Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: Cinematography

Sony’s NAB updates — a cinematographer’s perspective

By Daniel Rodriguez

With its NAB offerings, Sony once again showed that they have a firm presence in nearly every stage of production, be it motion picture, broadcast media or short form. The company continues to keep up to date with the current demands while simultaneously preparing for the inevitable wave of change that seems to come faster and faster each year. While the introduction of new hardware was kept to a short list this year, many improvements to existing hardware and software were released to ensure Sony products — both new and existing — still have a firm presence in the future.

The ability to easily access, manipulate, share and stream media has always been a priority for Sony. This year at NAB, Sony continued to demonstrate its IP Live, SR Live, XDCAM Air and Media Backbone Hive platforms, which give users the opportunity to manage media all over the globe. IP Live allows users to access remote production, which contains core processing hardware while accessing it anywhere. This extends to 4K and HDR/SDR streaming as well, which is where SR Live comes into play. SR Live allows for a native 4K HDR signal to be processed into full HD and regular SDR signals, and a core improvement is the ability to adjust the curves during a live broadcast for any issues that may arise in converting HDR signals to SDR.

For other media, including XDCAM-based cameras, XDCAM Air allows for the wireless transfer and streaming of most media through QoS services, and turns almost any easily accessible camera with wireless capabilities into a streaming tool.

Media Backbone Hive allows users to access their media anywhere they want. Rather than just being an elaborate cloud service, Media Backbone Hive allows internal Adobe Cloud-based editing, accepts nearly every file type, allows a user to embed metadata and makes searching simple with keywords and phrases that are spoken in the media itself.

For the broadcast market, Sony introduced the Sony HDC-5500 4K HDR three-CMOS sensor camcorder which they are calling their “flagship” camera in this market. Offering 4K HDR and high frame rates, the camera also offers a global shutter — which is essential for dealing with strobing from lights — and can now capture fast action without the infamous rolling shutter blur. The camera allows for 4K output over 12G SDI, allowing for 4K monitoring and HDR, and as these outputs continue to be the norm, the introduction of the HDC-5500 will surely be a hit with users, especially with the addition of global shutter.

Sony is very much a company that likes to focus on the longevity of their previous releases… cameras especially. Sony’s FS7 is a camera that has excelled in its field since its introduction in 2014, and to this day is an extremely popular choice for short form, narrative and broadcast media. Like other Sony camera bodies, the FS7 allows for modular builds and add-ons, and this is where the new CBK-FS7BK ENG Build-Up Kit comes in. Sporting a shoulder mount and ENG viewfinder, the kit includes an extension in the back that allows for two wireless audio inputs, RAW output, streaming and file transfer via Wireless LAN or 4G/LTE connection, as well as QoS streaming (only through XDCAM Air) and timecode input. This CBK-FS7BK ENG Build-Up Kit turns the FS7 into an even more well-rounded workhorse.

The Sony Venice is Sony’s flagship Cinema camera, replacing the Sony F65, which is still brilliant and a popular camera. Having popped up as recently as last year’s Annihilation, the Venice takes a leap further in entering the full-frame, VistaVision market. Boasting top-of-the-line specs and a smaller, more modular build than the F65, the camera isn’t exactly a new release — it came out in November 2017 — but Sony has secured longevity in their flagship camera in a time when other camera manufacturers are just releasing their own VistaVision-sensored cameras and smaller alternatives.

Sony recently released a firmware update to the Venice that allows X-OCN XT — their highest form of compressed 16-bit RAW — two new imager modes, allowing the camera to sample 5.7K 16:9 in full frame and 6K 2.39:1 in full width, as well as 4K signal over 6G/12G SDI output and wireless remote control with the CBK-WA02. Since the Venice is smaller and able to be mounted on harder-to-reach mounts, wireless control is quickly becoming a feature that many camera assistants need. Newer anamorphic desqueeze modes for 1.25x, 1.3x, 1.5x and 1.8x have also been added, which is huge, since many older and newer lenses are constantly being created and revisited, such as the Technovision 1.5x — made famous by Vittorio Storaro on Apocalypse Now (1979) — and the Cooke Full Frame Anamorphics 1.8X. With VistaVision full frame now being an easily accessible way of filming, new forms of lensing are now becoming common, so systems like anamorphic are no longer limited to 1.3X and 2X. It’s reassuring to see Sony look out for storytellers who may want to employ less common anamorphic desqueeze sizes.

As larger resolutions and higher frame rates become the norm, Sony has introduced the new Sony SxS Pro X cards. A follow up to the hugely successful Sony SxS Pro+ cards, these new cards boost an incredible transfer speed of 10Gbps (1250Mbps) in 120GB and 240GB cards. This is a huge step up from the previous SxS Pro+ cards that offered a read speed of 3.5Gbps and a write speed of 2.8Gbps. Probably the most exciting part of these new cards being introduced is the corresponding SBAC-T40 card reader which guarantees a full 240GB card to be offloaded in 3.5 minutes.

Sony’s newest addition to the Venice camera is the Rialto extension system. Using the Venice’s modular build, the Rialto is a hardware extension that allows you to remove the main body’s sensor and install it into a smaller body unit which is then tethered either nine or 18 feet by cable back to the main body. Very reminiscent of the design of ARRI’s Alexa M unit, the Rialto goes further by being an extension of its main system rather than a singular system, which may bring its own issues. The Rialto allows users to reach spots where it may otherwise prove difficult using the actual Venice body. Its lightweight design allows users to mount it nearly anywhere. Where other camera bodies that are designed to be smaller end up heavy when outfitted with accessories such as batteries and wireless transmitters, the Rialto can easily be rigged to aerials, handhelds, and Steadicams. Though some may question why you wouldn’t just get a smaller body from another camera company, the big thing to consider is that the Rialto isn’t a solution to the size of the Venice body — which is already very small, especially compared to the previous F65 — but simply another tool to get the most out of the Venice system, especially considering you’re not sacrificing anything as far as features or frame rates. The Rialto is currently being used on James Cameron’s Avatar sequels, as its smaller body allows him to employ two simultaneously for true 3D recording whilst giving all the options of the Venice system.

