups Billy Montross to editor

Billy Montross has been promoted to editor at Cutters Studio in Chicago. He joined the post house back in 2012 as an intern after working as a P.A. for director John Komnenich. By early 2013, Montross earned the role of assistant editor, supporting many of the Cutter Studio editors and key clients, but primarily working with managing editor Grant Güstafson. He edits on Avid Media Composer.

Montross has worked with agencies such as DDB, Leo Burnett, Mcgarrybowen, Ogilvy and We Are Unlimited, among many others. His reel features work for Capital One, Esurance, Fairfield Inn and Suites, McDonald’s, Oscar Mayer, Scotts, Spalding and Western Union.

Montross edited Scott’s :30 “Bill’s Yard” from DDB Chicago. It was directed by Christian Bevilacqua. The DP was Tim Hudson. Color was via Luke Morrison at The Mill.

“Billy is a rare talent,” says Güstafson. “He is an incredibly creative and instinctive editor with a very engaging and positive personality. This combination allows him to provide his clientele with beautifully nuanced edits while making the long hours working in the room extremely enjoyable and relaxed.”

In 2015 and 2016, Montross had the opportunity to work at Cutters Tokyo. There, he helped cut projects for Jeep, McDonald’s, Nissan and Suburu, all of which he says, “definitely made me into a more rounded editor.” He also acknowledges managing director/partner Craig Duncan. “He has always been tough in pushing me to work harder and grow.”

Montross continues to be busy with work at Cutters. “I’m already having a lot of opportunities that are building on the groundwork done over the past several years. Right now I’m finishing up a fun 30-second spot for Western Union with Mcgarrybowen Chicago. And then coming right up I start a Modelo project with Ogilvy and that’s being directed by Matt Bieler of Reset.”

Storage in the Studio: Post Houses

By Karen Maierhofer

There are many pieces that go into post production, from conform, color, dubbing and editing to dailies and more. Depending on the project, a post house can be charged with one or two pieces of this complex puzzle, or even the entire workload. No matter the job, the tasks must be done on time and on budget. Unforeseen downtime is unacceptable.

That is why when it comes to choosing a storage solution, post houses are very particular. They need a setup that is secure, reliable and can scale. For them, one size simply does not fit all. They all want a solution that fits their particular needs and the needs of their clients.

Here, we look at three post facilities of various sizes and range of services, and the storage solutions that are a good fit for their business.

Liam Ford

Sim International
The New York City location of Sim has been in existence for over 20 years, operating under the former name of Post Factory NY up until about a month ago when Sim rebranded it and its seven other founding post companies as Sim International. Whether called by its new moniker or its previous one, the facility has grown to become a premier space in the city for offline editorial teams as well as one of the top high-end finishing studios in town, as the list of feature films and episodic shows that have been cut and finished at Sim is quite lengthy. And starting this past year, Sim has launched a boutique commercial finishing division.

According to senior VP of post engineering Liam Ford, the vast majority of the projects at the NYC facility are 4K, much of which is episodic work. “So, the need is for very high-capacity, very high-bandwidth storage,” Ford says. And because the studio is located in New York, where space is limited, that same storage must be as dense as possible.

For its finishing work, Sim New York is using a Quantum Xcellis SAN, a StorNext-based appliance system that can be specifically tuned for 4K media workflow. The system, which was installed approximately two years ago, runs on a 16Gb Fibre Channel network. Almost half a petabyte of storage fits into just a dozen rack units. Meanwhile, an Avid Nexis handles the facility’s offline work.

The Sim SAN serves as the primary playback system for all the editing rooms. While there are SSDs in some of the workstations for caching purposes, the scheduling demands of clients do not leave much time for staging material back and forth between volumes, according to Ford. So, everything gets loaded back to the SAN, and everything is played back from the SAN.

As Ford explains, content comes into the studio from a variety of sources, whether drives, tapes or Internet transfers, and all of that is loaded directly onto the SAN. An online editor then soft-imports all that material into his or her conform application and creates an edited, high-resolution sequence that is rendered back to the SAN. Once at the SAN, that edited sequence is available for a supervised playback session with the in-house colorists, finishing VFX artists and so forth.

“The point is, our SAN is the central hub through which all content at all stages of the finishing process flows,” Ford adds.

Before installing the Xcellis system, the facility had been using local workstation storage only, but the huge growth in the finishing division prompted the transition to the shared SAN file system. “There’s no way we could do the amount of work we now have, and with the flexibility our clients demand, using a local storage workflow,” says Ford.

When it became necessary for the change, there were not a lot of options that met Sim’s demands for high bandwidth and reliable streaming, Ford points out, as Quantum’s StorNext and SGI’s CXFS were the main shared file systems for the M&E space. Sim decided to go with Quantum because of the work the vendor has done in recent years toward improving the M&E experience as well as the ease of installing the new system.

Nevertheless, with the advent of 25Gb and 100Gb Ethernet, Sim has been closely monitoring the high-performance NAS space. “There are a couple of really good options out there right now, and I can see us seriously looking at those products in the near future as, at the very least, an augmentation to our existing Fibre Channel-based storage,” Ford says.

At Sim, editors deal with a significant amount of Camera Raw, DPX and OpenEXR data. “Depending on the project, we could find ourselves needing 1.5GB/sec or more of bandwidth for a single playback session, and that’s just for one show,” says Ford. “We typically have three or four [shows] playing off the SAN at any one time, so the bandwidth needs are huge!”

Master of None

And the editors’ needs continue to evolve, as does their need for storage. “We keep needing more storage, and we need it to be faster and faster. Just when storage technology finally got to the point that doing 10-bit 2K shows was pretty painless, everyone started asking for 16-bit 4K,” Ford points out.

