Category Archives: Awards

Marvel’s Victoria Alonso to receive HPA’s Charles S. Swartz Award

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has announced that Victoria Alonso, producer and executive VP of production for Marvel Studios, will receive the organization’s 2018 Charles S. Swartz Award at the HPA Awards on November 15. The HPA Awards recognize creative artistry, innovation and engineering excellence, and the Charles S. Swartz Award honors the recipient’s significant impact across diverse aspects of the industry.

A native of Buenos Aires, Alonso moved to the US at the age of 19. She worked her way up through the industry, beginning as a PA and then working four years at the VFX house Digital Domain. She served as VFX producer on a number of films, including Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven, Tim Burton’s Big Fish, Andrew Adamson’s Shrek and Marvel’s Iron Man. She won the Visual Effects Society (VES) Award for outstanding supporting visual effects/motion picture for Kingdom of Heaven, with two additional shared nominations (best single visual effects, outstanding visual effects/effects-driven motion picture) for Iron Man.

Eventually, she joined Marvel as the company’s EVP of visual effects and post, doubling as co-producer on Iron Man, a role she reprised on Iron Man 2, Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger. In 2011, she advanced to executive producer on the hit The Avengers and has since executive produced Marvel’s Iron Man 3, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Captain America: Civil War, Thor: The Dark World, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, Doctor Strange, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Thor: Ragnarok, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War and most recently, Ant-Man and the Wasp.

She is currently at work on the untitled fourth installment of Avengers and Captain Marvel.

The Charles S. Swartz Award was named after executive Charles Swartz, who had a far ranging creative and technical career, eventually leading the Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California, a leading industry think tank and research center. The Charles S. Swartz Award is awarded at the discretion of the HPA Awards Committee and the HPA Board of Directors, and is not given annually.

Cinema Audio Society sets next awards date and timeline

The Cinema Audio Society (CAS) will be holding its 55th Annual CAS Awards on Saturday, February 16, 2019 at the InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown in the Wilshire Grand Ballroom. The CAS Awards recognize outstanding sound mixing in film and television as well as outstanding products for production and post. Recipients for the CAS Career Achievement Award and CAS Filmmaker Award will be announced later in the year.

The InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown is a new venue for the awards. They were held at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel at California Plaza last year.

The timeline for the awards is as follows:
• Entry submission form will be available online on the CAS website on Thursday, October 11, 2018.
• Entry submissions are due online by 5:00pm PST on Thursday, November 15, 2018.
• Outstanding product entry submissions are due online by 5:00pm PST on Friday December 7, 2018.
• Nomination ballot voting begins online on Thursday, December 13, 2018.
• Nomination ballot voting ends online at 5:00pm PST on Thursday, January 3, 2019.
• Final nominees in each category will be announced on Tuesday, January 8, 2019.
• Final voting begins online on Thursday, January 24, 2019.
• Final voting ends online at 5:00pm PST on Wednesday, February 6, 2019.

 

DG 7.9.18

HPA Engineering Excellence winners: BMD, Canon, Cinnafilm, IBM Aspera & Telestream

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) Awards Committee has announced the winners of the 2018 HPA Engineering Excellence Award. Winners were determined at a blue ribbon judging session held at IMAX on June 16. The awards will be given out on November 15 at the 13th annual HPA Awards gala at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

The Engineering Excellence Award was created to spotlight and reward companies and individuals providing services to the professional media content industry for their outstanding technical and creative ingenuity in media, content production, finishing, distribution and archiving. The HPA Awards launched in 2005 to recognize creative artistry, innovation and engineering excellence in the professional media content industry.

Joachim Zell, chair of the HPA Awards Engineering Committee says, “Once again, the Engineering Excellence judging sessions brought us outstanding presentations from a variety of companies at work in different parts of the media and entertainment ecosystem. The presenters are representative of the amazing work that great companies and brilliant individuals are bringing to the marketplace. The judges had a strong field of excellent technologies to evaluate, and the results were extremely close. Based on the effort, talent and time from the presenters and the enthusiasm of the judges, it is clear that the HPA Engineering Excellence award is meaningful to our industry, and I want to personally thank our presenters and our intrepid judges. Congratulations to the winners and to the entrants for truly impressive work.”

The winners of the 2018 HPA Award for Engineering Excellence are:

Blackmagic Design – DaVinci Resolve 15
DaVinci Resolve 15, released at NAB this year, offers a major step forward for the post production workflow, a significant shift in technically and creatively matched toolsets as well as overall efficiency. The platform, designed to provide a full suite of post tools, from ingest to delivery, directly integrated in a single ecosystem, includes significant improvements in quality, functionality and time to delivery. Exchange formats, translation and conform can be eliminated, and last-minute change efficiently managed for feature film, episodic TV and short form productions.

“We’re honored to be selected by the Hollywood Professional Association for one of this year’s Engineering Excellence Awards,” says BMD US president Dan May. “Blackmagic Design’s focus has always been to help provide the most innovative tools to the entertainment industry, and being recognized by the HPA for our newest advancements in DaVinci Resolve 15 helps us feel that we are on the right path. We want to thank the judging committee as well as HPA as a whole for its dedication to all advancements in technical and creative ingenuity. Congratulations also go out to all the winners this year. We are in amazing company.”

Canon – Visual and Technical Monitoring of HDR Images
Canon has seen the need for not only visually seeing HDR images on set, in editorial and in finishing but also for engineering tools to know exact values of the HDR images and their pixels; compare SDR and HDR images; compare different HDR deliverable systems; out-of-gamut warnings; and connection to various manufacturers camera metadata.

This complete system from Canon ensures that HDR and SDR image creation is easily and accurately accomplished.

“Canon is thrilled to be among those recognized by the Hollywood Professional Association with an Engineering Excellence Award. The built-in HDR toolkit that now comes standard in our 4K reference displays is a leap forward in creating and monitoring HDR content,” says Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon USA.

Cinnafilm – PixelStrings
PixelStrings is a cloud-based video conversion service focusing on ultimate playback quality for media. Leveraging the award-winning framerate conversion, retiming, artifact/noise/telecine correction and transcode technologies from Cinnafilm, this PaaS enables the mass creation of best-possible video versions while leveraging infinite, GPU-enabled cloud compute power. The platform is a growing hub of other best-of-breed media technologies and is a simple pay-as-you-use toolset available 24/7 though a browser. PixelStings enables the freedom of a predictable OpEx process.