With innovations in broadcast and motion picture production, there is a constant drive to push boundaries and make capture/distribution instant. Creating a huge network for distribution, streaming, capture, and storage has secured Sony not only as the powerhouse that it already is, but also ensures its presence in the ever-changing future.


Daniel Rodriguez is a New York based director and cinematographer. Having spent years working for such companies as Light Iron, Panavision and ARRI Rental, he currently works as a freelance cinematographer, filming narrative and commercial work throughout the five boroughs. 

 

Atomos’ new Shogun 7: HDR monitor, recorder, switcher

The new Atomos Shogun 7 is a seven-inch HDR monitor, recorder and switcher that offers an all-new 1500-nit, daylight-viewable, 1920×1200 panel with a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio and 15+ stops of dynamic range displayed. It also offers ProRes RAW recording and realtime Dolby Vision output. Shogun 7 will be available in June 2019, priced at $1,499.

The Atomos screen uses a combination of advanced LED and LCD technologies which together offer deeper, better blacks the company says rivals OLED screens, “but with the much higher brightness and vivid color performance of top-end LCDs.”

A new 360-zone backlight is combined with this new screen technology and controlled by the Dynamic AtomHDR engine to show millions of shades of brightness and color. It allows Shogun 7 to display 15+ stops of real dynamic range on-screen. The panel, says Atomos, is also incredibly accurate, with ultra-wide color and 105% of DCI-P3 covered, allowing for the same on-screen dynamic range, palette of colors and shades that your camera sensor sees.

Atomos and Dolby have teamed up to create Dolby Vision HDR “live” — a tool that allows you to see HDR live on-set and carry your creative intent from the camera through into HDR post. Dolby have optimized their target display HDR processing algorithm which Atomos has running inside the Shogun 7. It brings realtime automatic frame-by-frame analysis of the Log or RAW video and processes it for optimal HDR viewing on a Dolby Vision-capable TV or monitor over HDMI. Connect Shogun 7 to the Dolby Vision TV and AtomOS 10 automatically analyzes the image, queries the TV and applies the right color and brightness profiles for the maximum HDR experience on the display.

Shogun 7 records images up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 or 2kp240 slow motion from compatible cameras, in RAW/Log or HLG/PQ over SDI/HDMI. Footage is stored directly to AtomX SSDmini or approved off-the-shelf SATA SSD drives. There are recording options for Apple ProRes RAW and ProRes, Avid DNx and Adobe CinemaDNG RAW codecs. Shogun 7 has four SDI inputs plus a HDMI 2.0 input, with both 12G-SDI and HDMI 2.0 outputs. It can record ProRes RAW in up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 DCI/UHD and 2kp240 DCI/HD, depending on the camera’s capabilities. Also, 10-bit 4:2:2 ProRes or DNxHR recording is available up to 4Kp60 or 2Kp240. The four SDI inputs enable the connection of most quad-link, dual-link or single-link SDI cinema cameras. Pixels are preserved with data rates of up to 1.8Gb/s.

In terms of audio, Shogun 7 eliminates the need for a separate audio recorder. Users can add 48V stereo mics via an optional balanced XLR breakout cable, or select mic or line input levels, plus record up to 12 channels of 24/96 digital audio from HDMI or SDI. Monitoring selected stereo tracks is via the 3.5mm headphone jack. There are dedicated audio meters, gain controls and adjustments for frame delay.

Shogun 7 features the latest version of the AtomOS 10 touchscreen interface, first seen on the Ninja V.  The new body of Shogun 7 has a Ninja V-like exterior with ARRI anti-rotation mounting points on the top and bottom of the unit to ensure secure mounting.

AtomOS 10 on Shogun 7 has the full range of monitoring tools, including Waveform, Vectorscope, False Color, Zebras, RGB parade, Focus peaking, Pixel-to-pixel magnification, Audio level meters and Blue only for noise analysis.

Shogun 7 can also be used as a portable touchscreen-controlled multi-camera switcher with asynchronous quad-ISO recording. Users can switch up to four 1080p60 SDI streams, record each plus the program output as a separate ISO, then deliver ready-for-edit recordings with marked cut-points in XML metadata straight to your NLE. The current Sumo19 HDR production monitor-recorder will also gain the same functionality in a free firmware update.

There is asynchronous switching, plus use genlock in and out to connect to existing AV infrastructure. Once the recording is over, users can import the XML file into an NLE and the timeline populates with all the edits in place. XLR audio from a separate mixer or audio board is recorded within each ISO, alongside two embedded channels of digital audio from the original source. The program stream always records the analog audio feed as well as a second track that switches between the digital audio inputs to match the switched feed.

Arraiy 4.11.19

DP Chat: The Village cinematographer William Rexer

By Randi Altman

William Rexer is a cinematographer who has worked on documentaries, music videos, commercials and narratives — both comedies and dramas. He’s frequently collaborated with writer/director Ed Burns (Friends With Kids, Newlyweds, Summertime). Recently, he’s directed photography on several series including The Get Down, The Tick, Sneaky Pete and the new NBC drama The Village.

He sat down with us to answer some questions about his love of cinematography, his process and The Village, which follow a diverse group of people living in the same apartment building in Brooklyn.

The set of The Village. Photo: Peter Kramer

How did you become interested in cinematography?
When I was a kid, my mother had a theater company and my father was an agent/producer. I grew up sleeping backstage. When I was a teen, I was running a followspot (light) for Cab Calloway. I guess there was no escaping some job in this crazy business!

My father would check out 16mm movies from the New York City public library — Chaplin, Keaton — and that would be our weekend night entertainment. When I was in 8th grade, an art cinema started in my hometown; it is now called the Cinema Arts Center in Huntington, New York. It showed cinema from all over the world, including Bergman, Fellini, Jasny. I began to see the world through films and fell in love.

What inspires you artistically?
I love going to the movies, the theater and art galleries. Films like Roma and Cold War make me have faith in the world. What mostly inspires me is checking out what my peers are up to. Tim Ives, ASC, and Tod Campbell are two friends that I love to watch. Very impressive guys. David Mullen, ASC, and Eric Moynier are doing great work on Mrs. Maisel. I guess I would say watching my peers and their work inspires me.

