AMD 2.1

Category Archives: Colorist Chat

Colorist Chat: Framestore LA senior colorist Beau Leon

Veteran colorist Beau Leon recently worked with director Spike Jonze on a Beastie Boys documentary and a spot for cannabis retailer MedMen.

What’s your title and company?
I’m senior colorist at LA’s Framestore

Spike Jonze’s MedMen

What kind of services does Framestore offer?
Framestore is a multi-Oscar-winning creative studio founded over 30 years ago, and the services offered have evolved considerably over the decades. We work across film, television, advertising, music videos, cinematic data visualization, VR, AR, XR, theme park rides… the list is endless and continues to change as new platforms emerge.

As a colorist, what would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Despite creative direction or the equipment used to shoot something, whether it be for film or TV, people might not factor in how much color or tone can dictate the impact a story has on its audience. As a colorist, my role often involves acting as a mediator of sorts between various creative stakeholders to ensure everyone is on the same page about what we’re trying to convey, as it can translate differently through color.

Are you sometimes asked to do more than just color on projects?
Earlier in my career, the process was more collaborative with DPs and directors who would bring color in at the beginning of a project. Now, particularly when it comes to commercials with tighter deadlines and turnarounds, many of those conversations happen during pre-production without grading factored in until later in the pipeline.

Rihanna’s Needed Me

Building strong relationships and working on multiple projects with DPs or directors always allows for more trust and creative control on my end. Some of the best examples I’ve seen of this are on music video projects, like Rihanna’s Needed Me, which I graded here at Framestore for a DP I’d grown up in the industry with. That gave me the opportunity to push the creative boundaries.

What system do you work on?
FilmLight Baselight

You recently worked on the new Beastie Boys documentary, Beastie Boys Story. Can you talk a bit about what you did and any challenges relating to deadlines?
I’ve been privileged to work with Spike Jonze on a number of projects throughout my career, so going into Beastie Boys Story, we already had a strong dialogue. He’s a very collaborative director and respectful of everyone’s craft and expertise, which can be surprisingly rare within our industry.

Spike Jonze’s Beatie Boys Story

The unique thing about this project was that, with so much old footage being used, it needed to be mastered in HDR as well as reworked for IMAX. And with Spike being so open to different ideas, the hardest part was deciding which direction to choose. Whether you’re a hardcore Beastie Boys fan or not, the documentary is well worth watching once it will air on AppleTV+ in April.

Any suggestions for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
As an audience, our eyes have evolved a great deal over the last few decades. I would argue that most of what we see on TV and film today is extremely oversaturated compared to what we’d experience in our real environment. I think it speaks to how we treat consumers and anticipate what we think they want — colorful, bright and eye-catching. When it’s appropriate, I try to challenge clients to think outside those new norms.

How do you prefer to work with the DP or director?
Whether it’s working with a DP or director, the more involved I can be early on in the conversation, the more seamless the process becomes during post production and ultimately leads to a better end result. In my experience, this type of access is more common when working on music videos.

Most one-off commercial projects see us dealing with an agency more often than the director, but an exception to the rule that comes to mind is on another occasion when I had the chance to collaborate on a project with Spike Jonze for the first ever brand campaign for cannabis retailer MedMen called The New Normal. He placed an important emphasis on grading and was very open to my recommendations and vision.

How do you like getting feedback in terms of the look?
A conversation is always the best way to receive feedback versus a written interpretation of imagery, which tends to become very personal. An example might be when a client wants to create the feeling of a warm climate in a particular scene. Some might interpret that as adding more warm color tones, when in fact, if you think about some of the hottest places you’ve ever visited, the sun shines so fiercely that it casts a bright white hue.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
That’s an easy answer — to me, it’s all about the amazing people you meet in this industry and the creative collaboration that happens as a result. So many of my colleagues over the years have become great friends.

Any least favorites?
There isn’t much that I don’t love about my job, but I have witnessed a change over the years in the way that our industry has begun to undervalue relationships, which I think is a shame.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would be an art teacher. It combines my passion for color and visual inspiration with a forum for sharing knowledge and fostering creativity.

How early did you know this would be your path?
In my early 20s, I started working on dailies (think The Dukes of Hazzard, The Karate Kid, Fantasy Island) at a place in The Valley that had a telecine machine that transferred at a frame rate faster than anywhere else in LA at the time. It was there that I started coloring (without technically realizing that was the job I was doing, or that it was even a profession).

Soon after, I received a call from a company called 525 asking me to join them. They worked on all of the top music videos during the prime “I Want My MTV” era, and after working on music videos as a side hustle at night, I knew that’s where I wanted to be. When I first walked into the building, I was struck by how much more advanced their technology was and immediately felt out of my depth. Luckily, someone saw something in me before I recognized it within myself. I worked on everything from R.E.M.’s “Losing My Religion” to TLC’s “Waterfalls” and The Smashing Pumpkins’ “Tonight, Tonight.” I found such joy in collaborating with some of the most creative and spirited directors in the business, many of whom were inspiring artists, designers and photographers in their spare time.

Where do you find inspiration?
I’m lucky to live in a city like LA with such a rich artistic scene, so I make a point to attend as many gallery openings and exhibitions as I can. Some of my favorite spaces are the Annenberg Space for Photography, the Hammer Museum and Hauser & Wirth. On the weekends I also stop by Arcana bookstore in Culver City, where they source rare books on art and design.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
I think I would be completely fine if I had to survive without technology.

This industry comes with tight deadlines. How do you de-stress from it all?
After a long day, cooking helps me decompress and express my creativity through a different outlet. I never miss a trip to my local farmer’s market, which also helps to keep me inspired. And when I’m not looking at other people’s art, I’m painting my own abstract pieces at my home studio.

Colorist Chat: Keith Shaw on Showtime’s Homeland and the process

By Randi Altman

The long wait for the final season of Showtime’s Homeland seemed to last an eternity, but thankfully the series is now airing, and we here at postPerspective are pretty jazzed about it. Our favorite spies, Carrie and Saul, are back at it, with this season being set in Afghanistan.