“Winning the HPA Engineering Award is such an amazing honor for us,” says CEO Lance Maurer. “The Cinnafilm team has created something truly special with PixelStrings — when respected peers recognize the impact an endeavor like this represents to our industry, it is really quite special.”

IBM Aspera & Telestream – Telestream Vantage With Lightspeed Live Capture Powered by Aspera
IBM Aspera and Telestream have developed a game-changing solution for high-speed capture and production of live, broadcast-quality video from remote locations for faster production turnaround. The API integration of Aspera’s FASPStream streaming technology with Telestream Vantage and Lightspeed Live enables open-file workflows so production teams can work on live video feeds from remote locations in real time, with dramatically lower costs compared to satellite delivery, fiber or on-location production and more flexible deployment options.

“Winning the HPA Engineering Excellence award is a fantastic recognition of the remarkable contributions from many individuals at both Telestream and Aspera,” says Telestream CEO Scott Puopolo. “The original concept was literally drawn on the back of a napkin at NAB 2017 by Telestream’s Dave Norman and Aspera’s Mike Flathers. One year later, it’s the backbone of Fox Sports’ FIFA World Cup post production workflow. It’s a tremendous achievement for both companies.”

Honorable Mention:
Samsung — Samsung Onyx
The Samsung Onyx Cinema LED technology with DCI certification has come to market for both cinema and post uses with two models: a 2K resolution five-meter screen and a 4K resolution 10.3-meter screen. LED technology delivers visual quality, technical performance and reliability beyond that of traditional projector-based operations. This system also features surround sound from Harman/JBL. While operating nominally with traditional 14 fT-L SDR imagery, the screen is adopting support for HDR systems such as EClairColor and PQ with operating points at least to 300 cd/m2 and black performance including “off” and 0.005 cd/m2.

In addition to the honors for excellence in engineering, the HPA Awards will recognize excellence in 12 craft categories including color grading, editing, sound and visual effects.

The recipients of the Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation and other special awards will be announced in the coming weeks.


CAS celebrates Dunkirk, GoT and more at 54th Awards show

The 54th CAS Awards took place this weekend at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel. The event, hosted by comedian Michael Kosta, was a celebration of people and projects that featured the best sound mixing as well as what the Cinema Audio Society consider the top audio products from 2017.

Re-recording mixer Anna Behlmer was honored  with the CAS Career Achievement AwardShe  is the first woman to receive the CAS Career Achievement Honor. 

The following are all the winners from the evening: 

MOTION PICTURE – LIVE ACTION

Dunkirk

Production Mixer – Mark Weingarten, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Gregg Landaker

Re-recording Mixer – Gary Rizzo, CAS

Scoring Mixer – Alan Meyerson, CAS

ADR Mixer – Thomas J. O’Connell

Foley Mixer – Scott Curtis

(The Dunkirk team is our main image.)

(Photo: Alex J. Berliner / ABImages)

The Coco team. 

MOTION PICTURE—ANIMATED

Coco

Original Dialogue Mixer – Vince Caro

Re-recording Mixer – Christopher Boyes

Re-recording Mixer – Michael Semanick

Scoring Mixer – Joel Iwataki

Foley Mixer – Blake Collins

MOTION PICTURE—DOCUMENTARY

Jane

Production Mixer – Lee Smith

Re-recording Mixer – David E. Fluhr, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Warren Shaw

Scoring Mixer – Derek Lee

ADR Mixer – Chris Navarro, CAS

Foley Mixer – Ryan Maguire

TELEVISION MOVIE or MINI-SERIES

Black Mirror: USS Callister

Production Mixer – John Rodda, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Tim Cavagin

Re-recording Mixer – Dafydd Archard

Re-recording Mixer – William Miller

ADR Mixer – Nick Baldock

Foley Mixer – Sophia Hardman

TELEVISION SERIES – 1 HOUR 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall

Production Mixer – Ronan Hill, CAS

Production Mixer – Richard Dyer, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Onnalee Blank, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Mathew Waters, CAS

Foley Mixer – Brett Voss, CAS

Anna Behlmer with her CAS Career Achievement Award.

TELEVISION SERIES – 1/2 HOUR

Silicon Valley: Episode 9 “Hooli-Con”

Production Mixer – Benjamin A. Patrick, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Elmo Ponsdomenech

Re-recording Mixer – Todd Beckett

TELEVISION NON-FICTION, VARIETY or MUSIC SERIES or SPECIALS

Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge

Production Mixer – David Hocs

Production Mixer – Tom Tierney

Re-Recording Mixer – Tom Fleischman, CAS

OUTSTANDING PRODUCT – PRODUCTION

 Sound Devices’ Mix Pre- 10T Recorder

OUTSTANDING PRODUCT – POST PRODUCTION

 iZotope’s RX 6 Advanced

STUDENT RECOGNITION AWARD

Xing  Li

Chapman University – Orange, California


All Images: Alex J. Berliner/ABImages


The 16th annual VES Award winners

The Visual Effects Society (VES) celebrated artists and their work at the 16th Annual VES Awards, which recognize outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials, video games and special venues.

Seven-time host, comedian Patton Oswalt, presided over more than 1,000 guests at the Beverly Hilton. War for the Planet of the Apes was named photoreal feature film winner, earning four awards. Coco was named top animated film, also earning four awards. Games of Thrones was named best photoreal episode and garnered five awards — the most wins of the night. Samsung; Do What You Can’t; Ostrich won top honors in the commercial field, scoring three awards. These top four contenders collectively garnered 16 of the 24 awards for outstanding visual effects.

President of Marvel Studios Kevin Feige presented the VES Lifetime Achievement Award to producer/writer/director Jon Favreau. Academy Award-winning producer Jon Landau presented the Georges Méliès Award to Academy Award-winning visual effects master Joe Letteri, VES. Awards presenters included fan-favorite Mark Hamill, Coco director Lee Unkrich, War for the Planet of the Apes director Matt Reeves, Academy Award-nominee Diane Warren, Jaime Camil, Dan Stevens, Elizabeth Henstridge, Sydelle Noel, Katy Mixon and Gabriel “Fluffy” Iglesias.

