Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: Animation

Wonder Park’s whimsical sound

By Jennifer Walden

The imagination of a young girl comes to life in the animated feature Wonder Park. A Paramount Animation and Nickelodeon Movies film, the story follows June (Brianna Denski) and her mother (Jennifer Garner) as they build a pretend amusement park in June’s bedroom. There are rides that defy the laws of physics — like a merry-go-round with flying fish that can leave the carousel and travel all over the park; a Zero-G-Land where there’s no gravity; a waterfall made of firework sparks; a super tube slide made from bendy straws; and other wild creations.

But when her mom gets sick and leaves for treatment, June’s creative spark fizzles out. She disassembles the park and packs it away. Then one day as June heads home through the woods, she stumbles onto a real-life Wonderland that mirrors her make-believe one. Only this Wonderland is falling apart and being consumed by the mysterious Darkness. June and the park’s mascots work together to restore Wonderland by stopping the Darkness.

Even in its more tense moments — like June and her friend Banky (Oev Michael Urbas) riding a homemade rollercoaster cart down their suburban street and nearly missing an on-coming truck — the sound isn’t intense. The cart doesn’t feel rickety or squeaky, like it’s about to fly apart (even though the brake handle breaks off). There’s the sense of danger that could result in non-serious injury, but never death. And that’s perfect for the target audience of this film — young children. Wonder Park is meant to be sweet and fun, and supervising sound editor John Marquis captures that masterfully.

Marquis and his core team — sound effects editor Diego Perez, sound assistant Emma Present, dialogue/ADR editor Michele Perrone and Foley supervisor Jonathan Klein — handled sound design, sound editorial and pre-mixing at E² Sound on the Warner Bros. lot in Burbank.

Marquis was first introduced to Wonder Park back in 2013, but the team’s real work began in January 2017. The animated sequences steadily poured in for 17 months. “We had a really long time to work the track, to get some of the conceptual sounds nailed down before going into the first preview. We had two previews with temp score and then two more with mockups of composer Steven Price’s score. It was a real luxury to spend that much time massaging and nitpicking the track before getting to the dub stage. This made the final mix fun; we were having fun mixing and not making editorial choices at that point.”

The final mix was done at Technicolor’s Stage 1, with re-recording mixers Anna Behlmer (effects) and Terry Porter (dialogue/music).

Here, Marquis shares insight on how he created the whimsical sound of Wonder Park, from the adorable yet naughty chimpanzombies to the tonally pleasing, rhythmic and resonant bendy-straw slide.

The film’s sound never felt intense even in tense situations. That approach felt perfectly in-tune with the sensibilities of the intended audience. Was that the initial overall goal for this soundtrack?
When something was intense, we didn’t want it to be painful. We were always in search of having a nice round sound that had the power to communicate the energy and intensity we wanted without having the pointy, sharp edges that hurt. This film is geared toward a younger audience and we were supersensitive about that right out of the gate, even without having that direction from anyone outside of ourselves.

I have two kids — one 10 and one five. Often, they will pop by the studio and listen to what we’re doing. I can get a pretty good gauge right off the bat if we’re doing something that is not resonating with them. Then, we can redirect more toward the intended audience. I pretty much previewed every scene for my kids, and they were having a blast. I bounced ideas off of them so the soundtrack evolved easily toward their demographic. They were at the forefront of our thoughts when designing these sequences.

John Marquis recording the bendy straw sound.

There were numerous opportunities to create fun, unique palettes of sound for this park and these rides that stem from this little girl’s imagination. If I’m a little kid and I’m playing with a toy fish and I’m zipping it around the room, what kind of sound am I making? What kind of sounds am I imagining it making?

This film reminded me of being a kid and playing with toys. So, for the merry-go-round sequence with the flying fish, I asked my kids, “What do you think that would sound like?” And they’d make some sound with their mouths and start playing, and I’d just riff off of that.

I loved the sound of the bendy-straw slide — from the sound of it being built, to the characters traveling through it, and even the reverb on their voices while inside of it. How did you create those sounds?
Before that scene came to us, before we talked about it or saw it, I had the perfect sound for it. We had been having a lot of rain, so I needed to get an expandable gutter for my house. It starts at about one-foot long but can be pulled out to three-feet long if needed. It works exactly like a bendy-straw, but it’s huge. So when I saw the scene in the film, I knew I had the exact, perfect sound for it.