Keith Shaw

Year after year, the writing, production and post values on Homeland have been outstanding. One of those post folks is colorist Keith Shaw from FotoKem’s Keep Me Posted, which focuses on finishing services to television.

Shaw’s credits are impressive. In addition to Homeland, his work can be seen on Ray Donovan, Shameless, Animal Kingdom and many others. We reached out to Shaw to find out more about working on Homeland from the first episode to the last. Shaw shares his workflow and what inspires him.

You’ve been on Homeland since the beginning. Can you describe the look of the show and how you’ve worked with DPs David Klein, ASC, and Giorgio Scali, ASC, as well as producer Katie O’Hara?
Working on Homeland from Episode 1 has been a truly amazing experience. Katie, Dave, Giorgio and I are an extremely collaborative group.

One consistent factor of all eight seasons has been the need for the show to look “real.” We don’t have any drastic or aggressively stylized looks, so the goal is to subtly manipulate the color and mood yet make it distinct enough to help support the storyline.

When you first started on the show, how would you describe the look?
The first two seasons were shot by Nelson Cragg, ASC. For those early episodes, the show was a bit grittier and more desaturated. It had a darker, heavier feel to it. There was not as much detail in the dark areas of the image, and the light fell off more quickly on the edges.

Although the locations and looks have changed over the years, what’s been the common thread?
As I mentioned earlier, the show has a realism to it. It’s not super-stylized and affected.

Do the DPs come to the color suite? What kind of notes do you typically get from them?
They do when they are able (which is not often). They are generally on the other side of the world. As far as notes, it depends on the episode. When I’m lucky, I get none. Generally, there are not a lot of notes. That’s the advantage of collaborating on a show from the beginning. You and the DP can “mold” the look of the show together.

You’ve worked on many episodics at Keep Me Posted. Prior to that you were working on features at Warner Bros. Can you talk about how that process differs for you?
In remastering and restoration of feature films, the production stage is complete. It’s not happening simultaneously, and that means the timeline and deadlines aren’t as stressful.

Digital intermediates on original productions, on the other hand, are similar to television because multiple things are happening all at once. There is an overlap between production and post. During color, the cut can be changing, and new effects could be added or updated, but with much tighter deadlines. DI was a great stepping stone for me to move from feature films to television.

Now let’s talk about some more general aspects of the job…

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
First of all, most people don’t have a clear understanding of what a colorist is or does. Even after 25 years and multiple explanations, my father-in-law still tells everyone I’m an editor.

Being a colorist means you wear many hats — confidante, mediator, therapist, VFX supervisor, scheduler and data manager — in addition to that color thing. For me, it boils down to three main attributes. One, you need to be artistic/creative. Two, you need to be technical. Finally, you need to mediate the decision-making processes. Sometimes that can be the hardest part of all, when there are competing viewpoints and visions between all the parties involved.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Digital Vision’s Nucoda.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Today’s color correctors are incredibly powerful and versatile. In addition to color, I can do light VFX, beauty work, editing or technical fixes when necessary. The clients appreciate the value of saving time and money by taking care of last-minute issues in the color suite.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Building relationships with clients, earning their trust and helping them bring their vision to the screen. I love that special moment when you and the DP are completely in sync — you’re reaching for the knobs before they even ask for a change, and you are finishing each other’s sentences.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Deadlines. However, they are actually helpful in my case because otherwise I would tweak and re-tweak the smallest details endlessly.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Ray Donovan, Shameless, Animal Kingdom, Single Parents and Bless This Mess are my current shows.

ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF A PROJECT FROM A COLOR PERSPECTIVE?
Become a part of the process as early as possible. Establishing looks, LUTs and good communication with the cinematographer are essential.

HOW DO YOU PREFER THE DP OR DIRECTOR TO DESCRIBE THE LOOK THEY WANT?
Each client has a different source of inspiration and way of conveying their vision. I’ve worked from fabric and paint samples, YouTube videos, photographs, magazine ads, movie or television show references, previous work (theirs and/or mine) and so on.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I can’t pick just one, so I’ll pick two. From my feature mastering work, The Shawshank Redemption. From television, Homeland.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
Definitely in photography. My father was a professional photographer and we had our own darkroom. As a kid, I spent countless hours after school and on weekends learning how to plan, take and create great photographs. It is still a favorite hobby of mine to this day.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

AMD 2.1

Colorist Chat: Nice Shoes’ Maria Carretero on Super Bowl ads, more

This New York-based colorist, who worked on four Super Bowl spots this year, talks workflow, inspiration and more.

Name: Maria Carretero

Company: Nice Shoes

What kind of services does Nice Shoes offer?
Nice Shoes is a creative studio with color, editorial, animation, VFX, AR and VR services. It’s a full-service studio with offices in NYC, Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis and Toronto, as well as remote locations throughout North America.

Michelob Ultra’s Jimmy Works It Out

As a colorist, what would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think people are surprised when they discover that there is a visual language in every single visual story that connects your emotions through all the imagery that we’ve collected in our brains. This work gives us the ability to nudge the audience emotionally over the course of a piece. Color grading is rooted in a very artistic base — core, emotional aspects that have been studied in art and color theory that make you explore cinematography in such an interesting way.

What system do you work on?
We use FilmLight Baselight as our primary system, but the team is also versed in Blackmagic Resolve.

Are you sometimes asked to do more than just color on projects?
Sometimes. If you have a solid relationship with the DP or the director, they end up consulting you about palettes, optics and references, so you become an active part of the creativity in the film, which is very cool. I love when I can get involved in projects from the beginning.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
My favorite moment is when you land on the final look and you see that the whole film is making visual sense and you feel that the story, the look and the client are all aligned — that’s magic!

Any least favorites?
No, I love coloring. Sometimes the situation becomes difficult because there are technical issues or disagreements, but it’s part of the work to push through those moments and make things work

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would probably be a visual artist… always struggling to keep the lights on. I’m kidding! I have so much respect for visual artists, I think they should be treated better by our society because without art there is no progress.