NBC’s The Village

How do you stay on top of advancing technology tools for achieving your vision on set or in post?
The cameras and post workflow change every few months. I check in with the rental houses to stay on top of gear. Panavision, Arri Rental, TCS, Keslow and Abel are great resources. I also stay in touch with post houses. My friends at Harbor and Technicolor are always willing to help create LUTs, evaluate cameras and lenses.

Has any recent or new technology changed the way you work?
The introduction of the Red One MX and the ARRI D-20 changed a lot of things. They made shooting high-quality images affordable and cleaner for the environment. It put 35mm size sensors out there and gave a lot of young people a chance to create.

The introduction of large-format cameras, the Red Monstro 8K VV, the ARRI LF and 65, and the Sony Venice have made my life more interesting. All these sensors are fantastic, and the new color spaces we get to work with like Red’s IPP2 are truly astounding. I like having control of depth of field and controlling where the audience looks.

What are some of your best practices or rules you try to follow on each job?
I try my best to shoot tests, create a LUT in the test phase and take the footage through the entire process and see how it holds up. I make sure that all my monitors are calibrated at the post house to match; that gets us all on the same page. Then, I’ll adjust the LUT after a few days of shooting in the field, using the LUT as a film stock and light to it. I watch dailies, give notes and try to get in with colorist/timer and work with them.

Will Rexer (center) with showrunner Mike Daniels and director Minkie Spiro. Photo: Jennifer Rhoades

Tell us about The Village. How would you describe the general look of the show?
The look of The Village is somewhere between romantic realism and magical realism. It is a world that could be. Our approach was to thread that line between real and the potential — warm and inviting and full of potential.

Can you talk about your collaboration with the showrunner when setting the look of a project?
Mike Daniels, Minkie Spiro, Jessica Rhoades and I looked at a ton of photographs and films to find our look. The pilot designer Ola Maslik and the series designer Neil Patel created warm environments for me.

How early did you get involved in the production?
I had three weeks of prep for the pilot, and I worked with Minkie and Ola finding locations and refining the look.

How did you go about choosing the right camera and lenses to achieve the look?
The show required a decent amount of small gimbal work, so we chose the Red Monstro 8K VV using Red’s IPP2 color space. I love the camera, great look, great functionality and my team has customized the accessories to make our work on set effortless.

We used the Sigma Cine PL Primes with 180mm Leica R, Nikon 200 T2, Nikkor Zero Optik 58mm T1.2, Angenieux HR 25-250mm and some other special optics. I looked at other full-frame lenses but really liked the Sigma lenses and their character. These lenses are a nice mix of roundness and warmth and consistency.

What was your involvement with post? Who supported your vision from dailies through final grade? Have you worked with this facility and/or colorists on past projects?
Dailies were through Harbor Picture Company. I love these guys. I have worked with Harbor since they started, and they are total pros. They have helped me create LUTs for many projects, including Public Morals.

The final post for The Village was done in LA at NBC/Universal. Craig Budrick has done a great job coloring the show. I do wish that I could be in the room, but that’s not always possible.

What’s most satisfying to you about this show?
I am very proud of the show and its message. It’s a romantic vision of the world. TV and cinema often go to the dark side. I like going there, but I do think we need to be reminded of our better selves and our potential.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 


Review: Mzed.com’s Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington

By Brady Betzel

I am constantly looking to educate myself, no matter what the source — or subject. Whether I am learning how to make a transition in Adobe After Effects from an eSports editor on YouTube to Warren Eagles teaching color correction in Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve on FXPHD.com, I’m always beefing up my skills. I even learn from bad tutorials — they teach you what not to do!

But when you come across a truly remarkable learning experience, it is only fair to share with the rest of the world. Last year I saw an ad for an MZed.com course called “Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington,” and was immediately interested. These days you can pretty much find any technical tutorial you can dream of on YouTube, but truly professional, higher education-like, theory-based education series are very hard to come by. Even ones you need to pay for aren’t always worth their price of admission, which is a huge let down.

Ollie sharing his wisdom.

Once I gained access to MZed.com I wanted to watch every educational series they had. From lighting techniques with ASC member Shane Hurlbut to the ARRI Amira Camera Primer, there are over 150 hours of education available from industry leaders. However, I found my way to Directing Color…

I am often asked if I think people should go to college or a film school. My answer? If you have the money and time, you should go to college followed by film school (or do both together, if the college offers it). Not only will you learn a craft, but you will most likely spend hundreds of hours studying and visualizing the theory behind it. For example, when someone asks me about the science behind camera lenses, I can confidently answer them thanks to my physics class based on lenses and optics from California Lutheran University (yes, a shameless plug).

In my opinion, a two-, four- or even 10-year education allows me to live in the grey. I am comfortable arguing for both sides of a debate, as well as the options that are in between —  the grey. I feel like my post-high school education really allowed me to recognize and thrive in the nuances of debate. Leaving me to play devil’s advocate maybe a little too much, but also having civil and proactive discussions with others without being demeaning or nasty — something we are actively missing these days. So if living in the grey is for you, I really think a college education supplemented by online or film school education is valuable (assuming you make the decision that the debt is worth it like I did).

However, I know that is not an option for everyone since it can be very expensive — trust me, I know. I am almost done paying off my undergraduate fees while still paying off my graduate ones, which I am still two or three classes away from finishing. That being said, Directing Color With Ollie Kenchington is the only online education series I have seen so far that is on the same level as some of my higher education classes. Not only is the content beautifully shot and color corrected, but Ollie gives confident and accessible lessons on how color can be used to draw the viewer’s attention to multiple parts of the screen.

Ollie Kenchington is a UK-based filmmaker who runs Korro Films. From the trailer of his Directing Color series, you can immediately see the beauty of Ollie’s work and know that you will be in safe hands. (You can read more about his background here.)

The course raises the online education bar and will elevate the audiences idea of professional insight. The first module “Creating a Palette” covers the thoughts behind creating a color palette for a small catering company. You may even want to start with the last Bonus Module “Ox & Origin” to get a look at what Ollie will be creating throughout the seven modules and about an hour and a half of content.