Here is a list of the winners:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes

Joe Letteri

Ryan Stafford

Daniel Barrett

Dan Lemmon

Joel Whist

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

Dunkirk

Andrew Jackson

Mike Chambers

Andrew Lockley

Alison Wortman

Scott Fisher

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

Coco

Lee Unkrich

Darla K. Anderson

David Ryu

Michael K. O’Brien

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall

Joe Bauer

Steve Kullback

Chris Baird

David Ramos

Sam Conway

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Black Sails: XXIX

Erik Henry

Terron Pratt

Yafei Wu

David Wahlberg

Paul Dimmer

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Real-Time Project

Assassin’s Creed Origins

Raphael Lacoste

Patrick Limoges

Jean-Sebastien Guay

Ulrich Haar

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial

Samsung Do What You Can’t: Ostrich

Diarmid Harrison-Murray

Tomek Zietkiewicz

Amir Bazazi

Martino Madeddu

 

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

Avatar: Flight of Passage

Richard Baneham

Amy Jupiter

David Lester

Thrain Shadbolt

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes: Caesar

Dennis Yoo

Ludovic Chailloleau

Douglas McHale

Tim Forbes

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

Coco: Hèctor

Emron Grover

Jonathan Hoffman

Michael Honsel

Guilherme Sauerbronn Jacinto

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Real-Time Project

Game of Thrones The Spoils of War: Drogon Loot Train Attack

Murray Stevenson

Jason Snyman

Jenn Taylor

Florian Friedmann

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

Samsung Do What You Can’t: Ostrich

David Bryan

Maximilian Mallmann

Tim Van Hussen

Brendan Fagan

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

Blade Runner 2049; Los Angeles

Chris McLaughlin

Rhys Salcombe

Seungjin Woo

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

Coco: City of the Dead

Michael Frederickson

Jamie Hecker

Jonathan Pytko

Dave Strick

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project

Game of Thrones; Beyond the Wall; Frozen Lake

Daniel Villalba

Antonio Lado

José Luis Barreiro

Isaac de la Pompa

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Groot Dance/Opening Fight

James Baker

Steven Lo

Alvise Avati

Robert Stipp

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project

Blade Runner 2049: LAPD Headquarters

Alex Funke

Steven Saunders

Joaquin Loyzaga

Chris Menges

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes

David Caeiro Cebrián

Johnathan Nixon

Chet Leavai

Gary Boyle

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

Coco

Kristopher Campbell

Stephen Gustafson

Dave Hale

Keith Klohn

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project 

Game of Thrones; The Dragon and the Wolf; Wall Destruction

Thomas Hullin

Dominik Kirouac

Sylvain Nouveau

Nathan Arbuckle

  

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

War for the Planet of the Apes

Christoph Salzmann

Robin Hollander

Ben Warner

Beck Veitch

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

Game of Thrones The Spoils of War: Loot Train Attack

Dom Hellier

Thijs Noij

Edwin Holdsworth

Giacomo Matteucci

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

Samsung Do What You Can’t: Ostrich

Michael Gregory

Andrew Roberts

Gustavo Bellon

Rashabh Ramesh Butani

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

Hybrids

Florian Brauch

Romain Thirion

Matthieu Pujol

Kim Tailhades 

 

 

 


Oscar Watch: The Shape (and sound) of Water

Post production sound mixers Christian Cooke and Brad Zoern, who are nominated (with production mixer Glen Gauthier) for their work on Fox’s The Shape of Water, have sat side-by-side at mixing consoles for nearly a decade. The frequent collaborators, who handle mixing duties at Deluxe Toronto, faced an unusual assignment given that the film’s two lead characters never utter a single word of actual dialogue. In The Shape of Water, which has been nominated for 13 Academy Awards, Elisa (Sally Hawkins) is mute and the creature she falls in love with makes undefined sounds. This creative choice placed more than the usual amount of importance on the rest of the soundscape to support the story.

L-R: Nathan Robitaille, J. Miles Dale, Brad Zoern, director Guillermo del Toro, Christian Cooke, Nelson Ferreira, Filip Hosek, Cam McLauchlin, video editor Sidney Wolinsky, Rob Hegedus, Doug Wilkinson.

Cooke, who focused on dialogue and music, and Zoern, who worked with effects, backgrounds and Foley, knew from the start that their work would need to fit into the unique and delicate tone that infused the performances and visuals. Their work began, as always, with pre-dubs followed by three temp mixes of five days each, which allowed for discussion and input from director Guillermo del Toro. It was at the premixes that the mixers got a feel for del Toro’s conception for the film’s soundtrack. “We were more literal at first with some of the sounds,” says Zoern. “He had ideas about blending effects and music. By the time we started on the five-week-long mix, we had a very clear idea about what he was looking for.”

The final mix took place in one of Deluxe Toronto’s five stages, which have identical acoustic qualities and the same Avid Pro Tools-based Harrison MP4D/Avid S6 hybrid console, JBL M2 speakers and Crown amps.

The mixers worked to shape sonic moments that do more than represent “reality,” but create mood and tension. This includes key moments such as the sound of a car’s windshield wipers that build in volume until they take over the track in the form of a metronome-like beat underlining the tension of the moment. One pivotal scene finds Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon) paying a visit to Zelda Fuller (Octavia Spencer). As Strickland speaks, Zelda’s husband Brewster (Martin Roach) watches television. “It was an actual mono track from a real show,” Cooke explains. “It starts out sounding roomy and distant as it would really have sounded. As the scene progresses, it expands, getting more prominent and spreading out around the speakers [for the 5.1 version]. By the end of the scene, the audio from the TV has become something totally different from what it started the scene as and then we melded that seamlessly into Alexandre Desplat’s score.”

Beyond the aesthetic work of building a sound mix, particularly one so fluid and expressionistic, post production mixers must also collaborate on a large number of technical decisions during the mix to ensure the elements have the right amount of emotional punch without calling attention to themselves. Individual sounds, even specific frequencies, vie for audience attention and the mixers orchestrate and layer them.

“It’s raining outside when they come into the room,” Zoern notes about the above scene. “We want to initially hear the sound of the rain to have a context for the scene. You never just want dialogue coming out of nowhere; it needs to live in a space. But then we pull that back to focus on the dialogue, and then the [augmented] audio from the TV gains prominence. During the final mix, Chris and I are always working together, side by side, to meld the hundreds of sounds the editors have built in a way that reflects the story and mood of the film.”

“We’re like an old married couple,” Cooke jokes. “We finish each other’s sentences. But it’s very helpful to have that kind of shorthand in this job. We’re blending so many pieces together and if people notice what we’ve done, we haven’t done our jobs.”


