Category Archives: commercials

Timber finishes Chipolte ‘Fresh Food’ campaign

In Chipolte’s new Fresh Food campaign, directed by Errol Morris for Moxie Pictures out of agency Venables Bell + Partners, real-life employees of the food chain talk about the pride they take in their work while smashing guacamole and cutting peppers, parsley and other fresh ingredients.

The food shots are designed to get all five of your senses moving by grabbing the audience with the visually appealing, fresh food served and leading them to taste, smell, and hear the authentic ingredients.

The four spots — Bre – Just BraggingCarson – Good Food Good Person, Krista – Fresh Everyday
Robbie – Microwaves Not Welcome — are for broadcast and the web.

For Chipotle, Santa Monica’s Timber handled online, finishing and just a splash of clean-up. They used Flame on the project. According to Timber head of production Melody Alexander, “The Chipotle project was based on showcasing the realness of the products the restaurants uses in their food. Minimal clean-up was required as the client was keen to keep the naturalness of the footage. We at Timber use a combination of finishing tools when working on online projects. The Chipotle project was completely done in the Flame.”

Behind the Title: ATK PLN Technical Supervisor Jon Speer

NAME: Jon Speer

COMPANY: ATK PLN (@atkpln_studio) in Dallas

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a strategic creative group that specializes in design and animation for commercials and short-form video productions.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Technical Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
In general, a technical supervisor is responsible for leading the technical director team and making sure that the pipeline enables our artists’ effort of fulfilling the client’s vision.

Day-to-day responsibilities include:
– Reviewing upcoming jobs and making sure we have the necessary hardware resources to complete them
– Working with our producers and VFX supervisors to bid and plan future work
– Working with our CG/VFX supervisors to develop and implement new technologies that make our pipeline more efficient
– When problems arise in production, I am there to determine the cause, find a solution and help implement the fix
– Developing junior technical directors so they can be effective in mitigating pipeline issues that crop up during production

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I would say the most surprising thing that falls under the title is the amount of people and personality management that you need to employ.

As a technical supervisor, you have to represent every single person’s different perspectives and goals. Making everyone from artists, producers, management and, most importantly, clients happy is a tough balancing act. That balancing act needs to be constantly evaluated to make sure you have both the short-term and long-term interests of the company, clients and artists in mind.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Maya, Houdini and Nuke are the main tools we support for shot production. We have our own internal tracking software that we also integrate with.

From text editors for coding, to content creation programs and even budgeting programs, I typically use it all.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Starting the next project. Each new project offers the chance for us to try out a new or revamped pipeline tool that we hope will make things that much better for our team. I love efficiencies, so getting to try new tools, whether they are internally or externally developed, is always fun.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I know it sounds cliché, but I don’t really have one. My entire job is based on figuring out why things don’t work or how they could work better. So when things are breaking or getting technically difficult, that is why I am here. If I had to pick one thing, I suppose it would be looking at spreadsheets of any kind.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early morning when no one else is in. This is the time of day that I get to see what new tools are out there and try them. This is when I get to come up with the crazy ideas and plans for what we do next from a pipeline standpoint. Most of the rest of my day usually includes dealing with issues that crop up during production, or being in meetings.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I think I would have to give teaching a try. Having studied architecture in school, I always thought it would be fun to teach architectural history.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We just wrapped on a set of Lego spots for the new Lego 2 movie.

Fallout 76

We also did an E3 piece for Fallout 76 this year that was a lot of fun. We are currently helping out with a spot for the big game this year that has been a blast.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I think I am most proud of our Lego spots we have created over the last three years. We have really experimented with pipeline on those spots. We saw a new technology out there — rendering in Octane — and decided to jump in head first. While it wasn’t the easiest thing to do, we forced ourselves to become even more efficient in all aspects of production.

NAME PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Houdini really makes the difficult things simple to do. I also love Nuke. It does what it does so well, and is amazingly fast and simple to program in.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Mainly I’ll listen to soundtracks when I am working, the lack of words is best when I am programming.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Golf is something I really enjoy on the weekends. However, like a lot of people, I find travel is easily the best way to for me to hit the reset button.

DigitalGlue 3.7

Quick Chat: Digital Arts’ Josh Heilbronner on Audi, Chase spots

New York City’s Digital Arts provided audio post on a couple of 30-second commercial spots that presented sound designer/mixer Josh Heilbronner with some unique audio challenges. They are Audi’s Night Watchman via agency Venables Bell & Partners in New York and Chase’s Mama Said Knock You Out, featuring Serena Williams from agency Droga5 in New York.