How early did you know this would be your path?
I was a visual artist for seven years. I was part of Nives Fernandez’s roster, and all that I wanted at that time was to try to tell my stories as an artist. I was freelancing in VFX to get some money that helped me survive, and I landed on the VFX side, and from there to color was a very easy switch. When I landed in Deluxe Spain 16 years ago and started to explore color, I quickly fell in love.

It’s why I like to say that color chose me.

Avocados From Mexico: Shopping Network

You recently worked on a number of Super Bowl spots. Can you talk a bit about your work on them, and any challenges relating to deadlines?
This year I worked on four Super Bowl spots Michelob Ultra PureGold: 6 for 6 Pack, Michelob Ultra: Jimmy Works It Out, Walmart: United Towns and Avocados From Mexico: Shopping Network.

Working on these kinds of projects is definitely a really interesting experience. The deadlines are tight, the pressure is enormous, but at the same time, the amount of talent and creativity involved is gigantic, so if you survive (laughs) you always will be a better professional. As a colorist I love to be challenged. I love dealing with difficult situations where all your resources and your energy is being put to the test.

Any suggestions for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
Thousands! Technical understanding, artistic involvement, there are so many… But definitely trying to create something new, special, different; embracing the challenges and pushing beyond the boundaries are the keys to delivering good work.

How do you prefer to work with the DP or director?
I like working with both. Debating with any kind of artist is the best. It’s really great to be surrounded by someone that uses a common “language.” As I mentioned earlier, I love when there’s the opportunity to get the conversation going at the beginning of a project so that there’s more opportunity for collaboration, debate and creativity.

How do you like getting feedback in terms of the look? Photos, films, etc.?
Every single bit of information is useful. I love when they verbalize what they’re going for using stories, feelings — when you can really feel they’re expressing personality with the film.

Where do you find inspiration? Art? Photography?
I find inspiration in living! There are so many things that surround us that can be a source of inspiration. Art, landscapes, the light that you remember from your childhood, a painting, watching someone that grabs your attention on a train. New York is teeming with more than enough life and creativity to keep any artist going.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
The Tracker, Spotify and FaceTime.

This industry comes with tight deadlines. How do you de-stress from it all?
I have a sense of humor and lots of red wine (smiles).


Colorist Chat: Light Iron supervising colorist Ian Vertovec

“As colorists, we are not just responsible for enhancing each individual shot based on the vision of the filmmakers, but also for helping to visually construct an emotional arc over time.”

NAME: Ian Vertovec

TITLE: Supervising Colorist

COMPANY: Light Iron

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE IN THE COMPANY?
A Hollywood-based collaborator for motion picture finishing, with a studio in New York City as well.

GLOW

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
As colorists, we are not just responsible for enhancing each individual shot based on the vision of the filmmakers, but also for helping to visually construct an emotional arc over time. For example, a warm scene feels warmer coming out of a cool scene as opposed to another warm scene. We have the ability and responsibility to nudge the audience emotionally over the course of the film. Using color in this way makes color grading a bit like a cross between photography and editing.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Once in a while, I’ll be asked to change the color of an object, like change a red dress to blue or a white car to black. While we do have remarkable tools at our disposal, this isn’t quite the correct way to think about what we can do. Instead of being able to change the color of objects, it’s more like we can change the color of the light shining on objects. So instead of being able to turn a red dress to blue, I can change the light on the dress (and only the dress) to be blue. So while the dress will appear blue, it will not look exactly how a naturally blue dress would look under white light.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There is a moment with new directors, after watching the first finished scene, when they realize they have made a gorgeous-looking movie. It’s their first real movie, which they never fully saw until that moment — on the big screen, crystal clear and polished — and it finally looks how they envisioned it. They are genuinely proud of what they’ve done, as well as appreciative of what you brought out in their work. It’s an authentic filmmaking moment.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Working on multiple jobs at a time and long days can be very, very draining. It’s important to take regular breaks to rest your eyes.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Something with photography, VFX or design, maybe.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I was doing image manipulation in high school and college before I even knew what color grading was.

Just Mercy

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Just Mercy, Murder Mystery, GLOW, What We Do in the Shadows and Too Old to Die Young.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Sometimes your perspective and a filmmaker’s perspective for a color grade can be quite divergent. There can be a temptation to take the easy way and either defer or overrule. I find tremendous value in actually working out those differences and seeing where and why you are having a difference of opinion.

It can be a little scary, as nobody wants to be perceived as confrontational, but if you can civilly explain where and why you see a different approach, the result will almost always be better than what either of you thought possible in the first place. It also allows you to work more closely and understand each other’s creative instincts more accurately. Those are the moments I am most proud of — when we worked through an awkward discord and built something better.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I have a fairly extensive library of Pinterest boards — mostly paintings — but it’s real life and being in the moment that I find more interesting. The color of a green leaf at night under a sodium vapor light, or how sunlight gets twisted by a plastic water bottle — that is what I find so cool. Why ruin that with an Insta post?

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
FilmLight Baselight’s Base Grade, FilmLight Baselight’s Texture Equalizer and my Red Hydrogen.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram mostly.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
After working all day on a film, I often don’t feel like watching another movie when I get home because I’ll just be thinking about the color.  I usually unwind with a video game, book or podcast. The great thing about a book or video games is that they demand your 100% attention. You can’t be simultaneously browsing social media or the news  or be thinking about work. You have to be 100% in the moment, and it really resets your brain.


Color Chat: Light Iron’s Corinne Bogdanowicz

Corinne Bogdanowicz colorist at Light Iron, joined the post house in 2010 after working as a colorist and digital compositor for Post Logic/Prime Focus, Pacific Title and DreamWorks Animation.

Bogdanowicz, who comes from a family of colorists/color scientists (sister and father), has an impressive credit list, including the features 42, Flight, Hell or High Water, Allied and Wonder. On the episodic side, she has colored all five seasons of Amazon’s Emmy-winning series Transparent, as well as many other shows, including FX’s Baskets and Boomerang for BET. Her most recent work includes Netflix’s Dolemite is My Name and HBO’s Mrs. Fletcher.