ACE crowns Eddie winners

On Friday evening, the American Cinema Editors held its 68th Annual ACE Eddie awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel with over 1,000 in attendance to celebrate. ACE president Stephen Rivkin presided over the evening’s festivities with actress/comedian Tichina Arnold serving as the evening’s host. Trophies were handed out recognizing the best editing of 2017 in 10 categories of film, television and documentaries.

Dunkirk, edited by Lee Smith, ACE, and I, Tonya, edited by Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE, won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy), respectively.

Coco, edited by Steve Bloom, won Best Edited Animated Feature Film, and Jane, edited by Joe Beshenkovsky, ACE, Will Znidaric and Brett Morgen, won Best Edited Documentary (Feature).

Television winners included Black-ish — Lemons (edited by John Peter Bernardo and Jamie Pedroza) for Best Edited Comedy Series for Commercial Television, Curb Your Enthusiasm — The Shucker (edited by Jonathan Corn, ACE) for Best Edited Comedy Series for Non-Commercial Television, Fargo — Who Rules The Land of Denial (edited by Andrew Seklir, ACE) for Best Edited Drama Series for Commercial Television, The Handmaid’s Tale — Offred (edited by Julian Clarke, ACE & Wendy Hallam Martin) for Best Edited Drama Series for Non-Commercial Television, Genius:  Einstein Chapter One (edited by James D. Wilcox) for Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television,Vice News Tonight — Charlottesville: Race & Terror (edited by Tim Clancy, Cameron Dennis, John Chimples & Denny Thomas) for Best Edited Non-Scripted Series and Five Came Back: The Price of Victory (edited by Will Znidaric) for Best Edited Documentary (Non-Theatrical), making Znidaric a two-time winner.

(L-R) Mariska Hargitay and Career Achievement Honoree Leon Ortiz-Gil, ACE

Producer Gale Anne Hurd presented the Student Editing award honor to Mariah Zenk of Missouri State University, who beat out hundreds of competitors from film schools and universities around the country.

Writer, producer, creator and showrunner of such hits as Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul, Vince Gilligan, received the organization’s ACE Golden Eddie honor, which was presented to him by his long-time collaborator, film editor Skip MacDonald, ACE. Gilligan joins an impressive list of industry luminaries who have received ACE’s highest honor, including Norman Jewison, Nancy Meyers, Francis Ford Coppola, Clint Eastwood, Robert Zemeckis, Alexander Payne, Ron Howard, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, Kathleen Kennedy, Steven Spielberg, Christopher Nolan, Frank Marshall and Richard Donner.

Other presenters at the ACE Eddie Awards included director Denis Villeneuve (Blade Runner 2049) and film editor Joe Walker, ACE, filmmaker Edgar Wright (Baby Driver), actress Parminder Nagra, Sam Lerner (The Goldbergs), actress Betty Gabriel (Get Out), actor Brett Gelman (Stranger Things, Lemon) and Lady Bird cast members Jordan Rodriguez and Marielle Scott.

Leon Ortiz-Gil, ACE, and Mark Goldblatt, ACE, were presented with Career Achievement awards by actress Mariska Hargitay and filmmaker Joe Dante, respectively. Ortiz-Gil is a three-time ACE Eddie Awards nominee whose list of credits includes TV series’ Law & Order, 24 and Dragnet. Goldblatt is an Oscar-nominated editor for Terminator 2: Judgment Day who also edited the original Terminator and other blockbusters such as X-Men: The Last Stand, Pearl Harbor, True Lies and Chappie, among many others. His latest project is Eli Roth’s upcoming Death Wish.

(L-R) Dunkirk: Jordan Rodrigues, Lee Smith, ACE, Marielle Scott

Here is a full list of winners:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
Dunkirk
Lee Smith, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
I, Tonya
Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Coco
Steve Bloom

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Jane
Joe Beshenkovsky, ACE, Will Znidaric, Brett Morgen

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL)
Five Came Back: The Price of Victory
Will Znidaric

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Black-ish: “Lemons”
John Peter Bernardo, Jamie Pedroza

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Curb Your Enthusiasm: “The Shucker”
Jonathan Corn, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Fargo: “Who Rules the Land of Denial”
Andrew Seklir, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
The Handmaid’s Tale: “Offred”
Julian Clarke, ACE, and Wendy Hallam Martin

(L-R) Genuis: Denis Villeneue, James D. Wilcox, Joe Walker, ACE

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Genius: Einstein “Chapter One”
James D. Wilcox

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Vice News Tonight: “Charlottesville: Race & Terror”
Tim Clancy, Cameron Dennis, John Chimples and Denny Thomas

STUDENT COMPETITION WINNER
Mariah Zenk — Missouri State University

Main Image Caption: (l-R) I,Tonya: Nat Sanders, ACE, Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE, Joi McMillon, ACE, Brett Gelman.


Sci-Tech Award winners named

The 2018 Sci-Tech Awards (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) have been bestowed to 34 individuals and one company representing 10 scientific and technical achievements. Each recipient will be honored at the annual Scientific and Technical Awards Presentation on February 10 at the Beverly Wilshire in Beverly Hills.

“This year we are happy to honor a very international group of technologists for their innovative and outstanding accomplishments,” says Ray Feeney, Academy Award recipient and chair of the Scientific and Technical Awards Committee. “These individuals have significantly contributed to the ongoing evolution of motion pictures and their efforts continue to empower the creativity of our industry.”

Technical Achievement Award Winners (Academy Certificates)

Honorees: Jason Smith and Jeff White for the original design, and to Rachel Rose and Mike Jutan for the architecture and engineering of the BlockParty procedural rigging system at Industrial Light & Magic.

BlockParty streamlines the rigging process through a comprehensive connection framework, a unique graphical user interface and volumetric rig transfer. This has enabled ILM to build richly detailed and unique creatures while greatly improving artist productivity.

Honorees: Joe Mancewicz, Matt Derksen and Hans Rijpkema for the design, architecture and implementation of the Rhythm & Hues Construction Kit rigging system.

This toolset provides a new approach to character rigging that features topological independence, continuously editable rigs and deformation workflows with shape-preserving surface relaxation, enabling 15 years of improvements to production efficiency and animation quality.

Honorees: Alex Powell for the design and engineering and to Jason Reisig for the interaction design, and to Martin Watt and Alex Wells for the high-performance execution engine of the Premo character animation system at DreamWorks Animation.

