Cinnafilm 6.6.19

Category Archives: AR

Apple offers augmented reality with Reality Composer

By Barry Goch

In addition to introducing the new MacPro and the Pro Display XDR, at its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC19), Apple had some pretty cool demos. The coolest, in my mind, was the Minecraft augmented reality presentation.

Across the street from the San Jose Convention Center, where the keynote was held, Apple set up “The Studio” in the San Jose Civic. One of the demos there was an AR experience with the new MacPro which in reality, you only saw the space frame of Apple’s tower, but in augmented reality you were able to animate an exploded view. The technology behind this demo is the just-announced ARKit3 and Reality Composer.

Apple had a couple of stations demoing Reality Composer in The Studio. Apple has applied its famous legacy of enabling content creators by making new technology easy to use. Case in point is Reality Composer. I’ve tried building AR experiences in other apps and it’s not very straightforward. You have to learn a new interface and coding as well — and use yet another app for targeting your AR environment into the real world. The demo I saw of Reality Composer made it look easy, working in Motion with drag-and-drop prebuilt behaviors built into the app, along with multiple ways to target your AR experience in the real world.

AR QuickLook technology is part of iOS, and you can even get an AR experience of the new MacPro and Pro Display XDR through Apple’s website. They also mentioned its new file for holding AR elements, usdz. Apple has created a tool to convert other 3D file formats to usdz.

With native AR support across Apple’s ecosystem, there is no better time to experiment and learn about augmented reality.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation and a UCLA Extension Instructor in post production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya.

Behind the Title: Ntropic Flame artist Amanda Amalfi

NAME: Amanda Amalfi

COMPANY: Ntropic (@ntropic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Ntropic is a content creator producing work for commercials, music videos and feature films as well as crafting experiential and interactive VR and AR media. We have offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City and London. Some of the services we provide include design, VFX, animation, color, editing, color grading and finishing.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Flame Artist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being a senior Flame artist involves a variety of tasks that really span the duration of a project. From communicating with directors, agencies and production teams to helping plan out any visual effects that might be in a project (also being a VFX supervisor on set) to the actual post process of the job.

Amanda worked on this lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

It involves client and team management (as you are often also the 2D lead on a project) and calls for a thorough working knowledge of the Flame itself, both in timeline management and that little thing called compositing. The compositing could cross multiple disciplines — greenscreen keying, 3D compositing, set extension and beauty cleanup to name a few. And it helps greatly to have a good eye for color and to be extremely detail-oriented.

WHAT MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT YOUR ROLE?
How much it entails. Since this is usually a position that exists in a commercial house, we don’t have as many specialties as there would be in the film world.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
First is the artwork. I like that we get to work intimately with the client in the room to set looks. It’s often a very challenging position to be in — having to create something immediately — but the challenge is something that can be very fun and rewarding. Second, I enjoy being the overarching VFX eye on the project; being involved from the outset and seeing the project through to delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
We’re often meeting tight deadlines, so the hours can be unpredictable. But the best work happens when the project team and clients are all in it together until the last minute.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
The evening. I’ve never been a morning person so I generally like the time right before we leave for the day, when most of the office is wrapping up and it gets a bit quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably a tactile art form. Sometimes I have the urge to create something that is tangible, not viewed through an electronic device — a painting or a ceramic vase, something like that.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I loved films that were animated and/or used 3D elements growing up and wanted to know how they were made. So I decided to go to a college that had a computer art program with connections in the industry and was able to get my first job as a Flame assistant in between my junior and senior years of college.

ANA Airlines

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Most recently I worked on a campaign for ANA Airlines. It was a fun, creative challenge on set and in post production. Before that I worked on a very interesting project for Facebook’s F8 conference featuring its AR functionality and helped create a lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

IS THERE A PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked on a spot for Vaseline that was a “through the ages” concept and we had to create looks that would read as from 1880s, 1900, 1940s, 1970s and present day, in locations that varied from the Arctic to the building of the Brooklyn Bridge to a boxing ring. To start we sent the digitally shot footage with our 3D and comps to a printing house and had it printed and re-digitized. This worked perfectly for the ’70s-era look. Then we did additional work to age it further to the other eras — though my favorite was the Arctic turn-of-the-century look.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Flame… first and foremost. It really is the most inclusive software — I can grade, track, comp, paint and deliver all in one program. My monitors — the 4K Eizo and color-calibrated broadcast monitor, are also essential.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mostly Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
I generally have music on with clients, so I will put on some relaxing music. If I’m not with clients, I listen to podcasts. I love How Did This Get Made and Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hiking and cooking are two great de-stressors for me. I love being in nature and working out and then going home and making a delicious meal.

