Category Archives: Awards

Providing audio post for Three Identical Triplets documentary

By Randi Altman

It is a story that those of us who grew up in the New York area know well. Back in the ‘80s, triplet brothers separated at birth were reunited, after two of them attended the same college within a year of each other — with one being confused for the other. A classmate figured it out and their story was made public. Enter brother number three.

It’s an unbelievable story that at the time was considered to be a heart-warming tale of lost brothers — David Kellman, Bobby Shafran and Eddy Galland — who found each other again at the age of 19. But heart-warming turned heart-breaking when it was discovered that the triplets were part of a calculated, psychological research project. Each brother was intentionally placed in different levels of economic households, where they were “checked in on” over the years.

L-R: Chad Orororo, Nas Parkash and Kim Tae Hak

Last year, British director Tim Wardle told the story in his BAFTA-nominated documentary, Three Identical Strangers, produced by Raw TV. For audio post production, Wardle called on dialogue editor and re-recording mixer Nas Parkash, sound effects editor Kim Tae Hak and Foley and archive FX editor editor Chad Orororo, all from London-based post house Molinare. The trio was nominated for an MPSE Award earlier this year for their work on the film.

We recently reached out to the team to ask about workflow on this compelling work.

When you first started on Three Identical Strangers, did you realize then how powerful a film it was going to be?
Nas Parkash: It was after watching the film for the first time that we realized it was going to be seminal film. It’s an outrageous story — the likes of which we hadn’t come across before. We as a team have been fortunate to work on a broad range of documentary features, but this one has stuck out, probably because of its unpredictability and sheer number of plot twists.

Chad Orororo: I agree. It was quite an exciting moment to watch an offline cut and instantly know that it was going to be phenomenal project. The great thing about having this reaction was that the pressure was fused with excitement, which is always a win-win. Especially as the storytelling had so much charisma.

Kim Tae Hak: When the doc was first mentioned, I had no idea about their story, but soon after viewing the first cut I realized that this would be a great film. The documentary is based on an unbelievable true story — it evokes a lot of mixed feelings, and I wanted to ensure that every single sound effect element reflected those emotions and actions.

How early did you get involved in the project?
Tae Hak: I got to start working on the SFX as soon as the picture was locked and available.

Parkash: We had a spotting session a week before we started, with director Tim Wardle and editor Michael Harte, where we watched the film in sections and made notes. This helped us determine what the emotion in each scene should be, which is important when you’ve come to a film cold. They had been living with the edit, evolving it over months, so it was important to get up to speed with their vision as quickly as possible.

Courtesy of Newsday

Documentary audio often comes from many different sources and in varying types of quality. Can you talk about that and the challenges related to that?
Parkash: The audio quality was pretty good. The interview recordings were clean and on mic. We had two mics for every interview, but I went with the boom every time, as it sounded nicer, albeit more ambient, but with atmospheres that bedded in nicely.

Even the archive clips, such as from the Phil Donahue Show, were good. Funnily enough, you tend to get worse-sounding archives the more recent it is in history. 1970s stuff on the whole seems to have been preserved quite well, whereas stuff from the 1990s can be terrible.

Any technical challenges on the project?
Parkash: The biggest challenge for me was mixing in commercial music with vocals underneath interview dialogue. It had to be kept at a loud enough level to retain impact in the cinema, but low enough that it didn’t fight with the interview dialogue. The biggest deliberation was to what degree should we use sound effects in the drama recon — do we fully fill or just go with dialogue and music? In the end it was judged on a case-by-case basis.

How was Foley used within the doc?
Orororo: The Foley covered everything that you see on screen — all of the footsteps, clothing movement, shaving and breathing. You name it. It’s in there somewhere. My job was to add a level of subtle actuality, especially during the drama reconfiguration scenes.

These scenes took quite a bit of work to get right because they had to match the mood of the narration. For example, the coin spillage during the telephone box scene required a specific amount of coins on the right surface. It took a numerous amount of takes to get right because you can’t exactly control how objects fall and the texture also changes depending on the height from which you drop an object. So generally, there’s a lot more to consider when recording Foley than people may assume.

Unfortunately there we’re a few scenes where Foley was completely dropped (mainly on the archive material), but this is something that usually happens. The shape of the overall mix always takes favor over the individual elements that contribute to the mix. Teamwork makes the dream work, as they say, and I really think that showed with the final result.

Parkash: We did have sync sound recorded on location, but we decided it would be better to re-record at a higher fidelity. Some of it was noisy or didn’t sound cinematic enough. When it’s cleaner sound, you can make more of it.

What about the sound effects? Did you use a library or your own?
Parkash: Kim has his own extensive sound effects library. We also have our own personal ones, plus of Molinare’s. Anything we can’t find, we’ll go out and record. Kim has a Zoom recorder and his breathing has been featured on many films now (laughs).

Tae Hak: I mainly used my own SFX library. I always build up my own FX library, which I can apply instantly for any type of motioned pictures. I then tweak by applying various software plugins, such as Pitch & Time Pro, Altiverb and many more.

As a brief example of how I completed sound design for the opening title, the first thing I did was specifically look for realistic heartbeats of six-month infants. After successfully collecting some natural heartbeats. I then blended them with other synthetic elements as I started to vary the pitch slightly between them (for the three babies), applying various effects, such as chorus and reverb, so each heartbeat has a slightly different texture. It was a bit tricky to make them distinct, but still the same (like identical triplets).

The three heartbeats were panned across the front three speakers in order to create as much separation and clarity as possible. Once I was happy with the heartbeats as a foundation. I then added other sound elements, such as underwater, ambiguous liquids and other sound design elements. It was important for this sequence to build in a dramatic way, starting as mono and gradually filling the 5.1 space before a hard cut into the interview room.

Can you talk about working with director Tim Wardle?
Tae Hak: Tim was fantastic and very supportive throughout the project. As an FX editor, I had less face to face with him than Nas, but we had a spot session together before the first day of working, and we also talked about our sound designing approach over the phone, especially for the opening title, and the aforementioned sound of triplets’ heartbeats.

Orororo: Tim was great to work with! He’s a very open-minded director who also trusts in the talent that he’s working with, which can be hard to come by especially on a project as important as Three Identical Strangers.

Parkash: Tim and editor Michael Harte were wonderful to work with. The best aspect of working in this industry are the people you meet and the friendships you make. They are both cinephiles, who cited numerous other films and directors in order to guide us through the process — “this scene should feel like this scene from such and such movie.” But they were also open to our suggestions and willing to experiment with different approaches. It felt like a collaboration, and I remember having fun in those intense few weeks.

How much stock footage versus new footage was shot?
Parkash: It was all pretty much new — the sit-down interviews, drama recon and the GVs (b-roll). The archive material was obviously cleared from various sources. The home movie footage came mute, so we rebuilt the sound but upon review decided that it was better left mute. It tends to change the audience’s perspective of the material depending on whether you hear the sound or not. Without, it feels more like you’re looking upon the subjects, as opposed to being with them.

What kind of work went into the new interviews?
Parkash: EQ, volume automation, de-essing, noise reduction, de-reverb, reverb, mouth de-click — Izotope RX6 software basically. We’ve become quite reliant upon this software for unifying our source material into something consistent and to achieve a quality good enough to stand up in the cinema, at theatrical level.

What are you all working on now at Molinare?
Tae Hak: I am working on a project about football (soccer for Americans) as the FX editor. I can’t name it yet, but it’s a six-episode series for Amazon Prime. I’m thoroughly enjoying the project, as I am a football fan myself. It’s filmed across the world, including Russia where the World Cup was held last year. The story really captures the beautiful game, how it’s more than just a game, and its impact on so much of the global culture.

Parkash: We’ve just finished a series for Discovery ID, about spouses who kill each other. I’m also working on the football series that Kim mentioned for Amazon Prime. So, murder and footy! We are lucky to work on such varied, high-quality films, one after another.

Orororo: Surprisingly, I’m also working on this football series (smiles). I work with Nas fairly often and we’ve just finished up on an evocative, feature-length TV documentary that follows personal accounts of people who have survived massacre attacks in the US.

Molinare has revered creatives everywhere you look, and I’m lucky enough to be working with one of the sound greats — Greg Gettens — on a new HBO Channel 4 documentary. However, it’s quite secret so I can’t say much more, but keep your eyes peeled.

Main Image: Courtesy of Neon


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse: sound editors talk ‘magical realism’

By Randi Altman

Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse isn’t your ordinary Spider-Man movie, from its story to its look to its sound. The filmmakers took a familiar story and turned it on its head a bit, letting audiences know that Spider-Man isn’t just one guy wearing that mask… or even a guy, or even from this dimension.

The film focuses on Miles Morales, a teenager from Brooklyn, struggling with all things teenager while also dealing with the added stress of being Spider-Man.

Geoff Rubay

Audio played a huge role in this story, and we recently reached out to Sony supervising sound editors Geoff Rubay and Curt Schulkey to dig in a bit deeper. The duo recently won an MPSE Award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing — Feature Animation… industry peers recognizing the work that went into creating the sound for this stylized world.

Let’s find out more about the sound process on Spider-Man: Into the Spider Verse, which won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

What do you think is the most important element of this film’s sound?
Curt Schulkey: It is fun, it is bold, it has style and it has attitude. It has energy. We did everything we could to make the sound as stylistic and surprising as the imagery. We did that while supporting the story and the characters, which are the real stars of the movie. We had the opportunity to work with some incredibly creative filmmakers, and we did our best to surprise and delight them. We hope that audiences like it too.