Josh Heilbronner

Heilbronner, who has been sound designing and mixing for broadcast and film for almost 10 years, has worked on large fashion brands like Nike and J Crew to Fortune 500 Companies like General Electric, Bank of America and Estee Lauder. He has also mixed promos and primetime broadcast specials for USA Network, CBS and ABC Television. In addition to commercial VO recording, editing and mixing, Heilbronner has a growing credit list of long-form documentaries and feature films, including The Broken Ones, Romance (In the Digital Age), Generation Iron 2, The Hurt Business and Giving Birth in America (a CNN special series).

We recently reached out to Heilbronner to find out more about these two very different commercial projects and how he tackled each.

Both Audi and Chase are very different assignments from an audio perspective. How did these projects come your way?
On Audi, we were asked to be part of their new 2019 A7 campaign, which follows a security guard patrolling the Audi factory in the middle of night. It’s sort of James Bond meets Night at the Museum. The factory is full of otherworldly rooms built to put the cars through their paces (extreme cold, isolation etc.). Q Department did a great job crafting the sounds of those worlds and really bringing the viewer into the factory. Agency Venables & Bell were looking to really pull everything together tightly and have the dialogue land up-front, while still maintaining the wonderfully lush and dynamic music and sound design that had been laid down already.

The Chase Serena campaign is an impact-driven series of spots. Droga5 has a great reputation for putting together cinematic spots and this is no exception. Drazen Bosnjak from Q Department originally reached out to see if I would be interested in mixing this one because one of the final deliverables was the Jumbotron at the US Open in Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Digital Arts has a wonderful 7.1 Dolby approved 4K theater, so we were able to really get a sense of what the finals would sound and look like up on the big screen.

Did you have any concerns going into the project about what would be required creatively or technically?
For Audi our biggest challenge was the tight deadline. We mixed in New York but we had three different time zones in play, so getting approvals could sometimes be difficult. With Chase, the amount of content for this campaign was large. We needed to deliver finals for broadcast, social media (Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter), Jumbotron and cinema. Making sure they played back as loud and crisp as they could on all those platforms was a major focus.

What was the most challenging aspect for you on the project?
As with a lot of production audio, the noise on set was pretty extreme. For Audi they had to film the night watchman walking in different spaces, delivering the copy at a variety of volumes. It all needed to gel together as if he was in one smaller room talking directly to the camera, as if he were a narrator. We didn’t have access to re-record him, so we had to use a few different denoise tools, such as iZotope RX6, Brusfri and Waves WNS to clear out the clashing room tones.

The biggest challenge on Chase was the dynamic range and power of these spots. Serena beautifully hushed whisper narration is surrounded by impactful bass drops, cinematic hits and lush ambiences. Reigning all that in, building to a climax and still having her narration be the focus was a game of cat and mouse. Also, broadcast standards are a bit restrictive when it comes to large impacts, so finding the right balance was key.

Any interesting technology or techniques that you used on the project?
I mainly use Avid Pro Tools Ultimate 2018. They have made some incredible advancements — you can now do everything on one machine, all in the box. I can have 180 tracks running in a surround session and still print every deliverable (5.1, stereo, stems etc.) without a hiccup.

I’ve been using Penteo 7 Pro for stereo 5.1 upmixing. It does a fantastic job filling in the surrounds, but also folds down to stereo nicely (and passes QC). Spanner is another useful tool when working with all sorts of channel counts. It allows me to down-mix, rearrange channels and route audio to the correct buses easily.


Avengers: Infinity War leads VES Awards with six noms

The Visual Effects Society (VES) has announced the nominees for the 17th Annual VES Awards, which recognize outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games as well as the VFX supervisors, VFX producers and hands-on artists who bring this work to life.

Avengers: Infinity War garners the most feature film nomination with six. Incredibles 2 is the top animated film contender with five nominations and Lost in Space leads the broadcast field with six nominations.

Nominees in 24 categories were selected by VES members via events hosted by 11 of the organizations Sections, including Australia, the Bay Area, Germany, London, Los Angeles, Montreal, New York, New Zealand, Toronto, Vancouver and Washington.

The VES Awards will be held on February 5th at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. As previously announced, the VES Visionary Award will be presented to writer/director/producer and co-creator of Westworld Jonathan Nolan. The VES Award for Creative Excellence will be given to award-winning creators/executive producers/writers/directors David Benioff and D.B. Weiss of Game of Thrones fame. Actor-comedian-author Patton Oswalt will once again host the VES Awards.