Cinnafilm 6.6.19

Marvel Studios’ Victoria Alonso to keynote SIGGRAPH 2019

Marvel Studios executive VP of production Victoria Alonso has been name keynote speaker for SIGGRAPH 2019, which will run from July 28 through August 1 in downtown Los Angeles. Registration is now open. The annual SIGGRAPH conference is a melting pot for researchers, artists and technologists, among other professionals.

“Victoria is the ultimate symbol of where the computer graphics industry is headed and a true visionary for inclusivity,” says SIGGRAPH 2019 conference chair Mikki Rose. “Her outlook reflects the future I envision for computer graphics and for SIGGRAPH. I am thrilled to have her keynote this summer’s conference and cannot wait to hear more of her story.”

One of few women in Hollywood to hold such a prominent title, Alonso’s dedication to the industry has been admired for a long time, leading to multiple awards and honors, including the 2015 New York Women in Film & Television Muse Award for Outstanding Vision and Achievement, the Advanced Imaging Society’s first female Harold Lloyd Award recipient, and the 2017 VES Visionary Award (another female first). A native of Buenos Aires, her career began in visual effects and included a four-year stint at Digital Domain.

Alonso’s film credits include productions such as Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven, Tim Burton’s Big Fish, Andrew Adamson’s Shrek, and numerous Marvel titles — Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Thor, Captain America: The First Avenger, Iron Man 3, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America: Civil War, Thor: The Dark World, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, Doctor Strange, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Thor: Ragnarok, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War, Ant-Man and the Wasp and, most recently, Captain Marvel.

“I’ve been attending SIGGRAPH since before there was a line at the ladies’ room,” says Alonso. “I’m very much looking forward to having a candid conversation about the state of visual effects, diversity and representation in our industry.”

She adds, “At Marvel Studios, we have always tried to push boundaries with both our storytelling and our visual effects. Bringing our work to SIGGRAPH each year offers us the opportunity to help shape the future of filmmaking.”

The 2019 keynote session will be presented as a fireside chat, allowing attendees the opportunity to hear Alonso discuss her life and career in an intimate setting.


Behind the Title: Nice Shoes animator Yandong Dino Qiu

This artist/designer has taken to sketching people on the subway to keep his skills fresh and mind relaxed.

NAME: Yandong Dino Qiu

COMPANY: New York’s Nice Shoes

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Nice Shoes is a full-service creative studio. We offer design, animation, VFX, editing, color grading, VR/AR, working with agencies, brands and filmmakers to help realize their creative vision.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Designer/Animator

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Helping our clients to explore different looks in the pre-production stage, while aiding them in getting as close as possible to the final look of the spot. There’s a lot of exploration and trial and error as we try to deliver beautiful still frames that inform the look of the moving piece.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Not so much for the title, but for myself, design and animation can be quite broad. People may assume you’re only 2D, but it also involves a lot of other skill sets such as 3D lighting and rendering. It’s pretty close to a generalist role that requires you to know nearly every software as well as to turn things around very quickly.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Photoshop, After Effects,. Illustrator, InDesign — the full Adobe Creative Suite — and Maxon Cinema 4D.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Pitch and exploration. At that stage, all possibilities are open. The job is alive… like a baby. You’re seeing it form and helping to make new life. Before this, you have no idea what it’s going to look like. After this phase, everyone has an idea. It’s very challenging, exciting and rewarding.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Revisions. Especially toward the end of a project. Everything is set up. One little change will affect everything else.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
2:15pm. Its right after lunch. You know you have the whole afternoon. The sun is bright. The mood is light. It’s not too late for anything.

Sketching on the subway.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a Manga artist.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
La Mer. Frontline. Friskies. I’ve also been drawing during my commute everyday, sketching the people I see on the subway. I’m trying to post every week on Instagram. I think it’s important for artists to keep to a routine. I started up with this at the beginning of 2019, and there’ve been about 50 drawings already. Artists need to keep their pen sharp all the time. By doing these sketches, I’m not only benefiting my drawing skills, but I’m improving my observation about shapes and compositions, which is extremely valuable for work. Being able to break down shapes and components is a key principle of design, and honing that skill helps me in responding to client briefs.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
TED-Ed What Is Time? We had a lot of freedom in figuring out how to animate Einstein’s theories in a fun and engaging way. I worked with our creative director Harry Dorrington to establish the look and then with our CG team to ensure that the feel we established in the style frames was implemented throughout the piece.

