Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: Animation

London’s Jelly opens in NYC, EP relocates

London-based Jelly, an animation, design and production company that’s produced for many US-based agencies and direct clients, has opened a full-time presence in New York. Their senior creative producer Eri Panasci will relocate to lead the new entity as executive producer.

Launched in 2002, Jelly functions as both a production company and artist management agency. On the commercials front, Jelly represents a global roster of directors and creators who’ve produced animation and motion graphics for brands like Lacoste, Apple, Samsung, Adidas and others. In the latter role, it represents a roster of illustrators and designers who regularly collaborate with brands on print, digital and outdoor ad campaigns.

Panasci’s move to New York is also a homecoming. This Connecticut native and graduate of Boston University has worked in New York, San Francisco and London for McCann and Vice Media. She joined Jelly in London in 2016, overseeing design and production assignments for such clients as Virgin Media, Google, Nespresso, McDonald’s and Bombay Sapphire.

“One of the things I’ll be able to do is provide a deeper level of service for our US clients from New York versus London,” says Panasci, “and meld that with the Jelly model and culture. And being able to put a face to a name is always good, especially when you’re dealing with someone who understands the American market and its expectations.”

The studio has lined up US representation with James Bartlett of Mr. Bartlett, whose initial brief will be to handle the East Coast.

Coming from the UK, how does Panasci describe the Jelly approach? “It’s playful yet competent,” she says with enthusiasm. “We don’t take ourselves too seriously, but on the other hand we get shit done, and we do it well. We’re known for craft and solutions, and famously for not saying the word ‘no’ — unless we really have to!”

Recent Jelly projects include Hot House, a zany TVC for Virgin Mobile, co-directed by Design Lad and Kitchen; Soho, an animated short for the shared workspace company Fora and London agency Anyways, directed by Niceshit; and Escape, a spot for the outdoor clothing company Berghaus, directed by Em Cooper for VCCP that uses the director’s unique, hand-painted technique.

Panasci says the focus of Jelly’s US operations will initially be motion work, but adds their illustration talents will also be available, and they’ll be showing print portfolios along with show reels when meeting with agencies and clients. Jelly’s head of illustration, Nicki Field, will accompany Panasci in March to kick off the New York presence with a series of meetings and screenings.

While based in London, the studio is at ease working in America, Panasci says. They’ve produced campaigns for such shops as 72andSunny, Mother, Droga5, BBH, Wieden + Kennedy, Publicis and more, working with both their US and European offices.

Most recently, Jelly signed the New York-based animation team Roof to a representation agreement for the UK market; the team played a leading role in the recent “Imaginary Friends” campaign from RPA in Santa Monica.

AES/SMPTE panel: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse sound

By Mel Lambert

As part of its successful series of sound showcases, a recent joint meeting of the Los Angeles Section of the Audio Engineering Society and SMPTE’s Hollywood Section focused on the soundtrack of the animated features Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which has garnered several Oscar, BAFTA, CAS and MPSE award nominations, plus a Golden Globes win.

On January 31 at Sony Pictures Studios’ Kim Novak Theater in Culver City many gathered to hear a panel discussion between the film’s sound and picture editors and re-recording mixers. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was co-directed by Peter Ramsey, Robert Persichetti Jr. and Rodney Rothman, the creative minds behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street.

The panel

The Sound Showcase panel included supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey, re-recording mixer/sound designer Tony Lamberti, re-recording mixer Michael Semanick and associate picture editor Vivek Sharma. The Hollywood Reporter’s Carolyn Giardina moderated. The event concluded with a screening of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which represents a different Spider-Man Universe, since it introduces Brooklyn teen Miles Morales and the expanding possibilities of the Spider-Verse, where more than one entity can wear the arachnid mask.

Following the screening of an opening sequence from the animated feature, Rubay acknowledged that the film’s producers were looking for a different look for the Spider-Man character based on the Marvel comic books, but with a reference to previous live-action movies in the franchise. “They wanted us to make more of the period in which the new film is set,” he told the standing-room audience in the same dubbing stage where the soundtrack was re-recorded.

“[EVPs] Phil Lord and Chris Miller have a specific style of soundtrack that they’ve developed,” stated Lamberti, “and so we premixed to get that overall shape.”

“The look is unique,” conceded Semanick, “and our mix needed to match that and make it sound like a comic book. It couldn’t be too dynamic; we didn’t want to assault the audience, but still make it loud here and softer there.”

Full house

“We also kept the track to its basics,” Rubay added, “and didn’t add a sound for every little thing. If the soundtrack had been as complicated as the visuals, the audience’s heads would have exploded.”

“Yes, simpler was often better,” Lamberti confirmed, “to let the soundtrack tell the story of the visuals.”

In terms of balancing sound effects against dialog, “We did a lot of experimentation and went with what seemed the best solution,” Semanick said. “We kept molding the soundtrack until we were satisfied.” As Lamberti confirmed: “It was always a matter of balancing all the sound elements, using trial and error.”

=Nominated for a Cinema Audio Society Award in the Motion Picture — Animated category, Brian Smith, Aaron Hasson and Howard London served as original dialogue mixers on the film, with Sam Okell as scoring mixer and Randy K. Singer as Foley mixer. The crew also included sound designer John Pospisil, Foley supervisor Alec G. Rubay, SFX editors Kip Smedley, Andy Sisul, David Werntz, Christopher Aud, Ando Johnson, Benjamin Cook, Mike Reagan and Donald Flick.

During picture editorial, “we lived with many versions until we got to the sound,” explained Sharma. “The premix was fantastic and worked very well. Visuals are important but sound fulfils a complementary role. Dialogue is always key; the audience needs to hear what the characters say!”

“We present ideas and judge the results until everybody is happy,” said Semanick. “[Writer/producer] Phil Lord was very good at listening to everybody; he made the final decision, but deferred to the directors. ‘Maybe we should drop the music?’ ‘Does the result still pull the audience into the music?’ We worked until the elements worked very well together.”

The lead character’s “Spidey Sense” also discussed. As co-supervisor Schulkey explained: “Our early direction was that it was an internal feeling … like a warm, fuzzy feeling. But warm and fuzzy didn’t cut through the music. In the end there was not just a single Spidey Sense — it was never the same twice. The web slings were a classic sound that we couldn’t get too far from.”