Here are the nominees:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War

Daniel DeLeeuw

Jen Underdahl

Kelly Port

Matt Aitken

Daniel Sudick

 

Christopher Robin

Christopher Robin

Chris Lawrence

Steve Gaub

Michael Eames

Glenn Melenhorst

Chris Corbould

 

Ready Player One

Roger Guyett

Jennifer Meislohn

David Shirk

Matthew Butler

Neil Corbould

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story

Rob Bredow

Erin Dusseault

Matt Shumway

Patrick Tubach

Dominic Tuohy

 

Welcome to Marwen

Kevin Baillie

Sandra Scott

Seth Hill

Marc Chu

James Paradis

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature 

12 Strong

Roger Nall

Robert Weaver

Mike Meinardus

 

Bird Box

Marcus Taormina

David Robinson

Mark Bakowski

Sophie Dawes

Mike Meinardus

 

Bohemian Rhapsody

Paul Norris

Tim Field

May Leung

Andrew Simmonds

 

First Man

Paul Lambert

Kevin Elam

Tristan Myles

Ian Hunter

JD Schwalm

 

Outlaw King

Alex Bicknell

Dan Bethell

Greg O’Connor

Stefano Pepin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch

Pierre Leduc

Janet Healy

Bruno Chauffard

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Brad Bird

John Walker

Rick Sayre

Bill Watral

 

Isle of Dogs

Mark Waring

Jeremy Dawson

Tim Ledbury

Lev Kolobov

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet

Scott Kersavage

Bradford Simonsen

Ernest J. Petti

Cory Loftis

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Joshua Beveridge

Christian Hejnal

Danny Dimian

Bret St. Clair

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon; Out of the Past

Everett Burrell

Tony Meagher

Steve Moncur

Christine Lemon

Joel Whist

 

Krypton; The Phantom Zone

Ian Markiewicz

Jennifer Wessner

Niklas Jacobson

Martin Pelletier

 

LOST IN SPACE

Lost in Space; Danger, Will Robinson

Jabbar Raisani

Terron Pratt

Niklas Jacobson

Joao Sita

 

The Terror; Go For Broke

Frank Petzold

Lenka Líkařová

Viktor Muller

Pedro Sabrosa

 

Westworld; The Passenger

Jay Worth

Elizabeth Castro

Bruce Branit

Joe Wehmeyer

Michael Lantieri

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan; Pilot

Erik Henry

Matt Robken

Bobo Skipper

Deak Ferrand

Pau Costa

 

The Alienist; The Boy on the Bridge

Kent Houston

Wendy Garfinkle

Steve Murgatroyd

Drew Jones

Paul Stephenson

 

The Deuce; We’re All Beasts

Jim Rider

Steven Weigle

John Bair

Aaron Raff

 

The First; Near and Far

Karen Goulekas

Eddie Bonin

Roland Langschwert

Bryan Godwin

Matthew James Kutcher

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June

Brendan Taylor

Stephen Lebed

Winston Lee

Leo Bovell

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Realtime Project

Age of Sail

John Kahrs

Kevin Dart

Cassidy Curtis

Theresa Latzko

 

Cycles

Jeff Gipson

Nicholas Russell

Lauren Nicole Brown

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

 

Dr Grordbort’s Invaders

Greg Broadmore

Mhairead Connor

Steve Lambert

Simon Baker

 

God of War

Maximilian Vaughn Ancar

Corey Teblum

Kevin Huynh

Paolo Surricchio

 

Marvel’s Spider-Man

Grant Hollis

Daniel Wang

Seth Faske

Abdul Bezrati

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial 

Beyond Good & Evil 2

Maxime Luere

Leon Berelle

Remi Kozyra

Dominique Boidin

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Philip Whalley

Anthony Bloor

Andy Steele

 

McDonald’s; #ReindeerReady

Ben Cronin

Josh King

Gez Wright

Suzanne Jandu

 

U.S. Marine Corps; A Nation’s Call

Steve Drew

Nick Fraser

Murray Butler

Greg White

Dave Peterson

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident

Carsten Keller

Anandi Peiris

Dan Sanders

Fabian Frank

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

Beautiful Hunan; Flight of the Phoenix

R. Rajeev

Suhit Saha

Arish Fyzee

Unmesh Nimbalkar

 

Childish Gambino’s Pharos

Keith Miller

Alejandro Crawford

Thelvin Cabezas

Jeremy Thompson

 