TED-Ed What Is Time?

The film was extremely well received. There was a lot of excitement at Nice Shoes when it premiered, and TED-Ed’s audience seemed to respond really warmly as well. It’s rare to see so much positivity in the YouTube comments.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My Wacom tablet for drawing and my iPad for reading.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I take time and draw for myself. I love that drawing and creating is such a huge part of my job, but it can get stressful and tiring only creating for others. I’m proud of that work, but when I can draw something that makes me personally happy, any stress or exhaustion from the work day just melts away.


IDEA launches to create specs for next-gen immersive media

The Immersive Digital Experiences Alliance (IDEA) will launch at the NAB 2019 with the goal of creating a suite of royalty-free specifications that address all immersive media formats, including emerging light field technology.

Founding members — including CableLabs, Light Field Lab, Otoy and Visby — created IDEA to serve as an alliance of like-minded technology, infrastructure and creative innovators working to facilitate the development of an end-to-end ecosystem for the capture, distribution and display of immersive media.

Such a unified ecosystem must support all displays, including highly anticipated light field panels. Recognizing that the essential launch point would be to create a common media format specification that can be deployed on commercial networks, IDEA has already begun work on the new Immersive Technology Media Format (ITMF).

ITMF will serve as an interchange and distribution format that will enable high-quality conveyance of complex image scenes, including six-degrees-of-freedom (6DoF), to an immersive display for viewing. Moreover, ITMF will enable the support of immersive experience applications including gaming, VR and AR, on top of commercial networks.

Recognized for its potential to deliver an immersive true-to-life experience, light field media can be regarded as the richest and most dense form of visual media, thereby setting the highest bar for features that the ITMF will need to support and the new media-aware processing capabilities that commercial networks must deliver.

Jon Karafin, CEO/co-founder of Light Field Lab, explains that “a light field is a representation describing light rays flowing in every direction through a point in space. New technologies are now enabling the capture and display of this effect, heralding new opportunities for entertainment programming, sports coverage and education. However, until now, there has been no common media format for the storage, editing, transmission or archiving of these immersive images.”

“We’re working on specifications and tools for a variety of immersive displays — AR, VR, stereoscopic 3D and light field technology, with light field being the pinnacle of immersive experiences,” says Dr. Arianne Hinds, Immersive Media Strategist at CableLabs. “As a display-agnostic format, ITMF will provide near-term benefits for today’s screen technology, including VR and AR headsets and stereoscopic displays, with even greater benefits when light field panels hit the market. If light field technology works half as well as early testing suggests, it will be a game-changer, and the cable industry will be there to help support distribution of light field images with the 10G platform.”

Starting with Otoy’s ORBX scene graph format, a well-established data structure widely used in advanced computer animation and computer games, IDEA will provide extensions to expand the capabilities of ORBX for light field photographic camera arrays, live events and other applications. Further specifications will include network streaming for ITMF and transcoding of ITMF for specific displays, archiving, and other applications. IDEA will preserve backwards-compatibility on the existing ORBX format.

IDEA anticipates releasing an initial draft of the ITMF specification in 2019. The alliance also is planning an educational seminar to explain more about the requirements for immersive media and the benefits of the ITMF approach. The seminar will take place in Los Angeles this summer.

Photo Credit: All Rights Reserved: Light Field Lab. Future Vision concept art of room-scale holographic display from Light Field Lab, Inc.


Behind the Title: Left Field Labs ECD Yann Caloghiris

NAME: Yann Caloghiris

COMPANY: Left Field Labs (@LeftFieldLabs)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Left Field Labs is a Venice-California-based creative agency dedicated to applying creativity to emerging technologies. We create experiences at the intersection of strategy, design and code for our clients, who include Google, Uber, Discovery and Estée Lauder.