Geoff Rubay: For me, it’s the fusion of the real and the fantastic. Right from the beginning, the filmmakers made it clear that it should feel believable — grounded — while staying true to the fantastic nature of the visuals. We did not hold back on the fantastic side, but we paid close attention to the story and made sure we were supporting that and not just making things sound awesome.

Curt Schulkey

How early did your team get involved in the film?
Rubay: We started on an SFX pre-design phase in late February for about a month. The goal was to create sounds for the picture editors and animators to work with. We ended up doing what amounted to a temp mix of some key sequences. The “Super Collider” was explored. We only worked on the first sequence for the collider, but the idea was that material could be recycled by the picture department and used in the early temp mixes until the final visuals arrived.

Justin Thompson, the production designer, was very generous with his time and resources early on. He spent several hours showing us work-in-progress visuals and concept art so that we would know where visuals would eventually wind up. This was invaluable. We were able to work on sounds long before we saw them as part of the movie. In the temp mix phase, we had to hold back or de-emphasize some of those elements because they were not relevant yet. In some cases, the sounds would not work at all with the storyboards or un-lit animation that was in the cut. Only when the final lit animation showed up would those sounds make sense.

Schulkey: I came onto the film in May, about 9.5 months before completion. We were neck-deep in following changes throughout our work. We were involved in the creation of sounds from the very first studio screening, through previews and temp mixes, right on to the end of the final mix. This sometimes gave us the opportunity to create sounds in advance of the images, or to influence the development of imagery and timing. Because they were so involved in building the movie, the directors did not always have time to discuss their needs with us, so we would speculate on what kinds of sounds they might need or want for events that they were molding visually. As Geoff said, the time that Justin Thompson spent with us was invaluable. The temp-mix process often gave us the opportunity to audition creations for the directors/producers.

What sort of direction did you receive from the directors?
Schulkey: Luckily, because of our previous experiences with producers Chris Miller and Phil Lord and editor Bob Fisher, we had a pretty good idea of their tastes and sensitivities, so our first attempts were usually pointed in the right direction. The three directors — Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman — also provided input, so we were rich with direction.

As with all movies, we had hundreds of side discussions with the directors along the way about details, nuances, timing and so on. I think that the most important overall direction we got from the filmmakers was related to the dynamic arc of the movie. They wanted the soundtrack to be forceful but not so much that it hurt. They wanted it to breathe — quiet in some spots, loud in others, and they wanted it to be fun. So, we had to figure out what “fun” sounds like.

Rubay: This will sound strange, but we never did a spotting session for the movie. We just started our work and got feedback when we showed sequences or did temp mixes. Phil called when we started the pre-design phase and gave us general notes about tone and direction. He made it clear he did not want us to hold back, but he wanted to keep the film grounded. He explained the importance of the various levels of technology of different characters.

Peni Parker is from the 31st century, so her robot sidekick needed to sound futuristic. Scorpion is a pile of rusty metal. Prowler’s tech is appropriated from his surroundings and possibly with some help from Kingpin. We discussed the sound of previous Spider-Man movies and asked how much we needed to stay true to established sounds from those films. The direction was “not at all unless it makes sense.” We endeavored to make Peter Parker’s web-slings sound like the previous films. After that, we just “went for it.”

How was working on a film like this different than working on something live-action? Did it allow you more leeway?
Schulkey: In a live-action film, most or all of the imagery is shot before we begin working. Many aspects of the sound are already stamped in. On this film, we had a lot more creative involvement. At the start, a good percentage of the movie was still in storyboards, so if we expanded or contracted the timing of an event, the animators might adjust their work to fit the sounds. As the visual elements developed, we began creating layers of sound to support them.

For me, one of the best parts of an animated film’s soundtrack is that no sounds are imposed by the real world, as is often the case in live-action productions. In live-action, if a dialogue scene is shot on a city street in Brooklyn, there is a lot of uninteresting traffic noise built into the dialogue recordings.

Very few directors (or actors) want to lose the spontaneity of the original performance by re-recording dialogue in a studio, so we tweak, clean and process the dialogue to lessen unwanted noise, sometimes diminishing the quality of the recording. We sometimes make compromises with sound effects and music to support a not-so-ideal dialogue track. In an animated film, we don’t have that problem. Sound effects and ambiences can shine without getting in the way. This film has very quiet moments, which feel very natural and organic. That’s a pleasure to have in the movie.

Rubay: Everything Curt said! You have quite a bit of freedom because there is no “production track.” On the flip side, every sound that is added is just that — added. You have to be aware of that; more is not always better.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is an animated film with a unique visual style. At times, we played the effects straight, as we might in a live-action picture, to ground it. Other times, we stripped away any notion of “reality.” Sometimes we would do both in the same scene as we cut from one angle to the next. Chris and Phil have always welcomed hard right angle turns, snapping sounds off on a cut or mixing and matching styles in close proximity. They like to do whatever supports the story and directs the audience. Often, we use sound to make your eye notice one thing or look away from another. Other times, we expand the frame, adding sounds outside of what you can see to further enhance the image.

There are many characters in the film. Can you talk about helping to create personality for each?
Rubay: There was a lot of effort made to differentiate the various “spider people” from each other. Whether it was through their web-slings or inherent technology, we were directed to give as much individual personality as possible to each character. Since that directive was baked in from the beginning, every department had it in mind. We paid attention to every visual cue. For example, Miles wears a particular pair of shoes — Nike Air Jordan 1s. My son, Alec Rubay, who was the Foley supervisor, is a real sneakerhead. He tracked down those shoes — very rare — and we recorded them, capturing every sound we could. When you hear Miles’s shoes squeak, you are hearing the correct shoes. Those shoes sound very specific. We applied that mentality wherever possible.

Schulkey: We took the opportunity to exploit the fact that some characters are from different universes in making their sound signatures different from one another. Spider-Ham is from a cartoon universe, so many of the sounds he makes are cartoon sounds. Sniffles, punches, swishes and other movements have a cartoon sensibility. Peni Parker, the anime character, is in a different sync than the rest of the cast, and her voice is somewhat more dynamic. We experimented with making Spider-Man Noir sound like he was coming from an old movie soundtrack, but that became obnoxious, so we abandoned the idea. Nicolas Cage was quite capable of conveying that aspect of the character without our help.

Because we wanted to ground characters in the real world, a lot of effort was put into attaching their voices to their images. Sync, of course, is essential, as is breathing. Characters in most animated films don’t do much breathing, but we added a lot of breaths, efforts and little stutters to add realism. That had to be done carefully. We had a very special, stellar cast and we wanted to maintain the integrity of their performances. I think that effort shows up nicely in some of the more intimate, personal scenes.

To create the unique look of this movie, the production sometimes chose to animate sections of the film “on twos.” That means that mouth movements change every other frame rather than every frame, so sync can be harder than usual to pinpoint. I worked closely with director Bob Persichetti to get dialogue to look in its best sync, doing careful reviews and special adjustments, as needed, on all dialogue in the film.

The main character in this Spider-Man thread is Miles Morales, a brilliant African-American/Puerto Rican Brooklyn teenager trying to find his way in his multi-cultural world. We took special care to show his Puerto Rican background with added Spanish-language dialogue from Miles and his friends. That required dialect coaches, special record sessions and thorough review.

The group ADR required a different level of care than most films. We created voices for crowds, onlookers and the normal “general” wash of voices for New York City. Our group voices covered many very specific characters and were cast in detail by our group leader, Caitlin McKenna. We took a very realistic approach to crowd activity. It had to be subtler than most live-action films to capture the dry nonchalance of Miles Morales’s New York.

Would you describe the sounds as realistic? Fantastical? Both?
Schulkey: The sounds are fantastically realistic. For my money, I don’t want the sounds in my movie to seem fantastical. I see our job as creating an illusion for the audience — the illusion that they are hearing what they are seeing, and that what they are seeing is real. This is an animated film, where nothing is actually real, but has its own reality. The sounds need to live in the world we are watching. When something fantastical happens in the movie’s reality, we had to support that illusion, and we sometimes got to do fun stuff. I don’t mean to say that all sounds had to be realistic.

For example, we surmised that an actual supercollider firing up below the streets of Brooklyn would sound like 10,000 computer fans. Instead, we put together sounds that supported the story we were telling. The ambiences were as authentic as possible, including subway tunnels, Brooklyn streets and school hallways. Foley here was a great tool for giving reality to animated images. When Miles walks into the cemetery at night, you hear his footsteps on snow and sidewalk, gentle cloth movements and other subtle touches. This adds to a sense that he’s a real kid in a real city. Other times, we were in the Spider-Verse and our imagination drove the work.

Rubay: The visuals led the way, and we did whatever they required. There are some crazy things in this movie. The supercollider is based on a real thing so we started there. But supercolliders don’t act as they are depicted in the movie. In reality, they sound like a giant industrial site, fans and motors, but nothing so distinct or dramatic, so we followed the visuals.

Spider-sense is a kind of magical realism that supports, informs, warns, communicates, etc. There is no realistic basis for any of that, so we went with directions about feelings. Some early words of direction were “warm,” “organic,” “internal” and “magical.” Because there are no real sounds for those words, we created sounds that conveyed the emotional feelings of those ideas to the audience.

The portals that allow spider-people to move between dimensions are another example. Again, there was no real-world event to link to. We saw the visuals and assumed it should be a pretty big deal, real “force of nature” stuff. However, it couldn’t simply be big. We took big, energetic sounds and glued them onto what we were seeing. Of course, sometimes people are talking at the same time, so we shifted the frequency center of the moment to clear for the dialog. As music is almost always playing, we had to look for opportunities within the spaces it left.