DreamWorks Theatre Presents Kung Fu Panda

Marc Scott

Doug Cooper

Michael Losure

Alex Timchenko

 

Osheaga Music and Arts Festival

Andre Montambeault

Marie-Josee Paradis

Alyson Lamontagne

David Bishop Noriega

 

Pearl Quest

Eugénie von Tunzelmann

Liz Oliver

Ian Spendloff

Ross Burgess

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Thanos

Jan Philip Cramer

Darren Hendler

Paul Story

Sidney Kombo-Kintombo

 

Christopher Robin; Tigger

Arslan Elver

Kayn Garcia

Laurent Laban

Mariano Mendiburu

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Indoraptor

Jance Rubinchik

Ted Lister

Yannick Gillain

Keith Ribbons

 

Ready Player One; Art3mis

David Shirk

Brian Cantwell

Jung-Seung Hong

Kim Ooi

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; The Grinch

David Galante

Francois Boudaille

Olivier Luffin

Yarrow Cheney

 

Incredibles 2; Helen Parr

Michal Makarewicz

Ben Porter

Edgar Rodriguez

Kevin Singleton

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Ralphzilla

Dong Joo Byun

Dave K. Komorowski

Justin Sklar

Le Joyce Tong

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse; Miles Morales

Marcos Kang

Chad Belteau

Humberto Rosa

Julie Bernier Gosselin

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Realtime Project

Cycles; Rae

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

Jose Luis -Weecho- Velasquez

 

Lost in Space; Humanoid

Chad Shattuck

Paul Zeke

Julia Flanagan

Andrew McCartney

 

Nightflyers; All That We Have Found; Eris

Peter Giliberti

James Chretien

Ryan Cromie

Cesar Dacol Jr.

 

Spider-Man; Doc Ock

Brian Wyser

Henrique Naspolini

Sophie Brennan

William Salyers

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

McDonald’s; Bobbi the Reindeer

Gabriela Ruch Salmeron

Joe Henson

Andrew Butler

Joel Best

 

Overkill’s The Walking Dead; Maya

Jonas Ekman

Goran Milic

Jonas Skoog

Henrik Eklundh

 

Peta; Best Friend; Lucky

Bernd Nalbach

Emanuel Fuchs

Sebastian Plank

Christian Leitner

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident; Bam

David Bryan

Chris Welsby

Fabian Frank

Chloe Dawe

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

Ant-Man and the Wasp; Journey to the Quantum Realm

Florian Witzel

Harsh Mistri

Yuri Serizawa

Can Yuksel

 

Aquaman; Atlantis

Quentin Marmier

Aaron Barr

Jeffrey De Guzman

Ziad Shureih

 

Ready Player One; The Shining, Overlook Hotel

Mert Yamak

Stanley Wong

Joana Garrido

Daniel Gagiu

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Vandor Planet

Julian Foddy

Christoph Ammann

Clement Gerard

Pontus Albrecht

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Whoville

Loic Rastout

Ludovic Ramiere

Henri Deruer

Nicolas Brack

 

Incredibles 2; Parr House

Christopher M. Burrows

Philip Metschan

Michael Rutter

Joshua West

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Social Media District

Benjamin Min Huang

Jon Kim Krummel II

Gina Warr Lawes

Matthias Lechner

 

Spider-Man; Into the Spider-Verse; Graphic New York City

Terry Park

Bret St. Clair

Kimberly Liptrap

Dave Morehead

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Cycles; The House

Michael R.W. Anderson

Jeff Gipson

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

 

Lost in Space; Pilot; Impact Area

Philip Engström

Kenny Vähäkari

Jason Martin

Martin Bergquist

 

The Deuce; 42nd St

John Bair

Vance Miller

Jose Marin

Steve Sullivan

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June; Fenway Park

Patrick Zentis

Kevin McGeagh

Leo Bovell

Zachary Dembinski

 

The Man in the High Castle; Reichsmarschall Ceremony

Casi Blume

Michael Eng

Ben McDougal

Sean Myers

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

Aquaman; Third Act Battle

Claus Pedersen

Mohammad Rastkar

Cedric Lo

Ryan McCoy

 

Echo; Time Displacement

Victor Perez

Tomas Tjernberg

Tomas Wall

Marcus Dineen

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Gyrosphere Escape

Pawl Fulker

Matt Perrin

Oscar Faura

David Vickery

 

Ready Player One; New York Race

Daniele Bigi

Edmund Kolloen

Mathieu Vig

Jean-Baptiste Noyau

 