But it’s how we go about our business that has shaped who we have become. Over the past 10 years, we have consciously moved away from the traditional agency model and have grown by deepening our expertise, sourcing exceptional talent and, most importantly, fostering a “lab-like” creative culture of collaboration and experimentation.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
My role is to drive the creative vision across our client accounts, as well as our own ventures. In practice, that can mean anything from providing insights for ongoing work to proposing creative strategies to running ideation workshops. Ultimately, it’s whatever it takes to help the team flourish and push the envelope of our creative work.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably that I learn more now than I did at the beginning of my career. When I started, I imagined that the executive CD roles were occupied by seasoned industry veterans, who had seen and done it all, and would provide tried and tested direction.

Today, I think that cliché is out of touch with what’s required from agency culture and where the industry is going. Sure, some aspects of the role remain unchanged — such as being a supportive team lead or appreciating the value of great copy — but the pace of change is such that the role often requires both the ability to leverage past experience and accept that sometimes a new paradigm is emerging and assumptions need to be adjusted.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with the team, and the excitement that comes from workshopping the big ideas that will anchor the experiences we create.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The administrative parts of a creative business are not always the most fulfilling. Thankfully, tasks like timesheeting, expense reporting and invoicing are becoming less exhaustive thanks to better predictive tools and machine learning.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
The early hours of the morning, usually when inspiration strikes — when we haven’t had to deal with the unexpected day-to-day challenges that come with managing a busy design studio.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d probably be somewhere at the cross-section between an artist, like my mum was, and an engineer like my dad. There is nothing more satisfying than to apply art to an engineering challenge or vice versa.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I went to school in France, and there wasn’t much room for anything other than school and homework. When I got my Baccalaureate, I decided that from that point onward that whatever I did, it would be fun, deeply engaging and at a place where being creative was an asset.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We recently partnered with ad agency RK Venture to craft a VR experience for the New Mexico Department of Transportation’s ongoing ENDWI campaign, which immerses viewers into a real-life drunk-driving scenario.

ENDWI

To best communicate and tell the human side of this story, we turned to rapid breakthroughs within volumetric capture and 3D scanning. Working with Microsoft’s Mixed Reality Capture Studio, we were able to bring every detail of an actor’s performance to life with volumetric performance capture in a way that previous techniques could not.

Bringing a real actor’s performance into a virtual experience is a game changer because of the emotional connection it creates. For ENDWI, the combination of rich immersion with compelling non-linear storytelling proved to affect the participants at a visceral level — with the goal of changing behavior further down the road.

Throughout this past year, we partnered with the VMware Cloud Marketing Team to create a one-of-a-kind immersive booth experience for VMworld Las Vegas 2018 and Barcelona 2018 called Cloud City. VMware’s cloud offering needed a distinct presence to foster a deeper understanding and greater connectivity between brand, product and customers stepping into the cloud.

Cloud City

Our solution was Cloud City, a destination merging future-forward architecture, light, texture, sound and interactions with VMware Cloud experts to give consumers a window into how the cloud, and more specifically how VMware Cloud, can be an essential solution for them. VMworld is the brand’s penultimate engagement where hands-on learning helped showcase its cloud offerings. Cloud City garnered 4000-plus demos, which led to a 20% lead conversion in 10 days.

Finally, for Google, we designed and built a platform for the hosting of online events anywhere in the world: Google Gather. For its first release, teams across Google, including Android, Cloud and Education, used Google Gather to reach and convert potential customers across the globe. With hundreds of events to date, the platform now reaches enterprise decision-makers at massive scale, spanning far beyond what has been possible with traditional event marketing, management and hosting.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Recently, a friend and I shot and edited a fun video homage to the original technology boom-town: Detroit, Michigan. It features two cultural icons from the region, an original big block ‘60s muscle car and some gritty electro beats. My four-year-old son thinks it’s the coolest thing he’s ever seen. It’s going to be hard for me to top that.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Human flight, the Internet and our baby monitor!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram, Twitter, Medium and LinkedIn.

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Where to start?! Music has always played an important part of my creative process, and the joy I derive from what we do. I have day-long playlists curated around what I’m trying to achieve during that time. Being able to influence how I feel when working on a brief is essential — it helps set me in the right mindset.

Sometimes, it might be film scores when working on visuals, jazz to design a workshop schedule or techno to dial-up productivity when doing expenses.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Spend time with my kids. They remind me that there is a simple and unpretentious way to look at life.