Recently, Sim completed work on the feature American Made and the Netflix show Master of None, in addition to a number of other episodic projects. For these and others shows, the SAN acts as the central hub around which the color correction, online editing, visual effects and deliverables are created.

“The finishing portion of the post pipeline deals exclusively with the highest-quality content available. It used to be that we’d do our work directly from a film reel on a telecine, but those days are long past,” says Ford. “You simply can’t run an efficient finishing pipeline anymore without a lot of storage.”

DigitalFilm Tree
DigitalFilm Tree (DFT) opened its doors in 1999 and now occupies a 10,000-square-foot space in Universal City, California, offering full round-trip post services, including traditional color grading, conform, dailies and VFX, as well as post system rentals and consulting services.

While Universal City may be DFT’s primary location, it has dozens of remote satellite systems — mini post houses for production companies and studios – around the world. Those remote post systems, along with the increase in camera resolution (Alexa, Raw, 4K), have multiplied DFT’s storage needs. Both have resulted in a sea change in the facility’s storage solution.

According to CEO Ramy Katrib, most companies in the media and entertainment industry historically have used block storage, and DFT was no different. But four years ago, the company began looking at object storage, which is used by Silicon Valley companies, like Dropbox and AWS, to store large assets. After significant research, Katrib felt it was a good fit for DFT as well, believing it to be a more economical way to build petabytes of storage, compared to using proprietary block storage.

Ramy Katrib

“We were unique from most of the post houses in that respect,” says Katrib. “We were different from many of the other companies using object storage — they were tech, financial institutions, government agencies, health care; we were the rare one from M&E – but our need for extremely large, scalable and resilient storage was the same as theirs.”

DFT’s primary work centers around scripted television — an industry segment that continues to grow. “We do 15-plus television shows at any given time, and we encourage them to shoot whatever they like, at whatever resolution they desire,” says Katrib. “Most of the industry relies on LTO to back up camera raw materials. We do that too, but we also encourage productions to take advantage of our object storage, and we will store everything they shoot and not punish them for it. It is a rather Utopian workflow. We now give producers access to all their camera raw material. It is extremely effective for our clients.”

Over four years ago, DFT began using a cloud-based platform called OpenStack, which is open-source software that controls large pools of data, to build and design its own object storage system. “We have our own software developers and people who built our hardware, and we are able to adjust to the needs of our clients and the needs of our own workflow,” says Katrib.

DFT designs its custom PC- and Linux-based post systems, including chassis from Super Micro, CPUs from Intel and graphic cards from Nvidia. Storage is provided from a number of companies, including spinning-disc and SSD solutions from Seagate Technology and Western Digital.

DFT then deploys remote dailies systems worldwide, in proximity to where productions are shooting. Each day clients plug their production hard drives (containing all camera raw files) into DFT’s remote dailies system. From DFT’s facility, dailies technicians remotely produce editorial, viewing and promo dailies files, and transfer them to their destinations worldwide. All the while, the camera raw files are transported from the production location to DFT’s ProStack “massively scalable object storage.” In this case, “private cloud storage” consists of servers DFT designed that house all the camera raw materials, with management from DFT post professionals who support clients with access to and management of their files.

DFT provides color grading for Great News.

Recently, storage vendors such as Quantum and Avid have begun building and branding their own object storage solutions not unlike what DFT has constructed at its Universal City locale. And the reason is simple: Object storage provides a clear advantage because of reliability and the low cost. “We looked at it because the storage we were paying for, proprietary block storage, was too expensive to house all the data our clients were generating. And resolutions are only going up. So, every year we needed more storage,” Katrib explains. “We needed a solution that could scale with the practical reality we were living.”

Then, about four years ago when DFT started becoming a software company, one of the developers brought OpenStack to Katrib’s attention. “The open-source platform provided several storage solutions, networking capabilities and cloud compute capabilities for free,” he points out. Of course, the solution is not a panacea, as it requires a company to customize the offering for its own needs and even contribute back to the OpenStack community. But then again, that requirement enables DFT to evolve to the changing needs of its clients without waiting for a manufacturer to do it.

“It does not work out of the box like a solution from IBM, for instance. You have to develop around it,” Katrib says. “You have to have a lab mentality, designing your own hardware and software based on pain points in your own environment. And, sometimes it fails. But when you do it correctly, you realize it is an elegant solution.” However, there are vibrant communities, user groups and tech summits of those leveraging the technology who are willing to assist and collaborate.

DFT has evolved its object storage solution, extending its capabilities from an initial hundreds of terabytes – which is nothing to sneeze at — to hundreds of petabytes of storage. DFT also designs remote post systems and storage solutions for customers in remote locations around the world. And those remote locations can be as simple as a workstation running applications such as Blackmagic’s Resolve or Adobe After Effects and connected to object storage housing all the client’s camera raw material.

The key, Katrib notes, is to have great post and IT pros managing the projects and the system. “I can now place a remote post system with a calibrated 4K monitor and object storage housing the camera raw material, and I can bring the post process to you wherever you are, securely,” he adds. “From wherever you are, you can view the conform, color and effects, and sign off on the final timeline, as if you were at DFT.”

DFT posts American Housewife

In addition to the object storage, DFT is also using Facilis TerraBlock and Avid Nexis systems locally and on remote installs. The company uses those commercial solutions because they provide benefits, including storage performance and feature sets that optimize certain software applications. As Katrib points out, storage is not one flavor fits all, and different solutions work better for certain use cases. In DFT’s case, the commercial storage products provide performance for the playback of multiple 4K streams across the company’s color, VFX and conform departments, while its ProStack high-capacity object storage comes into play for storing the entirety of all files produced by our clients.