While Ollie goes over “looks,” the beauty of this course is that he goes through his internal thought processes including deciding on palettes based on color theory. He didn’t just choose teal and orange because it looks good, he chooses his color palette based on complementary colors.

Throughout the course Ollie covers some technical knowledge, including calibrating monitors and cameras, white balancing and shooting color charts to avoid having wrong color balance in post. This is so important because if you don’t do these simple steps, your color correction session while be much harder. And wasting time on fixing incorrect color balance takes time away from the fun of color grading. All of this is done through easily digestible modules that range from two to 20 minutes.

The modules include Creating a Palette; Perceiving Color; Calibrating Color; Color Management; Deconstructing Color 1 – 3 and the Bonus Module Ox & Origin.

Without giving away the entire content in Ollie’s catalog, my favorite modules in this course are the on-set modules. Maybe because I am not on-set that often, but I found the “thinking out loud” about colors helpful. Knowing why reds represent blood, which raise your heart rate a little bit, is fascinating. He even goes through practical examples of color use in films such as in Whiplash.

In the final “Deconstructing Color” modules, Ollie goes into a color bay (complete with practical candle backlighting) and dives in Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve. He takes this course full circle to show how since he had to rush through a scene he can now go into Resolve and add some lighting to different sides of someone’s face since he took time to set up proper lighting on set, he can focus on other parts of his commercial.

Summing Up
I want to watch every tutorial MZed.com has to offer. From “Philip Bloom’s Cinematic Masterclass” to Ollie’s other course “Mastering Color.” Unfortunately, as of my review, you would have to pay an additional fee to watch the “Mastering Color” series. It seems like an unfortunate trend in online education to charge a fee and then when an extra special class comes up, charge more, but this class will supposedly be released to the standard subscribers in due time.

MZed.com has two subscription models: MZed Pro, which is $299 for one year of streaming the standard courses, and MZed Pro Premium for $399. This includes the standard courses for one year and the ability to choose one “Premium” course.

“Philip Bloom’s Cinematic Master Class” was the Premium course I was signed up for initially, but you you can decide between this one and the “Mastering Color” course. You will not be disappointed regardless of which one you choose. Even their first course “How to Photograph Everyone” is chock full of lighting and positioning instruction that can be applied in many aspects of videography.

I really was impressed with Directing Color with Ollie Kenchington, and if the other course are this good MZed.com will definitely become a permanent bookmark for me.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


Atomos offering Shinobi SDI camera-top monitor

On the heels of its successful Shinobi launch in March, Atomos has introduced Atomos Shinobi SDI, a
super-lightweight, 5-inch HD-SDI and 4K HDMI camera-top monitor. Its color-accurate calibrated display makes makes it suitable compact HDR and SDR reference monitor. It targets the professional video creator who uses or owns a variety of cameras and camcorders and needs the flexibility of SDI or HDMI, accurate high bright and HDR, while not requiring external recording capability.

Shinobi SDI features a compact, durable body combined with an ultra-clear, ultra-bright, daylight viewable 1000-nit display. The anti-reflection, anti-fingerprint screen has a pixel density of 427PPI (pixels per inch) and is factory calibrated for color accuracy, with the option for in-field calibration providing ongoing accuracy. Thanks to the
HD-SDI input and output, plus a 4K HDMI input, it can be used in most productions.

This makes Shinobi SDI a useful companion for high-end cinema and production cameras, ENG cameras, handheld camcorders and any other
HD-SDI equipped source.

“Our most requested product in recent times has been a stand-alone SDI monitor. We are thrilled to be bringing the Atomos Shinobi SDI to market for professional video and film creators,” says Jeromy Young, CEO of Atomos.


ARRI’s new Alexa Mini LF offers large-format sensor in small footprint

Offering a large-format sensor in a small form factor, ARRI has introduced its new Alexa Mini LF camera, which combines the compact size and low weight of the Alexa Mini with the large-format Alexa LF sensor. According to the company, it “provides the best overall image quality for large-format shooting” and features three internal motorized FSND filters, 12V power input, extra power outputs, a new Codex Compact Drive and a new MVF-2 high-contrast HD viewfinder.

The new Alexa Mini LF cameras are scheduled to start shipping in mid-2019.

ARRI’s large-format camera system, launched in 2018, is based around a 4.5K version of the Alexa sensor, which is twice the size and offers twice the resolution of Alexa cameras in 35 format. This allows for large-format looks, with improvements on the Alexa sensor’s natural colorimetry, pleasing skin tones, low noise and it’s suitable for HDR and Wide Color Gamut workflows.

Alexa Mini LF now joins the existing system elements: the high-speed capable Alexa LF camera; ARRI Signature Prime lenses; LPL lens mount and PL-to-LPL adapter; and Lens Data System LDS-2. The combined feature sets and form factors of ARRI’s two large-format cameras encompass all on-set requirements.

The Alexa Mini LF is built for use in challenging professional conditions. It features a hard-wearing carbon body and a wide temperature range of -4° F to +113° F, and each Alexa Mini LF is put through a vigorous stress test before leaving the ARRI factory and is then supported by ARRI’s global service centers.

While Alexa Mini LF is compatible with almost all Alexa Mini accessories, the company says it brings significant enhancements to the Mini camera design. Among them are extra connectors, including regulated 12V and 24V accessory power; a new 6-pin audio connector; built-in microphones; and improved WiFi.

Six user buttons are now in place on the camera’s operating side, and the camera and viewfinder each have their own lock button, while user access to the recording media, and VF and TC connectors, has been made easier.

Alexa Mini LF allows internal recording of MXF/ARRIRAW or MXF/Apple ProRes in a variety of formats and aspect ratios, and features the new Compact Drive recording media from Codex, an ARRI technology partner. This small and lightweight drive offers 1TB of recording. It comes with a USB-C Compact Drive reader that can be used without any extra software or licenses on Mac or Windows computers. In addition, a Compact Drive adapter can be used in any dock that accepts SXR Capture Drives, potentially more than doubling download speeds.