Premo enables animators to pose full-resolution characters in representative shot context, significantly increasing their productivity.

Honorees: Rob Jensen for the foundational design and continued development and to Thomas Hahn for the animation toolset and to George ElKoura, Adam Woodbury and Dirk Van Gelder for the high-performance execution engine of the Presto Animation System at Pixar Animation Studios.

Presto allows artists to work interactively in scene context with full-resolution geometric models and sophisticated rig controls, and has significantly increased the productivity of character animators at Pixar.

Scientific and Engineering Award Winners (Academy Plaques)

Honorees: John Coyle, Brad Hurndell, Vikas Sathaye and Shane Buckham for the concept, design, engineering and implementation of the Shotover K1 camera system.

This six-axis stabilized aerial camera mount, with its enhanced ability to frame shots while looking straight down, enables greater creativity while allowing pilots to fly more effectively and safely.

Honorees: Jeff Lait, Mark Tucker, Cristin Barghiel and John Lynch for their contributions to the design and architecture of Side Effects Software’s Houdini visual effects and animation system.

Houdini’s dynamics framework and workflow management tools have helped it become the industry standard for bringing natural phenomena, destruction and other digital effects to the screen.

Honorees: Bill Spitzak and Jonathan Egstad for the visionary design, development and stewardship of Foundry’s Nuke compositing system.

Built for production at Digital Domain, Nuke is used across the motion picture industry, enabling novel and sophisticated workflows at an unprecedented scale.

Honorees: Abigail Brady, Jon Wadelton and Jerry Huxtable for their significant contributions to the architecture and extensibility of Foundry’s Nuke compositing system.

Expanded as a commercial product at The Foundry, Nuke is a comprehensive, versatile and stable system that has established itself as the backbone of compositing and image processing pipelines across the motion picture industry.

Honorees: Leonard Chapman for the overall concept, design and development, to Stanislav Gorbatov for the electronic system design, and to David Gasparian and Souhail Issa for the mechanical design and integration of the Hydrascope telescoping camera crane systems.

With its fully waterproof construction, the Hydrascope has advanced crane technology and versatility by enabling precise long-travel multi-axis camera movement in, out of and through fresh or salt water.

Academy Award of Merit (Oscar statuette)

Honorees: Mark Elendt and Side Effects Software for the creation and development of the Houdini visual effects and animation system.

With more than twenty years of continual innovation, Houdini has delivered the power of procedural methods to visual effects artists, making it the industry standard for bringing natural phenomena, destruction and other digital effects to the screen.

Gordon E. Sawyer Award (Oscar statuette)

Honoree: Jonathan Erland, visual effects technologist

Presented to an individual in the motion picture industry whose technological contributions have brought credit to the industry.

All images courtesy of A.M.P.A.S.


Dee Rees talks about directing Netflix’s Mudbound

By Iain Blair

Change is good, and while there are only a handful of young, successful, black female directors shooting features these days, the tide is starting to turn. Case in point: Dee Rees, who is helping lead the charge with her powerful new feature Mudbound, which was nominated for two Golden Globes.

Set in the rural American South during World War II, it’s an epic story of two families pitted against one another by a ruthless social hierarchy, yet bound together by the shared farmland of the Mississippi Delta.

Writer Iain Blair and director Dee Rees.

On one side is the McAllan family, newly transplanted from the quiet civility of Memphis and unprepared for the harsh demands of farming. Despite the grandiose dreams of Henry (Jason Clarke), his wife Laura (Carey Mulligan) struggles to keep the faith in her husband’s losing venture.

On the other side are Hap and Florence Jackson (Rob Morgan, Mary J. Blige), sharecroppers who have worked the land for generations and who also struggle bravely to build a small dream of their own despite the rigidly enforced social barriers they face.

The war upends both families’ plans as their returning loved ones, Jamie McAllan (Garrett Hedlund) and Ronsel Jackson (Jason Mitchell), forge a fast but uneasy friendship that challenges the brutal realities of the Jim Crow South in which they live.

The film was co-written by Rees, who made her feature film debut with Pariah, which won a ton of awards. She went on to direct the Emmy-Award-winning HBO film Bessie.

I talked recently with Rees about making the film and the push for more diversity in the industry.

What was your vision for this film?
A good old-fashioned sprawling Hollywood epic that they don’t make anymore, with tons of characters and drama and emotion.

This is a period piece, but there are a lot of the issues you deal with — racism, class, women’s issues, civil rights issues. These are all particularly timely now.
Yes, and I think it’s become more timely because our consciousness has changed. I think it would have been timely five or 10 years ago, but audiences might not have recognized it as such, and attitudes have changed and are still changing about all these issues — and others. Look at all the sex scandal stuff coming to light in Hollywood and other places.

Is it true you absolutely wanted to shoot this in the South, but then found it wasn’t so easy in terms of finding the right locations?
Yes, I’m from the South — Nashville, Tennessee — and I hate seeing Southerners and the South not depicted correctly and accurately, and the locations were vital as they function like another character in the story. So we scouted all over the South — Mississippi, where it’s actually set, and Georgia and Louisiana — and we ended up shooting on a working sugar plantation near New Orleans. The landscape and farmland was perfect. It really gave you the sense of unrelenting nature, and the way the furrows went in the field was a big artistic choice… deciding how the lines were going to go.

It’s interesting that Louisiana has preserved a lot of their slave history. You can see the original sharecroppers’ cabins, and I think it’s right to preserve stuff like that so you can see it actually happened. In Mississippi, a lot of that’s gone. So we used real sharecroppers’ cabins, and convinced the owners to let us move these historical buildings deeper into the fields, as we wanted to have these 360-degree shots where you feel that the characters are all dwarfed by the landscape. All that has an accumulative effect in creating this world. We didn’t use any soundstages at all because I wanted it to look and feel authentic. You just can’t fake all the mud and dust and that landscape.

I imagine the shoot wasn’t easy?
It was pretty intense. We were supposed to have 28 days there, but we got rained out two days and had to make that up. Then we shot for two days in Budapest for the wartime scenes, including a big tank battle. We did that in the morning and then the liberation scenes the next day, and then later, during the edit, we shot the B52 plane scenes at a war museum on Long Island, and that was a big dance between special effects and VFX. So we ended up with 29 days for a big story that you’d normally need 60 days to do justice considering the sheer scope and scale involved.