 

Can you talk about working on the action scenes?
Rubay: For me, when the action starts, the sound had to be really specific. There is dialogue for sure. The music is often active. The guiding philosophy for me at that point is not “Keep adding until there is nothing left to add,” rather, it’s, “We’re done when there is nothing left to strip out.” Busy action scene? Broom the backgrounds away. Usually, we don’t even cut BG’s in a busy action scene, but, if we do, we do so with a skeptical eye. How can we make it more specific? Also, I keep a keen eye on “scale.” One wrong, small detail sound, no matter how cool or interesting, will get the broom if it throws off the scale. Sometimes everything might be sounding nice and big; impressive but not loud, just big, and then some small detail creeps in and spoils it. I am constantly looking out for that.

The “Prowler Chase” scene was a fun exploration. There are times where the music takes over and runs; we pull out every sound we can. Other times, the sound effects blow over everything. It is a matter of give and take. There is a truck/car/prowler motorcycle crash that turns into a suspended slo-mo moment. We had to decide which sounds to play where and when. Its stripped-down nature made it among my favorite moments in the picture.

Can you talk about the multiple universes?
Rubay: The multiverse presented many challenges. It usually manifested itself as a portal or something we move between. The portals were energetic and powerful. The multiverse “place” was something that we used as a quiet place. We used it to provide contrast because, usually, there was big action on either side.

A side effect of the multiple universes interacting was a buildup or collision/overlap. When universes collide or overlap, matter from each tries to occupy the same space. Visually, this created some very interesting moments. We referred to the multi-colored prismatic-looking stuff as “Picasso” moments. The supporting sound needed to convey “force of nature” and “hard edges,” but couldn’t be explosive, loud or gritty. Ultimately, it was a very multi-layered sound event: some “real” sounds teamed with extreme synthesis. I think it worked.

Schulkey: Some of the characters in the movie are transported from another dimension into the dimension of the movie, but their bodies rebel, and from time to time their molecules try to jump back to their native dimension, causing “glitching.” We developed, with a combination of plug-ins, blending, editing and panning, a signature sound that served to signal glitching throughout the movie, and was individually applied for each iteration.

What stands out in your mind as the most challenging scenes audio wise?
Rubay: There is a very quiet moment between Miles and his dad when dad is on one side of the door and Miles is on the other. It’s a very quiet, tender one-way conversation. When a movie gets that quiet every sound counts. Every detail has to be perfect.

What about the Dolby Atmos mix? How did that enhance the film? Can you give a scene or two as an example?
Schulkey: This film was a native Atmos mix, meaning that the primary final mix was directly in the Atmos format, as opposed to making a 7.1 mix and then going back to re-mix sections using the Atmos format.

The native Atmos mix allowed us a lot more sonic room in the theater. This is an extremely complex and busy mix, heavily driven by dialogue. By moving the score out into the side and surround speakers — away from the center speaker — we were able to make the dialogue clearer and still have a very rich and exciting score. Sonic movement is much more effective in this format. When we panned sounds around the room, it felt more natural than in other formats.

Rubay: Atmos is fantastic. Being able to move sounds vertically creates so much space, so much interest, that might otherwise not be there. Also, the level and frequency response of the surround channels makes a huge difference.

You guys used Avid Pro Tools for editing, can you mention some other favorite tools you employed on this film?
Schulkey : The Delete key and the Undo key.

Rubay: Pitch ‘n’ Time, Envy, Reverbs by Exponential Audio, Recording rigs and microphones of all sorts.

What haven’t I asked that’s important?
Our crew! Just in case anyone thinks this can be done by two people, it can’t.
– re-recording mixers Michael Semanick and Tony Lamberti
– sound designer John Pospisil
– dialogue editors James Morioka and Matthew Taylor
– sound effects editors David Werntz, Kip Smedley, Andy Sisul, Chris Aud, Donald Flick, Benjamin Cook, Mike Reagan and Ando Johnson
– Foley mixer Randy Singer
– Foley artists Gary Hecker, Michael Broomberg and Rick Owens

DigitalGlue 3.7

CAS and MPSE honor audio post pros and their work

By Mel Lambert

With a BAFTA win and high promise for the upcoming Oscar Awards, the sound team behind Bohemian Rhapsody secured a clean sweep at both the Cinema Audio Society (CAS) and Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) ceremonies here in Los Angeles last weekend.

Paul Massey

The 55th CAS Awards also honored sound mixer Lee Orloff with a Cinema Audio Society Career Achievement Award, while director Steven Spielberg received its Cinema Audio Society Filmmaker Award. And at the MPSE Awards, director Antoine Fuqua accepted the 2019 Filmmaker Award, while supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick secured the MPSE Career Achievement honor.

Re-recording mixer Paul Massey — accepting the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture-Live Action on behalf of his fellow dubbing mixers Tim Cavagin and Niv Adiri, together with production mixer John Casali — thanked Bohemian Rhapsody’s co-executive producer and band members Roger Taylor and Brian May for “trusting me to mix the music of Queen.”

The film topped a nominee field that also included A Quiet Place, A Star is Born, Black Panther and First Man; for several years the CAS winner in the feature-film category also has secured an Oscar Award for sound mixing.

Isle of Dogs secured a CAS Award in the animation category, which also included Incredibles 2, Ralph Breaks the Internet, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and The Grinch. The sound-mixing team included original dialogue mixer Darrin Moore and re-recording mixers Christopher Scarabosio and Wayne Lemmer, together with scoring mixers Xavier Forcioli and Simon Rhodes and Foley mixer Peter Persaud.

Free Solo won a documentary award for production mixer Jim Hurst, re-recording mixers Tom Fleischman and Ric Schnupp, together with scoring mixer Tyson Lozensky, ADR mixer David Boulton and Foley mixer Joana Niza Braga.

Finally, American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace (Part 1) The Man Who Would Be Vogue, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: Vote For Kennedy, Vote For Kennedy and Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (Bhutan) won CAS Awards within various broadcast sound categories.

Steven Spielberg and Bradley Cooper

The CAS Filmmaker Award was presented to Steven Spielberg by fellow director Bradley Cooper. This followed tributes from regular members of Spielberg’s sound team, including production sound mixer Ron Judkins plus re-recording mixers Andy Nelson and Gary Rydstrom, who quipped: “We spent so much money on Jurassic Park that [Steven] had to shoot Schindler’s List in black & white!”

“Through your talent, [sound editors and mixers] allow the audience to see with their ears,” Spielberg acknowledged, while stressing the full sonic and visual impact of a theatrical experience. “There’s nothing like a big, dark theater,” he stated. He added that he still believes that movie theaters are the best environment in which to fully enjoy his cinematic creations.

Upon receiving his Career Achievement Award from sound mixer Chris Noyes and director Dean Parisot, production sound mixer Lee Orloff acknowledged the close collaboration that needs to exist between members of the filmmaking team. “It is so much more powerful than the strongest wall you could build,” he stated, recalling a 35-year career that spans nearly 80 films.

Lee Orloff

Outgoing CAS president Mark Ulano presented the President’s Award to leading Foley mixer MaryJo Lang, while the CAS Student Award went to Anna Wozniewicz of Chapman University. Finalists included Maria Cecilia Ayalde Angel of Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Allison Ng of USC, Bo Pang of Chapman University and Kaylee Yacono of Savannah College of Art and Design.

Finally, the CAS Outstanding Product Awards went to Dan Dugan Sound Design for its Dugan Automixing in the Sound Devices 633 Compact Mixer, and to Izotope for its RX7 Audio Repair Software.

The CAS Awards ceremony was hosted by comedian Michael Kosta.

 

Motion Picture Sound Editors Awards

During the 66th Annual Golden Reels, outstanding achievement in sound editing awards were presented in 23 categories, encompassing feature films, long- and short-form television, animation, documentaries, games, special venue and other media.

The Americans, Atlanta, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Westworld figured prominently within the honored TV series.

Following introductions by re-recording mixer Steve Pederson and supervising sound editor Mandell Winter, director/producer Michael Mann presented the 2019 MPSE Filmmaker Award to Antoine Fuqua, while Academy Award-winning supervising sound editor Ben Wilkins presented the MPSE Career Achievement Award to fellow supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick, who also serves as professor of cinematic arts at the University of Southern California.

Antoine Fuqua

“We celebrate the creation of entertainment content that people will enjoy for generations to come,” MPSE president Tom McCarthy stated in his opening address. “As new formats appear and new ways to distribute content are developed, we need to continue to excel at our craft and provide exceptional soundtracks that heighten the audience experience.”

As Pederson stressed during his introduction to the MPSE Filmmaker Award, Fuqua “counts on sound to complete his vision [as a filmmaker].” “His films are stylish and visceral,” added Winter, who along with Pederson has worked on a dozen films for the director during the past two decades.

“He is a director who trusts his own vision,” Mandell confirmed. “Antoine loves a layered soundtrack. And ADR has to be authentic and true to his artistic intentions. He is a bone fide storyteller.”

Four-time Oscar-nominee Mann stated that the honored director “always elevates everything he touches; he uses sound design and music to its fullest extent. [He is] a director who always pushes the limits, while evolving his art.”

Pre-recorded tributes to Fuqua came from actor Chis Pratt, who starred in The Magnificent Seven (2017). “Nobody deserves [this award] more,” he stated. Actor Mark Wahlberg, who starred in Shooter (2007), and producer Jerry Bruckheimer were also featured.