From artist to AR technologist: What I learned along the way

By Leon Hui

As an ARwall co-founder and chief technology officer (CTO), I manage all things relating to technology for the company. This includes overseeing software and technology development, designs, engineering, IT, troubleshooting and everything in-between. Launching the company, I solely developed the critical pieces of technology required to achieve the ARwall concept overall.

I came into augmented reality (AR) as a game development software engineer, and that plays a big role in how I approach this new medium. Stepping into ARwall, it became my job to produce artistic realtime graphics for AR backdrops and settings, while also pursuing technological advancements that will move the AR industry forward.

Rene Amador presents in front of an ARwall screen. The TV monitor in the foreground shows the camera’s perspective.

Alongside CEO Rene Amador, the best way we found to make sure the company retained artistic values was to bring on highly talented artists, coders and engineers with a diverse skill set in both art and tech. It’s our mission to not let the scales tip one way or the other, and to focus on bringing in both artistic and tech talent.

With the continuing convergence of entertainment and technology, it is vital for a creative technology company to continue to advance, while maintaining and nurturing artistic integrity.

Here is what we have learned along the way in striking this balance:

Diversify Your Hiring
Going into AR, or any other immersive field, it is very important that one understands realtime graphics.

So, while it’s useful for my company to hire engineers that have graphics and coding backgrounds — as many game engineers do — it’s still crucial to hire for the individual strengths of both tech and art. At ARwall, our open roles could be combined for one gifted individual, or isolated with an emphasis on either artistry or coding, for those with specialties.

Because we are dealing with high-quality realtime graphics, the ARwall team would be similar to the team profiles of any AAA game studio. We never deviated from an artistic trajectory — we just brought technology along for the ride. We think of talent recruitment as a crucial process in our advancement and always have our eyes out for our next game developer to fill roles ranging from technical, environment, material and character artist to graphics, game engine and generalist engineer.

Expand Your Education
If someone with a background in film or TV post production came to work in a new tech industry, like AR, they would need to expand their own education. It’s challenging, but not impossible. While my company’s current emphasis is on game developers and CG artists, the backgrounds of fellow co-founders Rene Amador, Eric Navarrette and Jocelyn Hsu sit in ad agencies, television digital development, post production and beyond.

Jocelyn Hsu on an XR set, a combination of physical set pieces with the CG set extension running in the background.

There are a variety of toolsets and concepts left to learn, including: the software development life cycle; Microsoft Project or Hansoft; Agile methodology; the definition of “realtime graphics” and how it works; the top-dog game engine tools, including Unity and Unreal Engine 4; and digital asset creation pipelines for game engines, among others.

The transition is largely based on ones game development background but, of course, there is always a learning curve when entering a new industry.

Focus on the Balance
We understand that the core of a “technology company,” as we bill ourselves, is still the foundational technology. However, depending on the type of technology, companies need staffers that have a high-level mastery of the technology in order to demonstrate its full potential to others. It just happens that with AR technology there is an inherently visual aspect, which translates to a need for superior artistry in unison with the precise technology.

In order for AR technology to showcase and look more appealing, high-quality artistry is very much needed. This can be a difficult balance to maintain if focus or purpose are lost. For ARwall, we aim to hire talent that excels at art or engineering, or both.

ARwall expanded its offerings to stake its claim as a technology company, but built on each founders’ roots as artists, engineers and producers. Tech and art aren’t mutually-exclusive; rather, with focus, education and time to search for the right talent, technology companies can excel with invention and keep their creative edge, all at once.


Leon Hui brings to the team 20+ years of technical experience as a software engineer focusing on realtime 3D graphics, VR/AR and systems architecture. He has lead/senior technical roles on 15 AAA shipped titles as a veteran of top developers including EA, Microsoft Studios, Konami Digital Entertainment. He was previously TD at Skydance Interactive. ARwall is based in Burbank. 

 


Behind the Title: Lobo EP, Europe Loic Francois Marie Dubois

NAME: Loic Francois Marie Dubois

COMPANY: New York- and São Paulo, Brazil-based Lobo

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a full-service creative studio offering design, live action, stop motion, 3D & 2D, mixed media, print, digital, AR and VR.