“Rather than retrieve files from an LTO tape, as most do when working on a TV series, with object storage, the files are readily available, saving hours in retrieval time,” says Katrib.

Currently, DFT is working on a number of television series, including Great News (color correction only) and Good Behavior (dailies only). For other shows, such as the Roseanne revival, NCIS: Los Angeles, American Housewife and more, it is performing full services such as visual effects, conform, color, dailies and dubbing. And in some instances, even equipment rental.

As the work expands, DFT is looking to extend upon its storage and remote post systems. “We want to have more remote systems where you can do color, conform, VFX, editorial, wherever you are, so the DP or producer can have a monitor in their office and partake in the post process that’s particular to them,” says Katrib. “That is what we are scaling as we speak.”

Broadway Video
Broadway Video is a global media and entertainment company that is primarily engaged in post-production services for television, film, music, digital and commercial projects for the past four decades. Located in New York and Los Angeles, the facility offers one-stop tools and talent for editorial, audio, design, color grading, finishing and screening, as well as digital file storage, preparation, aggregation and delivery of digital content across multiple platforms.

Since its founding in 1979, Broadway Video has grown into an independent studio. During this timeframe, content has evolved greatly, especially in terms of resolution, to where 4K and HD content — including HDR and Atmos sound — is becoming the norm. “Staying current and dealing with those data speeds are necessary in order to work fluidly on a 4K project at 60p,” says Stacey Foster, president and managing director, Broadway Video Digital and Production. “The data requirements are pretty staggering for throughput and in terms of storage.”

Stacey Foster

This led Broadway Video to begin searching a year ago for a storage system that would meet its needs now as well as in the foreseeable future — in short, it also needed a system that is scalable. Their solution: an all-Flash Hitachi Vantara Virtual Storage Platform (VSP) G series. Although quite expensive, a flash-based system is “ridiculously powerful,” says Foster. “Technology is always marching forward, and Flash-based systems are going to become the norm; they are already the norm at the high end.”

Foster has had a long-standing relationship with Hitachi for more than a decade and has witnessed the company’s growth into M&E from the medical and financial worlds where it has been firmly ensconced. According to Foster, Hitachi’s VSP series will enhance Broadway Video’s 4K offerings and transform internal operations by allowing quick turnaround, efficient and cost-effective production, post production and delivery of television shows and commercials. And, the system offers workload scalability, allowing the company to expand and meet the changing needs of the digital media production industry.

“The systems we had were really not that capable of handling DPX files that were up to 50TB, and Hitachi’s VSP product has been handling them effortlessly,” says Foster. “I don’t think other [storage] manufacturers can say that.”

Foster explains that as Broadway Video continued to expand its support of the latest 4K content and technologies, it became clear that a more robust, optimized storage solution was needed as the company moved in this new direction. “It allows us to look at the future and create a foundation to build our post production and digital distribution services on,” Foster says.

Broadway Video’s with Netflix projects sparked the need for a more robust system. Recently, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, an Embassy Row production, transitioned to Netflix, and one of the requirements by its new home was the move from 2K to 4K. “It was the perfect reason for us to put together a 4K end-to-end workflow that satisfies this client’s requirements for technical delivery,” Foster points out. “The bottleneck in color and DPX file delivery is completely lifted, and the post staff is able to work quickly and sometimes even faster than in real time when necessary to deliver the final product, with its very large files. And that is a real convenience for them.”

Broadway Video’s Hitachi Vantara Virtual Storage Platform G series.

As a full-service post company, Broadway Video in New York operates 10 production suites of Avids running Adobe Premiere and Blackmagic Resolve, as well as three full mixing suites. “We can have all our workstations simultaneously hit the [storage] system hard and not have the system slow down. That is where Hitachi’s VSP product has set itself apart,” Foster says.

For Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, like many projects Broadway Video encounters, the cut is in a lower-resolution Avid file. The 4K media is then imported into the Resolve platform, so it is colored in its original material and format. In terms of storage, once the material is past the cutting stage, it is all stored on the Hitachi system. Once the project is completed, it is handed off on spinning disc for archival, though Foster foresees a limited future for spinning discs due to their inherent nature for a limited life span — “anything that spins breaks down,” he adds.

All the suites are fully HD-capable and are tied with shared SAN and ISIS storage; because work on most projects is shared between editing suites, there is little need to use local storage. Currently Broadway Video is still using its previous Avid ISIS products but is slowly transitioning to the Hitachi system only. Foster estimates that at this time next year, the transition will be complete, and the staff will no longer have to support the multiple systems. “The way the systems are set up right now, it’s just easier to cut on ISIS using the Avid workstations. But that will soon change,” he says.

Other advantages the Hitachi system provides is stability and uptime, which Foster maintains is “pretty much 100 percent guaranteed.” As he points out, there is no such thing as downtime in banking and medical, where Hitachi earned its mettle, and bringing that stability to the M&E industry “has been terrific.”

Of course, that is in addition to bandwidth and storage capacity, which is expandable. “There is no limit to the number of petabytes you can have attached,” notes Foster.

Considering that the majority of calls received by Broadway Video center on post work for 4K-based workflows, the new storage solution is a necessary technical addition to the facility’s other state-of-the-art equipment. “In the environment we work in, we spend more and more time on the creative side in terms of the picture cutting and sound mixing, and then it is a rush to get it out the door. If it takes you days to import, color correct, export and deliver — especially with the file sizes we are talking about – then having a fast system with the kind of throughput and bandwidth that is necessary really lifts the burden for the finishing team,” Foster says.