Another development from Codex is Codex High Density Encoding (HDE), which uses sophisticated, loss-less encoding to reduce ARRIRAW file sizes by around 40% during downloading or later in the workflow. This lowers storage costs, shortens transfer times and speeds up workflows.

HDE is free for use with Codex Capture or Compact Drives, openly shared and fast: ARRIRAW Open Gate 4.5K can be encoded at 24fps on a modern MacBook Pro.

ARRI’s new MVF-2 viewfinder for the Alexa Mini LF is the same high-contrast HD OLED display, color science and ARRICAM eyepiece as in Alexa LF’s EVF-2 viewfinder, allowing optimal judgment of focus, dynamic range and color on set.

In addition, the MVF-2 features a large, four-inch flip-out monitor that can display the image or the camera control menu. The MVF-2 can be used on either side of the camera and connects via a new CoaXPress VF cable that has a reach of up to 10m for remote camera operations. It features a refined user interface, a built-in eyepiece lens heater for de-fogging and a built-in headphones connector.


DP Tom Curran on Netflix’s Tidying Up With Marie Kondo

By Iain Blair

Forget all the trendy shows about updating your home décor or renovating your house. What you really need to do is declutter. And the guru of decluttering is Marie Kondo, the Japanese star of the hot Netflix show Tidying Up With Marie Kondo.

The organizational expert became a global star when her first book, 2014’s “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing,” was translated into English, becoming a New York Times bestseller. Her follow-up was 2016’s “Spark Joy: An Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up.”

Tom Curran

Clearly, people everywhere need to declutter, and Kondo’s KonMari Method is the answer for those who have too much stuff. As she herself puts it, “My mission is to organize the world and spark joy in people’s lives. Through this partnership with Netflix, I am excited to spread the KonMari Method to as many people as possible.”

I recently spoke with Tom Curran, the cinematographer of the Kondo show. His extensive credits include Ugly Delicious for Netflix, Fish My City for National Geographic and 9 Months for Facebook, which is hosted by Courteney Cox. Curran has an Emmy on his mantle for ABC Sports’ Iditarod Sled Dog Race.

Let’s start with the really important stuff. Do you have too much clutter? Has Marie’s philosophy helped you?
(Laughs). It has! I think we all have too much stuff. To be honest, I was a little skeptical at first about all this. But as I spent time with her and educated myself, I began to realize just how much there is to it. I think that it particularly applies to the US, where we all have so much and move so quickly.

In her world, you come to a pause and evaluate all of that, and it’s really quite powerful. And if you follow all of her steps, you can’t do it quickly. It forces you to slow down and take stock. My wife is an editor, and we’re both always so busy, but now we take little pockets of time to attack different parts of the house and the clutter we have. It’s been really powerful and helpful to us.

Why do you think her method and this show have resonated so much with people everywhere?
Americans tend to get so busy and locked into routines, and Japan’s culture is very different. I’ve worked there quite a bit, and she brings this whole other quality to the show. She’s very thoughtful and kind. I think the show does a good job of showing that, and you really feel it. An awful lot of current TV can be a little sharp and mean, and there’s something old-fashioned about this, and audiences really respond. She doesn’t pass judgment on people’s messy houses — she just wants to help.

You’re well-known for shooting in extreme conditions and locations all over the world. How did this compare?
It was radically different in some ways. Instead of vast and bleak landscapes, like Antarctica, you’re shooting the interiors of people’s homes in LA. Working with EP Hend Baghdady and showrunner Bianca Barnes-Williams, we set out to redefine how to showcase these homes. We used some of the same principles, like how to incorporate these characters into their environment and weave the house into the storyline. That was our main goal.

What were the challenges of shooting this show?
A big one was keeping ourselves out of the shot, which isn’t so easy in a small space. Also, keeping Marie central to all the storytelling. I’ve done several series before, shooting in people’s homes, like Little People, Big World, where we stayed in one family’s home for many years. With this show the crew was walking into their homes for a far shorter time, and none of them were actors. The were baring their souls.

Cleaning up all their clutter before we arrived was contrary to what the show’s all about, so you’re seeing all the ugly. My background’s in cinéma vérité, and a lot of this was stripping back the way these types of unscripted shows are usually done — with multiple cameras. We did use multiple cameras, but often it was just one, as you’re in a tiny room, where there’s no space for another, and we’re shooting wide since the main character in most stories was the home.

As well as being a DP you’re also the owner of Curran Camera, Inc. Did you supply all the camera gear for this through your company?
Sometimes I supply equipment for a series, sometimes not. It all depends on what the project needs. On this, when Hend, Bianca and I began discussing different camera options, I felt it wasn’t a series we could shoot on prime lenses, but we wanted the look that primes would bring. We ended up working with Fujinon Cabrio Cine Zooms and Canon cameras, which gave us a really filmic look, and we got most of our gear from T-stop Camera Rentals in LA. In fact, the Fujinon Cabrio 14-35mm became the centerpiece of the storytelling in the homes because of its wide lens capture — which was crucial for scenes with closets and small rooms and so on.

I assume all the lighting was a big challenge?
You’re right. It was a massive undertaking because we wanted to follow all the progress in each home. And we didn’t want it to be a dingy, rough-looking show, especially since Marie represented this bright light that’d come into people’s homes and then it would get brighter and brighter. We ended up bringing in all the lighting from the east coast, which was the only place I could source what I needed.

For Marie’s Zen house we had a different lighting package with dozens of small fresnels because it was so calm and stood still. For the homes and all the movement, we used about 80 Flex lights — paper-thin LED lights that are easily dimmable and quick to install and take down. Even though we had a pretty small crew, we were able to achieve a pretty consistent look.

How did the workflow operate? How did you deal with dailies?
Our post supervisor Joe Eckardt was pretty terrific, and I’d spend a lot of time going through all the dailies and then give a big download to the crew once a week. We had six to eight camera operators and three crews with two cameras and additional people some days. We had so much footage, and what ended up on screen is just a fraction of what we shot. We had a lot of cards at the end of every day, and they’d be loaded into the post system, and then a team of 16 editors would start going through it all.  Since this was the first season, we were kind of doing it on the fly and trying different techniques to see what worked best.