HBO’s Mrs. Fletcher

We reached out to find out more…

NAME: Corinne Bogdanowicz

COMPANY: Light Iron

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Light Iron is a post production company owned by Panavision. We have studios in New York and Los Angeles.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think that most people would be surprised that we are the last stop for all visuals on a project. We are where all of the final VFX come together, and we also manage the different color spaces for final distribution.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Yes, I am very often doing work that crosses over into visual effects. Beauty work, paint outs and VFX integration are all commonplace in the DI suite these days.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The collaboration between myself and the creatives on a project is my favorite aspect of color correction. There is always a moment when we start color where I get “the look,” and everyone is excited that their vision is coming to fruition.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Maybe farming? (laughs) I’m not sure. I love being outdoors and working with animals.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I have an art background, and when I moved to Los Angeles years ago I worked in VFX. I quickly was introduced to the world of color and found it was a great fit. I love the combination of art and technology, as well as constantly being introduced to new ideas by industry creatives.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Where’d You Go, Bernadette?, Sextuplets, Truth Be Told, Transparent, Mrs. Fletcher and Dolemite is My Name.

Transparent

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
This is a hard question because I feel like I leave a little piece of myself in everything that I work on.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone, the coffee maker and FilmLight Baselight.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM THE PRESSURES OF THE JOB?
I have two small children at home, so I think I de-stress when I get to work (laughs)!


Colorist Chat: Scott Ostrowsky on Amazon’s Sneaky Pete

By Randi Altman

Scott Ostrowsky, senior colorist at Deluxe’s Level 3 in Los Angeles has worked on all three seasons of Amazon’s Sneaky Pete, produced by Bryan Cranston and David Shore and starring Giovanni Ribisi. Season 3 is the show’s last.

For those of you unfamiliar with the series, it follows a con man named Marius (Ribisi), who takes the place of his former cell-mate Pete and endears himself to Pete’s seemingly idyllic family while continuing to con his way through life. Over time he comes to love the family, which is nowhere as innocent as they seem.

Scott Ostrowsky

We reached out to this veteran colorist to learn more about how the look of the series developed over the seasons and how he worked with the showrunners and DPs.

You’ve been on Sneaky Pete since the start. Can you describe how the look has changed over the years?
I worked on Seasons 1 through Season 3. The DP for Season 1 was Rene Ohashi and it had somewhat of a softer feel. It was shot on a Sony F55. It mostly centered around the relationship of Bryan Cranston’s character and Giovanni Ribisi’s newly adopted fake family and his brother.

Season 2 was shot by DPs Frank DeMarco and William Rexer on a Red Dragon, and it was a more stylized and harsher look in some ways. The looks were different because the storylines and the locations had changed. So, even though we had some beautiful, resplendent looks in Season 2, we also created some harsher environments, and we did that through color correction. Going into Season 2, the storyline changed, and it became more defined in the sense that we used the environments to create an atmosphere that matched the storyline and the performances.

An example of this would be the warehouse where they all came together to create the scam/ heist that they were going to pull off. Another example of this would be the beautiful environment in the casino that was filled with rich lighting and ornate colors. But there are many examples of this through the show — both DPs used shadow and light to create a very emotional mood or a very stark mood and everything in between.

Season 3 shot by Arthur Albert and his son, Nick Albert on a Red Gemini, and it had a beautiful, resplendent, rich look that matched the different environments when it moved from the cooler look of New York to the more warm, colorful look in California.

So you gave different looks based on locale? 
Yes, we did. Many times, the looks would depend on time of day and the environment that they were in. An example of this might be the harsh fluorescent green in the gas station bathroom where Giovanni’s character is trying to figure out a way to help his brother and avoid his captures.

How did you work with the Alberts on the most recent season?
I work at Level 3 Post, which is a Deluxe company. I did Season 1 and 2 at the facility on the Sony lot. Season 3 was posted at Level 3. Arthur and Nick Albert came in to my color suite with the camera tests shot on the Red Gemini and also the Helium. We set up a workflow based on the Red cameras and proceeded to grade the various setups.

Once Arthur and Nick decided to use the Gemini, we set up our game plan for the season. When I received my first conform, I proceeded to grade it based on our conversations. I was very sensitive to the way they used their setups, lighting and exposures. Once I finished my first primary grade, Arthur would come in and sit with me to watch the show and make any changes. After Arthur approved the grade, The producers and showrunner would come in for their viewing. They could make any additional changes at that time. (Read our interview with Arthur Albert here.)

How do you prefer to work with directors/DPs?
The first thing is have conversation with them on their approach and how they view color as being part of the story they want to tell. I always like to get a feel for how the cinematographer will shoot the show and what, if any, LUTs they’re using so I can emulate that look as a starting point for my color grading.

It is really important to me to find out how a director envisions the image he or she would like to portray on the screen. An example of this would be facial expressions. Do we want to see everything or do they mind if the shadow side remains dark and the light falls off.

A lot of times, it’s about how the actors emote and how they work in tandem with each other to create tension, comedy or other emotions — and what the director is looking for in these scenes.

Any tips for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
Communication. Communication. Communication. Having an open dialogue with the cinematographer, showrunners and directors is extremely important. If the colorist is able to get the first pass very close, you spend more time on the nuisances rather than balancing or trying to find a look. That is why it is so important to have an understanding of the essence of what a director, cinematographer and showrunner is looking for.

How do you prefer the DP or director to describe their desired look?
However they’re comfortable in enlightening me to their styles or needs for the show is fine. Usually, we can discuss this when we have a camera test before principal photography starts. There’s no one way that you can work with everybody — you just adapt to how they work. And as a colorist, it’s your job to make that image sing or shine the way that they intended it to.

You used Resolve on this. Is there a particular tool that came in handy for this show?
All tools on the Resolve are useful for a drama series. You would not buy the large crayon box and throw out colors you didn’t like because, at some point, you might need them. I use all tools — from keys, windows, log corrections and custom curves to create the looks that were needed.