He continues: “The other day the engineers were telling me we were delivering 20 times faster using the Hitachi technology in the final cutting and coloring of a Jerry Seinfeld stand-up special we had done in 4K” resulting in a DPX file that was about 50TB. “And that is pretty significant,” Foster adds.

Main Image: DigitalFilm Tree’s senior colorist Patrick Woodard.

Stitch cuts down 200+ hours of footage for TalkTalk Xmas spot

Can you feel it? The holidays are here, and seasonal ads have begun. One UK company, TalkTalk — which provides pay television, telecommunications, Internet and mobile services — is featuring genuine footage of a family Christmas. Documenting a real family during last year’s holiday, this totally unscripted, fly-on-the-wall commercial sees the return of the Merwick Street family and their dog, Elvis, in This is Christmas.

Directed by Park Pictures’ Tom Tagholm and cut by Stitch’s Tim Hardy, the team used the same multi-camera techniques that were used on their 2016 This Stuff Matters campaign.

Seventeen cameras — a combination of Blackmagic Micro Studio 4K, a remote Panasonic AW-UE70WP and Go Pros — were used over the four-day festive period, located across eight rooms and including a remote controlled car. The cameras were rolling from 6:50am on Christmas Eve and typically rolled until midnight on most days, accumulating in over 200 hours of rushes that were edited down into this 60-second spot.

In lessons learned from the last year’s shoot, which was shot continuously, this time video loggers were in place to to identify moments the rooms were empty.

“I think we had pretty much perfected our system for organizing and managing the rushes in Talk Talk’s summer campaign, so we were in a good position to start off with,” explains editor Hardy, who cut the piece on an Avid Media Composer. “The big difference this time around was that the whole family were in the house at the same time, meaning that quite often there were conversations going on between two or three different rooms at once. Although it did get a little confusing, it was often very funny as they are not the quietest of families!”

Director Tagholm decided to add a few extra cameras, such as the toy remote-controlled car that crashes into the Christmas tree. “This extra layer of complexity added a certain feel to the Christmas film that we didn’t have in the previous ones,” says Hardy.

Saddington Baynes adds senior lighting artist Luis Cardoso

Creative production house Saddington Baynes has hired Luis Cardoso as a senior lighting artist, adding to the studio’s creative team with specialist CGI skills in luxury goods, beauty and cosmetics. He joins the team following a four-year stint at Burberry, where he worked on high-end CGI.

He specializes in Autodesk 3ds Max, Chaos Group’s V-Ray and Adobe Photoshop. Cardoso’s past work includes imagery for all Burberry fragrances, clothing and accessories and social media assets for the Pinterest Cat Lashes campaign. He also has experience under his belt as senior CG artist at Sectorlight, and later in his career Assembly Studios.

At Saddington Baynes, Cardoso will be working on new motion cinematic sequences for online video to expand the beauty, fragrance, fashion and beverage departments and take the expertise further, particularly in regards to video lighting.

According to executive creative director James Digby-Jones, “It no longer matters whether elements are static or moving; whether the brief is for a 20,000-pixel image or 4K animation mixed with live action. We stretch creative and technical boundaries with fully integrated production that encompasses everything from CGI and motion to shoot production and VR capability.”

Sonic Union adds Bryant Park studio targeting immersive, broadcast work

New York audio house Sonic Union has launched a new studio and creative lab. The uptown location, which overlooks Bryant Park, will focus on emerging spatial and interactive audio work, as well as continued work with broadcast clients. The expansion is led by principal mix engineer/sound designer Joe O’Connell, now partnered with original Sonic Union founders/mix engineers Michael Marinelli and Steve Rosen and their staff, who will work out of both its Union Square and Bryant Park locations. O’Connell helmed sound company Blast as co-founder, and has now teamed up with Sonic Union.

In other staffing news, mix engineer Owen Shearer advances to also serve as technical director, with an emphasis on VR and immersive audio. Former Blast EP Carolyn Mandlavitz has joined as Sonic Union Bryant Park studio director. Executive creative producer Halle Petro, formerly senior producer at Nylon Studios, will support both locations.

The new studio, which features three Dolby Atmos rooms, was created and developed by Ilan Ohayon of IOAD (Architect of Record), with architectural design by Raya Ani of RAW-NYC. Ani also designed Sonic’s Union Square studio.

“We’re installing over 30 of the new ‘active’ JBL System 7 speakers,” reports O’Connell. “Our order includes some of the first of these amazing self-powered speakers. JBL flew a technician from Indianapolis to personally inspect each one on site to ensure it will perform as intended for our launch. Additionally, we created our own proprietary mounting hardware for the installation as JBL is still in development with their own. We’ll also be running the latest release of Pro Tools (12.8) featuring tools for Dolby Atmos and other immersive applications. These types of installations really are not easy as retrofits. We have been able to do something really unique, flexible and highly functional by building from scratch.”

Working as one team across two locations, this emerging creative audio production arm will also include a roster of talent outside of the core staff engineering roles. The team will now be integrated to handle non-traditional immersive VR, AR and experiential audio planning and coding, in addition to casting, production music supervision, extended sound design and production assignments.

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Halle Petro, Steve Rosen, Owen Shearer, Joe O’Connell, Adam Barone, Carolyn Mandlavitz, Brian Goodheart, Michael Marinelli and Eugene Green.