Color correction and the mix was handled by Margarita Mix. How involved were you in post and the look of the show?
I was very involved, especially early on. Even in the first month or so we started to work on the grade a bit to get some patterns in place; that helped carry us through. We set out to capture a really naturalistic look, and a lot of the homes were very cramped, so we had to keep the wrong lighting look looking wrong, so to speak. I’m pretty happy with what we were able to do. (Margarita Mix’s Troy Smith was the colorist.)

How important is post to you as a DP?
It’s hard to overstate. I’d say it’s not just a big piece of the process, it is the process. When we’re shooting, I only really think about three things; One, what is the story we’re trying to tell? Two, how can we best capture that, particularly with non-actors. How do you create an environment of complete trust where they basically just forget about you? How do we capture Marie doing her thing and not break the flow, since she’s this standup performer? Three, how do we give post what they need? If we’re not giving editorial the right coverage, we’re not doing our job. That last one is the most important to me — since I’m married to an editor, I’m always so aware of post.

The first eight shows aired in January. When is the next season?
We’ve had some light talks about it, and I assume since it’s so popular we’ll do more, but nothing’s finalized yet. I hope we do more.  I love this show.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.


Red Ranger all-in-one camera system now available

Red Digital Cinema has made its new Red Ranger all-in-one camera system available to select Red authorized rental houses. Ranger includes Red’s cinematic full-frame 8K sensor Monstro in an all-in-one camera system, featuring three SDI outputs (two mirrored and one independent) allowing two different looks to be output simultaneously; wide-input voltage (11.5V to 32V); 24V and 12V power outs (two of each); one 12V P-Tap port; integrated 5-pin XLR stereo audio input (Line/Mic/+48V Selectable); as well as genlock, timecode, USB and control.

Ranger is capable of handling heavy-duty power sources and boasts a larger fan for quieter and more efficient temperature management. The system is currently shipping in a gold mount configuration, with a v-lock option available next month.

Ranger captures 8K RedCode RAW up to 60fps full-format, as well as Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHR formats at 4K up to 30fps and 2K up to 120fps. It can simultaneously record RedCode RAW plus Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD or DNxHR at up to 300MB/s write speeds.

To enable an end-to-end color management and post workflow, Red’s enhanced image processing pipeline (IPP2) is also included in the system.

Ranger ships complete, including:
• Production top handle
• PL mount with supporting shims
• Two 15mm LWS rod brackets
• Red Pro Touch 7.0-inch LCD with 9-inch arm and LCD/EVF cable
• LCD/EVF adaptor A and LCD/EVF adaptor D
• 24V AC power adaptor with 3-pin 24V XLR power cable
• Compatible Hex and Torx tools


Shooting, posting New Republic’s Indie film, Sister Aimee

After a successful premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, New Republic Studios’ Sister Aimee screened at this month’s SXSW. The movie tells the story of an infamous American evangelist of the 1920s, Sister Aimee Semple McPherson, who gets caught up in her lover’s dreams of Mexico and finds herself on a road trip toward the border.

Sister Aimee shot at the newly renovated New Republic Studios near Austin, Texas, over two and a half weeks. “Their crew used our 2,400-square-foot Little Bear soundstage, our 3,000-square-foot Lone Wolf soundstage, our bullpen office space and numerous exterior locations in our backlot,” reports New Republic Studios president Mindy Raymond, adding that the Sister Aimee production also had access to two screening rooms with 5.1 surround sound, HDMI hookups to 4K monitors and theater-style leather chairs to watch dailies. The film also hit the road, shooting in the New Mexico desert.

L-R: Directors Samantha Buck, Marie Schlingmann at SXSW. Credit: Harrison Funk

Co-written and co-directed by Samantha Buck and Marie Schlingmann, the movie takes some creative license with the story of Aimee. “We don’t look for factual truth in Aimee’s journey,” they explain. “Instead we look for a more timeless truth that says something about female ambition, the female quest for immortality and, most of all, the struggle for women to control their own narratives. It becomes a story about storytelling itself.”

The film, shot by cinematographer Carlos Valdes-Lora at 3.2K ProRes 4444 XQ on an Arri Alexa Mini, was posted at Dallas and Austin-based Charlieuniformtango.

We reached out to the DP and the post team to find out more.

Carlos, why did you choose the package of the Alexa and Cooke Mini S4 Primes?
Carlos Valdes-Lora: In early conversations with the directors, we all agreed that we didn’t want Sister Aimee to feel like a traditional period movie. We didn’t want to use softening filters or vintage lenses. We aimed instead for clear images, deep focus and a rich color palette that remains grounded in the real world. We felt that this would lend the story a greater sense of immediacy and draw the viewer closer to the characters. Following that same thinking, we worked very extensively with the 25mm and 32mm, especially in closeups and medium closeups, emphasizing accessibility.

The Cooke Mini S4s are a beautiful and affordable set (relative to our other options.) We like the way they give deep dimensionality and warmth to faces, and how they create a slightly lower contrast image compared to the other modern lenses we looked at. They quickly became the right choice for us, striking the right balance between quality, size and value.

The Cookes paired with the Alexa Mini gave us a lightweight camera system with a very contained footprint, and we needed to stay fast and lean due to our compressed shooting schedule and often tight shooting quarters. The Chapman Cobra dolly was a big help in that regard as well.

What was the workflow to post like?
Charlieuniformtango producers Bettina Barrow, Katherine Harper, David Hartstein: Post took place primarily between Charlieuniformtango’s Dallas and Austin offices. Post strategizing started months before the shoot, and active post truly began when production began in July 2018.

Tango’s Evan Linton handled dailies brought in from the shoot, working alongside editor Katie Ennis out of Tango’s Austin studio, to begin assembling a rough cut as shooting continued. Ennis continued to cut at the studio through August with directors Schlingmann and Buck.

Editorial then moved back to the directors’ home state of New York to finish the cut for Sundance. (Editor Ennis, who four-walled out of Tango Austin for the first part of post, went to  New York with the directors, working out of a rented space.)