You have been working in TV for many years. How has color grading changed during that time?
Color correction has become way more sophisticated over the years, and is continually growing and expanding into a blend of not only color grading but helping to create environments that are needed to express the look of a show. We no longer just have simple color correctors with simple secondaries; the toolbox continues to grow with added filters, added grain and sometimes even helping to create visual effects, which most color correctors are able to do today.

Where do you find inspiration? Art? Photography?
I’ve always loved photography and B&W movies. There’s a certain charm or subtlety that you find in B&W, whether it’s a film noir, the harshness of film grain, or just the use of shadow and light. I’ve always enjoyed going to museums and looking at different artists and how they view the world and what inspires them.

To me, it’s trying to portray an image and have that image make a statement. In daily life, you can see multiple examples as you go through your day, and I try and keep the most interesting ones that I can remember in my lexicon of images.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 


Colorist Chat: Lucky Post’s Neil Anderson

After joining Lucky Post in Dallas in 2013 right out of film school, Neil Anderson was officially promoted to colorist in 2017. He has worked on a variety of projects during his time at the studio, including projects for Canada Dry, Costa, TGI Fridays, The Salvation Army and YETI. He also contributed to Augustine Frizzell’s feature comedy, Never Goin’ Back, which premiered at Sundance and was distributed by A24.

YETI

We checked in with Anderson to find out how he works, some favorite projects and what inspires him.

What do you enjoy most about your work?
That’s a really hard question because there are a lot of things I really enjoy about color grading. If I had to choose, I think it comes back to the fact that it’s rewarding to both left- and right-brained people. It truly is both an art and a science.

The satisfaction I get when I first watch a newly graded spot is also very special. A cohesive and mindful color grade absolutely transforms the piece into something greater, and it’s a great feeling to be able to make such a powerful impact.

What’s the most misunderstood aspect of color artistry?
I’m not sure many people stop and think about how amazing it is that we can fine tune our engineering to something as wild as our eye sight. Our vision is very fluid and organic, constantly changing under different constraints and environments, filled with optical illusions and imperfect guesses. There are immensely strange phenomena that drastically change our perception of what we see. Yet we need to make camera systems and displays work with this deeply non-uniform perception. It’s an absolutely massive area of study that we take for granted; I’m thankful for those color scientists out there.

Where do you find your creative inspiration?
I definitely like to glean new ideas and ways of approaching new projects from seeing other great colorists. Sometimes certain commercials come on TV that catch my eye and I’ll excitedly say to my partner Odelie, “That is damn good color!” Depending on the situation, I might get an eye-roll or two from her.

Tell us about some recent projects, and what made them stand out to you creatively?
Baylor Scott & White Health: I just loved how moody we took these in the end. They are very inspiring stories that we wanted to make feel even more impactful. I think the contrast and color really turned out beautiful.

Is This All There Is?

Is This All There Is? by Welcome Center: This is a recent music video that we filmed in a stunningly dilapidated house. The grit and grain we added in color really brings out the “worst” of it.

Hurdle: This was a documentary feature I worked on that I really enjoyed. The film was shot over a six-month window in the West Bank in Israel, so wrangling it in while also giving it a distinctly unique look was both difficult and fun.

Light From Light: Also a feature film that I finished a few months ago. I really enjoyed the process of developing the look with its wonderful DP Greta Zozula. We specifically wanted to capture the feeling of paintings by Andrew Wyeth, Thomas Eakins and Johannes Vermeer.

Current bingeable episodics and must see films?
Exhibit A, Mindhunter, Midsommar and The Cold Blue.

When you are not at Lucky Post, where do you like to spend time?
I’m an avid moviegoer so definitely a lot of my time (and money) is spent at the theater. I’m also a huge sports fan; you’ll find me anywhere that carries my team’s games! (Go Pack Go)

Favorite podcast?
The Daily (“The New York Times”)

Current Book?
“Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954-1963”

Dumbest thing you laughed at today?
https://bit.ly/2MYs0V1

Song you can’t stop listening to?
John Frusciante — 909 Day


Color grading IT Chapter Two’s terrifying return

In IT Chapter Two, the kids of the Losers’ Club are all grown up and find themselves lured back to their hometown of Derry. Still haunted both by the trauma that monstrous clown Pennywise let loose on the community and by each one’s own unique insecurities, the group (James McAvoy, Jessica Chastain, Bill Hader) find themselves up against even more terrifying forces than they faced in the first film, IT.

Stephen Nakamura

IT Chapter Two director Andy Muschietti called on cinematographer Checco Varese and colorist Stephen Nakamura of Company 3. Nakamura returned to the franchise, performing the final color grade at Efilm in Hollywood. “I felt the first one was going to be a big hit when we were working on it, because these kids’ stories were so compelling and the performances were so strong. It was more than just a regular horror movie. This second one, in my opinion, is just as powerful in terms of telling these characters’ stories. And, not surprisingly, it also takes the scary parts even further.”

According to Nakamura, Muschietti “is a very visually oriented director. When we were coloring both of the films, he was very aware of the kinds of things we can do in the DI to enhance the imagery and make things even more scary. He pushed me to take some scenes in Chapter Two in directions I’ve never gone with color. I think it’s always important, whether you’re a colorist or a chef or a doctor, to always push yourself and explore new aspects of your work. Andy’s enthusiasm encouraged me to try new approaches to working in DaVinci Resolve. I think the results are very effective.”

For one thing, the technique he used to bring up just the light level in the eyes of the shapeshifting clown Pennywise got even more use here because there were more frightening characters to use it on. In many cases, the companies that created the visual effects also provided mattes that let Nakamura easily isolate and adjust the luminance of each individual eye in Resolve. When such mattes weren’t available, he used Resolve to track each eyeball a frame at a time.

“Resolve has excellent tracking capabilities, but we were looking to isolate just the tiny whites of the characters’ eyes,” Nakamura explains, “and there just wasn’t enough information to track.” It was meticulous work, he recalls, “but it’s very effective. The audience doesn’t consciously know we’re doing anything, but it makes the eyes brighter in a very strange way, kind of like a cat’s eyes when they catch the light. It really enhances the eerie feeling.”