 

Aubrey Woodiwiss joins Carbon LA as lead colorist

Full-service creative studio Carbon has added colorist Aubrey Woodiwiss as senior colorist/director of color grading to their LA roster. He comes to Carbon with a portfolio that includes spots for Dulux, NBA 2K17, Coors and Honda, and music videos for Beyonce’s Formation, Jay-Z’s On to the Next One and the Calvin Harris/Rihanna song This Is What You Came For.

“I’m always prepared to bend and shape myself around the requirements of the project at hand, but always with a point of view,” says Woodiwiss, who honed his craft at The Mill and Electric Theater Collective during his career.

“I am fortunate to have been able to collate various experiences within life and work, and have been able to reapply them back into the work I do. I vary my approach and style as required, and never bring a labored or autonomous look to anything. Communication is key, and a large part of what I do as well,” he adds.

Woodiwiss’ focus on creativity began during his adolescence, when he experimented with editing films on VHS and later directed and cut homemade music videos. Woodiwiss started his pro career in the early 2000s at Framestore, first as a runner and then as a digital lab operator, helping to pioneer film scanning and digital film tech on Harry Potter, Love Actually, Bridget Jones Diary and Troy.

While he’s traversed creative mediums from film, commercials, music videos and on over 3,000 projects, he maintains a linear mindset when it comes to each project. “I approach them similarly in that I try to realize the vision set by the creators of the project,” says Woodiwiss, who co-creative directed the immersive mixed media art exhibition and initiative mentl, with Pulse Films director Ben Newman and producer Craig Newman (Radiohead, Nick Cave).

Carbon’s addition of the FilmLight Baselight color system and Woodiwiss as senior colorist to its established VFX/design services hammers home the studio’s move toward a complete post solution in Los Angeles. Plans are in the works to offer remote grading capabilities from any of the Carbon offices in NY, Chicago and Los Angeles.

VFX company Kevin launches in LA

VFX vets Tim Davies, Sue Troyan and Darcy Parsons have partnered to open the Los Angeles-based VFX house, Kevin. The company is currently up and running in a temp studio in Venice, while construction is underway on Kevin’s permanent Culver City location, scheduled to open early next year.

When asked about the name, as none of the partners are actually named Kevin, Davies said, “Well, Kevin is always there for you! He’s your best mate and will always have your back. He’s the kind of guy you want to have a beer with whenever he’s in town. Kevin knows his stuff and works his ass off to make sure you get what you need and then some!” Troyan added, “Kevin is a state of mind.”

Davies is on board as executive creative director, overseeing the collective creative output of the company. Having led teams of artists for over 25 years, he was formerly at Asylum Visual Effects and The Mill as creative director and head of 2D. Among his works are multiple Cannes Gold Lion-winning commercials, including HBO’s “Voyeur” campaign for Jake Scott, Nike Golf’s Ripple for Steve Rogers, Old Spice’s Momsong for Steve Ayson, Old Spice’s Dadsong for Andreas Nilsson, and Old Spice’s Whale and Rocket Car for Steve Rogers.

Troyan will serve as senior executive producer of Kevin, having previously worked on campaigns at The Mill and Method. Parsons, owner and partner of Kevin, has enjoyed a career covering multiple disciplines, including producer, VFX producer and executive producer.

Launch projects for Kevin include recent spots for Wieden + Kennedy Portland, The Martin Agency and Spark44.

Main Image: L-R: Darcy Parsons, Sue Troyan, Tim Davies

Deb Oh joins Nylon Studios from Y&R

Music and sound boutique Nylon Studios, which has offices in NYC and Sydney, has added Deb Oh as senior producer. A classically trained musician, Oh has almost a decade of experience in the commercial music space, working as a music supervisor and producer on both the agency and studio sides.

She comes to Nylon from Y&R, where she spent two years working as a music producer for Dell, Xerox, Special Olympics, Activia and Optum, among others. Outside of the studio, Oh has continued to pursue music, regularly writing and performing with her band Deb Oh & The Cavaliers and serving as music supervisor for the iTunes podcast series, “Limetown.”

A lifelong musician, Oh grew up learning classical piano and singing at a very early age. She began writing and performing her own music in high school and kept up her musical endeavors while studying Political Science at NYU. Following graduation, she made the leap to follow her passion for music full time, landing as a client service coordinator at Headroom. She was then promoted to music supervisor. After five years with the audio shop, she made the leap to the agency side to broaden her skillset and glean perspective into the landscape of vendors, labels and publishers in the commercial music industry.

 

Digging Deeper: The Mill Chicago’s head of color Luke Morrison

A native Londoner, Morrison started his career at The Mill where worked on music videos and commercials. In 2013, he moved across to the Midwest to head up The Mill Chicago’s color department.

Since then, Morrison has worked on campaigns for Beats, Prada, Jeep, Miller, Porsche, State Farm, Wrigley’s Extra Gum and a VR film for Jack Daniel’s.

Let’s find out more about Morrison.

How early on did you know color would be your path?
I started off, like so many at The Mill, as a runner. I initially thought I wanted to get into 3D, and after a month of modeling a photoreal screwdriver I realized that wasn’t the path for me. Luckily, I poked my nose into the color suites and saw them working with neg and lacing up the Spirit telecine. I was immediately drawn to it. It resonated with me and with my love of photography.

You are also a photographer?
Yes, I actually take pictures all the time. I always carry some sort of camera with me. I’m fortunate to have a father who is a keen photographer and he had a darkroom in our house when I was young. I was always fascinated with what he was doing up there, in the “red room.”

Photography for me is all about looking at your surroundings and capturing or documenting life and sharing it with other people. I started a photography club at The Mill, S35, because I wanted to share that part of my passion with people. I find as a ‘creative’ you need to have other outlets to feed into other parts of you. S35 is about inspiring people — friends, colleagues, clients — to go back to the classic, irreplaceable practice of using 35mm film and start to consider photography in a different way than the current trends.