You had a women DP (Rachel Morrison), who shot Fruitvale Station, and a woman editor (Mako Kamitsuna), who cut Pariah for you and who’s now cutting Johnny Depp’s LAbyrinth as well as a woman composer (Tamar-Kali). Was that deliberate?
Absolutely, but I wanted to make sure it wasn’t just tokenism. Too often hiring women can get conflated with tokenism, and they are women who are incredibly at what they do.

Do you like the post process?
I love it, and it reminds me of writing, which is solitary, contemplative and internal. Production is a frenzied rush, external and exhausting, and then you get to post which is where you recoup in a way, and was just me and Mako making the film. We did most of the editing in an artist’s loft in upstate New York, which was really cheap to rent. I like being away from all the noise and bustle of New York and just isolating for a bit and really focusing. Then Tama, our composer, came in, and then our sound team, and we had the space and time to really build it all up and elevate the raw material.

What were the main editing challenges?
The biggest one was figuring out when to move from one family story to the other. I was worried about staying with the McAllan’s too long, and then suddenly the Jacksons come out of nowhere, maybe too soon, and then having to explain some of the back story out of sequence. So do you break the chronology or trust that when you hand off to the Jacksons it’ll work for the audience? We kept starting with the burial, and then going into all the tensions between the families, with all the questions, like why do they hate each other so much?

In one version we went off with the Jacksons, but it didn’t quite work, and ultimately we started with Henry. He took us to the farm, which takes us to the war, and the war takes us to Ronsel and Jamie, and then it all flowed. But we had to make sure each family had its own trajectory, and one exercise we did was to edit just one family story as if it was its own film. Then we did the other family to see where it worked, where it didn’t, and where the natural intersections fell in their stories. That was so helpful.

Can you talk about the importance of sound and music in Mudbound?
It’s so important to me, and I always want the score to work seamlessly with the sound design so it feels like it comes out of the sound design. Like with the editing, I feel the music shouldn’t be used as an emotional crutch, so once we had picture locked Tamar came in and then reacted to it with her score, and I didn’t have to say much to her.

She was inspired and wrote this beautiful orchestral score, which was perfect because I didn’t want to have the obvious 1940s thing with banjo, blues and harmonica. I wanted strings, and my sound team did a fantastic job. We did a Atmos mix at Harbor in New York, thanks to a Dolby grant, and it was so cool and exciting to do that.

This is obviously a performance-driven piece, but there must have been a fair amount of visual effects?
Mr. X Gotham did them all, and we had quite a lot for the plane scenes, including the B52 formation and the tank battle scenes. They also added some explosions, and there was cleanup work, but all the farm stuff — the mud and water — was all real and in-camera. We used a lot of special effects — squibs and gore packs — for the war scenes.

What about the DI?
We did it at Harbor Post in New York, and the colorist was Joe Gawler (who worked on Blackmagic Resolve). He did a really great job.

Did it all turn out the way you pictured?
It did and I’m really happy with it.

Mudbound is making a lot of Oscar and other awards noise right now — deservedly so. What does that mean to you?
It’s very exciting for all the crafts people involved. I feel we made a great film, but without a huge budget, so the more attention the better.

There’s been a lot of talk about the lack of opportunity for women and minorities in Hollywood. Are things improving?
Very slowly, but a lot of the problem is the pipeline. We need more creatives able to get in the door. The Academy is just a receptacle at the end of the pipeline. We can change its make up, but the bigger thing is changing what’s getting made.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

VES names award nominees

The Visual Effects Society (VES) has announced the nominees for its 16th Annual VES Awards, which recognize visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games and the VFX supervisors, VFX producers and hands-on artists who bring this work to life.

Blade Runner 2049 and War for the Planet of the Apes have tied for the most feature film nominations with seven each. Despicable Me 3 is the top animated film contender with five nominations, and Game of Thrones leads the broadcast field and scores the most nominations overall with 11.

Nominees in 24 categories were selected by VES members via events hosted by 10 of its sections, including Australia, the Bay Area, London, Los Angeles, Montreal, New York, New Zealand, Toronto, Vancouver and Washington. The VES Awards will be held on February 13 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The VES Georges Méliès Award will be presented to Academy Award-winning visual effects supervisor Joe Letteri, VES. The VES Lifetime Achievement Award will be presented to producer/writer/director Jon Favreau. Comedian Patton Oswalt will once again host.

Here are the nominees:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049

John Nelson

Karen Murphy Mundell

Paul Lambert

Richard Hoover

Gerd Nefzer

 

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Christopher Townsend

Damien Carr

Guy Williams

Jonathan Fawkner

Dan Sudick

Kong: Skull Island

Jeff White

Tom Peitzman

Stephen Rosenbaum

Scott Benza

Michael Meinardus

 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Ben Morris

Tim Keene

Eddie Pasquarello

Daniel Seddon

Chris Corbould

 

War for the Planet of the Apes

Joe Letteri

Ryan Stafford

Daniel Barrett

Dan Lemmon

Joel Whist

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

 

Darkest Hour

Stephane Naze

Warwick Hewitt

Guillaume Terrien

Benjamin Magana

Downsizing

James E. Price

Susan MacLeod

Lindy De Quattro

Stéphane Nazé

 

Dunkirk

Andrew Jackson

Mike Chambers

Andrew Lockley

Alison Wortman

Scott Fisher

 

Mother!

Dan Schrecker

Colleen Bachman

Ben Snow

Wayne Billheimer

Peter Chesney

 

Only the Brave

Eric Barba

Dione Wood

Matthew Lane

Georg Kaltenbrunner

Michael Meinardus

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

 

Captain Underpants

David Soren

Mark Swift

Mirielle Soria

David Dulac

 

Cars 3

Brian Fee

Kevin Reher

Michael Fong

Jon Reisch

Coco

Lee Unkrich

Darla K. Anderson

David Ryu

Michael K. O’Brien

 

Despicable Me 3

Pierre Coffin

Chris Meledandri

Kyle Balda

Eric Guillon

 

The Lego Batman Movie

Rob Coleman

Amber Naismith

Grant Freckelton

Damien Gray

The Lego Ninjago Movie

Gregory Jowle

Fiona Chilton

Miles Green

Kim Taylor

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

 

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Orientation Part 1

Mark Kolpack

Sabrina Arnold

David Rey

Kevin Yuille

Gary D’Amico

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall

Joe Bauer

Steve Kullback

Chris Baird

David Ramos

Sam Conway

 