Day One spot Sunshine

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative executive producer for Europe and formerly head of production. I’m based in Brazil, but work out of the New York office as well.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Managing, hiring creative teams, designers, producers and directors for international productions (USA, Europe, Asia). Also, I have served as the creative executive director for TBWA Paris on the McDonald’s Happy Meal global campaign for the last five years. Now as creative EP for Europe, I am also responsible for streamlining information from pre-production to post production between all production parties for a more efficient and prosperous sales outcome.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The patience and the fun psychological side you need to have to handle all the production peeps, agencies, and clients.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Excel, Word, Showbiz, Keynote, Pages, Adobe Package (Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, Premiere, InDesign), Maya, Flame, Nuke and AR/VR technology.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with talented creative people on extraordinary projects with a stunning design and working on great narratives, such as the work we have done for clients including Interface, Autism Speaks, Imaginary Friends, Unicef and Travelers, to name a few.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Monday morning.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early afternoon between Europe closing down and the West Coast waking up.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Meditating in Tibet…

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Since I was 13 years old. After shooting and editing a student short film (an Oliver Twist adaptation) with a Bolex 16mm on location in London and Paris, I was hooked.

Promoting Lacta 5Star chocolate bars

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
An animated campaign for the candy company Mondelez’s Lacta 5Star chocolate bars; an animated short film for the Imaginary Friends Society; a powerful animated short on the dangers of dating abuse and domestic violence for nonprofit Day One; a mixed media campaign for Chobani called FlipLand; and a broadcast spot for McDonald’s and Spider-Man.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
My three kids 🙂

It’s really hard to choose one project, as they are all equally different and amazing in their own way, but maybe D&AD Wish You Were Here. It stands out for the number of awards it won and the collective creative production process.

NAME PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The Internet.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Meditation and yoga.


Chaos Group to support Cinema 4D with two rendering products

At the Maxon Supermeet 2018 event, Chaos Group announced its plans to support the Maxon Cinema 4D community with two rendering products: V-Ray for Cinema 4D and Corona for Cinema 4D. Based on V-Ray’s Academy Award-winning raytracing technology, the development of V-Ray for Cinema 4D will be focused on production rendering for high-end visual effects and motion graphics. Corona for Cinema 4D will focus on artist-friendly design visualization.

Chaos Group, which acquired the V-Ray for Cinema 4D product from LAUBlab and will lead development on the product for the first time, will offer current customers free migration to a new update, V-Ray 3.7 for Cinema 4D. All users who move to the new version will receive a free V-Ray for Cinema 4D license, including all product updates, through January 15, 2020. Moving forward, Chaos Group will be providing all support, sales and product development in-house.

In addition to ongoing improvements to V-Ray for Cinema 4D, Chaos Group is also released the Corona for Cinema 4D beta 2 at Supermeet, with the final product to follow in January 2019.

Main Image: Daniel Sian created Robots using V-ray for Cinema 4D.

SIGGRAPH conference chair Roy C. Anthony: VR, AR, AI, VFX, more

By Randi Altman

Next month, SIGGRAPH returns to Vancouver after turns in Los Angeles and Anaheim. This gorgeous city, whose convention center offers a water view, is home to many visual effects studios providing work for film, television and spots.

As usual, SIGGRAPH will host many presentations, showcase artists’ work, display technology and offer a glimpse into what’s on the horizon for this segment of the market.

Roy C. Anthony

Leading up to the show — which takes place August 12-16 — we reached out to Roy C. Anthony, this year’s conference chair. For his day job, Anthony recently joined Ventuz Technology as VP, creative development. There, he leads initiatives to bring Ventuz’s realtime rendering technologies to creators of sets, stages and ProAV installations around the world

SIGGRAPH is back in Vancouver this year. Can you talk about why it’s important for the industry?
There are 60-plus world-class VFX and animation studios in Vancouver. There are more than 20,000 film and TV jobs, and more than 8,000 VFX and animation jobs in the city.

So, Vancouver’s rich production-centric communities are leading the way in film and VFX production for television and onscreen films. They are also are also busy with new media content, games work and new workflows, including those for AR/VR/mixed reality.

How many exhibitors this year?
The conference and exhibition will play host to over 150 exhibitors on the show floor, showcasing the latest in computer graphics and interactive technologies, products and services. Due to the increase in the amount of new technology that has debuted in the computer graphics marketplace over this past year, almost one quarter of this year’s 150 exhibitors will be presenting at SIGGRAPH for the first time

In addition to the traditional exhibit floor and conferences, what are some of the can’t-miss offerings this year?
We have increased the presence of virtual, augmented and mixed reality projects and experiences — and we are introducing our new Immersive Pavilion in the east convention center, which will be dedicated to this area. We’ve incorporated immersive tech into our computer animation festival with the inclusion of our VR Theater, back for its second year, as well as inviting a special, curated experience with New York University’s Ken Perlin — he’s a legendary computer graphics professor.