We mic’d it with a Sanken CO-100k, inside and out. We pulled the tube apart and closed it, and got this great, ribbed, rippling, zuzzy sound. We also captured impulse responses inside the tube so we could create custom reverbs. It was one of those magical things that I didn’t even have to think about or go hunting for. This one just fell in my lap. It’s a really fun and tonal sound. It’s musical and has a rhythm to it. You can really play with the Doppler effect to create interesting pass-bys for the building sequences.

Another fun sequence for sound was inside Zero-G-Land. How did you come up with those sounds?
That’s a huge, open space. Our first instinct was to go with a very reverberant sound to showcase the size of the space and the fact that June is in there alone. But as we discussed it further, we came to the conclusion that since this is a zero-gravity environment there would be no air for the sound waves to travel through. So, we decided to treat it like space. That approach really worked out because in the scene proceeding Zero-G-Land, June is walking through a chasm and there are huge echoes. So the contrast between that and the air-less Zero-G-Land worked out perfectly.

Inside Zero-G-Land’s tight, quiet environment we have the sound of these giant balls that June is bouncing off of. They look like balloons so we had balloon bounce sounds, but it wasn’t whimsical enough. It was too predictable. This is a land of imagination, so we were looking for another sound to use.

John Marquis with the Wind Wand.

My friend has an instrument called a Wind Wand, which combines the sound of a didgeridoo with a bullroarer. The Wind Wand is about three feet long and has a gigantic rubber band that goes around it. When you swing the instrument around in the air, the rubber band vibrates. It almost sounds like an organic lightsaber-like sound. I had been playing around with that for another film and thought the rubbery, resonant quality of its vibration could work for these gigantic ball bounces. So we recorded it and applied mild processing to get some shape and movement. It was just a bit of pitching and Doppler effect; we didn’t have to do much to it because the actual sound itself was so expressive and rich and it just fell into place. Once we heard it in the cut, we knew it was the right sound.

How did you approach the sound of the chimpanzombies? Again, this could have been an intense sound, but it was cute! How did you create their sounds?
The key was to make them sound exciting and mischievous instead of scary. It can’t ever feel like June is going to die. There is danger. There is confusion. But there is never a fear of death.

The chimpanzombies are actually these Wonder Chimp dolls gone crazy. So they were all supposed to have the same voice — this pre-recorded voice that is in every Wonder Chimp doll. So, you see this horde of chimpanzombies coming toward you and you think something really threatening is happening but then you start to hear them and all they are saying is, “Welcome to Wonderland!” or something sweet like that. It’s all in a big cacophony of high-pitched voices, and they have these little squeaky dog-toy feet. So there’s this contrast between what you anticipate will be scary but it turns out these things are super-cute.

The big challenge was that they were all supposed to sound the same, just this one pre-recorded voice that’s in each one of these dolls. I was afraid it was going to sound like a wall of noise that was indecipherable, and a big, looping mess. There’s a software program that I ended up using a lot on this film. It’s called Sound Particles. It’s really cool, and I’ve been finding a reason to use it on every movie now. So, I loaded this pre-recorded snippet from the Wonder Chimp doll into Sound Particles and then changed different parameters — I wanted a crowd of 20 dolls that could vary in pitch by 10%, and they’re going to walk by at a medium pace.

Changing the parameters will change the results, and I was able to make a mass of different voices based off of this one, individual audio file. It worked perfectly once I came up with a recipe for it. What would have taken me a day or more — to individually pitch a copy of a file numerous times to create a crowd of unique voices — only took me a few minutes. I just did a bunch of varieties of that, with smaller groups and bigger groups, and I did that with their feet as well. The key was that the chimpanzombies were all one thing, but in the context of music and dialogue, you had to be able to discern the individuality of each little one.

There’s a fun scene where the chimpanzombies are using little pickaxes and hitting the underside of the glass walkway that June and the Wonderland mascots are traversing. How did you make that?
That was for Fireworks Falls; one of the big scenes that we had waited a long time for. We weren’t really sure how that was going to look — if the waterfall would be more fiery or more sparkly.