Legion: Chapter 1

John Ross

Eddie Bonin

Sebastien Bergeron

Lionel Lim

Paul Benjamin

 

Star Trek: Discovery: The Vulcan Hello

Jason Michael Zimmerman

Aleksandra Kochoska

Ante Dekovic

Mahmoud Rahnama

 

Stranger Things 2: The Gate

Paul Graff

Christina Graff

Seth Hill

Joel Sevilla

Caius the Man

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

 

Black Sails: XXIX

Erik Henry

Terron Pratt

Yafei Wu

David Wahlberg

Paul Dimmer

 

Fear the Walking Dead: Sleigh Ride

Peter Crosman

Denise Gayle

Philip Nussbaumer

Martin Pelletier

Frank Ludica

 

Mr. Robot: eps3.4_runtime-err0r.r00

Ariel Altman

Lauren Montuori

John Miller

Luciano DiGeronimo

 

Outlander: Eye of the Storm

Richard Briscoe

Elicia Bessette

Aladino Debert

Filip Orrby

Doug Hardy

 

Taboo: Pilot

Henry Badgett

Tracy McCreary

Nic Birmingham

Simon Rowe

Colin Gorry

 

Vikings: On the Eve

Dominic Remane

Mike Borrett

Ovidiu Cinazan

Paul Wishart

Paul Byrne

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Real-Time Project

 

Assassin’s Creed Origins

Raphael Lacoste

Patrick Limoges

Jean-Sebastien Guay

Ulrich Haar

 

Call of Duty: WWII

Joe Salud

Atsushi Seo

Danny Chan

Jeremy Kendall

 

Fortnite: A Hard Day’s Night

Michael Clausen

Gavin Moran

Brian Brecht

Andrew Harris

 

Sonaria

Scot Stafford

Camille Cellucci

Kevin Dart

Theresa Latzko

 

Uncharted: The Lost Legacy

Shaun Escayg

Tate Mosesian

Eben Cook

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial

 

Beyond Good and Evil 2

Leon Berelle

Maxime Luère

Dominique Boidin

Remi Kozyra

 

Kia Niro: Hero’s Journey

Robert Sethi

Anastasia von Rahl

Tom Graham

Chris Knight

Dave Peterson

 

Mercedes Benz: King of the Jungle

Simon French

Josh King

Alexia Paterson

Leonardo Costa

 

Monster: Opportunity Roars

Ruben Vandebroek

Clairellen Wallin

Kevin Ives

Kyle Cody

 

Samsung: Do What You Can’t, Ostrich

Diarmid Harrison-Murray

Tomek Zietkiewicz

Amir Bazazi

Martino Madeddu

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

 

Avatar: Flight of Passage

Richard Baneham

Amy Jupiter

David Lester

Thrain Shadbolt

 

Corona: Paraiso Secreto

Adam Grint

Jarrad Vladich

Roberto Costas Fernández

Ed Thomas

Felipe Linares

 

Guardians of the Galaxy: Mission: Breakout!

Jason Bayever

Amy Jupiter

Mike Bain

Alexander Thomas

 

National Geographic Encounter: Ocean Odyssey

Thilo Ewers

John Owens

Gioele Cresce

Mariusz Wesierski

 

Nemo and Friends SeaRider

Anthony Apodaca

Kathy Janus

Brandon Benepe

Nick Lucas

Rick Rothschild

 

Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire

Ben Snow

Judah Graham

Ian Bowie

Curtis Hickman

David Layne

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049: Rachael

Axel Akkeson

Stefano Carta

Wesley Chandler

Ian Cooke-Grimes

Kong: Skull Island: Kong

Jakub Pistecky

Chris Havreberg

Karin Cooper

Kris Costa

 

War for the Planet of the Apes: Bad Ape

Eteuati Tema

Aidan Martin

Florian Fernandez

Mathias Larserud

War for the Planet of the Apes: Caesar

Dennis Yoo

Ludovic Chailloleau

Douglas McHale

Tim Forbes

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

 

Coco: Hèctor

Emron Grover

Jonathan Hoffman

Michael Honsel

Guilherme Sauerbronn Jacinto

 

Despicable Me 3: Bratt

Eric Guillon

Bruno Dequier

Julien Soret

Benjamin Fournet

 

The Lego Ninjago Movie: Garma Mecha Man

Arthur Terzis

Wei He

Jean-Marc Ariu

Gibson Radsavanh

 

The Boss Baby: Boss Baby

Alec Baldwin

Carlos Puertolas

Rani Naamani

Joe Moshier

 

The Lego Ninjago Movie: Garmadon

Matthew Everitt

Christian So

Loic Miermont

Fiona Darwin

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Real-Time Project

 

Black Mirror: Metalhead

Steven Godfrey

Stafford Lawrence

Andrew Robertson

Lestyn Roberts

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Zombie Polar Bear

Paul Story

Todd Labonte

Matthew Muntean

Nicholas Wilson

 

Game of Thrones: Eastwatch – Drogon Meets Jon

Jonathan Symmonds

Thomas Kutschera

Philipp Winterstein

Andreas Krieg

 

Game of Thrones: The Spoils of War – Drogon Loot Train Attack

Murray Stevenson

Jason Snyman

Jenn Taylor

Florian Friedmann

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

 

Beyond Good and Evil 2: Zhou Yuzhu

Dominique Boidin

Maxime Luère

Leon Berelle

Remi Kozyra

 

Mercedes Benz: King of the Jungle

Steve Townrow

Joseph Kane

Greg Martin

Gabriela Ruch Salmeron

 

Netto: The Easter Surprise – Bunny

Alberto Lara

Jorge Montiel

Anotine Mariez

Jon Wood

 

Samsung: Do What You Can’t – Ostrich

David Bryan

Maximilian Mallmann

Tim Van Hussen

Brendan Fagan

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049: Los Angeles

Chris McLaughlin

Rhys Salcombe

Seungjin Woo

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Blade Runner 2049: Trash Mesa

Didier Muanza

Thomas Gillet

Guillaume Mainville

Sylvain Lorgeau

Blade Runner 2049: Vegas

Eric Noel

Arnaud Saibron

Adam Goldstein

Pascal Clement

 

War for the Planet of the Apes: Hidden Fortress

Greg Notzelman

James Shaw

Jay Renner

Gak Gyu Choi

 