We’ll be kicking off the week in a big VR way with a special session following the opening ceremony featuring Ivan Sutherland, considered by many as “the father of computer graphics.” That 50-year retrospective will present the history and innovations that sparked our industry.

We have also brought Syd Mead, a legendary “visual futurist” (Blade Runner, Tron, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Aliens, Time Cop, Tomorrowland, Blade Runner 2049), who will display an arrangement of his art in a special collection called Progressions. This will be seen within our Production Gallery experience, which also returns for its second year. Progressions will exhibit more than 50 years of artwork by Syd, from his academic years to his most current work.

We will have an amazing array of guest speakers, including those featured within the Business Symposium, which is making a return to SIGGRAPH after an absence of a few years. Among these speakers are people from the Disney Technology Innovation Group, Unity and Georgia Tech.

On Tuesday, August 14, our SIGGRAPH Next series will present a keynote speaker each morning to kick off the day with an inspirational talk. These speakers are Tony Derose, a senior scientist from Pixar; Daniel Szecket, VP of design for Quantitative Imaging Systems; and Bob Nicoll, dean of Blizzard Academy.

There will be a 25th anniversary showing of the original Jurassic Park movie, being hosted by “Spaz” Williams, a digital artist who worked on that film.

Can you talk about this year’s keynote and why he was chosen?
We’re thrilled to have ILM head and senior VP, ECD Rob Bredow deliver the keynote address this year. Rob is all about innovation — pushing through scary new directions while maintaining the leadership of artists and technologists.

Rob is the ultimate modern-day practitioner, a digital VFX supervisor who has been disrupting ‘the way it’s always been done’ to move to new ways. He truly reflects the spirit of ILM, which was founded in 1975 and is just one year younger than SIGGRAPH.

A large part of SIGGRAPH is its slant toward students and education. Can you discuss how this came about and why this is important?
SIGGRAPH supports education in all sub-disciplines of computer graphics and interactive techniques, and it promotes and improves the use of computer graphics in education. Our Education Committee sponsors a broad range of projects, such as curriculum studies, resources for educators and SIGGRAPH conference-related activities.

SIGGRAPH has always been a welcoming and diverse community, one that encourages mentorship, and acknowledges that art inspires science and science enables advances in the arts. SIGGRAPH was built upon a foundation of research and education.

How are the Computer Animation Festival films selected?
The Computer Animation Festival has two programs, the Electronic Theater and the VR Theater. Because of the large volume of submissions for the Electronic Theater (over 400), there is a triage committee for the first phase. The CAF Chair then takes the high scoring pieces to a jury comprised of industry professionals. The jury selects then become the Electronic Theater show pieces.

The selections for the VR Theater are made by a smaller panel comprised mostly of sub-committee members that watch each film in a VR headset and vote.

Can you talk more about how SIGGRAPH is tackling AR/VR/AI and machine learning?
Since SIGGRAPH 2018 is about the theme of “Generations,” we took a step back to look at how we got where we are today in terms of AR/VR, and where we are going with it. Much of what we know today couldn’t have been possible without the research and creation of Ivan Sutherland’s 1968 head-mounted display. We have a fanatic panel celebrating the 50-year anniversary of his HMD, which is widely considered and the first VR HMD.

AI tools are newer, and we created a panel that focuses on trends and the future of AI tools in VFX, called “Future Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning Tools for VFX.” This panel gains insight from experts embedded in both the AI and VFX industries and gives attendees a look at how different companies plan to further their technology development.

What is the process for making sure that all aspects of the industry are covered in terms of panels?
Every year new ideas for panels and sessions are submitted by contributors from all over the globe. Those submissions are then reviewed by a jury of industry experts, and it is through this process that panelists and cross-industry coverage is determined.

Each year, the conference chair oversees the program chairs, then each of the program chairs become part of a jury process — this helps to ensure the best program with the most industries represented from across all disciplines.

In the rare case a program committee feels they are missing something key in the industry, they can try to curate a panel in, but we still require that that panel be reviewed by subject matter experts before it would be considered for final acceptance.