The little pickaxes were a blacksmith’s hammer beating an iron bar on an anvil. Those “tink” sounds were pitched up and resonated just a little bit to give it a glass feel. The key with that, again, was to try to make it cute. You have these mischievous chimpanzombies all pecking away at the glass. It had to sound like they were being naughty, not malicious.

When the glass shatters and they all fall down, we had these little pinball bell sounds that would pop in from time to time. It kept the scene feeling mildly whimsical as the debris is falling and hitting the patio umbrellas and tables in the background.

Here again, it could have sounded intense as June makes her escape using the patio umbrella, but it didn’t. It sounded fun!
I grew up in the Midwest and every July 4th we would shoot off fireworks on the front lawn and on the sidewalk. I was thinking about the fun fireworks that I remembered, like sparklers, and these whistling spinning fireworks that had a fun acceleration sound. Then there were bottle rockets. When I hear those sounds now I remember the fun time of being a kid on July 4th.

So, for the Fireworks Falls, I wanted to use those sounds as the fun details, the top notes that poke through. There are rocket crackles and whistles that support the low-end, powerful portion of the rapids. As June is escaping, she’s saying, “This is so amazing! This is so cool!” She’s a kid exploring something really amazing and realizing that this is all of the stuff that she was imagining and is now experiencing for real. We didn’t want her to feel scared, but rather to be overtaken by the joy and awesomeness of what she’s experiencing.

The most ominous element in the park is the Darkness. What was your approach to the sound in there?
It needed to be something that was more mysterious than ominous. It’s only scary because of the unknown factor. At first, we played around with storm elements, but that wasn’t right. So I played around with a recording of my son as a baby; he’s cooing. I pitched that sound down a ton, so it has this natural, organic, undulating, human spine to it. I mixed in some dissonant windchimes. I have a nice set of windchimes at home and I arranged them so they wouldn’t hit in a pleasing way. I pitched those way down, and it added a magical/mystical feel to the sound. It’s almost enticing June to come and check it out.

The Darkness is the thing that is eating up June’s creativity and imagination. It’s eating up all of the joy. It’s never entirely clear what it is though. When June gets inside the Darkness, everything is silent. The things in there get picked up and rearranged and dropped. As with the Zero-G-Land moment, we bring everything to a head. We go from a full-spectrum sound, with the score and June yelling and the sound design, to a quiet moment where we only hear her breathing. For there, it opens up and blossoms with the pulse of her creativity returning and her memories returning. It’s a very subjective moment that’s hard to put into words.

When June whispers into Peanut’s ear, his marker comes alive again. How did you make the sound of Peanut’s marker? And how did you give it movement?
The sound was primarily this ceramic, water-based bird whistle, which gave it a whimsical element. It reminded me of a show I watched when I was little where the host would draw with his marker and it would make a little whistling, musical sound. So anytime the marker was moving, it would make this really fun sound. This marker needed to feel like something you would pick up and wave around. It had to feel like something that would inspire you to draw and create with it.

To get the movement, it was partially performance based and partially done by adding in a Doppler effect. I used variations in the Waves Doppler plug-in. This was another sound that I also used Sound Particles for, but I didn’t use it to generate particles. I used it to generate varied movement for a single source, to give it shape and speed.

Did you use Sound Particles on the paper flying sound too? That one also had a lot of movement, with lots of twists and turns.
No, that one was an old-fashioned fader move. What gave that sound its interesting quality — this soft, almost ethereal and inviting feel — was the practical element we used to create the sound. It was a piece of paper bag that was super-crumpled up, so it felt fluttery and soft. Then, every time it moved, it had a vocally whoosh element that gave it personality. So once we got that practical element nailed down, the key was to accentuate it with a little wispy whoosh to make it feel like the paper was whispering to June, saying, “Come follow me!”

Wonder Park is in theaters now. Go see it!


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. Follow her on Twitter @audiojeney.

Behind the Title: Nice Shoes animator Yandong Dino Qiu

This artist/designer has taken to sketching people on the subway to keep his skills fresh and mind relaxed.