Welcome to Marwen; Town of Marwen

Kim Miles

Matthew Ward

Ryan Beagan

Marc Chu

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project 

Avengers: Infinity War; Nidavellir Forge Megastructure

Chad Roen

Ryan Rogers

Jeff Tetzlaff

Ming Pan

 

Incredibles 2; Underminer Vehicle

Neil Blevins

Philip Metschan

Kevin Singleton

 

Mortal Engines; London

Matthew Sandoval

James Ogle

Nick Keller

Sam Tack

 

Ready Player One; DeLorean DMC-12

Giuseppe Laterza

Kim Lindqvist

Mauro Giacomazzo

William Gallyot

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Millennium Falcon

Masa Narita

Steve Walton

David Meny

James Clyne

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Gerardo Aguilera

Ashraf Ghoniem

Vasilis Pazionis

Hartwell Durfor

 

Avengers: Infinity War; Wakanda

Florian Witzel

Adam Lee

Miguel Perez Senent

Francisco Rodriguez

 

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Dominik Kirouac

Chloe Ostiguy

Christian Gaumond

 

Venom

Aharon Bourland

Jordan Walsh

Aleksandar Chalyovski

Federico Frassinelli

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Snow, Clouds and Smoke

Eric Carme

Nicolas Brice

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Paul Kanyuk

Tiffany Erickson Klohn

Vincent Serritella

Matthew Kiyoshi Wong

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Virus Infection & Destruction

Paul Carman

Henrik Fält

Christopher Hendryx

David Hutchins

 

Smallfoot

Henrik Karlsson

Theo Vandernoot

Martin Furness

Dmitriy Kolesnik

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Ian Farnsworth

Pav Grochola

Simon Corbaux

Brian D. Casper

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Altered Carbon

Philipp Kratzer

Daniel Fernandez

Xavier Lestourneaud

Andrea Rosa

 

Lost in Space; Jupiter is Falling

Denys Shchukin

Heribert Raab

Michael Billette

Jaclyn Stauber

 

Lost in Space; The Get Away

Juri Bryan

Will Elsdale

Hugo Medda

Maxime Marline

 

The Man in the High Castle; Statue of Liberty Destruction

Saber Jlassi

Igor Zanic

Nick Chamberlain

Chris Parks

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Sabine Laimer

Tim Walker

Tobias Wiesner

Massimo Pasquetti

 

First Man

Joel Delle-Vergin

Peter Farkas

Miles Lauridsen

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

John Galloway

Enrik Pavdeja

David Nolan

Juan Espigares Enriquez

 

Welcome to Marwen

Woei Lee

Saul Galbiati

Max Besner

Thai-Son Doan

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon

Jean-François Leroux

Reece Sanders

Stephen Bennett

Laraib Atta

 

Handmaids Tale; June

Winston Lee

Gwen Zhang

Xi Luo

Kevin Quatman

 

Lost in Space; Impact; Crash Site Rescue

David Wahlberg

Douglas Roshamn

Sofie Ljunggren

Fredrik Lönn

 

Silicon Valley; Artificial Emotional Intelligence; Fiona

Tim Carras

Michael Eng

Shiying Li

Bill Parker

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

Apple; Unlock

Morten Vinther

Michael Gregory

Gustavo Bellon

Rodrigo Jimenez

 

Apple; Welcome Home

Michael Ralla

Steve Drew

Alejandro Villabon

Peter Timberlake

 

Genesis; G90 Facelift

Neil Alford

Jose Caballero

Joseph Dymond

Greg Spencer

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Pratyush Paruchuri

Kalle Kohlstrom

Daniel Benjamin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

Chocolate Man

David Bellenbaum

Aleksandra Todorovic

Jörg Schmidt

Martin Boué

 

Proxima-b

Denis Krez

Tina Vest

Elias Kremer

Lukas Löffler

 

Ratatoskr

Meike Müller

Lena-Carolin Lohfink

Anno Schachner

Lisa Schachner

 

Terra Nova

Thomas Battistetti

Mélanie Geley

Mickael Le Mezo

Guillaume Hoarau


Ben Corfield promoted to editor at Stitch in London

Ben Corfield is now a full-fledged editor on the Stitch roster. Having joined the edit house as a Homespun editor a year ago, the London-based Corfield has been working hard on a range of projects. Homespun is the sister company to Stitch. Assistants start editing through Homespun on music videos and short films and then “graduate” to Stitch to work on commercials.