“And we used [Dolby] Atmos to spin and pan those sounds around the room,” added Lamberti, who told the audience that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse marked Sony Animation’s first native Atmos mix. “We used the format to get the most out of it,” concluded the SFX re-recording mixer, who mixed sound effects “in the box” using an Avid S6 console/controller, while Semanick handled dialogue and music on the Kim Novak Theater’s Harrison MPC4D X-Range digital console.


Mel Lambert has been intimately involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists. 

Arraiy 4.11.19

Quick Chat: Crew Cuts’ Nancy Jacobsen and Stephanie Norris

By Randi Altman

Crew Cuts, a full-service production and post house, has been a New York fixture since 1986. Originally established as an editorial house, over the years as the industry evolved they added services that target all aspects of the workflow.

This independently-owned facility is run by executive producer/partner Nancy Jacobsen, senior editor/partner Sherri Margulies Keenan and senior editor/partner Jake Jacobsen. While commercial spots might be in their wheelhouse, their projects vary and include social media, music videos and indie films.

We decided to reach out to Nancy Jacobsen, as well as EP of finishing Stephanie Norris, to find out about trends, recent work and succeeding in an industry and city that isn’t always so welcoming.

Can you talk about what Crew Cuts provides and how you guys have evolved over the years?
Jacobsen: We pretty much do it all. We have 10 offline editors as well as artists working in VFX, 2D/3D animation, motion graphics/design, audio mix and sound design, VO record, color grading, title treatment, advanced compositing and conform. Two of our editors double as directors.

In the beginning, Crew Cuts primarily offered only editorial. As the years went by and the industry climate changed we began to cater to the needs of clients and slowly built out our entire finishing department. We started with some minimal graphics work and one staff artist in 2008.

In 2009, we expanded the team to include graphics, conform and audio mix. From there we just continued to grow and expand our department to the full finishing team we have today.

As a woman owner of a post house, what challenges have you had to overcome?
Jacobsen: When I started in this business, the industry was very different. I made less money than my male counterparts and it took me twice as long to be promoted because I am a woman. I have since seen great change where women are leading post houses and production houses and are finally getting the recognition for the hard work they deserve. Unfortunately, I had to “wait it out” and silently work harder than the men around me. This has paid off for me, and now I can help women get the credit they rightly deserve

Do you see the industry changing and becoming less male-dominated?
Jacobsen: Yes, the industry is definitely becoming less male-dominated. In the current climate, with the birth of the #metoo movement and specifically in our industry with the birth of Diet Madison Avenue (@dietmadisonave), we are seeing a lot more women step up and take on leading roles.

Are you mostly a commercial house? What other segments of the industry do you work in?
Jacobsen: We are primarily a commercial house. However, we are not limited to just broadcast and digital commercial advertising. We have delivered specs for everything from the Godzilla screen in Times Square to :06 spots on Instagram. We have done a handful of music videos and also handle a ton of B2B videos for in-house client meetings, etc., as well as banner ads for conferences and trade shows. We’ve even worked on display ads for airports. Most recently, one of our editors finished a feature film called Public Figure that is being submitted around the film festival circuit.

What types of projects are you working on most often these days?
Jacobsen: The industry is all over the place. The current climate is very messy right now. Our projects are extremely varied. It’s hard to say what we work on most because it seems like there is no more norm. We are working on everything from sizzle pitch videos to spots for the Super Bowl.

What trends have you seen over the last year, and where do you expect to be in a year?
Jacobsen: Over the last year, we have noticed that the work comes from every angle. Our typical client is no longer just the marketing agency. It is also the production company, network, brand, etc. In a year we expect to be doing more production work. Seeing as how budgets are much smaller than they used to be and everyone wants a one-stop shop, we are hoping to stick with our gut and continue expanding our production arm.

Crew Cuts has beefed up its finishing services. Can you talk about that?
Stephanie Norris: We offer a variety of finishing services — from sound design to VO record and mix, compositing to VFX, 2D and 3D motion graphics and color grading. Our fully staffed in-house team loves the visual effects puzzle and enjoys working with clients to help interpret their vision.

Can you name some recent projects and the services you provided?
Norris: We just worked on a new campaign for New Jersey Lottery in collaboration with Yonder Content and PureRed. Brian Neaman directed and edited the spots. In addition to editorial, Crew Cuts also handled all of the finishing, including color, conform, visual effects, graphics, sound design and mix. This was one of those all-hands-on-deck projects. Keeping everything under one roof really helped us to streamline the process.

New Jersey Lottery

Working with Brian to carefully plan the shooting strategy, we filmed a series of plate shots as elements that could later be combined in post to build each scene. We added falling stacks of cash to the reindeer as he walks through the loading dock and incorporated CG inflatable decorations into a warehouse holiday lawn scene. We also dramatically altered the opening and closing exterior warehouse scenes, allowing one shot to work for multiple seasons. Keeping lighting and camera positions consistent was mission-critical, and having our VFX supervisor, Dulany Foster, on set saved us hours of work down the line.

For the New Jersey Lottery Holiday spots, the Crew Cuts CG team, led by our creative director Ben McNamara created a 3D Inflatable display of lottery tickets. This was something that proved too costly and time consuming to manufacture and shoot practically. After the initial R&D, our team created a few different CG inflatable simulations prior to the shoot, and Dulany was able to mock them up live while on set. Creating the simulations was crucial for giving the art department reference while building the set, and also helped when shooting the plates needed to composite the scene together.

Ben and his team focused on the physics of the inflation, while also making sure the fabric simulations, textures and lighting blended seamlessly into the scene — it was important that everything felt realistic. In addition to the inflatables, our VFX team turned the opening and closing sunny, summer shots of the warehouse into a December winter wonderland thanks to heavy compositing, 3D set extension and snow simulations.

New Jersey Lottery

Any other projects you’d like to talk about?
Jacobsen: We are currently working on a project here that we are handling soup to nuts from production through finishing. It was a fun challenge to take on. The spot contains a hand model on a greenscreen showing the audience how to use a new product. The shoot itself took place here at Crew Cuts. We turned our common area into a stage for the day and were able to do so without interrupting any of the other employees and projects going on.