Stephen Hunter Flick

During his 40-year career in the motion picture industry, while working on some 150 films, Steven H. Flick has garnered two Oscar Award wins for Speed (1994) and Robocop (1987) together with nominations for Total Recall (1990), Die Hard (1988) and Poltergeist (1982).

The award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Animation Short Form went to Overwatch – Reunion from Blizzard Entertainment, headed by supervising sound editor Paul Menichini. The Non-Theatrical Animation Long Form award was awarded to NextGen from Netflix, headed by supervising sound editors David Acord and Steve Slanec.

The Feature Animation award went to the Oscar-nominated Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse from Sony Pictures Entertainment/Marvel, headed by supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey. The Non-Theatrical Documentary award went to Searching for Sound — Islandman and Veyasin from Karga Seven Pictures/Red Bull TV, headed by supervising sound editor Suat Ayas. Finally, the Feature Documentary was a tie between Free Solo from National Geographic Documentary Films, headed by supervising sound editor Deborah Wallach, and They Shall Not Grow Old from Wingnut Films/Fathom Events/Warner Bros., headed by supervising sound editors Martin Kwok, Brent Burge, Melanie Graham and Justin Webster.

The Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing — Music Score award also went to Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, with music editors Katie Greathouse and Catherine Wilson, while the Musical award went to Bohemian Rhapsody from GK Films/Fox Studios, with supervising music editor John Warhurst and music editor Neil Stemp. The Dialogue/ADR award also went to Bohemian Rhapsody, with supervising ADR/dialogue editors Nina Hartston and Jens Petersen, while the Effects/Foley award went to A Quiet Place from Paramount Pictures, with supervising sound editors Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl.

The Student Film/Verna Fields Award went to Facing It from National Film and Television School, with supervising sound designer/editor Adam Woodhams.


LA-based Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.


Karol Urban is president of CAS, others named to board

As a result of the Cinema Audio Society board of Directors election Karol Urban will replace CAS president Mark Ulano, whose term has come to an end.  Steve Venezia with replace treasurer Peter Damski who opted not to run for re-election.

“I am so incredibly honored to have garnered the confidence of our esteemed members,” says Urban. “After years of serving under different presidents and managing the content for the CAS Quarterly I have learned so much about the achievements, interests, talents and concerns of our membership. I am excited to given this new platform to celebrate the achievements and herald new opportunities to serve this incredibly dynamic and talented community.”

For 2019 the Executive Committee with include newly elected Urban and Venezia as well as VP Phillip W. Palmer, CAS, and secretary David J. Bondelevitch, CAS,  who were not up for election.

The incumbent CAS Board of Directors (Production) that were re-elected are  Peter J. Devlin CAS, Lee Orloff CAS, and Jeffrey W. Wexler, CAS. They will be joined by newly elected Amanda Beggs, CAS, and Mary H. Ellis, CAS, who are taking the seats of outgoing  board members Chris Newman CAS and Lisa Pinero, CAS.

Incumbent board members (Post Production) who were reelected are Bob Bronow CAS, and Mathew Waters, CAS, and they will be joined by newly elected Board Members Onnalee Blank, CAS, and Mike Minkler CAS, who will be taking the seats of board members Urban and Steve Venezia, CAS, who are now officers.

Continuing to serve as their terms were not up for reelection are for production Willie Burton, CAS, and Glen Trew, CAS, and for post production Tom Fleischman, CAS, Doc Kane CAS, Sherry Klein, CAS, and Marti Humphrey, CAS.

The new Board will be installed at the 55 Annual CAS Awards Saturday, February 16.


ACE celebrates editing, names Eddie Award winners

By Dayna McCallum

On Friday evening, the 69th Annual ACE Eddie Awards were presented at the Beverly Hilton Hotel with over 1,000 in attendance. ACE president Stephen Rivkin, ACE, presided over the evening’s festivities with comedian Tom Kenny serving as the evening’s host (SpongeBob!).

(L-R) Director Peter Farrelly, Bohemian Rhapsody’s John Ottman, ACE

Bohemian Rhapsody, edited by John Ottman, ACE, and The Favourite, edited by Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy) respectively. Ottman and Mavropsaridis, who are also nominated for the Oscar in film editing, were both first time Eddie winners.

Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse, edited by Robert Fisher, Jr., won Best Edited Animated Feature Film and Free Solo, edited by Bob Eisenhardt, ACE, won Best Edited Documentary (Feature).

Television winners included Kyle Reiter for Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Commercial Television), Kate Sanford, ACE for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Non-Commercial Television), Gary Dollner, ACE for Killing Eve – “Nice Face” (Best Edited Drama Series for Commercial Television), Steve Singleton for Bodyguard – Episode 1 (Best Edited Drama Series for Non-Commercial Television), Malcolm Jamieson and Geoffrey Richman, ACE for Escape at Dannemora – Episode Seven (Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television), Greg Finton, ACE and Poppy Das, ACE for Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind (Best Edited Documentary, Non-Theatrical), and Hunter Gross, ACE for Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia” (Best Edited Non-Scripted Series), who delivered a very moving acceptance speech in tribute to the late Bourdain.

The Anne V. Coates Student Editing Award went to Boston University’s Marco Gonzalez, who beat out hundreds of competitors from film schools and universities around the country. The Student Editing honor was re-named in honor of the legendary editor who passed away this past year. In another emotional moment, the award was presented by Coates daughter, Emma Hickox, ACE (What Men Want).

Jerrold Ludwig, ACE and Craig McKay, ACE received Career Achievement awards.  Their work was highlighted with clip reels exhibiting their tremendous contributions to film and television throughout their careers.

(L-R) Octavia Spencer, Golden Eddie Honoree Guillermo del Toro

ACE’s prestigious Golden Eddie honor was presented to artist and Oscar-winning filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. He received the award from his friend and collaborator Octavia Spencer, who starred in del Toro’s The Shape of Water last year.

Other presenters at the show included Oscar nominated director Spike Lee (BlacKkKlansman); Oscar nominated director and ACE Eddie Award nominee for Roma, Alfonso Cuarón; director Jon M. Chu (Crazy Rich Asians); director Peter Farrelly (Green Book); D’Arcy Carden (The Good Place); Jennifer Lewis (Black-ish); Angela Sarafyan (Westworld); Harry Shum, Jr. (Crazy Rich Asians); Paul Walter Hauser (BlacKkKlansman); and film editor Carol Littleton, ACE.

Here is the full list of winners:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
Bohemian Rhapsody
John Ottman, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
The Favourite
Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Robert Fisher, Jr.

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Free Solo
Bob Eisenhardt, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):
Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind
Greg Finton, ACE & Poppy Das, ACE

Killing Eve Editor Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins”
Kyle Reiter

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone”
Kate Sanford, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Killing Eve – “Nice Face”
Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Bodyguard – “Episode 1”
Steve Singleton

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Escape at Dannemora – “Episode Seven”
Malcolm Jamieson & Geoffrey Richman ACE

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia”
Hunter Gross, ACE

STUDENT WINNER
Marco Gonzalez – Boston University

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE, The Favourite’s Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, Paul Walter Hauser.


AES/SMPTE panel: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse sound

By Mel Lambert

As part of its successful series of sound showcases, a recent joint meeting of the Los Angeles Section of the Audio Engineering Society and SMPTE’s Hollywood Section focused on the soundtrack of the animated features Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which has garnered several Oscar, BAFTA, CAS and MPSE award nominations, plus a Golden Globes win.

On January 31 at Sony Pictures Studios’ Kim Novak Theater in Culver City many gathered to hear a panel discussion between the film’s sound and picture editors and re-recording mixers. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was co-directed by Peter Ramsey, Robert Persichetti Jr. and Rodney Rothman, the creative minds behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street.

The panel

The Sound Showcase panel included supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey, re-recording mixer/sound designer Tony Lamberti, re-recording mixer Michael Semanick and associate picture editor Vivek Sharma. The Hollywood Reporter’s Carolyn Giardina moderated. The event concluded with a screening of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which represents a different Spider-Man Universe, since it introduces Brooklyn teen Miles Morales and the expanding possibilities of the Spider-Verse, where more than one entity can wear the arachnid mask.

Following the screening of an opening sequence from the animated feature, Rubay acknowledged that the film’s producers were looking for a different look for the Spider-Man character based on the Marvel comic books, but with a reference to previous live-action movies in the franchise. “They wanted us to make more of the period in which the new film is set,” he told the standing-room audience in the same dubbing stage where the soundtrack was re-recorded.

“[EVPs] Phil Lord and Chris Miller have a specific style of soundtrack that they’ve developed,” stated Lamberti, “and so we premixed to get that overall shape.”

“The look is unique,” conceded Semanick, “and our mix needed to match that and make it sound like a comic book. It couldn’t be too dynamic; we didn’t want to assault the audience, but still make it loud here and softer there.”

Full house

“We also kept the track to its basics,” Rubay added, “and didn’t add a sound for every little thing. If the soundtrack had been as complicated as the visuals, the audience’s heads would have exploded.”

“Yes, simpler was often better,” Lamberti confirmed, “to let the soundtrack tell the story of the visuals.”

In terms of balancing sound effects against dialog, “We did a lot of experimentation and went with what seemed the best solution,” Semanick said. “We kept molding the soundtrack until we were satisfied.” As Lamberti confirmed: “It was always a matter of balancing all the sound elements, using trial and error.”