Working on an Avid Media Composer Corfield recently cut a spot for a film for Leica, directed by Barney Cokeliss, involving editing 105 hours of footage for a two-minute spot. At the end of last year, he cut the Sam Smith and Calvin Harris Promises documentary which explores the art of voguing. It was directed by Emil Nava.

Corfield’s initial interest in editing was piqued in the early ’90s while he was watching Terminator 2 on VHS. Inspired after seeing the T 1000 melt through a metal prison gate, he knew then that he somehow wanted to get into film.

“I get to work on the best part of the process as I put it all together to create the finished piece,” says Corfield on the process of editing. “It’s always a privilege to work closely with the director during the edit and see his or her vision in its final form. I’ve already been lucky enough to work with numerous inspirational editors and directors, much of the way I work now is down to what I’ve learnt from them.”


VFX studio Electric Theatre Collective adds three to London team

London visual effects studio Electric Theatre Collective has added three to its production team: Elle Lockhart, Polly Durrance and Antonia Vlasto.

Lockhart brings with her extensive CG experience, joining from Touch Surgery where she ran the Johnson & Johnson account. Prior to that she worked at Analog as a VFX producer where she delivered three global campaigns for Nike. At Electric, she will serve as producer on Martini and Toyota.

Vlasto joins Electric working on clients such Mercedes, Tourism Ireland and Tui. She joins from 750MPH where, over a four-year period, she served as producer on Nike, Great Western Railway, VW and Amazon to name but a few.

At Electric, Polly Durrance will serve as producer on H&M, TK Maxx and Carphone Warehouse. She joins from Unit where she helped launched their in-house Design Collective, worked with clients such as Lush, Pepsi and Thatchers Cider. Prior to Unit Polly was at Big Buoy where she produced work for Jaguar Land Rover, giffgaff and Redbull.

Recent projects at the studio, which also has an office in Santa Monica, California, include Tourism Ireland Capture Your Heart and Honda Palindrome.

Main Image: (L-R) Elle Lockhart, Antonia Vlasto and Polly Durrance.


Asahi beer spot gets the VFX treatment

A collaboration between The Monkeys Melbourne, In The Thicket and Alt, a newly released Asahi campaign takes viewers on a journey through landscapes built around surreal Japanese iconography. Watch Asahi Super Dry — Enter Asahi here.

From script to shoot — a huge operation that took place at Sydney’s Fox Studios — director Marco Prestini and his executive producer Genevieve Triquet (from production house In The Thicket) brought on the VFX team at Alt to help realize the creative vision.

The VFX team at Alt (which has offices in Sydney, Melbourne and Los Angeles) worked with Prestini to help design and build the complex “one shot” look, with everything from robotic geishas to a gigantic CG squid in the mix, alongside a seamless blend of CG set extensions and beautifully shot live-action plates.

“VFX supervisor Dave Edwards and the team at Alt, together with my EP Genevieve, have been there since the very beginning, and their creative input and expertise were key in every step of the way,” explains Prestini. “Everything we did on set was the results of weeks of endless back and forth on technical previz, a process that required pretty much everyone’s input on a daily basis and that was incredibly inspiring for me to be part of.”

Dave Edwards, VFX supervisor at Alt, shares: “Production designer Michael Iacono designed sets in 3D, with five huge sets built for the shoot. The team then worked out camera speeds for timings based on these five sets and seven plates. DP Stefan Duscio would suggest rigs and mounts, which our team was able to then test it in previs to see if it would work with the set. During previs, we worked out that we couldn’t get the resolution and the required frame rate to shoot the high frame rate samurais, so we had to use Alexa LF. Of course, that also helped Marco, who wanted minimal lens distortion as it allowed a wide field of view without the distortion of normal anamorphic lenses.”

One complex scene involves a character battling a gigantic underwater squid, which was done via a process known as “dry for wet” — a film technique in which smoke, colored filters and/or lighting effects are used to simulate a character being underwater while filming on a dry stage. The team at Alt did a rough animation of the squid to help drive the actions of the talent and the stunt team on the day, before spending the final weeks perfecting the look of the photoreal monster.

In terms of tools, for concept design/matte painting Alt used Adobe Photoshop while previs/modeling/texturing/animation was done in Autodesk Maya. All of the effects/lighting/look development was via Side Effects Houdini; the compositing pipeline was built around Foundry Nuke; final online was completed in Autodesk Flame; and for graphics, they used Adobe After Effects.
The final edit was done by The Butchery.