We are now working on editorial and finishing. The edit is coming along nicely. What really drives the piece here is the graphic icons. Our team is having a lot of fun designing these elements and implementing them into the spot. We are so proud because we budgeted wisely to make sure to accommodate all of the needs of the project so that we could handle everything and still turn a profit. It was so much fun to work in a different setting for the day and has been a very successful project so far. Clients are happy and so are we.

Main Image: (L-R) Stephanie Norris and Nancy Jacobsen


Efilm’s Natasha Leonnet: Grading Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

By Randi Altman

Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is not your typical Spider-Man film… in so many ways. The most obvious is the movie’s look, which was designed to make the viewer feel they are walking inside a comic book. This tale, which blends CGI with 2D hand-drawn animation and comic book textures, focuses on a Brooklyn teen who is bitten by a radioactive spider on the subway and soon develops special powers.

Natasha Leonnet

When he meets Peter Parker, he realizes he’s not alone in the Spider-Verse. It was co-directed by Peter Ramsey, Robert Persichetti Jr. and Rodney Rothman and produced by Phil Lord and Chris Miller, the pair behind 21 Jump Street and The Lego Movie.

Efilm senior colorist Natasha Leonnet provided the color finish for the film, which was nominated for an Oscar in the Best Animated Feature category. We reached out to find out more.

How early were you brought on the film?
I had worked on Angry Birds with visual effects supervisor Danny Dimian, which is how I was brought onto the film. It was a few months before we started color correction. Also, there was no LUT for the film. They used the ACES workflow, developed by The Academy and Efilm’s VP of technology, Joachim “JZ” Zell.

Can you talk about the kind of look they were after and what it took to achieve that look?
They wanted to achieve a comic book look. You look at the edges of characters or objects in comic books and you actually see aspects of the color printing from the beginning of comic book printing — the CMYK dyes wouldn’t all be the same line — it creates a layered look along with the comic book dots and expression lines on faces, as if you’re drawing a comic book.

For example, if someone gets hurt you put actual slashes on their face. For me it was a huge education about the comic book art form. Justin Thompson, the art director, in particular is so knowledgeable about the history of comic books. I was so inspired I just bought my first comic book. Also, with the overall look, the light is painting color everywhere the way it does in life.

You worked closely Justin, VFX supervisor Danny Dimian and art director Dean Gordon What was that process like?
They were incredible. It was usually a group of us working together during the color sessions — a real exercise in collaboration. They were all so open to each other’s opinions and constantly discussing every change in order to make certain that the change best served the film. There was no idea that was more important than another idea. Everyone listened to each other’s ideas.

Had you worked on an animated film previously? What are the challenges and benefits of working with animation?
I’ve been lucky enough to do all of Blue Sky Studios’ color finishes so far, except for the first Ice Age. One of the special aspects of working on animated films is that you’re often working with people who are fine-art painters. As a result, they bring in a different background and way of analyzing the images. That’s really special. They often focus on the interplay of different hues.

In the case of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, they also wanted to bring a certain naturalism to the color experience. With this particular film, they made very bold choices with their use of color finishing. They used an aspect of color correctors that are used to shift all of the hues and colors; that’s usually reserved for music videos. They completely embraced it. They were basically using color finishing to augment the story and refine their hues, especially time of day and progression of the day or night. They used it as their extra lighting step.

Can you talk about your typical process? Did that differ because of the animated content?
My process actually does not differ when I’m color finishing animated content. Continuity is always at the forefront, even in animation. I use the color corrector as a creative tool on every project.

How would you describe the look of the film?
The film embodies the vivid and magical colors that I always observed in childhood but never saw reflected on the screen. The film is very color intense. It’s as if you’re stepping inside a comic book illustrator’s mind. It’s a mind-meld with how they’re imagining things.

What system did you use for color and why?
I used Resolve on this project, as it was the system that the clients were most familiar with.

Any favorite parts of the process?
My favorite part is from start to finish. It was all magical on this film.

What was your path to being a colorist?
My parents loved going to the cinema. They didn’t believe in babysitters, so they took me to everything. They were big fans of the French new wave movement and films that offered unconventional ways of depicting the human experience. As a result, I got to see some pretty unusual films. I got to see how passionate my parents were about these films and their stories and unusual way of telling them, and it sparked something in me. I think I can give my parents full credit for my career.

I studied non-narrative experimental filmmaking in college even though ultimately my real passion was narrative film. I started as a runner in the Czech Republic, which is where I’d made my thesis film for my BA degree. From there I worked my way up and met a colorist (Biggi Klier) who really inspired me. I was hooked and lucky enough to study with her and another mentor of mine in Munich, Germany.

How do you prefer a director and DP describe a look?
Every single person I’ve worked with works differently, and that’s what makes it so fun and exciting, but also challenging. Every person communicates about color differently and our vocabulary for color is so limited, therein lies the challenge.

Where do you find inspiration?
From both the natural world and the world of films. I live in a place that faces east, and I get up every morning to watch the sunrise and the color palette is always different. It’s beautiful and inspiring. The winter palettes in particular are gorgeous, with reds and oranges that don’t exist in summer sunrises.


Autodesk launches Maya 2019 for animation, rendering, more

Autodesk has released the latest version of Maya, its 3D animation, modeling, simulation and rendering software. Maya 2019 features significant updates for speed and interactivity and addresses some challenges artists face throughout production, providing faster animation playback to reduce the need for playblasts, higher quality 3D previews with Autodesk Arnold updates in viewport 2.0, improved pipeline integration with more flexible development environment support, and performance improvements that most Maya artists will notice in their daily work.

Key new Maya 2019 features include:
• Faster Animation: New cached playback increases animation playback speeds in viewport 2.0, giving animators a more interactive and responsive animating environment to produce better quality animations. It helps reduce the need to produce time-consuming playblasts to evaluate animation work, so animators can work faster.


• Higher Quality Previews Closer to Final Renders: Arnold upgrades improve realtime previews in viewport 2.0, allowing artists to preview higher quality results that are closer to the final Arnold render for better creativity and less wasted time.
• Faster Maya: New performance and stability upgrades help improve daily productivity in a range of areas that most artists will notice in their daily work.
• Refining Animation Data: New filters within the graph editor make it easier to work with motion capture data, including the Butterworth filter and the key reducer to help refine animation curves.
• Rigging Improvements: New updates help make the work of riggers and character TDs easier, including the ability to hide sets from the outliner to streamline scenes, improvements to the bake deformer tool and new methods for saving deformer weights to more easily script rig creation.
• Pipeline Integration Improvements: Development environment updates make it easier for pipeline and tool developers to create, customize and integrate into production pipelines.
• Help for Animators in Training: Sample rigged and animated characters, as well as motion capture samples, make it easier for students to learn and quickly get started animating.