=Nominated for a Cinema Audio Society Award in the Motion Picture — Animated category, Brian Smith, Aaron Hasson and Howard London served as original dialogue mixers on the film, with Sam Okell as scoring mixer and Randy K. Singer as Foley mixer. The crew also included sound designer John Pospisil, Foley supervisor Alec G. Rubay, SFX editors Kip Smedley, Andy Sisul, David Werntz, Christopher Aud, Ando Johnson, Benjamin Cook, Mike Reagan and Donald Flick.

During picture editorial, “we lived with many versions until we got to the sound,” explained Sharma. “The premix was fantastic and worked very well. Visuals are important but sound fulfils a complementary role. Dialogue is always key; the audience needs to hear what the characters say!”

“We present ideas and judge the results until everybody is happy,” said Semanick. “[Writer/producer] Phil Lord was very good at listening to everybody; he made the final decision, but deferred to the directors. ‘Maybe we should drop the music?’ ‘Does the result still pull the audience into the music?’ We worked until the elements worked very well together.”

The lead character’s “Spidey Sense” also discussed. As co-supervisor Schulkey explained: “Our early direction was that it was an internal feeling … like a warm, fuzzy feeling. But warm and fuzzy didn’t cut through the music. In the end there was not just a single Spidey Sense — it was never the same twice. The web slings were a classic sound that we couldn’t get too far from.”

“And we used [Dolby] Atmos to spin and pan those sounds around the room,” added Lamberti, who told the audience that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse marked Sony Animation’s first native Atmos mix. “We used the format to get the most out of it,” concluded the SFX re-recording mixer, who mixed sound effects “in the box” using an Avid S6 console/controller, while Semanick handled dialogue and music on the Kim Novak Theater’s Harrison MPC4D X-Range digital console.


Mel Lambert has been intimately involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists. 


Patrick J. Don Vito on editing Green Book

By Randi Altman

Universal Pictures’ Green Book tells the tale of an African-American piano virtuoso and his white driver. Based on a true story, this unlikely pair must navigate the Deep South in 1962 for a concert tour during a time most places to eat and sleep were segregated.

This unlikely pairing of the well-educated and sophisticated Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali) and the blue-collar Tony Lip (Viggo Mortensen) ends up teaching both men a lesson in understanding and acceptance, and turns into a life-long friendship.

L-R: Viggo Mortensen, Patrick Don Vito and Peter Farrelly

The film was nominated for five Golden Globes and won three: Best Screenplay, Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy and Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture. The work of the film’s editor, Patrick J. Don Vito, has also been noticed, receiving an Oscar nomination for Best Film Editing, in addition to an ACE Eddie nomination in the Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy) category.

We recently spoke to Don Vito, who had previously collaborated with the film’s director, Peter Farrelly, known for unapologetic comedy films such as There’s Something About Mary, Dumb & Dumber and Hall Pass. Don Vito, whose resume includes other comedies such as Walk of Shame and My Life in Ruins, really enjoyed walking the line between comedy and drama in this film, which he says made for a fun but challenging edit.

Let’s find out more…

How early did you get involved in Green Book?
I got the script back in August of 2017, expressed a lot of interest to Pete and got hired! The movie started shooting right after Thanksgiving, and I began a few days before that. We set up shop in New Orleans, near where they were shooting.

So you were keeping up with camera?
Yes, I would get dailies every day and try to keep up with the footage. I’d cut during the week when Pete was shooting and he would come in on the weekend to look at cuts. We would discuss ideas, and I’d show him alternate cuts. We did that throughout the shoot, and when we were done shooting, we went to Ojai, where Pete lives, and cut there for six weeks. We then came back to Los Angeles to finish — we set up rooms at EPS-Cineworks.

So you were not on set but you were near set.
Yes. I popped in like the first day of shooting and said hello. I don’t think I ever went to the set again.

Do you prefer it that way?
I’m an editor. I like to tell the story. The set is a lot of sitting around, waiting and planning; you shoot for a couple minutes, then you stop and wait. I like to keep working, and in the cutting room it never stops. You’re always trying new things, looking at different takes and seeing what you can create out of something. It’s that process of always being engaged that I like. Every minute I spend on the set, I feel like I am falling behind. It’s different if you’re directing the film. I’ve directed some shorts, and that is fun because you are always busy and engaged.

Were there times when you realized a scene was close, but still needed something additional?
Yes, every once in a while something would come up and I’d say, “It would be great if we had an insert of this so I can bridge these shots together.” Or I’d say, “If there is time, can you get a shot of this?”

They had a second unit go out and get a bunch of insert shots to fill in gaps — driving shots and various things that we needed. That happened out of our discussions and asking, “What if we did that?”

How do you approach editing? Do you watch everything up front and then build selects?
Usually, but It depends on the scene and how I feel that day. I’ll watch everything and get a feel for what the scene is about and what I have available, and I’ll try to keep that in my head. Once the scenes are placed in the bin, it’s easier for me to visually remember where things are.

I’ll break down selects. Then if a scene is for some reason particularly difficult or causing me problems, I may jump around. I may start at the end of a scene and work backwards, or start in the middle and work out from there. It depends. I like switching it up and making my brain work a little differently each time. I try different tricks to kind of keep it fresh for me in my head.

What would an example of a trick be? Are there any scenes within the film that you can point to?
When Tony Lip’s wife, Delores, is reading the letter to her family and the guys are playing poker in the background — that scene was a little long. We had the entire letter being read on camera in the original cut. Then we went back to the table in the kitchen where the guys are playing poker and talking about Tony’s letters. “They’re not bad. You know? Oh, we had an artsy family.”

Originally, the joke was when the female family member says, “I want a letter,” and her husband answers, “Yeah, as soon as you make a meal.” That used to be in the middle of the scene. What I did was have Tony’s wife start the letter then cut over to the table and she’s now off-camera. You’re hearing her continue to read the letter while we are watching the guys play poker. Then we go back for the end of Delores reading the letter and the joke. It became a much better scene, and thanks to the joke it punched you right out into the next scene.

Essentially, it was just a little reorder, which we do once in a while. One thing I try to do with comedy is look at it as a mathematical equation. Say you have three jokes in a scene. You have A, B and C jokes. A is the funniest, B is not as funny and C is the least funny. You may have an idea of what the funniest joke is, but you don’t necessarily know which one it is until you play it for people. Once you have some screenings you know. You don’t want to end a scene on a B or C joke. You want to end on an A joke. So you can try to either remove a joke or try to reorder the scene so that it ends on the A joke. You want to build it from funny, funnier to funniest.

L-R: Patrick Don Vito and Mahershala Ali

This is such a serious topic, but the film’s got funny moments as well. How did you walk that line?
That was probably the most difficult thing about it. You don’t want the jokes to seem like a joke. You want them to come out of a scene naturally — out of the drama, characters or the emotion of the scene. There were a lot of options as far as jokes. At first I cut everything in to see what was working and what seemed too jokey. You start eliminating things that take it to a different type of comedy and you try to keep it more real. That was always the mantra from Pete: “Let’s keep it real. All the comedy needs to come out of the scenes and not seem like it’s too much of a joke.”

Had you worked with Pete before?
Yes, a couple of times. I worked on Movie 43 with him, which was a very different kind of comedy. I also worked on a pilot for him a few years ago called Cuckoo, which was a remake of a British series. It didn’t get picked up.

Do you find that you tend to get pigeonholed as an editor? You are either a comedy editor or an action editor, etc.?
I think that happens to everyone. Absolutely, and it can be tough. Even with this movie, the studio asked for a reference list of people. I think that was because they looked at my resume and saw a lot of comedies.

The movie I did right before this, but isn’t out yet, is a drama called Three Christs. It has some comedic elements but it’s pretty much a drama. I think that gave me a better chance at Green Book. It’s directed by Jon Avnet and stars Peter Dinklage, Richard Gere, Walton Goggins, Bradley Whitford and Julianna Margulies. It’s a true story, also from the ’60s, about a psychiatrist who has three patients who all think they’re Jesus Christ. He decides to put them in a room together while they are in a psych ward to see what happens. Will they give up their delusions? Will they fight over it? I’ve known Jon Avnet since I was an assistant editor on Up Close and Personal in 1996.

Ok, let’s turn to tools. You use Avid Media Composer. Do you have any tips or tricks that you would like to share?
It’s not a trick, but when I start a movie I have one of the assistants set up Script Sync, which is really helpful for when you’re in the room with the director and the producers and want to quickly get to different line readings.

Basically, you put the clips on the script itself and you can click on a line and hear every single line reading of that line. I know editors sometimes take every single line reading of dialogue and cut them next to each other in a sequence. I prefer to use Scrypt Sync and make select rolls.

Speaking of assistants, how did you work with yours on Green Book?
Petra Demas was my first assistant, and she was great. She would help organize my room, and when I needed help I could throw her a scene. So she would help me cut scenes now and again when she wasn’t busy.

I had another great assistant named Bart Breve’. He did all the Script Sync work and helped out with dailies with Petra. They would keep me up-to-date with footage to make sure I always had something to work on. Bart was a local in New Orleans, so when I came back to LA, we hired Aleigh Lewis who handled all the visual effects — there are over 400 in the movie.

You assume because it’s a period piece there will be some visual effects, but that’s a lot of shots.
Absolutely. Aleigh helped keep all the visual effects organized. I relied on her to organize the visual effects and show me the new ones as they came in, so I could give notes. Pixel Magic did the visual effects, including the piano playing.