NAME: Yandong Dino Qiu

COMPANY: New York’s Nice Shoes

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Nice Shoes is a full-service creative studio. We offer design, animation, VFX, editing, color grading, VR/AR, working with agencies, brands and filmmakers to help realize their creative vision.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Designer/Animator

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Helping our clients to explore different looks in the pre-production stage, while aiding them in getting as close as possible to the final look of the spot. There’s a lot of exploration and trial and error as we try to deliver beautiful still frames that inform the look of the moving piece.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Not so much for the title, but for myself, design and animation can be quite broad. People may assume you’re only 2D, but it also involves a lot of other skill sets such as 3D lighting and rendering. It’s pretty close to a generalist role that requires you to know nearly every software as well as to turn things around very quickly.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Photoshop, After Effects,. Illustrator, InDesign — the full Adobe Creative Suite — and Maxon Cinema 4D.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Pitch and exploration. At that stage, all possibilities are open. The job is alive… like a baby. You’re seeing it form and helping to make new life. Before this, you have no idea what it’s going to look like. After this phase, everyone has an idea. It’s very challenging, exciting and rewarding.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Revisions. Especially toward the end of a project. Everything is set up. One little change will affect everything else.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
2:15pm. Its right after lunch. You know you have the whole afternoon. The sun is bright. The mood is light. It’s not too late for anything.

Sketching on the subway.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a Manga artist.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
La Mer. Frontline. Friskies. I’ve also been drawing during my commute everyday, sketching the people I see on the subway. I’m trying to post every week on Instagram. I think it’s important for artists to keep to a routine. I started up with this at the beginning of 2019, and there’ve been about 50 drawings already. Artists need to keep their pen sharp all the time. By doing these sketches, I’m not only benefiting my drawing skills, but I’m improving my observation about shapes and compositions, which is extremely valuable for work. Being able to break down shapes and components is a key principle of design, and honing that skill helps me in responding to client briefs.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
TED-Ed What Is Time? We had a lot of freedom in figuring out how to animate Einstein’s theories in a fun and engaging way. I worked with our creative director Harry Dorrington to establish the look and then with our CG team to ensure that the feel we established in the style frames was implemented throughout the piece.

TED-Ed What Is Time?

The film was extremely well received. There was a lot of excitement at Nice Shoes when it premiered, and TED-Ed’s audience seemed to respond really warmly as well. It’s rare to see so much positivity in the YouTube comments.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My Wacom tablet for drawing and my iPad for reading.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I take time and draw for myself. I love that drawing and creating is such a huge part of my job, but it can get stressful and tiring only creating for others. I’m proud of that work, but when I can draw something that makes me personally happy, any stress or exhaustion from the work day just melts away.

Arraiy 4.11.19

Quick Chat: Lord Danger takes on VFX-heavy Devil May Cry 5 spot

By Randi Altman

Visual effects for spots have become more and more sophisticated, and the recent Capcom trailer promoting the availability of its game Devil May Cry 5 is a perfect example.

 The Mike Diva-directed Something Greater starts off like it might be a commercial for an anti-depressant with images of a woman cooking dinner for some guests, people working at a construction site, a bored guy trimming hedges… but suddenly each of our “Everyday Joes” turns into a warrior fighting baddies in a video game.

Josh Shadid

The hedge trimmer’s right arm turns into a futuristic weapon, the construction worker evokes a panther to fight a monster, and the lady cooking is seen with guns a blazin’ in both hands. When she runs out of ammo, and to the dismay of her dinner guests, her arms turn into giant saws. 

Lord Danger’s team worked closely with Capcom USA to create this over-the-top experience, and they provided everything from production to VFX to post, including sound and music.

We reached out to Lord Danger founder/EP Josh Shadid to learn more about their collaboration with Capcom, as well as their workflow.

How much direction did you get from Capcom? What was their brief to you?
Capcom’s fight-games director of brand marketing, Charlene Ingram, came to us with a simple request — make a memorable TV commercial that did not use gameplay footage but still illustrated the intensity and epic-ness of the DMC series.

What was it shot on and why?
We shot on both Arri Alexa Mini and Phantom Flex 4k using Zeiss Super Speed MKii Prime lenses, thanks to our friends at Antagonist Camera, and a Technodolly motion control crane arm. We used the Phantom on the Technodolly to capture the high-speed shots. We used that setup to speed ramp through character actions, while maintaining 4K resolution for post in both the garden and kitchen transformations.

We used the Alexa Mini on the rest of the spot. It’s our preferred camera for most of our shoots because we love the combination of its size and image quality. The Technodolly allowed us to create frame-accurate, repeatable camera movements around the characters so we could seamlessly stitch together multiple shots as one. We also needed to cue the fight choreography to sync up with our camera positions.