Maya 2019 is available now as a standalone subscription or with a collection of end-to-end creative tools within the Autodesk Media & Entertainment Collection.


Asahi beer spot gets the VFX treatment

A collaboration between The Monkeys Melbourne, In The Thicket and Alt, a newly released Asahi campaign takes viewers on a journey through landscapes built around surreal Japanese iconography. Watch Asahi Super Dry — Enter Asahi here.

From script to shoot — a huge operation that took place at Sydney’s Fox Studios — director Marco Prestini and his executive producer Genevieve Triquet (from production house In The Thicket) brought on the VFX team at Alt to help realize the creative vision.

The VFX team at Alt (which has offices in Sydney, Melbourne and Los Angeles) worked with Prestini to help design and build the complex “one shot” look, with everything from robotic geishas to a gigantic CG squid in the mix, alongside a seamless blend of CG set extensions and beautifully shot live-action plates.

“VFX supervisor Dave Edwards and the team at Alt, together with my EP Genevieve, have been there since the very beginning, and their creative input and expertise were key in every step of the way,” explains Prestini. “Everything we did on set was the results of weeks of endless back and forth on technical previz, a process that required pretty much everyone’s input on a daily basis and that was incredibly inspiring for me to be part of.”

Dave Edwards, VFX supervisor at Alt, shares: “Production designer Michael Iacono designed sets in 3D, with five huge sets built for the shoot. The team then worked out camera speeds for timings based on these five sets and seven plates. DP Stefan Duscio would suggest rigs and mounts, which our team was able to then test it in previs to see if it would work with the set. During previs, we worked out that we couldn’t get the resolution and the required frame rate to shoot the high frame rate samurais, so we had to use Alexa LF. Of course, that also helped Marco, who wanted minimal lens distortion as it allowed a wide field of view without the distortion of normal anamorphic lenses.”

One complex scene involves a character battling a gigantic underwater squid, which was done via a process known as “dry for wet” — a film technique in which smoke, colored filters and/or lighting effects are used to simulate a character being underwater while filming on a dry stage. The team at Alt did a rough animation of the squid to help drive the actions of the talent and the stunt team on the day, before spending the final weeks perfecting the look of the photoreal monster.

In terms of tools, for concept design/matte painting Alt used Adobe Photoshop while previs/modeling/texturing/animation was done in Autodesk Maya. All of the effects/lighting/look development was via Side Effects Houdini; the compositing pipeline was built around Foundry Nuke; final online was completed in Autodesk Flame; and for graphics, they used Adobe After Effects.
The final edit was done by The Butchery.

Here is the VFX breakdown:

Enter Asahi – VFX Breakdown from altvfx on Vimeo.


Behind the Title: Aardman director/designer Gavin Strange

NAME: Gavin Strange

COMPANY: Bristol, England-based Aardman. They also have an office in NYC under the banner Aardman Nathan Love

CAN YOU DESCRIBE HOW YOUR CAREER AT AARDMAN BEGAN?
I can indeed! I started 10 years ago as a freelancer, joining the fledgling Interactive department (or Aardman Online as it was known back then). They needed a digital designer for a six-month project for the UK’s Channel 4.

I was a freelancer in Bristol at the time and I made it my business to be quite vocal on all the online platforms, always updating those platforms and my own website with my latest work — whether that be client work or self-initiated projects. Luckily for me, the creative director of Aardman Online, Dan Efergan, saw my work when he was searching for a designer and got in touch (it was the most exciting email ever, with the subject of “Hello from Aardman!”

The short version of this story is that I got Dan’s email, popped in for a cup of tea and a chat, and 10 years later I’m still here! Ha!

The slightly longer but still truncated version is that after the six-month freelance project was done, the role of senior designer for the online team became open and I gave up the freelance life and, very excitedly, joined the team as an official Aardmanite!

Thing is, I was never shy about sharing with my new colleagues the other work I did. My role in the beginning was primarily digital/graphic design, but in my own time, under the banner of JamFactory (my own artist alter-ego name) I put out all sorts of work that was purely passion projects; films, characters, toys, clothing, art.

Gavin Strange directed this Christmas spot for the luxury brand Fortnum & Mason .

Filmmaking was a huge passion of mine and even at the earliest stages in my career when I first started out (I didn’t go to university so I got my first role as a junior designer when I was 17) I’d always be blending graphic design and film together.

Over those 10 years at Aardman I continued to make films of all kinds and share them with my colleagues. Because of that more opportunities arose to develop my film work within my existing design role. I had the unique advantage of having a lot of brilliant mentors who guided me and helped me with my moving image projects.

Those opportunities continued to grow and happen more frequently. I was doing more and more directing here, finally becoming officially represented by Aardman and added to their roster of directors. It’s a dream come true for me, because, not only do I get to work at the place I’ve admired growing up, but I’ve been mentored and shaped by the very individuals who make this place so special — that’s a real privilege.

What I really love is that my role is so varied — I’m both a director and a senior designer. I float between projects, and I love that variety. Sometimes I’m directing a commercial, sometimes I’m illustrating icons, other times I’m animating motion graphics. To me though, I don’t see a difference — it’s all creating something engaging, beautiful and entertaining — whatever the final format or medium!

So that’s my Aardman story. Ten years in, and I just feel like I’m getting started. I love this place.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE OF DIRECTOR?
Hmm, it’s tricky, as I actually think that most people’s perception of being a director is true: it’s that person’s responsibility to bring the creative vision to life.

Maybe what people don’t know is how flexible the role is, depending on the project. I love smaller projects where I get to board, design and animate, but then I love larger jobs with a whole crew of people. It’s always hands-on, but in many different ways.