In addition, Nakamura and the filmmakers made use of Resolve’s Flicker tool in the OpenFX panel to enhance the flickering effect in a scene involving flashing lights, taking the throbbing light effects further than they did on set. Not long ago, this type of enhancement would have been a more involved process in which the shots would likely be sent to a visual effects house. “We were able to do it as part of the grading, and we all thought it looked completely realistic. They definitely appreciated the ability to make little enhancements like that in the final grade, when everyone can see the scenes with the grade in context and on a big screen.”

Portions of the film involve scenes of the Losers’ Club as children, which were comprised of newly shot material (not cut in from the production of the first It). Nakamura applied a very subtle amount of Resolve’s mid-tone detail tool over them primarily to help immediately and subliminally orient the audience in time.

But the most elaborate use of the color corrector involved one short sequence in which Hader’s character, walking in a local park on a pleasant, sunny day, has a sudden, terrifying interaction with a very frightening character. The shots involved a significant amount of CGI and compositing work, which was completed at several effects houses. Muschietti was pleased with the effects work, but he wanted Nakamura to bring in an overall quality to the look of the scene that made it feel a bit more otherworldly.

Says Nakamura, “Andy described something that reminded me of the old-school, two-strip color process, where essentially anything red would get pushed into being a kind of magenta, and something blue or green would become a kind of cyan.”

Nakamura, who colored Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator (shot by Robert Richardson, ASC), had designed something at that point to create more of a three-strip look, but this process was more challenging, as it involved constraining the color palette to an even greater degree — without, of course, losing definition in the imagery.

With a bit of trial and error, Nakamura came up with the notion of using the splitter/combiner node and recombined some nodes in the output, forcing the information from the green channel into the red and blue channels. He then used a second splitter/combiner node to control the output. “It’s almost like painting a scene with just two colors,” he explains. “Green grass and blue sky both become shades of cyan, while skin and anything with red in it goes into the magenta area.”

The work became even more complex because the red-haired Pennywise also makes an appearance; it was important for him to retain his color, despite the rest of the scene going two-tone. Nakamura treated this element as a complex chroma key, using a second splitter/combiner node and significantly boosting the saturation just to isolate Pennywise while preventing the two-tone correction from affecting him.

When it came time to complete the pass for HDR Dolby Cinema — designed for specialty projectors capable essentially of displaying brighter whites and darker blacks than normal cinema projectors — Muschietti was particularly interested in the format’s treatment of dark areas of the frame.

“Just like in the first one,” Nakamura explains, “we were able to make use of Dolby Cinema to enhance suspense. People usually talk about how bright the highlights can be in HDR. But, when you push more light through the picture than you do for the P3 version, we also have the ability to make shadowy areas of the image appear even darker while keeping the details in those really dark areas very clear. This can be very effective in a movie like this, where you have scary characters lurking in the shadows.

“The color grade always plays some kind of role in a movie’s storytelling,” Nakamura sums up, “but this was a fun example of how work we did in the color grade really helped scare the audience.”

You can check out our Q&A with Nakamura about his work on the original IT.


Colorist Chat: Technicolor’s Doug Delaney

Industry veteran Doug Delaney started his career in VFX before the days of digital, learning his craft from the top film timers and color scientists as well as effects supervisors.

Today he is a leading colorist and finisher at Technicolor, working on major movies including the recent Captain Marvel. We spoke to him to find out more about how he works.

NAME: Doug Delaney

TITLE: Senior Colorist

IN ADDITION TO CAPTAIN MARVEL, CANYOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We have just wrapped on Showtime’s The Loudest Voice, which documented Fox News’ Roger Ailes and starred Russell Crow, Naomi Watts and Sienna Miller.

I also just had the immense pleasure of working with DP Cameron Duncan on Nat Geo’s thriller The Hot Zone. For that show we actually worked together early on to establish two looks — one for laboratory scenes taking place in Washington, DC, and another for scenes in central Africa. These looks were then exported as LUTs for dailies so that the creative intent was established from the beginning of shooting and carried through to finishing.

And earlier this year I worked on Love, Death & Robots, which just received two Emmy nominations, so big congrats to that team!

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Yes, these days I tend to think of “colorists” as finishing artists — meaning that our suites are typically the last stop for a project and where everything comes together.

The technology we have access to in our suites continues to develop, and therefore our capabilities have expanded — there is more we can do in our suites that previously would have needed to be handled by others. A perfect example is visual effects. Sometimes we get certain shots in from VFX vendors that are well-executed but need to be a bit more nuanced — say it’s a driving scene against a greenscreen, and the lighting outside the car feels off for the time of day it’s supposed to be in the scene. Whereas we used to have to kick it back to VFX to fix, I can now go in and use the alpha channels and mattes to color-correct that imbalance.

And what’s important about this new ability is that in today’s demanding schedules and deadlines, it allows us to work collaboratively in real time with the creative rather than in an iterative workflow that takes time we often don’t have.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The look development. That aspect can take on various conversations depending on the project. Sometimes it’s talking with filmmakers in preproduction, sometimes just when it gets to post, but ultimately, being part of the creative journey and how to deliver the best-looking show is what I love.

That and when the final playback happens in our room, when the filmmakers see for the first time all of the pieces of the puzzle come together with sound … it’s awesome.

ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF A PROJECT FROM A COLOR PERSPECTIVE?
Understanding that each project has a different relationship with the filmmaker, there needs to be transparency and agreement to the process amongst the director, DP, execs, etc. Whether a clear vision is established early on or they are open to further developing the look, a willingness to engage in an open dialogue is key.

Personally, I love when I’m able to help develop the color pipeline in preproduction, as I find it often makes the post experience more seamless. For example, what aired on Strange Angel Season 2 was not far removed from dailies because we had established a LUT in advance and had worked with wardrobe, make-up and others to carry the look through. It doesn’t need to be complicated, but open communication and planning really can go a long way in creating a stunning visual identity and a seamless experience.