I was wondering about that!
Mahershala Ali is a good actor, but that’s virtuoso piano playing! He did take lessons for a few months from the composer Kris Bowers, who played the piano in the movie. Mahershala learned where to put his hands and how to sit like a classical pianist. Kris would play the music and they’d shoot that, then Mahershala would sit and he would play. Then we’d combine the two into a take. It was mostly head replacement kind of stuff.

What were some of the other VFX shots?
A ton of them were getting rid of modern things in the shots… modern cars, signs, cameras on buildings … that kind of thing. On top of that, the car they were in had a tear in the roof inside the car and it’s supposed to be a brand new 1962 Cadillac. About 85% of the car scenes are visual effects shots. There is an amazing bridge shot where the Cadillacs are leaving NY on the George Washington Bridge. In that shot the blacktop and all the cars are CGI. Pixel Magic took a modern stock shot and created that. It’s pretty impressive.

Fotokem, who processed dailies for us and provided the color correction, even did a few visual effects. When we saw the film in such high resolution during the color correction, we noticed modern elements in some shots that we missed and needed to remove. They took care of that.

Were most of the driving shot greenscreen?
No. It was almost all practical. We drove in and around New Orleans. The only ones that were green screened were when they’re driving in the snow, and still some of them are practical because we actually did get some snow just outside of New Orleans. It started snowing, so they got the camera crew together and went out and shot. Who knew it was going to snow in New Orleans?!


Avengers: Infinity War leads VES Awards with six noms

The Visual Effects Society (VES) has announced the nominees for the 17th Annual VES Awards, which recognize outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games as well as the VFX supervisors, VFX producers and hands-on artists who bring this work to life.

Avengers: Infinity War garners the most feature film nomination with six. Incredibles 2 is the top animated film contender with five nominations and Lost in Space leads the broadcast field with six nominations.

Nominees in 24 categories were selected by VES members via events hosted by 11 of the organizations Sections, including Australia, the Bay Area, Germany, London, Los Angeles, Montreal, New York, New Zealand, Toronto, Vancouver and Washington.

The VES Awards will be held on February 5th at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. As previously announced, the VES Visionary Award will be presented to writer/director/producer and co-creator of Westworld Jonathan Nolan. The VES Award for Creative Excellence will be given to award-winning creators/executive producers/writers/directors David Benioff and D.B. Weiss of Game of Thrones fame. Actor-comedian-author Patton Oswalt will once again host the VES Awards.

Here are the nominees:

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War

Daniel DeLeeuw

Jen Underdahl

Kelly Port

Matt Aitken

Daniel Sudick

 

Christopher Robin

Christopher Robin

Chris Lawrence

Steve Gaub

Michael Eames

Glenn Melenhorst

Chris Corbould

 

Ready Player One

Roger Guyett

Jennifer Meislohn

David Shirk

Matthew Butler

Neil Corbould

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story

Rob Bredow

Erin Dusseault

Matt Shumway

Patrick Tubach

Dominic Tuohy

 

Welcome to Marwen

Kevin Baillie

Sandra Scott

Seth Hill

Marc Chu

James Paradis

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature 

12 Strong

Roger Nall

Robert Weaver

Mike Meinardus

 

Bird Box

Marcus Taormina

David Robinson

Mark Bakowski

Sophie Dawes

Mike Meinardus

 

Bohemian Rhapsody

Paul Norris

Tim Field

May Leung

Andrew Simmonds

 

First Man

Paul Lambert

Kevin Elam

Tristan Myles

Ian Hunter

JD Schwalm

 

Outlaw King

Alex Bicknell

Dan Bethell

Greg O’Connor

Stefano Pepin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch

Pierre Leduc

Janet Healy

Bruno Chauffard

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Brad Bird

John Walker

Rick Sayre

Bill Watral

 

Isle of Dogs

Mark Waring

Jeremy Dawson

Tim Ledbury

Lev Kolobov

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet

Scott Kersavage

Bradford Simonsen

Ernest J. Petti

Cory Loftis

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Joshua Beveridge

Christian Hejnal

Danny Dimian

Bret St. Clair

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon; Out of the Past

Everett Burrell

Tony Meagher

Steve Moncur

Christine Lemon

Joel Whist

 

Krypton; The Phantom Zone

Ian Markiewicz

Jennifer Wessner

Niklas Jacobson

Martin Pelletier

 

LOST IN SPACE

Lost in Space; Danger, Will Robinson

Jabbar Raisani

Terron Pratt

Niklas Jacobson

Joao Sita

 

The Terror; Go For Broke

Frank Petzold

Lenka Líkařová

Viktor Muller

Pedro Sabrosa

 

Westworld; The Passenger

Jay Worth

Elizabeth Castro

Bruce Branit

Joe Wehmeyer

Michael Lantieri

 

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode

Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan; Pilot

Erik Henry

Matt Robken

Bobo Skipper

Deak Ferrand

Pau Costa

 

The Alienist; The Boy on the Bridge

Kent Houston

Wendy Garfinkle

Steve Murgatroyd

Drew Jones

Paul Stephenson

 

The Deuce; We’re All Beasts

Jim Rider

Steven Weigle

John Bair

Aaron Raff

 

The First; Near and Far

Karen Goulekas

Eddie Bonin

Roland Langschwert

Bryan Godwin

Matthew James Kutcher

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June

Brendan Taylor

Stephen Lebed

Winston Lee

Leo Bovell

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Realtime Project

Age of Sail

John Kahrs

Kevin Dart

Cassidy Curtis

Theresa Latzko

 

Cycles

Jeff Gipson

Nicholas Russell

Lauren Nicole Brown

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

 

Dr Grordbort’s Invaders

Greg Broadmore

Mhairead Connor

Steve Lambert

Simon Baker

 

God of War

Maximilian Vaughn Ancar

Corey Teblum

Kevin Huynh

Paolo Surricchio

 

Marvel’s Spider-Man

Grant Hollis

Daniel Wang

Seth Faske

Abdul Bezrati

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Commercial 

Beyond Good & Evil 2

Maxime Luere

Leon Berelle

Remi Kozyra

Dominique Boidin

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Philip Whalley

Anthony Bloor

Andy Steele

 

McDonald’s; #ReindeerReady

Ben Cronin

Josh King

Gez Wright

Suzanne Jandu

 

U.S. Marine Corps; A Nation’s Call

Steve Drew

Nick Fraser

Murray Butler

Greg White

Dave Peterson

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident

Carsten Keller

Anandi Peiris

Dan Sanders

Fabian Frank

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Special Venue Project

Beautiful Hunan; Flight of the Phoenix

R. Rajeev

Suhit Saha

Arish Fyzee

Unmesh Nimbalkar

 

Childish Gambino’s Pharos

Keith Miller

Alejandro Crawford

Thelvin Cabezas

Jeremy Thompson

 

DreamWorks Theatre Presents Kung Fu Panda

Marc Scott

Doug Cooper

Michael Losure

Alex Timchenko

 

Osheaga Music and Arts Festival

Andre Montambeault

Marie-Josee Paradis

Alyson Lamontagne

David Bishop Noriega

 

Pearl Quest

Eugénie von Tunzelmann

Liz Oliver

Ian Spendloff

Ross Burgess

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Thanos

Jan Philip Cramer

Darren Hendler

Paul Story

Sidney Kombo-Kintombo

 

Christopher Robin; Tigger

Arslan Elver

Kayn Garcia

Laurent Laban

Mariano Mendiburu

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Indoraptor

Jance Rubinchik

Ted Lister

Yannick Gillain

Keith Ribbons

 

Ready Player One; Art3mis

David Shirk

Brian Cantwell

Jung-Seung Hong

Kim Ooi

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; The Grinch

David Galante

Francois Boudaille

Olivier Luffin

Yarrow Cheney

 

Incredibles 2; Helen Parr

Michal Makarewicz

Ben Porter

Edgar Rodriguez

Kevin Singleton

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Ralphzilla

Dong Joo Byun

Dave K. Komorowski

Justin Sklar

Le Joyce Tong

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse; Miles Morales

Marcos Kang

Chad Belteau

Humberto Rosa

Julie Bernier Gosselin

 

Outstanding Animated Character in an Episode or Realtime Project

Cycles; Rae

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

Jorge E. Ruiz Cano

Jose Luis -Weecho- Velasquez

 

Lost in Space; Humanoid

Chad Shattuck

Paul Zeke

Julia Flanagan

Andrew McCartney

 

Nightflyers; All That We Have Found; Eris

Peter Giliberti

James Chretien

Ryan Cromie

Cesar Dacol Jr.