Perhaps what would surprise a lot of people is that it’s every directors responsibility to clean the toilets at the end of the day. That’s what Aardman has always told me and, of course, I honor that tradition. I mean, I haven’t actually ever seen anyone else do it, but that’s because everyone else just gets on with it quietly, right? Right!?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Oh man, can I say everything!? I really, really enjoy the job as a whole — having that creative vision, working with yourself, your colleagues and your clients to bring it to life. Adapting and adjusting to changes and ensuring something great pops out the other end.

I really, genuinely, get a thrill seeing something on screen. I love concentrating on every single frame — it’s a win-win situation. You get to make a lovely image each frame, but when you stitch them together and play them really fast one after another, then you get a lovely movie — how great is that?

In short, I really love the sum total of the job. All those different exciting elements that all come together for the finished piece.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I pride myself on being an optimist and being a right positive pain in the bum, so I don’t know if there’s any part I don’t enjoy — if anything is tricky I try and see it as a challenge and something that will only improve my skillset.

I know that sounds super annoying doesn’t it? I know that can seem all floaty and idealistic, but I pride myself on being a “realistic’ idealist” — recognizing the reality of a tricky situation, but seeing it through an idealistic lens.

If I’m being honest, then probably that really early stage is my least favorite — when the project is properly kicking off and you’ve got that gap between what the treatment/script/vision says it will be and the huge gulf in between that and the finished thing. That’s also the most exciting too, the not knowing how it will turn out. It’s terrifying and thrilling, in all good measure. It surprises me every single time, but I think that panic is an essential part of any creative process.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
In an alternate world, I’d be a photographer, traveling the world, documenting everything I see, living the nomadic life. But that’s still a creative role, and I still class it as the same job, really. I love my graphic design roots too — print and digital design — but, again, I see it as all the same role really.

So that means, if I didn’t have this job, I’d be roaming the lands, offering to draw/paint/film/make for anyone that wanted it! (Is that a mercenary? Is there such a thing as a visual mercenary? I don’t really have the physique for that I don’t think.)

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
This profession chose me. I’m just kidding, that’s ridiculous, I just always wanted to say that.

I think, like most folks, I fell into it in a series of natural choices. Art, design, graphics and games always stole my attention as a kid, and I just followed the natural path into that, which turned into my career. I’m lucky enough that I didn’t feel the need to single out any one passion, and kept them all bubbling along even as I made my career choices as designer to director. I still did and still do indulge my passion for all types of mediums in my own time.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I’m not sure. I wasn’t particularly driven or focused as a kid. I knew I loved design and art, but I didn’t know of the many, many different roles out there that existed. I like that though, I see that as a positive, and also as an achievable way to progress through a career path. I speak to a lot of students and young professionals and I think it can be so overwhelming to plot a big ‘X’ on a career map and then feel all confused about how to get there. I’m an advocate of taking it one step at a time, and make more manageable advances forward — as things always get in the way and change anyway.

I love the idea of a meandering, surprising path. Who knows where it will lead!? I think as long as your aim is to make great work, then you’ll surprise yourself where you end up.

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT DIRECTING THAT ATTRACTED YOU?
I’ve always obsessed over films, and obsessed over the creation of them. I’ll watch a behind-the-scenes on any film or bit of moving image. I just love the fact that the role is to bring something to life — it’s to oversee and create something from nothing, ensuring every frame is right. The way it makes you feel, the way it looks, the way it sounds.

It’s just such an exciting role. There’s a lot of unknowns too, on every project. I think that’s where the good stuff lies. Trusting in the process and moving forwards, embracing it.

HOW DOES DIRECTING FOR ANIMATION DIFFER FROM DIRECTING FOR LIVE ACTION — OR DOES IT?
Technically it’s different — with animation your choices are pretty much made all up front, with the storyboards and animatic as your guides, and then they’re brought to life with animation. Whereas, for me, the excitement in live action is not really knowing what you’ll get until there’s a lens on it. And even then, it can come together in a totally new way in the edit.

I don’t try to differentiate myself as an “animation director” or “live-action” director. They’re just different tools for the job. Whatever tells the best story and connects with audiences!

HOW DO YOU PICK THE PEOPLE YOU WORK WITH ON A PARTICULAR PROJECT?
Their skillset is paramount, but equally as important is their passion and their kindness. There are so many great people out there, but I think it’s so important to work with people who are great and kind. Too many people get a free pass for being brilliant and feel that celebration of their work means it’s okay to mistreat others. It’s not okay… ever. I’m lucky that Aardman is a place full of excited, passionate and engaged folk who are a pleasure to work with, because you can tell they love what they do.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’ve been lucky enough to work on a real variety of projects recently. I directed an ident for the rebrand of BBC2, a celebratory Christmas spot for the luxury brand Fortnum & Mason and an autobiographical motion graphics short film about Maya Angelou for BBC Radio 4.

Maya Angelou short film for BBC Radio 4

I love the variety of them; just those three projects alone were so different. The BBC2 ident was live-action in-camera effects with a great crew of people, whereas the Maya Angelou film was just me on design, direction and animation. I love hopping between projects of all types and sizes!

I’m working on development of a stop-frame short at the moment, which is all I can say for now, but just the process alone going from idea to a scribble in a notebook to a script is so exciting. Who knows what 2019 holds!?

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Oh man, that’s a tough one! A few years back I co-directed a title sequence for a creative festival called OFFF, which happens every year in Barcelona. I worked with Aardman legend Merlin Crossingham to bring this thing to life, and it’s a proper celebration of what we both love — it ended up being what we lovingly refer to as our “stop-frame live-action motion-graphics rap-video title-sequence.” It really was all those things.

That was really special as not only did we have a great crew, I got to work with one of my favorite rappers, P.O.S., who kindly provided the beats and the raps for the film.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT
– My iPhone. It’s my music player, Internet checker, email giver, tweet maker, picture capturer.
– My Leica M6 35mm camera. It’s my absolute pride and joy. I love the images it makes.
– My Screens. At work I have a 27-inch iMac and then two 25-inch monitors on either side. I just love screens. If I could have more, I would!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I genuinely love what I do, so I rarely feel like I “need to get away from it all.” But I do enjoy life outside of work. I’m a drummer and that really helps with any and all stress really. Even just practicing on a practice pad is cathartic, but nothing compares to smashing away on a real kit.

I like to run, and I sometimes do a street dance class, which is both great fun and excruciatingly frustrating because I’m not very good.