HOW DO YOU PREFER THE DP OR DIRECTOR TO DESCRIBE THE LOOK THEY WANT? PHYSICAL EXAMPLES, FILMS TO EMULATE, ETC.?
Physical examples — photo books, style sheets with examples of tones they like and things like that. But ultimately my role is to correctly interpret what it is that they like in what they are showing me and to discern if what they are looking for is a literal representation, or more of an inspiration to start from and massage. Again, the open communication and ability to develop strong working relationships — in which I’m able to discern when there is a direct ask versus a need versus an opportunity to do more and push the boundaries — is key to a successful project.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Baselight. I love the flexibility of the system and the support that the FilmLight team provides us, as we are constantly pushing the capabilities of the platform, and they continue to deliver.

 

Perpetual Grace’s DPs, colorist weigh in on show’s gritty look

You don’t have to get very far into watching the Epix series Perpetual Grace LTD to realize just how ominous this show feels. It begins with the opening shots, and by the time you’ve spent a few minutes with the dark, mysterious characters who populate this world — and gathered hints of the many schemes within schemes that perpetuate the story — the show’s tone is clear. With its black-and-white flashbacks and the occasional, gritty flash-forwards, Perpetual Grace gets pretty dark, and the action goes in directions you won’t see coming.

This bizarre show revolves around James (Westworld’s Jimmi Simpson), who gets caught up in what initially seems like a simple con that quickly gets out of control. Sir Ben Kingsley, Jacki Weaver, Chris Conrad and Luis Guzmán also star as an assortment of strange and volatile characters.

The series comes from the minds of executive producer Steve Conrad, who also served in that role on Amazon’s quirky drama Patriot, and Bruce Terris, who was both a writer and a first AD on that show.

These showrunners developed the look with other Patriot veterans: cinematographers James Whitaker and Nicole Hirsch Whitaker, who incorporated colorist Sean Coleman’s input before commencing principal photography.

Coleman left his grading suite at Company 3 in Santa Monica to spend several days at the series’ New Mexico location. While there he worked with the DPs to build customized LUTs for them to use during production. This meant that everyone on set could get a strong sense of how lighting, costumes, sets and locations would read with the show’s signature looks applied.

The Whitakers on set

“I’ve never been able to work with the final colorist this way,” says Whitaker, who also alternated directing duties with Conrad. “It was great having him there on set where we could talk about the subtleties of color. What should the sky look like? What should blood look like? Faces? Clothes? Using Resolve, he made two LUTs — “the main one for the color portions and a different one specifically for the black-and-white parts.”

The main look of the show is inspired by film noir and western movie tropes, and all with a tip of the hat to Roger Deakins’ outstanding work on The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. “For me,” says Whitaker, “it’s about strong contrast, deep blacks and desert colors … the moodier the better. I don’t love very blue skies, but we wanted to keep some tonality there.”

“It’s real sweaty, gritty, warm, nicotine-stained kind of thing,” Coleman elaborates.

“When we showed up in New Mexico,” Whitaker recalls, “all these colors did exist at various times of the day, and we just leaned into them. When you have landscapes with big, blue skies, strong greens and browns, you can lean in the other way and make it overly saturated. We leaned into it the other way, holding the brown earth tones but pulling out some of the color, which is always better for skin tones.”

The LUTs, Whitaker notes, offer a lot more flexibility than the DPs would have if they used optical filters. Beyond the nondestructive aspect of a LUT, it also allows for a lot more complexity. “If you think about a ‘sepia’ or ‘tobacco’ filter or something like that, you think of an overall wash that goes across the entire frame, and I get immediately bored by that. It’s tricky to do something that feels like it’s from a film a long time ago without dating the project you’re working on now; you want a lot of flexibility to get [the imagery] where you want it to go.”

The series was shot in November through February, often in brutally cold environments. Almost the entire series (the present-day scenes and black-and-white flashbacks) was shot on ARRI Alexa cameras in a 2.0:1 aspect ratio. A frequent Whitaker/Hirsch Whitaker collaborator, DIT Ryan Kunkleman applied and controlled the LUTs so the set monitors reflected their effect on the look.

The flash forwards, which usually occur in very quick spurts, were shot on a 16mm Bolex camera using Kodak’s 7203 (50D) and 7207 (250D) color negative film, which was pushed two stops in processing to enhance grain in post by Coleman.

Final color was done at Company 3’s Santa Monica facility, working primarily alongside the Whitakers. “We enhanced the noir look with the strong, detailed blacks,” says Coleman. Even though a lot of the show exudes the dry desert heat, it was actually shot over a particularly cold winter in New Mexico. “Things were sometimes kind of cold-looking, so sometimes we’d twist things a bit. We also added some digital ‘grain’ to sort of muck it up a little.”

For the black and white, Coleman took the color material in Resolve and isolated just the blue channel in order to manipulate it independent of the red and green, “to make it more inky,” he says. “Normally, you might just drain the color out, but you can really go further than that if you want a strong black-and-white look. When you adjust the individual channel, you affect the image in a way that’s similar to the effect of shooting black-and-white film through a yellow filter. It helps us make darker skies and richer blacks.”

Sean Coleman

“We’ve booked a whole lot of hours together, and that provides a level of comfort,” says Hirsch Whitaker about her and Whitaker’s work with Coleman. “He does some wonderful painting [in Resolve] that helps make a character pop in the frame or direct the viewer’s eye to a specific part of the frame. He really enjoys the collaborative element of color grading.”

Whitaker seconds that emotion: “As a cinematographer, I look at color grading a bit like working on set. It’s not a one-person job. It takes a lot of people to make these images.”

Assimilate Scratch 9.1: productivity updates, updated VFX workflow

Assimilate’s Scratch 9.1, a dailies and finishing software, now includes new and extensive performance and productivity features, including integration with Foundry Nuke and Adobe After Effects. It’s available now.