Here is the VFX breakdown:

Enter Asahi – VFX Breakdown from altvfx on Vimeo.


Behind the Title: Exile Editor Kyle Brown

With recent spot work that includes jobs for Comcast, AT&T, T-Mobile and Trojan, this editor jokes, “A good Netflix and chill Tinder date was made possible thanks to the results of my commercial work.”

Name: Kyle Brown

Company: New York- and Santa Monica-based Exile

Can you describe your company?
Exile is a bicoastal editorial and finishing boutique with spaces on both coasts.

What’s your job title?
Offline editor, with a splash of camp counselor.

What does that entail? 
As an offline editor, I take the footage that was shot and assemble it based on the script and creative vision honed on set, adding in tone and texture, rhythm and pacing. Basically, editors are given all the raw material that has been created and we turn it into a visual experience.

What’s great about editorial is you have to be honest — the footage is shot, you have what you have and nothing more, and now you have to take what’s there and stitch it together. If something does not work, you move on and make something else work. You can’t hide in the edit. You can’t say we will fix it in post. You are post! It’s the finish line, and all the preparation and hard work on the front end pays off in the edit bay. It has to.

Kyle Brown cut this Bud Light spot.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Editor can be a catch-all title — we cut music, add sound effects, edit story and script. We do rough effects, we scratch voiceover and build title lock-ups. It really feels like DIY filmmaking at times, when you’re adding lines or building some crazy comp of two scenes to get the desired reaction or pause.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Problem solving, seeing an edit work and happy accidents. I still get a kick out of an edit working, feeling a joke land or a punch connect. To be a part of movie magic is still a dream come true. I like to rough cut with my gut. I slam things together to have something to react to, and sometimes the best happy accidents come from that. I also enjoy all of the creative challenges that I’m faced with. A client might have a note that seems like a far-out ask, but the answer is always there. Edits can be a puzzle, and I like that.

What’s your least favorite?
This answer, I’m sure will not be popular… but watching dailies. I watch every frame, I swear. Part of my job is knowing all that is there and being able to recall and find it quickly. But nine times out of 10, when I’m watching dailies I have to take a break halfway through and edit a sequence or scene. It’s hard to see something you get excited by and not just start cutting it. Dailies look different after you have done a rough cut; they mean different things and usually give better solutions. So a lot of times, I cut, then I go back and review.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Double agent. Ok, I’m not that cool. Let’s say, schoolteacher.

Why did you choose this profession?
I think I love editing because I did not choose it. I actually stumbled into it. I’ve learned so much through it, as cheesy as it sounds. It’s helped me grow and achieve my goals, not only in work but in life, and it still does. I think is crazy and exciting that I do it for a living. Through necessity and curiosity, something that I fell into — without ever going through the traditional route of assistant editor — has given me a career that allows me to scratch my creative itch. I’m very lucky.

Trojan

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Lately, I’ve mostly been doing commercials: spots for Comcast, AT&T, T-Mobile and Trojan. So, basically, a good Netflix and chill Tinder date was made possible thanks to the results of my commercial work.

You have worked on all sorts of projects. Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre?
I have been lucky enough to have worked in a wide variety of genres — from comedy to docs to music videos — but I try to tackle all storytelling the same way: I work around a key moment or idea and fill in the blanks on how to get there. The best example I can use is music videos. I like to find that great part of the track, cut the visual to it, then work backwards to get to that point. This allows me to use each edit to get to the intent of that key moment. The same can be said for a good physical gag or joke. Getting that moment to land, then using what’s around it to make it work harder.

What do you use to edit?
I was a diehard Final Cut Pro guy, but then when the bottom fell out, so I switched to Avid Media Composer for the challenge. I also use Adobe Premiere, on occasion. Over the years, I’ve found that whatever I’m fastest on, meaning getting my thoughts to the screen quickest, is what works best for me. I am sure a new workflow or program will come along, and I make sure that I’m always able to adapt.

You mentioned earlier, that sometimes you provide more than just the cut. Can you talk about that?
I’ve rewritten scripts, done some finishing work, done After Effects work, been the VO artist and, sometimes, I even act as the account person to help sell something through to a client. Of course, there are people that do all these things professionally and are experts at their job, but I feel like in an edit bay we’re all there together trying to hit the deadlines with the best piece in hand, and that means we all dive in. No one can be precious about their roles; we have to be precious about our goals.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Copy and paste (seriously whoever invented that is a god), Spell Check and coffee makers.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Cook. I can’t think of editing when I’m burning stuff.