I’m a big gamer, even though I don’t have much time for it anymore. A blast on the PS4 is a treat. In fact, after this I’m going to have a little session on God of War before bedtime.

I love hanging with my family. My wife Jane, our young son Sullivan and our dog Peggy. Just hanging out, being a dad and being a husband is the best for de-stressing. Unless Sullivan gets up at 3am, then I change my answer back to the PS4.

I’m kidding, I love my family, I wouldn’t be anything or be anywhere without them.


Making an animated series with Adobe Character Animator

By Mike McCarthy

In a departure from my normal film production technology focus, I have also been working on an animated web series called Grounds of Freedom. Over the past year I have been directing the effort and working with a team of people across the country who are helping in various ways. After a year of meetings, experimentation and work we finally started releasing finished episodes on YouTube.

The show takes place in Grounds of Freedom, a coffee shop where a variety of animated mini-figures gather to discuss freedom and its application to present-day cultural issues and events. The show is created with a workflow that weaves through a variety of Adobe Creative Cloud apps. Back in October I presented our workflow during Adobe Max in LA, and I wanted to share it with postPerspective’s readers as well.

When we first started planning for the series, we considered using live action. Ultimately, after being inspired by the preview releases of Adobe Character Animator, I decided to pursue a new digital approach to brick filming (a film made using Legos), which is traditionally accomplished through stop-motion animation. Once everyone else realized the simpler workflow possibilities and increased level of creative control offered by that new animation process, they were excited to pioneer this new approach. Animation gives us more control and flexibility over the message and dialog, lowers production costs and eases collaboration over long distances, as there is no “source footage” to share.

Creating the Characters
The biggest challenge to using Character Animator is creating digital puppets, which are deeply layered Photoshop PSDs with very precise layer naming and stacking. There are ways to generate the underlying source imagery in 3D animation programs, but I wanted the realism and authenticity of sourcing from actual photographs of the models and figures. So we took lots of 5K macro shots of our sets and characters in various positions with our Canon 60D and 70D DSLRs and cut out hundreds of layers of content in Photoshop to create our characters and all of their various possible body positions. The only thing that was synthetically generated was the various facial expressions digitally painted onto their clean yellow heads, usually to match an existing physical reference character face.

Mike McCarthy shooting stills.

Once we had our source imagery organized into huge PSDs, we rigged those puppets in Character Animator with various triggers, behaviors and controls. The walking was accomplished by cycling through various layers, instead of the default bending of the leg elements. We created arm movement by mapping each arm position to a MIDI key. We controlled facial expressions and head movement via webcam, and the mouth positions were calculated by the program based on the accompanying audio dialog.

Animating Digital Puppets
The puppets had to be finished and fully functional before we could start animating on the digital stages we had created. We had been writing the scripts during that time, parallel to generating the puppet art, so we were ready to record the dialog by the time the puppets were finished. We initially attempted to record live in Character Animator while capturing the animation motions as well, but we didn’t have the level of audio editing functionality we needed available to us in Character Animator. So during that first session, we switched over to Adobe Audition, and planned to animate as a separate process, once the audio was edited.

That whole idea of live capturing audio and facial animation data is laughable now, looking back, since we usually spend a week editing the dialog before we do any animating. We edited each character audio on a separate track and exported those separate tracks to Character Animator. We computed lipsync for each puppet based on their dedicated dialog track and usually exported immediately. This provided a draft visual that allowed us to continue editing the dialog within Premiere Pro. Having a visual reference makes a big difference when trying to determine how a conversation will feel, so that was an important step — even though we had to throw away our previous work in Character Animator once we made significant edit changes that altered sync.

We repeated the process once we had a more final edit. We carried on from there in Character Animator, recording arm and leg motions with the MIDI keyboard in realtime for each character. Once those trigger layers had been cleaned up and refined, we recorded the facial expressions, head positions and eye gaze with a single pass on the webcam. Every re-record to alter a particular section adds a layer to the already complicated timeline, so we limited that as much as possible, usually re-recording instead of making quick fixes unless we were nearly finished.

Compositing the Characters Together
Once we had fully animated scenes in Character Animator, we would turn off the background elements, and isolate each character layer to be exported in Media Encoder via dynamic link. I did a lot of testing before settling on JPEG2000 MXF as the format of choice. I wanted a highly compressed file, but need alpha channel support, and that was the best option available. Each of those renders became a character layer, which was composited into our stage layers in After Effects. We could have dynamically linked the characters directly into AE, but with that many layers that would decrease performance for the interactive part of the compositing work. We added shadows and reflections in AE, as well as various other effects.

Walking was one of the most challenging effects to properly recreate digitally. Our layer cycling in Character Animator resulted in a static figure swinging its legs, but people (and mini figures) have a bounce to their step, and move forward at an uneven rate as they take steps. With some pixel measurement and analysis, I was able to use anchor point keyframes in After Effects to get a repeating movement cycle that made the character appear to be walking on a treadmill.

I then used carefully calculated position keyframes to add the appropriate amount of travel per frame for the feet to stick to the ground, which varies based on the scale as the character moves toward the camera. (In my case the velocity was half the scale value in pixels per seconds.) We then duplicated that layer to create the reflection and shadow of the character as well. That result can then be composited onto various digital stages. In our case, the first two shots of the intro were designed to use the same walk animation with different background images.

All of the character layers were pre-comped, so we only needed to update a single location when a new version of a character was rendered out of Media Encoder, or when we brought in a dynamically linked layer. It would propagate all the necessary comp layers to generate updated reflections and shadows. Once the main compositing work was finished, we usually only needed to make slight changes in each scene between episodes. These scenes were composited at 5K, based on the resolution off the DSLR photos of the sets we had built. These 5K plates could be dynamically linked directly into Premiere Pro, and occasionally used later in the process to ripple slight changes through the workflow. For the interactive work, we got far better editing performance by rendering out flattened files. We started with DNxHR 5K assets, but eventually switched to HEVC files since they were 30x smaller and imperceptibly different in quality with our relatively static animated content.