VFX and audio work started early at Tango, with continuously updated timelines coming from editorial, working to have certain locked shots also finished for the Sundance submission, while saving much of the cleanup and other CG heavy shots for the final picture lock.

Tango audio engineer Nick Patronella also tackled dialogue edit, sound design and mix for the submission out of the Dallas studio.

Can you talk about the VFX?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: The cut was locked in late November, and the heavy lifting really began. With delivery looming, Tango’s Flame artists Allen Robbins, Joey Waldrip, David Hannah, David Laird, Artie Peña and Zack Smith divided effects shots, which ranged from environmental cleanup, period-specific cleanup, beauty work such as de-aging, crowd simulation, CG sign creation and more. 3D

(L-R) Tango’s Artie Peña, Connor Adams, Allen Robbins in one of the studio’s Flame suites.

Artist Connor Adams used Houdini, Mixamo and Maya to create CG elements and crowds, with final comps being done in Nuke and sent to Flame for final color. Over 120 VFX shots were handled in total and Flame was the go-to for effects. Color and much of the effects happened simultaneously. It was a nice workflow as the project didn’t have major VFX needs that would have impacted color.

What about the color grade?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: Directors Buck and Schlingmann and DP Valdes-Lora worked with Tango colorist Allen Robbins to craft the final look of the film — with the color grade also done in Flame. The trio had prepped shooting for a Kodachrome-style look, especially for the exteriors, but really overall. They found important reference in selections of Robert Capa photographs.

Buck, Schlingmann and Valdes-Lora responded mostly to Kodachrome’s treatment of blues, browns, tans, greens and reds (while staying true to skin tone), but also to their gamma values, not being afraid of deep shadows and contrast wherever appropriate. Valdes-Lora wanted to avoid lighting/exposing to a custom LUT on set that would reflect this kind of Kodachrome look, in case they wanted to change course during the process. With the help of Tango, however, they discovered that by dialing back the Capa look it grounded the film a little more and made the characters “feel” more accessible. The roots of the inspiration remained in the image but a little more naturalism, a little more softness, served the story better.

Because of that they monitored on set with Alexa 709, which he thought exposing for would still provide enough room. Production designer Jonathan Rudak (another regular collaborator with the directors) was on the same page during prep (in terms of reflecting this Capa color style), and the practical team did what they could to make sure the set elements complemented this approach.

What about the audio post?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: With the effects and color almost complete, the team headed to Skywalker Ranch for a week of final dialogue edit, mix, sound design and Foley, led by Skywalker’s Danielle Dupre, Kim Foscato and E. Larry Oatfield. The team also was able to simultaneously approve color sections in Skywalker’s Stag Theater allowing for an ultra-efficient schedule. With final mix in hand, the film was mastered just after Christmas so that DCP production could begin.

Since a portion of the film was musical, how complex was the audio mix?
Skywalker sound mixer Dupre: The musical number was definitely one of the most challenging but rewarding scenes to design and mix. It was such a strong creative idea that played so deeply into the main character. The challenge was in striking a balance between tying it into the realism of the film while also leaning into the grandiosity of the musical to really sell the idea.

It was really fun to play with a combination of production dialogue and studio recordings to see how we could make it work. It was also really rewarding to create a soundscape that starts off minimally and simply and transitions to Broadway scale almost undetectably — one of the many exciting parts to working with creative and talented filmmakers.

What was the biggest challenge in post?
Barrow, Harper, Hartstein: Finishing a film in five to six weeks during the holidays was no easy feat. Luckily, we were able to have our directors hands-on for all final color, VFX and mix. Collaborating in the same room is always the best when you have no time to spare. We had a schedule where each day was accounted for — and we stuck to it almost down to the hour.

 

DP Chat: Madam Secretary’s Learan Kahanov

By Randi Altman

Cinematographer Learan Kahanov’s love of photography started at an early age, when he would stage sequences and scenes with his Polaroid camera, lining up the photos to create a story.

He took that love of photography and turned it into a thriving career, working in television, features and commercials. He currently works on the CBS drama Madam Secretary — where he was initially  hired to be the A-camera operator and additional DP. He shot 12 episodes and tandem units, then he took over the show fully in Season 3. The New York-shot, Washington, DC-set show stars Téa Leoni as the US Secretary of State, following her struggle to balance her work and personal life.

We recently reached out to Kahanov to find out more about his path, as well as his workflow, on Madam Secretary.

Learan Kahanov on set with director Rob Greenlea.

Can you talk about your path to cinematography?
My mother is a sculptor and printmaker, and when I was in middle school, she went back to get a degree in fine arts with a minor in photography. This essentially meant I was in tow, on many a weeknight, to the darkroom so she could do her printing and, in turn, I learned as well.

I shot mostly black and white all through middle school and high school. I would often use my mother’s art studio to shoot the models who posed for the drawing class she taught. Around the same time, I developed a growing fascination with animal behavior and strove to become a wildlife photographer, until I realized I didn’t have the patience to sit in a tree for days to get the perfect shot.

I soon turned my attention to videography while working at a children’s museum, teaching kids how to use the cameras and how to make short movies. I decided to pursue cinematography officially in high school. I eventually found myself at NYU film school, based off my photography portfolio. As soon as I got to New York City, I started working on indie films, as an electrician and gaffer, shooting every student film and indie project I could.

What inspires you artistically? And how do you simultaneously stay on top of advancing technology that serves your vision?
I could list artists or filmmakers whose work I gravitate to, but the main thing I learned from my mother about art is that it’s about a feeling. Whether it’s being affected by a beautifully photographed image of a woman in a commercial or getting sucked into the visuals in a wildlife documentary, if you can invoke a feeling and or create an emotion you have made art.

Madam Secretary

I am always looking at things around me, and I’m always aware of how light falls on the world around me. Or how the shape of everyday objects and places change depending on the time, the weather or just my mood at the moment.

My vision of a project is always born out of the story, so the key for me is to always use technology (new or old) to support that story. Sometimes the latest in LED technology is the right tool for the job, sometimes it’s a bare light bulb attached to the underside of a white, five-gallon paint bucket (a trick Gaffer Jack Coffin and I use quite often). I think the balance between vision and technology is a two-way street — the key is to recognize when the technology serves your vision or the other way around.