“A primary goal for us is to quickly respond to the needs of DITs and post artists, whether it’s for more advanced features, new format support, or realtime bug-fixes,” said Mazze Aderhold, Scratch product manager at Assimilate. “Every feature introduced in Scratch 9.1 is based on feedback we received from our users before and during the beta cycle.”

The software now features native touch controls for grading by clicking and dragging directly on the image. Thanks to this intuitive way to color and manipulate images, an artist can grade the overall image or even control curves and secondaries — all without a panel and directly where the cursor is dragging.

There is also a redesigned color management system, enabling deep control over how camera-specific gamut and gamma spaces are handled and converted. Additionally, there is a new color-space conversion plugin (any color space to any other) that can be applied at any stage of the color/mastering process.

Also new is integration with After Effects and Nuke. Within Scratch, users can now seamlessly send shots to and from Nuke and After Effects, including transparencies and alphas. This opens up Scratch to high-end tracking, compositing, 3D models, advanced stabilization, motion graphics and more.

Within the VFX pipeline, Scratch can act as a central hub for all finishing needs. It provides realtime tools for any format, data management, playback and all color management in a timeline with audio, including to and from After Effects and Nuke.

Other new features include:

• Integration with Avid, including all metadata in the Avid MXF. Additionally, Scratch includes all the source-shot metadata, such as the genuine Sound TC in Avid MXF, which is important later on in post for something like a Pro Tools roundtrip
• Per-frame metadata on ARRIRAW files, allowing camera departments to pass through camera roll and tilt, lens focus distance metadata items, and more. Editorial and VFX teams can benefit from per-frame info later in the post process.
• Faster playback and rendering
• Realtime, full-res Red 8K DeBayer on GPU
• A deep set of options to load media, including sizing options, LUTs and automatic audio-sync, speeding up the organizational process when dealing with large amounts of disparate media
• A LUT cycler that allows for quick preview and testing of large numbers of looks on footage
• Preset outputs for Pix, Dax, MediaSilo and Copra, simplifying the delivery of industry-standard web dailies


• Vector tool for advanced color remapping using a color grid
• Automatic installation of free Matchbox Shaders, opening Scratch up to a wealth of realtime VFX effects, including glows, lens effects, grain add/remove, as well as more advanced creative FX
• Built-in highlight glow, diffusion, de-noise and time-warp FX
• Added support for AJA’s Io 4K Plus and Kona 5 SDI output devices using the latest SDKs.
• Support for Apple’s new ProRes RAW compressed-acquisition format and Blackmagic RAW support on both OS X and Windows

Scratch 9.1 starts at $89 monthly and $695 annually.

Color Chat: Light Iron’s Sean Dunckley

Sean Dunckley joined Light Iron New York’s studio in 2013, where he has worked on episodic television and features films. He finds inspiration in many places, but most recently in the photography of Stephen Shore and Greg Stimac. Let’s find out more…

NAME: Sean Dunckley

COMPANY: LA- and NYC-based Light Iron

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Light Iron is a Panavision company that offers end-to-end creative and technical post solutions. I color things there.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I like to get involved early in the process. Some of the most rewarding projects are those where I get to work with the cinematographer from pre-production all the way through to the final DCP.

Ongoing advances in technology have really put the spotlight on the holistic workflow. As part of the Panavision ecosystem, we can offer solutions from start to finish, and that further strengthens the collaboration in the DI suite. We can help a production with camera and lens choices, oversee dailies and then bring all that knowledge into the final grade.

Recently, I had a client who was worried about the speed of his anamorphics at night. The cinematographer was much more comfortable shooting the faster spherical lenses, but the film and story called for the anamorphic look. In pre-production, I was able to show him how we can add some attributes of anamorphic lenses in post. That project ended up shooting a mix of anamorphic and spherical, delivering on both the practical and artistic needs.

Hulu’s Fyre Fraud doc.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Filmlight’s Baselight. Its color management tools offer with strong paint capabilities, and the Blackboard 2 panel is very user-friendly.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Now that DI systems have expanded their tools, I can integrate last-minute fixes during the DI sessions without having to stop and export a shot to another application. Baselight’s paint tools are very strong and have allowed me to easily solve many client issues in the room. Many times, this has saved valuable time against strict deadlines.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
That’s easy. It is the first day of a new project. It feels like an artistic release when I am working with filmmakers to create style frames. I like to begin the process by discussing the goals of color with the film’s creative team.

I try to get their take on how color can best serve the story. After we talk, we play for a little while. I demonstrate the looks that have been inspired by their words and then form a color palette for the project. During this time, it is just as important to learn what the client doesn’t like as much as what they do like.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I think the hours can be tough at times. The deadlines we face often battle with the perfectionist in me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Architecture is a field I would have loved to explore. It’s very similar, as it is equal parts technical and creative.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I had always been interested in post. I used to cut skateboard videos with friends in high school. In film school, I pursued more of an editing route. After graduation, I got a job at a post house and quickly realized I wanted to deviate and dive into color.

Late Night with Emma Thompson. Photo by Emily Aragones

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Recent film titles I worked on include Late Night and Brittany Runs a Marathon, both of which got picked up at Sundance by Amazon.

Other recent projects include Amazon Studio’s Life Itself, and the Fyre Fraud documentary on Hulu. Currently, I am working on multiple episodic series for different OTT studios.

The separation that used to exist between feature films, documentaries and episodics has diminished. Many of my clients are bouncing between all types of projects and aren’t contained to a single medium.

It’s a unique time to be able to color a variety of productions. Being innovative and flexible is the name of the game here at Light Iron, and we’ve always been encouraged to follow the client and not the format.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s impossible to pick a single project. They are all my children!

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I go through phases but right now it’s mostly banal photography. Stephen Shore and Greg Stimac are two of my favorite artists. Finding beauty in the mundane has a lot to do with the shape of light, which is very inspiring to me as a colorist.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I need my iPhone, Baselight and, of course, my golf course range finder.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I follow Instagram for visuals, and I keep up with Twitter for my sports news and scores.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have young children, so they make sure I leave those stresses back at the office, or at least until they go to bed. I also try to sneak in some golf whenever I can.