War for the Planet of the Apes: Prison Camp

Phillip Leonhardt

Paul Harris

Jeremy Fort

Thomas Lo

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

 

Cars 3: Abandoned Racetrack

Marlena Fecho

Thidaratana Annee Jonjai

Jose L. Ramos Serrano

Frank Tai

 

Coco: City of the Dead

Michael Frederickson

Jamie Hecker

Jonathan Pytko

Dave Strick

 

Despicable Me 3: Hollywood Destruction

Axelle De Cooman

Pierre Lopes

Milo Riccarand

Nicolas Brack

 

The Lego Ninjago Movie: Ninjago City

Kim Taylor

Angela Ensele

Felicity Coonan

Jean Pascal leBlanc

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial or Real-Time Project

 

Assassin’s Creed Origins: City of Memphis

Patrick Limoges

Jean-Sebastien Guay

Mikael Guaveia

Vincent Lombardo

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Frozen Lake

Daniel Villalba

Antonio Lado

José Luis Barreiro

Isaac de la Pompa

 

Game of Thrones: Eastwatch

Patrice Poissant

Deak Ferrand

Dominic Daigle

Gabriel Morin

 

Still Star-Crossed: City

Rafael Solórzano

Isaac de la Pompa

José Luis Barreiro

Óscar Perea

 

Stranger Things 2: The Gate

Saul Galbiati

Michael Maher

Seth Cobb

Kate McFadden

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

 

Beauty and the Beast: Be Our Guest

Shannon Justison

Casey Schatz

Neil Weatherley

Claire Michaud

 

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Groot Dance/Opening Fight

James Baker

Steven Lo

Alvise Avati

Robert Stipp

 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Crait Surface Battle

Cameron Nielsen

Albert Cheng

John Levin

Johanes Kurnia

 

Thor: Ragnarok – Valkyrie’s Flashback

Hubert Maston

Arthur Moody

Adam Paschke

Casey Schatz

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project

 

Blade Runner 2049: LAPD Headquarters

Alex Funke

Steven Saunders

Joaquin Loyzaga

Chris Menges

 

Despicable Me 3: Dru’s Car

Eric Guillon

François-Xavier Lepeintre

Guillaume Boudeville

Pierre Lopes

 

Life: The ISS

Tom Edwards

Chaitanya Kshirsagar

Satish Kuttan

Paresh Dodia

 

US Marines: Anthem – Monument

Tom Bardwell

Paul Liaw

Adam Dewhirst

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

 

Kong: Skull Island

Florent Andorra

Alexis Hall

Raul Essig

Branko Grujcic

 

Only the Brave: Fire & Smoke

Georg Kaltenbrunner

Thomas Bevan

Philipp Zaufel

Himanshu Joshi

 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Bombing Run

Peter Kyme

Miguel Perez Senent

Ahmed Gharraph

Billy Copley

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Mega Destroyer Destruction

Mihai Cioroba

Ryoji Fujita

Jiyong Shin

Dan Finnegan

 

War for the Planet of the Apes

David Caeiro Cebrián

Johnathan Nixon

Chet Leavai

Gary Boyle

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

 

Cars 3

Greg Gladstone

Stephen Marshall

Leon JeongWook Park

Tim Speltz

 

Coco

Kristopher Campbell

Stephen Gustafson

Dave Hale

Keith Klohn

 

Despicable Me 3

Bruno Chauffard

Frank Baradat

Milo Riccarand

Nicolas Brack

Ferdinand

Yaron Canetti

Allan Kadkoy

Danny Speck

Mark Adams

 

The Boss Baby

Mitul Patel

Gaurav Mathur

Venkatesh Kongathi

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial or Real-Time Project

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Frozen Lake

Manuel Ramírez

Óscar Márquez

Pablo Hernández

David Gacituaga

 

Game of Thrones: The Dragon and the Wolf – Wall Destruction

Thomas Hullin

Dominik Kirouac

Sylvain Nouveau

Nathan Arbuckle

 

Heineken: The Trailblazers

Christian Bohm

Andreu Lucio Archs

Carsten Keller

Steve Oakley

 

Outlander: Eye of the Storm – Stormy Seas

Jason Mortimer

Navin Pinto

Greg Teegarden

Steve Ong

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

 

Blade Runner 2049: LAPD Approach and Joy Holograms

Tristan Myles

Miles Lauridsen

Joel Delle-Vergin

Farhad Mohasseb

 

Kong: Skull Island

Nelson Sepulveda

Aaron Brown

Paolo Acri

Shawn Mason

 

Thor: Ragnarok: Bridge Battle

Gavin McKenzie

David Simpson

Owen Carroll

Mark Gostlow

 

War for the Planet of the Apes

Christoph Salzmann

Robin Hollander

Ben Morgan

Ben Warner

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall – Frozen Lake

Óscar Perea

Santiago Martos

David Esteve

Michael Crane

 

Game of Thrones: Eastwatch

Thomas Montminy Brodeur

Xavier Fourmond

Reuben Barkataki

Sébastien Raets

 

Game of Thrones: The Spoils of War – Loot Train Attack

Dom Hellier

Thijs Noij

Edwin Holdsworth

Giacomo Matteucci

 

Star Trek: Discovery

Phil Prates

Rex Alerta

John Dinh

Karen Cheng

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

 

Destiny 2: New Legends Will Rise

Alex Unruh

Michael Ralla

Helgi Laxdal

Timothy Gutierrez

 

Nespresso: Comin’ Home

Matt Pascuzzi

Steve Drew

Martin Lazaro

Karch Koon

 

Samsung: Do What You Can’t – Ostrich

Michael Gregory

Andrew Roberts

Gustavo Bellon

Rashabh Ramesh Butani

 

Virgin Media: Delivering Awesome

Jonathan Westley

John Thornton

Milo Paterson

George Cressey

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

 

Creature Pinup

Christian Leitner

Juliane Walther

Kiril Mirkov

Lisa Ecker

 

Hybrids

Florian Brauch

Romain Thirion

Matthieu Pujol

Kim Tailhades

 

Les Pionniers de l’Univers

Clementine Courbin

Matthieu Guevel

Jérôme Van Beneden

Anthony Rege

 

The Endless

Nicolas Lourme

Corentin Gravend

Edouard Calemard

Romaric Vivier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naomi Goldman

Principal
NLG Communications
Office: 424-293-2113

Cell: 310-770-2765

ngoldman77@gmail.com

 

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