Editing the Animated Scenes
In Premiere Pro, we had the original audio edit, and usually a draft render of the characters with just their mouths moving. Once we had the plate renders, we placed them each in their own 5K scene sub-sequence and used those sequences as source on our master timeline. This allowed us to easily update the content when new renders were available, or source from dynamically linked layers instead if needed. Our master timeline was 1080p, so with 5K source content we could push in two and a half times the frame size without losing resolution. This allowed us to digitally frame every shot, usually based on one of two rendered angles, and gave us lots of flexibility all the way to the end of the editing process.

Collaborative Benefits of Dynamic Link
While Dynamic Link doesn’t offer the best playback performance without making temp renders, it does have two major benefits in this workflow. It ripples change to the source PSD all the way to the final edit in Premiere just by bringing each app into focus once. (I added a name tag to one character’s PSD during my presentation, and 10 seconds later, it was visible throughout my final edit.) Even more importantly, it allows us to collaborate online without having to share any exported video assets. As long as each member of the team has the source PSD artwork and audio files, all we have to exchange online are the Character Animator project (which is small once the temp files are removed), the .AEP file and the .PrProj file.

This gives any of us the option to render full-quality visual assets anytime we need them, but the work we do on those assets is all contained within the project files that we sync to each other. The coffee shop was built and shot in Idaho, our voice artist was in Florida, our puppets faces were created in LA. I animate and edit in Northern California, the AE compositing was done in LA, and the audio is mixed in New Jersey. We did all of that with nothing but a Dropbox account, using the workflow I have just outlined.

Past that point, it was a fairly traditional finish, in that we edited in music and sound effects, and sent an OMF to Steve, our sound guy at DAWPro Studios http://dawpro.com/photo_gallery.html for the final mix. During that time we added other b-roll visuals or other effects, and once we had the final audio back we rendered the final result to H.264 at 1080p and uploaded to YouTube.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with over 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


Logan uses CG to showcase the luxury of the Lexus ES series

Logan, a creative studio with offices in Los Angeles and New York, worked on the new Lexus ES series “A Product of Mastery” campaign with agency Team One. The goal was to showcase the interior craftsmanship and amenities of this luxury sedan with detailed animations. Viewers are at first given just a glimpse of these features as the spot builds toward a reveal of the sedan’s design.

The campaign was created entirely in CG. “When we first saw Team One’s creative brief, we realized we would be able to control the environments, lighting and the overall mood better by using CG, which allowed us to make the campaign stand apart aesthetically and dramatically compared to shooting the products practically. From day one, our team and Team One were aligned on everything and they were an incredible partner throughout the entire process,” says Logan executive producer Paul Abatemarco.

The three spots in the campaign totaled 23 shots, highlighting things like the car’s high-end Mark Levinson sound system. They also reveal the craftsmanship of the driver seat’s reverse ventilation as infinite bars of light while in another spot, the sedan’s wide-view high-definition monitor is unveiled through a vivid use of color and shape.

Autodesk Maya was Logan’s main CG tool, but for the speaker spot they also called on Side Effects Houdini and Cinema 4D. All previs was done in Maya.

Editing was done on Adobe Premiere and they color graded in Resolve in their certified-Dolby Color Studio.

 According to Waka Ichinose and Sakona Kong, co-creative leads on the project, “We had a lot of visual ideas, and there was a lot of exploration on the design side of things. But finding the balance between the beautiful, abstract imagery and then clearly conveying the meaning of each product so that the viewers were intrigued and ultimately excited was a challenge. But it was also really fun and ultimately very satisfying to solve.”

Storage for VFX Studios

By Karen Moltenbrey

Visual effects are dazzling — inviting eye candy, if you will. But when you mention the term “storage,” the wide eyes may turn into a stifled yawn from viewers of the amazing content. Not so for the makers of that content.

They know that the key to a successful project rests within the reliability of their storage solutions. Here, we look at two visual effects studios — both top players in television and feature film effects — as they discuss how data storage enables them to excel at their craft.

Zoic Studios
A Culver City-based visual effects facility, with shops in Vancouver and New York, Zoic Studios has been crafting visual effects for a host of television series since its founding in 2002, starting with Firefly. In addition to a full plate of episodics, Zoic also counts numerous feature films and spots to its credits.

Saker Klippsten

According to Saker Klippsten, CTO, the facility has used a range of storage solutions over the past 16 years from BlueArc (before it was acquired by Hitachi), DataDirect Networks and others, but now uses Dell EMC’s Isilon cluster file storage system for its current needs. “We’ve been a fan of theirs for quite a long time now. I think we were customer number two,” he says, “back when they were trying to break into the media and entertainment sector.”

Locally, the studio uses Intel and NVMe drives for its workstations. NVMe, or non-volatile memory express, is an open logical device interface specification for accessing all-flash storage media attached via PCI Express (PCIe) bus. Previously, Zoic had been using Samsung SSD drives, with Samsung 1TB and 2TB EVO drives, but in the past year and a half, began migrating to NVMe on the local workstations.

Zoic transitioned to the Isilon system in 2004-2005 because of the heavy usage its renderfarm was getting. “Renderfarms work 24/7 and don’t take breaks. Our storage was getting really beat up, and people were starting to complain that it was slow accessing the file system and affecting playback of their footage and media,” explains Klippsten. “We needed to find something that could scale out horizontally.”

At the time, however, file-level storage was pretty much all that was available — “you were limited to this sort of vertical pool of storage,” says Klippsten. “You might have a lot of storage behind it, but you were still limited at the spigot, at the top end. You couldn’t get the data out fast enough.” But Isilon broke through that barrier by creating a cluster storage system that allotted the scale horizontally, “so we could balance our load, our render nodes and our artists across a number of machines, and access and update in parallel at the same time,” he adds.

Klippsten believes that solution was a big breakthrough for a lot of users; nevertheless, it took some time for others to get onboard. “In the media and entertainment industry, everyone seemed to be locked into BlueArc or NetApp,” he notes. Not so with Zoic.

Fairly recently, some new players have come onto the market, including Qumulo, touted as a “next-generation NAS company” built around advanced, distributed software running on commodity hardware. “That’s another storage platform that we have looked at and tested,” says Klippsten, adding that Zoic even has a number of nodes from the vendor.

There are other open-source options out there as well. Recently, Red Hat began offering Gluster Storage, an open, software-defined storage platform for physical, virtual and cloud environments. “And now with NVMe, it’s eliminating a lot of these problems as well,” Klippsten says.