What new technology has changed the way you work?
In the area of lighting, I have found that no matter what new tools come onto the scene, I still hold true to my go-to lighting techniques that I have preferred for years.

A perfect example would be my love for book lights — a book light is a bounced light that then goes through another layer of diffusion, which is perfect for lighting faces. Whether I am using an old Mole Richardson 5K tungsten unit or the newer ARRI S60 SkyPanels, the concept and end result are basically the same.

That being said, for location work the ARRI LED SkyPanels have become one of the go-to units on my current show, Madam Secretary. The lights’ high-output, low-power consumption, ease for matching existing location color sources and quick effects make them an easy choice for dealing with the faster-paced TV production schedule.

On-set setup

One other piece of gear that I have found myself calling for on a daily basis, since my key grip Ted Lehane introduced me to. It’s a diffusion material called Magic Cloth, which is produced by The Rag Place. This material can work as a bounce, as well as a diffusion, and you can directly light through. It produces a very soft light, as it’s fairly thick, but it does not change the color temperature of the source light. This new material, in conjunction with new LED technology, has created some interesting opportunities for my team.

Many DPs talk about the latest digital sensor, camera support (drone/gimbals, etc.) or LED lighting, but sometimes it’s something very simple, like finding a new diffusion material that can really change the look and the way I work. In fact, I think gripology in general often gets overlooked in the current affairs of filmmaking where everything seems to need to be “state of the art.”

What are some of your best practices or rules that you try to follow on each job?
I have one hard and fast rule in any project I shoot: support the story! I like to think of myself as a filmmaker first, using cinematography as a way to contribute to the filmmaking process. That being said, we can create lots of “rules” and have all the “go-to practices” to create beautiful images, but if what you are doing doesn’t advance the story, or at the very least create the right mood for the scene, then you are just taking a picture.

There are definite things I do because I simply prefer how it looks, but if it doesn’t make sense for the scene/move (based on the directors and my vision), I will then adjust what I do to make sure I am always supporting the story. There are definitely times where a balance is needed. We don’t create in a bubble, as there are all the other factors to consider, like budget, time, shooting conditions, etc. It’s this need/ability to be both technician and artisan that excites me the most about my job.

Can you explain your ideal collaboration with the director when setting the look of a project?
When working in episodic TV, every episode — essentially every eight days — there is a different director. Even when I have a repeat director, I have to adapt quickly between each director’s style. This goes beyond just being a chameleon from a creative standpoint — I need to quickly establish trust and a short hand to help the director put their stamp on their episode, all while staying within the already established look of the show.

Madam Secretary

I have always considered myself not an “idea man” but rather a “make-the-idea-better” man. I say this because being able to collaborate with a director and not just see their vision, but also enhance it and take it a step further (and see their excitement in the process), is completely fulfilling.

Tell us about Madam Secretary. How would you describe the overarching look of the show? How early did you get involved in the production?
I have been a part of Madam Secretary since the beginning, minus the pilot. I was hired as the A camera operator and as an additional DP. Jonathan Brown, ASC, shot the pilot and was the DP for the first two seasons. He was also one of our directors for the first three seasons. In addition to shooting tandem/2nd unit days and filling on scout days, I was the DP whenever Jonathan directed. So while I didn’t create the initial look of the show, I worked closely with Jonathan as the seasons went on until I officially took over in the third season.

Since I took over (and during my episodes), I felt an obligation to hold true to the original look and the intent of the show, while also adding my personal touch and allowing the show’s look to evolve with the series. The show does give us opportunities every week to create something new. While the reoccurring sets/locations do have a relatively set look, every episode takes us to new parts of the world and to new events.

It gives the director, production team and me an opportunity to create different looks and aesthetics to differentiate it from Madam Secretary’s life in DC. While it’s a quick schedule to prep,  research and create new looks for convincing foreign locations every episode (we shoot 99% of the show in New York), it is a challenge that brings a creativity and excitement to the job that I really enjoy.

Learan Kahanov on set with Hillary Clinton for the episode E Pluribus Unum.

Can you talk about what you shoot on and what lenses you use, etc.?
The show is currently shooting on Alexa SXTs with Leica Summicron Prime lenses and Fujinon Cabrio zooms. One of the main things I did when I officially took over the show was to switch to Lecia Primes. We did some testing with Tèa Leoni and Tim Daly on our sets to see how the lenses treated skin tones.

Additionally, we wanted to see how they reacted to the heavy backlight and to the blown out windows we have on many of our sets. We all agreed that the lenses were sharp, but also realized that they created a softer feel on our actors faces, had a nice focus fall-off and they handled the highlights really well. They are flexible enough to help me create different looks while still retaining a consistency for the show. The lenses have an interesting flare characteristic that sometimes makes controlling them difficult, but it all adds to the current look of the show and has yet to be limiting.

You used a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema camera for some specialized shots. Can you describe those?
The show has many scenes that entail some specialized shots that need a small but high-res camera that has an inherently different feel from the Alexa. These shots include webcam and security camera footage. There are also many times when we need to create body/helmet cam footage to emulate images recorded from military/police missions that then were played back in the president’s situation room. That lightweight, high-quality camera allows for a lot of flexibility. We also employ other small cameras like GoPro and DJI Osmo, as well as the Sony A7RII with PL mount.

Madam Secretary

Any challenging scenes that you are particularly proud of?
I don’t think there is an episode that goes by without some type of challenge, but one in particular that I was really happy with took place on a refugee boat in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea.

The scene was set at night where refugees were making a harrowing trip from the north coast of Libya to France. Since we couldn’t shoot on the ocean at night, we brought the boat and a storm into the studio.

Our production designer and art department cut a real boat in half and brought it onto the stage. Drew Jiritano and his special effects team then placed the boat on a gimbal and waterproofed the stage floor so we could place rain towers and air cannons to simulate a storm in the middle of the sea.

Using a technocrane, handheld cameras and interactive lighting, we created a great scene that immersed the audience in a realistic depiction of the dramatic journey that happens more often than most Americans realize.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years.