State Farm

In 2013, you moved from London to Chicago. Are the markets different and did anything change?
Yes and no. I personally haven’t changed my style to suit or accommodate the different market. I think it’s one of the things that appeals to my clients. Chicago, however, has quite a different market than in the UK. Here, post production is more agency led and directors aren’t always involved in the process. In that kind of environment, there is a bigger role for the colorist to play in carrying the director’s vision through or setting the tone of the “look.”

I still strive to keep that collaboration with the director and DP in the color session whether it’s a phone call to discuss ahead of the session, doing some grade tests or looping them in with a remote grade session. There is definitely a difference in the suite dynamics, too. I found very quickly I had to communicate and translate the client’s and my creative intent differently here.

What sort of content do you work on?
We work on commercials, music promos, episodics and features, but always have an eye on new ways to tell narratives. That’s where the pioneering work in the emerging technology field comes into play. We’re no longer limited and are constantly looking for creative ways to remain at the forefront of creation for VR, AR, MR and experiential installations. It’s really exciting to watch it develop and to be a part of it. When Jack Daniel’s and DFCB Chicago approached us to create a VR experience taking the viewer to the Jack Daniel’s distillery in Kentucky, we leapt at the chance.

Do you like a variety of projects?
Who doesn’t? It’s always nice to be working on a variety, keeping things fresh and pushing yourself creatively. We’ve moved into grading more feature projects and episodic work recently, which has been an exciting way to be creatively and technically challenged. Most recently, I’ve had a lot of fun grading some comedy specials, one for Jerrod Carmichael and one for Hasan Minhaj. This job is ever-changing, be it thanks to evolving technology, new clients or challenging projects. That’s one of the many things I love about it.

Toronto Maple Leafs

You recently won two AICE awards for best color for your grade on the Toronto Maple Leafs’ spot Wise Man. Can you talk about that?
It was such a special project to collaborate on. I’ve been working with Ian Pons Jewell, who directed it, for many years now. We met way back in the day in London, when I was a color assistant. He would trade me deli meats and cheeses from his travels to do grades for him! That shared history made the AICE awards all the more special. It’s incredible to have continued to build that relationship and see how each of us have grown in our careers. Those kinds of partnerships are what I strive to do with every single client and job that comes through my suite.

When it comes to color grading commercials, what are the main principles?
For me, it’s always important to understand the idea, the creative intent and the tone of the spot. Once you understand that, it influences your decisions, dictates how you’ll approach the grade and what options you’ll offer the client. Then, it’s about crafting the grade appropriately and building on that.

You use FilmLight Baselight, what do your clients like most about what you can provide with that system?
Clients are always impressed with the speed at which I’m able to address their comments and react to things almost before they’ve said them. The tracker always gets a few “ooooooh’s” or “ahhhh’s.” It’s like they’re watching fireworks or something!

How do you keep current with emerging technologies?
That’s the amazing thing about working at The Mill: we’re makers and creators for all media. Our Emerging Technologies team is constantly looking for new ways to tell stories and collaborate with our clients, whether it’s branded content or passion projects, using all technologies at our disposal: anything is at our fingertips, even a Pop Llama.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Well, I’ve got to have my Contax T2, an alarm clock, otherwise I’d never be anywhere on time, and my bicycle.

Would you say you are a “technical” colorist or would you rather prioritize instincts?
It’s all about instincts! I’m into the technical side, but I’m mostly driven by my instincts. It’s all about feeling and that comes from creating the correct environment in the suite, having a good kick off chat with clients, banging on the tunes and spinning the balls.

Where do you find inspiration?
I find a lot of inspiration from just being outside. It might sound like a cliché but travel is massive for me, and that goes hand in hand with my photography. I think it’s important to change your surroundings, be it traveling to Japan or just taking a different route to the studio. The change keeps me engaged in my surroundings, asking questions and stimulating my imagination.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Riding my bike is my main thing. I usually do a 30-mile ride a few mornings a week and then 50 to 100 miles at the weekend. Riding keeps you constantly focused on that one thing, so it’s a great way to de-stress and clear your mind.

What’s next for you?
I’ve got some great projects coming up that I’m excited about. But outside of the suite, I’ll be riding in this year’s 10th Annual Fireflies West ride. For the past 10 years, Fireflies West participants have embarked on a journey from San Francisco to Los Angeles in support of City of Hope. This year’s ride has the added challenge of an extra day tacked onto it making the ride 650 miles in total over seven days, so…I best get training! (See postPerspectives’ recent coverage on the ride.)

Cabin Editing Company opens in Santa Monica focusing on editing, VFX

Cabin Editing Company has opened in Santa Monica, started by three industry veterans: managing partner Carr Schilling and award-winning editors Chan Hatcher, Graham Turner and Isaac Chen.

“We are a company of film editors with a passion for storytelling who are committed to mentoring talent and establishing lasting relationships with directors and agencies,” says Schilling, who formerly worked alongside Hatcher, Turner and Chen at NO6.

L-R: Isaac Chen, Carr Schilling, Graham Turner and Chan Hatcher.

Cabin, which also features creative director/Flame artist Verdi Sevenhuysen and editor Lucas Spaulding, will offer creative editorial, visual effects, finishing, graphics and color. The boutique’s work spans mediums across broadcast, branded content, web, film and more.

Why was now the right time to open a studio? “Everything aligned to make it possible, and at Cabin we have a collective of top creative talent where each of us bring our individual style to our projects to create great work with our clients,” says Schilling.