Back when Zoic selected Isilon, there were a number of major issues that affected the studio’s decision making. As Klippsten notes, they had just opened the Vancouver office and were transferring data back and forth. “How do we back up that data? How do we protect it? Storage snapshot technology didn’t really exist at the time,” he says. But, Isilon had a number of features that the studio liked, including SyncIQ, software for asynchronous replication of data. “It could push data between different Isilon clusters from a block level, in a more automated fashion. It was very convenient. It offered a lot of parameters, such as moving data by time of day and access frequency.”

SyncIQ enabled the studio to archive the data. And for dealing with interim changes, such as a mistakenly deleted file, Zoic found Isilon’s SnapshotIQ ideal for fast data recovery. Moreover, Isilon was one of the first to support Aspera, right on the Isilon cluster. “You didn’t have to run it on a separate machine. It was a huge benefit because we transfer a lot of secure, encrypted data between us and a lot of our clients,” notes Klippsten.

Netflix’s The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Within the pipeline, Zoic’s storage system sits at the core. It is used immediately as the studio ingests the media, whether it is downloaded or transferred from hard drives – terabytes upon terabytes of data. The data is then cleaned up and distributed to project folders for tasks assigned to the various artists. In essence, it acts as a holding tank for the main production storage as an artist begins working on those specific shots, Klippsten explains.

Aside from using the storage at the floor level, the studio also employs it at the archive level, for data recovery as well as material that might not be accessed for weeks. “We have sort of a tiered level of storage — high-performance and deep-archival storage,” he says.

And the system is invaluable, as Zoic is handling 400 to 500 shots a week. If you multiply that by the number of revisions and versions that take place during that time frame, it adds up to hundreds of terabytes weekly. “Per day, we transfer between LA, Vancouver and New York somewhere around 20TB to 30TB,” he estimates. “That number increases quite a bit because we do a lot of cloud rendering. So, we’re pushing a lot of data up to Google and back for cloud rendering, and all of that hits our Isilon storage.”

When Zoic was founded, it originally saw itself as a visual effects company, but at the end of the day, Klippsten says they’re really a technology company that makes pretty pictures. “We push data and move it around to its limits. We’re constantly coming up with new, creative ideas, trying to find partners that can help provide solutions collaboratively if we cannot create them ourselves. The shot cost is constantly being squeezed by studios, which want these shots done faster and cheaper. So, we have to make sure our artists are working faster, too.”

The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Recently, Zoic has been working on a TV project involving a good deal of water simulations and other sims in general — which rapidly generate a tremendous amount of data. Then the data is transferred between the LA and Vancouver facilities. Having storage capable of handling that was unheard of three years ago, Klippsten says. However, Zoic has managed to do so using Isilon along with some off-the-shelf Supermicro storage with NVMe drives, enabling its dynamics department to tackle this and other projects. “When doing full simulation, you need to get that sim in front of the clients as soon as possible so they can comment on it. Simulations take a long time — we’re doing 26GB/sec, which is crazy. It’s close to something in the high-performance computing realm.”

With all that considered, it is hardly surprising to hear Klippsten say that Zoic could not function without a solid storage solution. “It’s funny. When people talk about storage, they are always saying they don’t have enough of it. Even when you have a lot of storage, it’s always running at 99 percent full, and they wonder why you can’t just go out to Best Buy and purchase another hard drive. It doesn’t work that way!”

Milk VFX
Founded just five years ago, Milk VFX is an independent visual effects facility in the UK with locations in London and Cardiff, Wales. While Milk VFX may be young, it was founded by experienced and award-winning VFX supervisors and producers. And the awards have continued, including an Oscar (Ex-Machina), an Emmy (Sherlock) and three BAFTAs, as the studio creates innovative and complex work for high-end television and feature films.

Benoit Leveau

With so much precious data, and a lot of it, the studio has to ensure that its work is secure and the storage system is keeping pace with the staff using it. When the studio was set up, it installed Pixit Media’s PixStor, a parallel file system with limitless storage, for its central storage solution. And, it has been growing with the company ever since. (Milk uses almost no local storage, except for media playback.)

“It was a carefully chosen solution due to its enterprise-level performance,” says Benoit Leveau, head of pipeline at Milk, about the decision to select PixStor. “It allowed us to expand when setting up our second studio in Cardiff and our rendering solutions in the cloud.”

When Milk was shopping for a storage offering while opening the studio, four things were forefront in their minds: speed, scalability, performance and reliability. Those were the functions the group wanted from its storage system — exactly the same four demands that the projects at the studios required.

“A final image requires gigabytes, sometimes terabytes, of data in the form of detailed models, high-resolution textures, animation files, particles and effects caches and so forth,” says Leveau. “We need to be able to review 4K image sequences in real time, so it’s really essential for daily operation.”

This year alone, Milk has completed a number of high-end visual effects sequences for feature films such as Adrift, serving as the principal vendor on this true story about a young couple lost at sea during one of the most catastrophic hurricanes in recorded history. The Milk team created all the major water and storm sequences, including bespoke 100-foot waves, all of which were rendered entirely in the cloud.

As Leveau points out, one of the shots in the film was more than 60TB, as it required complex ocean simulations. “We computed the ocean simulations on our local renderfarm, but the rendering was done in the cloud, and with this setup, we were able to access the data from everywhere almost transparently for the artists,” he explains.

Adrift

The studio also recently completed work on the blockbuster Fantastic Beasts sequel, The Crimes of Grindelwald.

For television, the studio created visual effects for an episode of the Netflix Altered Carbon sci-fi series, where people can live forever, as they digitally store their consciousness (stacks) and then download themselves into new bodies (sleeves). For the episode, the Milk crew created forest fires and the aftermath, as well as an alien planet and escape ship. For Origin, an action-thriller, the team generated 926 VFX shots in 4K for the 10-part series, spanning a wide range of work. Milk is also serving as the VFX vendor for Good Omens, a six-part horror/fantasy/drama series.

“For Origin, all the data had to be online for the duration of the four-month project. At the same time, we commenced work as the sole VFX vendor on the BBC/Amazon Good Omens series, which is now rapidly filling up our PixStor, hence the importance of scalability!” says Leveau.

Main Image: Origin via Milk VFX


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran VFX and post writer.