 

Spider-Man; Doc Ock

Brian Wyser

Henrique Naspolini

Sophie Brennan

William Salyers

 

Outstanding Animated Character in a Commercial

McDonald’s; Bobbi the Reindeer

Gabriela Ruch Salmeron

Joe Henson

Andrew Butler

Joel Best

 

Overkill’s The Walking Dead; Maya

Jonas Ekman

Goran Milic

Jonas Skoog

Henrik Eklundh

 

Peta; Best Friend; Lucky

Bernd Nalbach

Emanuel Fuchs

Sebastian Plank

Christian Leitner

 

Volkswagen; Born Confident; Bam

David Bryan

Chris Welsby

Fabian Frank

Chloe Dawe

 

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

Ant-Man and the Wasp; Journey to the Quantum Realm

Florian Witzel

Harsh Mistri

Yuri Serizawa

Can Yuksel

 

Aquaman; Atlantis

Quentin Marmier

Aaron Barr

Jeffrey De Guzman

Ziad Shureih

 

Ready Player One; The Shining, Overlook Hotel

Mert Yamak

Stanley Wong

Joana Garrido

Daniel Gagiu

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Vandor Planet

Julian Foddy

Christoph Ammann

Clement Gerard

Pontus Albrecht

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Whoville

Loic Rastout

Ludovic Ramiere

Henri Deruer

Nicolas Brack

 

Incredibles 2; Parr House

Christopher M. Burrows

Philip Metschan

Michael Rutter

Joshua West

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Social Media District

Benjamin Min Huang

Jon Kim Krummel II

Gina Warr Lawes

Matthias Lechner

 

Spider-Man; Into the Spider-Verse; Graphic New York City

Terry Park

Bret St. Clair

Kimberly Liptrap

Dave Morehead

 

Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Cycles; The House

Michael R.W. Anderson

Jeff Gipson

Jose Luis Gomez Diaz

Edward Everett Robbins III

 

Lost in Space; Pilot; Impact Area

Philip Engström

Kenny Vähäkari

Jason Martin

Martin Bergquist

 

The Deuce; 42nd St

John Bair

Vance Miller

Jose Marin

Steve Sullivan

 

The Handmaid’s Tale; June; Fenway Park

Patrick Zentis

Kevin McGeagh

Leo Bovell

Zachary Dembinski

 

The Man in the High Castle; Reichsmarschall Ceremony

Casi Blume

Michael Eng

Ben McDougal

Sean Myers

 

Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project

Aquaman; Third Act Battle

Claus Pedersen

Mohammad Rastkar

Cedric Lo

Ryan McCoy

 

Echo; Time Displacement

Victor Perez

Tomas Tjernberg

Tomas Wall

Marcus Dineen

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; Gyrosphere Escape

Pawl Fulker

Matt Perrin

Oscar Faura

David Vickery

 

Ready Player One; New York Race

Daniele Bigi

Edmund Kolloen

Mathieu Vig

Jean-Baptiste Noyau

 

Welcome to Marwen; Town of Marwen

Kim Miles

Matthew Ward

Ryan Beagan

Marc Chu

 

Outstanding Model in a Photoreal or Animated Project 

Avengers: Infinity War; Nidavellir Forge Megastructure

Chad Roen

Ryan Rogers

Jeff Tetzlaff

Ming Pan

 

Incredibles 2; Underminer Vehicle

Neil Blevins

Philip Metschan

Kevin Singleton

 

Mortal Engines; London

Matthew Sandoval

James Ogle

Nick Keller

Sam Tack

 

Ready Player One; DeLorean DMC-12

Giuseppe Laterza

Kim Lindqvist

Mauro Giacomazzo

William Gallyot

 

Solo: A Star Wars Story; Millennium Falcon

Masa Narita

Steve Walton

David Meny

James Clyne

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Gerardo Aguilera

Ashraf Ghoniem

Vasilis Pazionis

Hartwell Durfor

 

Avengers: Infinity War; Wakanda

Florian Witzel

Adam Lee

Miguel Perez Senent

Francisco Rodriguez

 

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Dominik Kirouac

Chloe Ostiguy

Christian Gaumond

 

Venom

Aharon Bourland

Jordan Walsh

Aleksandar Chalyovski

Federico Frassinelli

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Snow, Clouds and Smoke

Eric Carme

Nicolas Brice

Milo Riccarand

 

Incredibles 2

Paul Kanyuk

Tiffany Erickson Klohn

Vincent Serritella

Matthew Kiyoshi Wong

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet; Virus Infection & Destruction

Paul Carman

Henrik Fält

Christopher Hendryx

David Hutchins

 

Smallfoot

Henrik Karlsson

Theo Vandernoot

Martin Furness

Dmitriy Kolesnik

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Ian Farnsworth

Pav Grochola

Simon Corbaux

Brian D. Casper

 

Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Realtime Project

Altered Carbon

Philipp Kratzer

Daniel Fernandez

Xavier Lestourneaud

Andrea Rosa

 

Lost in Space; Jupiter is Falling

Denys Shchukin

Heribert Raab

Michael Billette

Jaclyn Stauber

 

Lost in Space; The Get Away

Juri Bryan

Will Elsdale

Hugo Medda

Maxime Marline

 

The Man in the High Castle; Statue of Liberty Destruction

Saber Jlassi

Igor Zanic

Nick Chamberlain

Chris Parks

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature

Avengers: Infinity War; Titan

Sabine Laimer

Tim Walker

Tobias Wiesner

Massimo Pasquetti

 

First Man

Joel Delle-Vergin

Peter Farkas

Miles Lauridsen

Francesco Dell’Anna

 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

John Galloway

Enrik Pavdeja

David Nolan

Juan Espigares Enriquez

 

Welcome to Marwen

Woei Lee

Saul Galbiati

Max Besner

Thai-Son Doan

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode

Altered Carbon

Jean-François Leroux

Reece Sanders

Stephen Bennett

Laraib Atta

 

Handmaids Tale; June

Winston Lee

Gwen Zhang

Xi Luo

Kevin Quatman

 

Lost in Space; Impact; Crash Site Rescue

David Wahlberg

Douglas Roshamn

Sofie Ljunggren

Fredrik Lönn

 

Silicon Valley; Artificial Emotional Intelligence; Fiona

Tim Carras

Michael Eng

Shiying Li

Bill Parker

 

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Commercial

Apple; Unlock

Morten Vinther

Michael Gregory

Gustavo Bellon

Rodrigo Jimenez

 

Apple; Welcome Home

Michael Ralla

Steve Drew

Alejandro Villabon

Peter Timberlake

 

Genesis; G90 Facelift

Neil Alford

Jose Caballero

Joseph Dymond

Greg Spencer

 

John Lewis; The Boy and the Piano

Kamen Markov

Pratyush Paruchuri

Kalle Kohlstrom

Daniel Benjamin

 

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Student Project

Chocolate Man

David Bellenbaum

Aleksandra Todorovic

Jörg Schmidt

Martin Boué

 

Proxima-b

Denis Krez

Tina Vest

Elias Kremer

Lukas Löffler

 

Ratatoskr

Meike Müller

Lena-Carolin Lohfink

Anno Schachner

Lisa Schachner

 

Terra Nova

Thomas Battistetti

Mélanie Geley

Mickael Le Mezo

Guillaume Hoarau


ASC names film, TV nominees, Top 100 films

The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has announced the nominees for all categories of its 33rd Annual ASC Outstanding Achievement Awards.

Winners will be named at the awards gala on February 9 at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood and Highland.

This year’s nominees are:

Theatrical Release
Alfonso Cuarón for Roma
• Matthew Libatique, ASC for A Star is Born
• Robbie Ryan, BSC, ISC for The Favourite
• Linus Sandgren, ASC, FSF for First Man
• Łukasz Żal, PSC for Cold War

Spotlight Award
• Joshua James Richards for The Rider
• Giorgi Shvelidze for Namme
• Frank van den Eeden, NSC, SBC for Girl

Episode of a Series for Non-Commercial Television
• Gonzalo Amat for The Man in the High Castle, “Jahr Null”
• Adriano Goldman, ASC, ABC for The Crown, “Beryl”
• David Klein, ASC for Homeland, “Paean to the People”
• Colin Watkinson, ASC for The Handmaid’s Tale, “The Word”
• Cathal Watters, ISC for Peaky Blinders, “The Company”
• Zoë White, ACS for The Handmaid’s Tale, “Holly”

Episode of a Series for Commercial Television
• Nathaniel Goodman, ASC for Timeless, “The King of the Delta Blues”
• Jon Joffin, ASC for Beyond, “Two Zero One”
• Ben Richardson for Yellowstone, “Daybreak”
• David Stockton, ASC for Gotham, “A Dark Knight: Queen Takes Knight”
• Thomas Yatsko, ASC for Damnation, “A Different Species”

Motion Picture, Miniseries, or Pilot Made for Television
• James Friend, BSC for Patrick Melrose, “Bad News”
• Mathias Herndl, AAC for Genius: Picasso, “Chapter 1”
• Florian Hoffmeister, BSC for The Terror, “Go for Broke”
• M. David Mullen, ASC for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (pilot)
• Brendan Steacy, CSC for Alias Grace, “Part 1”

This year’s awards ceremony will not only honor the most artful cinematography of 2018 but will also celebrate the ASC’s 100th anniversary. As part of the centennial celebrations, the Society released their members’ list of the 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography of the 20th century.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, ASC, (The Affair, Good Girls Revolt, Entourage) and voted on by ASC members, it showcases the best of cinematography as selected by professional cinematographers.

The list represents a range of styles, eras and visual artistry, but most importantly, it commemorates films that are inspirational or influential to ASC members and have exhibited enduring influence to generations of filmmakers.