The boutique studio has already been busy working with agencies such as 215 McCann, BBDO, CP+B, Deutsch, GSD&M, Mekanism and Saatchi & Saatchi.

In terms of tools, Cabin uses Avid Media Composer and Autodesk Flame Premium all centralized to the Facilis TerraBlock shared storage system via Fibre.

Updating the long-running Ford F-150 campaign

Giving a decade-long very successful campaign a bit of a goose presents unique challenges, including maintaining tone and creative continuity while bringing a fresh perspective. To help with the launch of the new 2018 Ford F-150, Big Block director Paul Trillo brought all of his tools to the table, offering an innovative spin to the campaign.

Big Block worked closely with agency GTB, from development to previz, live-action, design, editorial, all the way through color and finish.

Trillo wanted to maintain the tone and voice of the original campaign while adding a distinct technical style and energy. Dynamic camera movement and quick editing helped bring new vitality to the “Built Ford Tough” concept.

Technically challenging camera moves help guide the audience through distinct moments. While previous spots relied largely on motion graphics, Trillo’s used custom camera rigs on real locations.

Typography remained a core of the spots, all underscored by an array of stop-motion, hyperlapse, dolly zooms, drone footage, camera flips, motion control and match frames.

We reached out to Big Block’s Paul and VFX supervisor John Cherniack to find out more…

How early did Big Block get involved in this F-150 campaign?
We worked with Detroit agency GTB starting in May 2017.

How much creative input did you have on the campaign? In terms of both original concept and execution?
Trillo: What was so original about this pitch was that they gave us a blank canvas and VO script to work with, and that’s it. I was building off a campaign that had been running for nearly 10 years and I knew what the creatives were looking for in terms of some sort of kinetic, constantly transitioning energy. However, it was essentially up to me to design each moment of the spot and how we get from A to B to C.

Typically, car commercials can be pretty prescriptive and sensitive to how the car is depicted. This campaign functions a lot differently than your typical car commercial. There was a laundry list of techniques, concepts, tricks and toys I’ve wanted to implement, so we seized the opportunity to throw the kitchen sink at this. Then, by breaking down the script and pairing it with the different tricks I wanted to try out, I sort of formed the piece. It was through the development of the scripts, boards and animatics that certain ideas fell to the wayside and the best rose to the top.

Cherniack: Paul had some great ideas from the very beginning, and the whole team got to help contribute to the brainstorming. We took the best ideas and started to put them all together in a previz to see which ones would stitch together seamlessly.

Paul, Justin Trask (production designer) and I all spent a very long together going through each board and shot, determining which elements we could build, and what we would make in CG. As much as we wanted to build a giant gantry to raise the bar, some elements were cost-prohibitive. This is where we were able to get creative on what we would be able to achieve between practical and CG elements.

How much creative input did you have on set?
Trillo: The only creative decisions we were let to make on set were coming up with creative solutions for logistical challenges. We’d done all the pre-production work, mapping out the camera moves and transitions down to the frame, so the heavy lifting was finished. Of course, you always look to make it better on set and find the right energy in the moment, but that’s all icing.

Cherniack: By the time we started shooting, we had gone through a good amount of planning, and I had a good feeling about everything that Paul was trying to achieve. One area that we both worked together on set was to get the most creative shot, while also maintaining our plans for combining the shots in post.

What challenges did you face?
Trillo: I think I have a sort of addictive personality when it comes to logistical and creative challenges. Before this thing was fully locked in, before we had any storyboards or a single location, I knew what I had written out was going to be super challenging if not impossible. Especially because I wanted to shot as much as we could practically. However, what you write down on a piece of paper and what you animate in a 3D environment doesn’t always align with the physics of the real world. Each shot provided its own unique challenge, whether it’s an art department build or deciding which type of camera rig to use to move the camera in an unusual way. Fortunately, I had a top-notch crew both in camera (DP Dan Mindel) and production design (Justin Trask) that there were always a couple ways to solve each problem.

Cherniack: In order to have all of the measurements, HDRI, set surveys and reference photography, I had to always be on the move, while being close enough should any VFX questions come up. Doing this in 110+ degree heat, in the quarry, during three of the hottest days of the summer was quite a challenge. We also had very little control of lake currents, and had to modify the way we shot the boat scene in Brainiac on the fly. We had a great crew who was able to change directions quickly.

What was your favorite part of working on this campaign? What aspect are you most proud of?
Trillo: It was pretty spectacular to see each of these pieces evolve from chicken scratch into a fully-realized image. There was little creative compromise in that entire process. But I have to say I think I’m proudest of dropping 400lbs of french fries out of a shipping container.

Any major differences between automotive campaigns and ads for other industries?
The main difference is there aren’t any rules here. The only thing you need to keep in mind when doing this campaign is stay true to the F-150’s brand and ethos. As long as you remain true to the spirit, there are no other guidelines to follow in terms of how a car commercial needs to function. What appeals to me about this campaign is it combines a few of my interests of design, technical camera work and a dash of humor.

What tools did you use?
Cherniack: We used the software Maya, 3ds Max, Nuke, Flame, PFTrack for post-production.

Tobin Kirk joins design/animation house Laundry as EP

Tobin Kirk has joined LA-based design and animation studio Laundry as executive producer. Kirk brings nearly 20 years of experience spanning broadcast design, main title sequences, integrated content, traditional on-air spots, branded content, digital and social. At Laundry, he will work closely with executive producer Garrett Braren on business development, as well as client and project management efforts.