Director Lee J. Ford joins Interrogate

Director Lee J. Ford has joined LA/NY/Sydney-based production house Interrogate. A British native, Ford worked as a creative in the advertising industry for years before pivoting to directing. Ford’s agency experience allows him to “understand the politics and daily struggles the creatives are facing throughout the process and will continue to face” long after he’s done directing the piece.

Ford’s interest in film started early. He grew up next to a video store and would stay up late re-watching The Hills Have Eyes, The Exorcist, Exterminator and other banned-in-the-UK movies until he failed his classes. This led him to drop out and go to art school to study graphic design. Studying at The University of Brighton and the Central Saint Martins school of art helped inform Ford’s preferred minimalist aesthetic, and gave him his first hands-on experience with art direction.

After graduation, Ford worked his way through the advertising industry as a creative, with stints at various ad agencies, including 180 Amsterdam, Ogilvy London, TBWA London and Saatchi & Saatchi London, to name a few. While he ended up as a creative director, Ford never forgot his dream of directing, so when the opportunity to direct Top Gear came his way while working at an agency in Amsterdam, Ford jumped at the chance.

His work includes a New African Icons for SportsPesa, a spot for Audi, and a short film for fashion designer Roland Mouret based on Mouret’s childhood memories of watching his father, who was a butcher.

Ford, who was previously repped by Prettybird in the US and UK, knew Interrogate was the right home for him when he met executive producers and partners George Meeker and Jeff Miller. Their first project together was a spot for Blizzard Games’ Diablo III out of Omelet LA.

Promoting a Mickey Mouse watch without Mickey

Imagine creating a spot for a watch that celebrates the 90th anniversary of Mickey Mouse — but you can’t show Mickey Mouse. Already Been Chewed (ABC), a design and motion graphics studio, developed a POV concept that met this challenge and also tied in the design of the actual watch.

Nixon, a California-based premium watch company that is releasing a series of watches around the Mickey Mouse anniversary, called on Already Been Chewed to create the 20-second spot.

“The challenge was that the licensing arrangement that Disney made with Nixon doesn’t allow Mickey’s image to be in the spot,” explains Barton Damer, creative director at Already Been Chewed. “We had to come up with a campaign that promotes the watch and has some sort of call to action that inspires people to want this watch. But, at the same time, what were we going to do for 20 seconds if we couldn’t show Mickey?”

After much consideration, Damer and his team developed a concept to determine if they could push the limits on this restriction. “We came up with a treatment for the video that would be completely point-of-view, and the POV would do a variety of things for us that were working in our favor.”

The solution was to show Mickey’s hands and feet without actually showing the whole character. In another instance, a silhouette of Mickey is seen in the shadows on a wall, sending a clear message to viewers that the spot is an official Disney and Mickey Mouse release and not just something that was inspired by Mickey Mouse.

Targeting the appropriate consumer demographic segment was another key issue. “Mickey Mouse has long been one of the most iconic brands in the history of branding, so we wanted to make sure that it also appealed to the Nixon target audience and not just a Disney consumer,” Damer says. “When you think of Disney, you could brand Mickey for children or you could brand it for adults who still love Mickey Mouse. So, we needed to find a style and vibe that would speak to the Nixon target audience.”

The Already Been Chewed team chose surfing and skateboarding as dominant themes, since 16-to 30-year-olds are the target demographic and also because Disney is a West Coast brand.
Damer comments, “We wanted to make sure we were creating Mickey in a kind of 3D, tangible way, with more of a feature film and 3D feel. We felt that it should have a little bit more of a modern approach. But at the same time, we wanted to mesh it with a touch of the old-school vibe, like 1950s cartoons.”

In that spirit, the team wanted the action to start with Mickey walking from his car and then culminate at the famous Venice Beach basketball courts and skate park. Here’s the end result.

“The challenge, of course, is how to do all this in 15 seconds so that we can show the logos at the front and back and a hero image of the watch. And that’s where it was fun thinking it through and coming up with the flow of the spot and seamless transitions with no camera cuts or anything like that. It was a lot to pull off in such a short time, but I think we really succeeded.”

Already Been Chewed achieved these goals with an assist from Maxon’s Cinema 4D and Adobe After Effects. With Damer as creative lead, here’s the complete cast of characters: head of production Aaron Smock; 3D design was via Thomas King, Barton Damer, Bryan Talkish, Lance Eckert; animation was provided by Bryan Talkish and Lance Eckert; character animation was via Chris Watson; soundtrack was DJ Sean P.