The Top 10 are:

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962), shot by Freddie Young, BSC (Dir. David Lean)
2. Blade Runner (1982), shot by Jordan Cronenweth, ASC (Dir. Ridley Scott)
3. Apocalypse Now (1979), shot by Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC (Dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
4. Citizen Kane (1941), shot by Gregg Toland, ASC (Dir. Orson Welles)
5. The Godfather (1972), shot by Gordon Willis, ASC (Dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
6. Raging Bull (1980), shot by Michael Chapman, ASC (Dir. Martin Scorsese)
7. The Conformist (1970), shot by Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC (Dir. Bernardo Bertolucci)
8. Days of Heaven (1978), shot by Néstor Almendros, ASC (Dir. Terrence Malick)
9. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), shot by Geoffrey Unsworth, BSC with additional photography by John Alcott, BSC (Dir. Stanley Kubrick)
10. The French Connection (1971), shot by Owen Roizman, ASC (Dir. William Friedkin)

 Main Image: Roma

Editor Wyatt Smith talks Mary Poppins Returns, Marvel Universe

By Amy Leland

Wyatt Smith’s career as an editor is the kind that makes for a great story. His unintended path began with an unusual opportunity to work with Mariah Carey and a chance meeting with director Rob Marshall. He has since collaborated on big musicals and action films with Marshall, which opened the door to superhero movies. His latest project — in which he was reunited with Marshall — saw him editing a big musical with a title character who is, in her own Disney way, also a superhero.

Smith’s resume is impressive: Doctor Strange, Into the Woods, 300: Rise of an Empire, Thor: The Dark World, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides. When I had a chance to talk with him about Mary Poppins Returns, I first had to ask him how his fascinating journey began.

Wyatt Smith at the Mary Poppins Returns premiere.

Can you talk about what led you to editing?
Some things just happen unexpectedly. Opportunities arise and you just have to hear the knock and not be afraid to open the door. When they were building the now-closed Sony Music Studios in New York City, I knew a lot about computers. Avid was first coming in, and there were all these video engineers who weren’t as savvy with Macs and things like that because they were used to linear, old-school tape editing. I worked in the maintenance department at the studio, servicing online editing suites, as well as setting up their first Avid Media Composer and giving people some tutorials on how to use that.

Then a very odd circumstance came up — they were working on a Mariah Carey concert video and needed an additional editor to work at her house at night (she was working during the day with another editor). My father is in the music business and had ties to Mariah — we had met before — so they thought it would be a comfortable situation. It came out of nowhere, and while I certainly knew, technically, how to edit, creatively I had no idea.

That was my first opportunity to edit, and I never went back to anything else. That was the day. That was it. I started to edit music videos and concerts and little music documentaries. Years and years later that led me to work with Rob Marshall on a music project.

The Tony Bennett American Classic special?
Exactly. I had known the Bennett family and worked with them since Tony Bennett’s “Unplugged.” When Rob was brought on to direct an NBC special celebrating Tony’s career, he wanted to bring his whole film team with him, but the TV network and the Bennett family wanted somebody who knew the music world, and that style of deadline, which is quite different from film.

I was brought in to interview with Rob, and we had a wonderful experience making that show. When it was done, he said, “Next time I make a film, I want you to come along.” To be completely honest, I didn’t believe him. I thought it was very kind of him, and he is a very nice man, but I was like, yeah, sure. In 2008, I think it was the Friday before they started shooting Nine, he called and said, “You gotta get to London.” I immediately quit my job and got on a plane.

I’m guessing the music world was a heavy influence on you, but were you drawn toward movies as well?
I have always been a movie junkie. At an early age, I saw a lot of the big epics, including David Lean’s films — Lawrence of Arabia, A Passage to India — which just transported me to another place and another culture. I loved that.

That was back in the early VHS days, and I had just about every Bond film that had been released. I watched them obsessively. In high school, my closest friend worked in a video rental store, so we constantly had movies. It was always a huge thing for me, but never in my life did I dream of pursuing it. The language of film was never anything I studied or thought about until I was kind of thrust into it.

What was it like coming into this film with Rob Marshall, after so many years of working with him? Do your collaborations now feel different from when you first started working together?
The most important part is trust. When I first met Rob, aside from just not having any confidence, I didn’t remotely know what I was doing. We all know that when you have your actors and your sets if something’s not quite right that’s the time to bring it up. But 12 years ago, the thought of me going to Rob and saying, “I don’t know if that really works, maybe you should grab a shot like…” I’d never, ever. But over the years we’ve developed that trust. I’m still very cautious with things like that, but I now know I can talk to him. And if he has a question, he’ll call me to set and say, “Quickly put this together,” or, “Stay here and watch this with me,” and he’ll explain to me exactly what he’s going for.

Then, once we reach post, unquestionably that relationship changes. We used to cut everything from scratch and start re-watching all the material and rebuilding the film again. Now we can work through existing cuts because I kind of know his intentions. It’s easier for me to see in the scene work what he’s going for, and that only comes from collaborating. Now I’m able to get the movie that’s in his head on screen a lot faster.

Mary Poppins Returns

You were working with complex animations and effects, and also combining those with elaborate choreography and live action. Was there more preplanning for this than you might normally have done?
I wasn’t really involved in the preplanning. I came in about a month before shooting to mostly to catch up with the schedules of the second unit, because I’m always going to work closely with them. I also went through all the storyboards and worked with visual effects and caught up on their look development. We did have a previz team, but we only really needed to previz two of the sequences in the film — the underwater bath time and the balloon sequence.

While previz gives you methodology, shot count, rough lenses and things, it’s missing the real emotion of the story because it is a video game and often cut like a music video. This is no disrespect to previz editors — they’re very good — but I always want to come in and do a pass before we start shooting because I find the timings are very different.

Doctor Strange

Take a film like Marvel’s Doctor Strange. So much of it had been prevized to figure out how to do it. When I came into the Doctor Strange previz cuts early on, they were exciting, psychedelic, wild and really imaginative, but I was losing actors. I found that something that was running at four minutes wasn’t representing any of the dialogue or the emotional content of the actors. So I asked them to give me stills of close-ups to cut them in. After putting in the dialogue, that four-minute sequence becomes seven minutes and you realize it’s too long. Before we go shoot it, how do we make it something that’s more manageable for the ultimate film?

Were you on set during most of the filming?
There were days where Rob would pull me onto set, and then days or weeks where I wouldn’t even see him. I did the traditional assembly process. Even the film I’m cutting right now, which has a very short schedule, four days after they were done shooting I had a cut of the film. It’s the only way for me to know that it’s working. It’s not a great cut, but I know that the movie’s all there. And, most importantly, I need to know, barring the last day of shooting, that I’ve seen every single frame of every take before they wrap. I need the confidence of knowing where it’s all going. I don’t want to discover any of that with a director in post.

On a project this complex, I imagine you must work with multiple assistants?
When I worked on the second Thor movie, The Dark World, I had a friend who was my first assistant, Meagan Costello. She has worked on many Marvel films. When Doctor Strange came up — I think it was almost a year before shooting that I got the call from the director saying I was in —within five seconds, I called Meagan because of her experience, her personality and her incredible skill set. Toward the end of Doctor Strange, when the schedule for Poppins was starting to lock in, she said, “I’ve always wanted to live in New York, and I’ve always wanted to work in a music hall.” I said, “We can make that happen.”

Thor: The Dark World

She is great at running the cutting room, taking care of all of my little, and many, prima donna bugaboos — how things are set up and working, technically, cutting in surround, having the right types of monitors, etc. What’s also important is having someone spiritually and emotionally connected into the film… someone I can talk to and trust.

We had two second assistant editors on Mary Poppins once we were in post — two in the US and two in London. It’s always interesting when you have two different teams. I try to keep as much consistency as I can, so we had Meagan all the way through London and New York. For second assistants in London, we had Gemma Bourne, Ben Renton and Tom Lane. Here in the states we had Alexander Johnson and Christa Haley. Christa is my first assistant on the film I’m currently doing for Focus Features, called Harriet.

On huge films like these, so much of the assistant editor’s time is dealing with the vast deliveries for the studio, the needs of a huge sound and music team as well as a lot of visual effects. In the end, we had about 1,300 hundred visual effect shots. That means a lot of turnovers, screenings and quality control so that nothing is ever coming in or going out without being meticulously watched and listened to.

The first assistant runs the cutting room and the stuff I shouldn’t be thinking about. It’s not stuff I would do well either. I want to be solely focusing on the edit, and when I’m lost in the movie, that’s the greatest thing. Having a strong editorial team allows me to be in a place where I’m not thinking about anything but the cut.

Mary Poppins Returns

That’s always good to hear. Most editors I talk to also care about making sure their assistants are getting opportunities.
When I started out, I had assistants in the room with me. It was very much film-style — the assistant was in the room helping me out with the director and the producers every day. If I had to run out of the room, the assistant could step in.

Unfortunately, the way the world has evolved, with digital post, the assistant editor and editor positions have diverged massively. The skill sets are very different. I don’t think I could do a first assistant editor’s job, but I know they could do my job. Also, the extra level of material keeps them very busy, so they’re not with me in the room. That makes for a much harder path, and that bothers me. I don’t quite know how to fix that yet, but I want to.

This industry started with apprentices, and it was very guild-like. Assistants were very hands on with the editor, so it was very natural to become an editor. Right now, that jump is a little tricky, and I wish I knew how to fix it.

Even if the assistants cut something together for you, it doesn’t necessarily evolve into them getting to work with a director or producer. With Poppins, there’s certainly a scene or two in the film that I asked Meagan to put together for that purpose. Rob works very closely in the cutting room each day, along with John DeLuca, our producer and choreographer. I was wondering if there would be that moment when maybe they’d split off, like, “Oh, go with Meagan and work on this, while I work on this with Rob.” But those opportunities never really arose. It’s hard to figure out how to get that door open.

Do you have any advice for editors who are just starting out?
I love the material I’m working on, and that’s the most important part. Even if something’s not for you, your job is not to make it what you want it to be. The job is to figure out who the audience is and how you make it great for them. There’s an audience for everything, you just have to tap into who that audience is.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.