Kirk was most recently managing executive producer at Troika, where he oversaw all production at the entertainment brand agency’s 25,000-square-foot facility in Hollywood, including its creative studio and live-action production subsidiary, Troika Production Group. Prior to that, he spent nearly five years as executive producer at Blind, managing projects for Xbox/Microsoft, AT&T, ancestry.com and Sealy Mattress, among others.

As a producer, Kirk’s background is highlighted by such projects as the main title sequence for David Fincher’s The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo at Blur Studio, commercials for Chrysler and Gatorade at A52 and an in-flight video for Method/Virgin America at Green Dot Films. He also spent three years with Farmer Brown working for TBS, CBS, Mark Burnett Productions, Al Roker Productions, The Ant Farm, Bunim/Murray and Endemol USA.

In addition, Kirk collaborated with video artist Bill Viola for over six years, producing projects for the London National Gallery, Athens Olympics, the Getty Museum, Opera National de Paris, Guggenheim Museum, Munich’s E.ON Corporation and Anthony d’Offay Gallery.

Agent of Sleep: The making of a spec commercial

By Jennifer Walden

Names like Jason Bourne and James Bond make one think “eternal sleep,” not just merely a “restful” one. That’s what makes director/producer/writer Stephen Vitale’s spec commercial for Tempur-Pedic mattresses so compelling. Like a mad scientist crossing a shark with a sheep, Vitale combines an energetic spy/action film aesthetic with the sleepy world of mattress advertising for Agent of Sleep.

Vitale originally pitched the idea to a different mattress brand. “That brand passed, and I decided they were silly to, so I made the spot that exists on spec and chose to use Tempur-Pedic as the featured brand instead. I hear Tempur-Pedic really enjoyed the spot.”

In Agent of Sleep, two assailants fight their way up a stairwell and into a sun-dappled apartment where their altercation eventually leads into a bedroom and onto a comfy (albeit naked) mattress. One assailant applies a choke hold to the other but his grip loosens as he falls fast asleep. The other assailant lies down beside the first and promptly falls asleep too.

LA-based Vitale drew inspiration from Bourne and Bond films. He referenced fight scenes from Haywire, John Wick and Mission Impossible too. “Mostly all of them have a version of the action sequence in Agent of Sleep — a visceral, intimate fight between spies/hired guns that ends with one of them getting choked out. It was about distilling this trope, dropping a viewer right into the middle of it to grab them and immediately establishing visuals that would tap into the familiarity they have with the setup.”

Once the spy/action foundation was in place, Vitale (who is pictured shooting in our main image) added tropes from mattress ads to his concept, like choosing a warmly lit, serene apartment and ending the spot with a couple lying comfortably on a bare mattress as a narrator shares product information. “The spies are bursting into what would be the typical setting for a mattress ad and they upend all of its elements. The visuals reflect that trajectory.”

To achieve the desired cinematic look, Vitale chose the Arri Alexa Mini with Cooke anamorphic lenses, and shot in a wide aspect ratio of 2:66 — wider than the normal cinemascope. “My cinematographer David Bolen and I felt like it gave the confined sets and the close-range fist fight a bigger scope and pushed the piece further away from the look of an ad.”

They shot in a practical location and dressed it to replicate the bedrooms shown in actual Tempur-Pedic product images. As for smashing through the bedroom wall, that wasn’t part of the plan but it did add to the believability of the fight. “That was an accidental alteration to the location,” jokes Vitale.

The handheld camera movement up front adds to the energy of the fight, and Vitale framed the shots to clearly show who is throwing the punch and how hard it landed. “I tried to design longer takes and find angles that created a dance between the camera and the amazing fight work from Yoshi Sudarso and Cory DeMeyers.”

In contrast, the spot ends with steady, smooth shots that exude a calm feeling. Vitale says, “We used a jib and sticks for the end shots because I wanted it to be as tranquil and still as possible to play up the joke.”

Production sound was captured with a Røde NTG-2 boom mic onto a Zoom H5 recorder. The vocalizations from the two spies on-set, i.e. their breaths and efforts, were all used in post. Vitale, who handled the sound design and final mix, says, “I would use alt audio takes and drop in grunts and impact reactions to shots that needed a boost. The main goal was that it felt kinetic throughout and that the fight sounded really visceral. A lot of punch sounds were layered with other sound effects to avoid them feeling canned, and I also did Foley for different moments in the spot to help fill it out and give it a more natural sound.”

The Post
Vitale also handled picture editing using Apple Final Cut Pro 7, which worked out perfectly for him. Editing the spot was pretty straightforward, since he had designed a solid plan for the shoot and didn’t need to cover extra shots and setups. “I usually only shoot what I know I will use,” he says. “The one shot I didn’t use was an insert of the glass the woman drops, shattering on the floor. So structurally, it was easy to find. The rest was about keeping cuts tight, making sure the longer takes didn’t drag and the quicker cuts were still clear and exciting to watch.”

Vitale worked with colorist Bryan Smaller, who uses Blackmagic Resolve. They agreed that fully committing to the action film aesthetic, by playing with contrast levels and grain to keep the image gritty and grounded was the best way of not letting the audience in on the joke until the end. “For the stairwell and hallway, we leaned into the green and orange hues of those respective locations. The apartment has a bit of a teal hue to it and has a much more organic feel, which again was to help transition the spies and the audience into the mattress ad world, so to speak,” explains Vitale.

The icing on the cake was composer Patrick Sullivan’s action film-style score. “He did a great job of bringing the audience into the action and creating tension and excitement. We’ve been friends since elementary school and played in a band together, so we can find what’s working and what’s not pretty quickly. He’s one of my most consistent collaborators, in various aspects of post production, and he always brings something special to the project.”


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based writer. Follow her at @audiojeney on Twitter.