You had a VFX supervisor on set. Can you give an example of how that was beneficial?
We did have a VFX supervisor on site for this production. Our usual VFX supervisor is one of our lead animators — having him on site to work with means we’re often starting elements in our post production workflow while we’re still shooting.

Assuming some of it was greenscreen?
We shot elements of the construction site and gardening scene on greenscreen. We used pop-ups to film these elements on set so we could mimic camera moves and lighting perfectly. We also took photogrammetry scans of our characters to help rebuild parts of their bodies during transition moments, and to emulate flying without requiring wire work — which would have been difficult to control outside during windy and rainy weather.

Can you talk about some of the more challenging VFX?
The shot of the gardener jumping into the air while the camera spins around him twice was particularly difficult. The camera starts on a 45-degree frontal, swings behind him and then returns to a 45-degree frontal once he’s in the air.

We had to digitally recreate the entire street, so we used the technocrane at the highest position possible to capture data from a slow pan across the neighborhood in order to rebuild the world. We also had to shoot this scene in several pieces and stitch it together. Since we didn’t use wire work to suspend the character, we also had to recreate the lower half of his body in 3D to achieve a natural looking jump position. That with the combination of the CG weapon elements made for a challenging composite — but in the end, it turned out really dramatic (and pretty cool).

Were any of the assets provided by Capcom? All created from scratch?
We were provided with the character and weapons models from Capcom — but these were in-game assets, and if you’ve played the game you’ll see that the environments are often dark and moody, so the textures and shaders really didn’t apply to a real-world scenario.

Our character modeling team had to recreate and re-interpret what these characters and weapons would look like in the real world — and they had to nail it — because game culture wouldn’t forgive a poor interpretation of these iconic elements. So far the feedback has been pretty darn good.

In what ways did being the production company and the VFX house on the project help?
The separation of creative from production and post production is an outdated model. The time it takes to bring each team up to speed, to manage the communication of ideas between creatives and to ensure there is a cohesive vision from start to finish, increases both the costs and the time it takes to deliver a final project.

We shot and delivered all of Devil May Cry’s Something Greater in four weeks total, all in-house. We find that working as the production company and VFX house reduces the ratio of managers per creative significantly, putting more of the money into the final product.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 


Autodesk Arnold 5.3 with Arnold GPU in public beta

Autodesk has made its Arnold 5.3 with Arnold GPU available as a public beta. The release provides artists with GPU rendering for a set number of features, and the flexibility to choose between rendering on the CPU or GPU without changing renderers.

From look development to lighting, support for GPU acceleration brings greater interactivity and speed to artist workflows, helping reduce iteration and review cycles. Arnold 5.3 also adds new functionality to help maximize performance and give artists more control over their rendering processes, including updates to adaptive sampling, a new version of the Randomwalk SSS mode and improved Operator UX.

Arnold GPU rendering makes it easier for artists and small studios to iterate quickly in a fast working environment and scale rendering capacity to accommodate project demands. From within the standard Arnold interface, users can switch between rendering on the CPU and GPU with a single click. Arnold GPU currently supports features such as arbitrary shading networks, SSS, hair, atmospherics, instancing, and procedurals. Arnold GPU is based on the Nvidia OptiX framework and is optimized to leverage Nvidia RTX technology.

New feature summary:
— Major improvements to quality and performance for adaptive sampling, helping to reduce render times without jeopardizing final image quality
— Improved version of Randomwalk SSS mode for more realistic shading
— Enhanced usability for Standard Surface, giving users more control
— Improvements to the Operator framework
— Better sampling of Skydome lights, reducing direct illumination noise
— Updates to support for MaterialX, allowing users to save a shading network as a MaterialX look

Arnold 5.3 with Arnold GPU in public beta will be available March 20 as a standalone subscription or with a collection of end-to-end creative tools within the Autodesk Media & Entertainment Collection. You can also try Arnold GPU with a free 30-day trial of Arnold. Arnold GPU is available in all supported plug-ins for Autodesk Maya, Autodesk 3ds Max, Houdini, Cinema 4D and Katana.


Behind the Title: Legwork director of production Chris Grey

NAME: Chris Grey

COMPANY: Denver-based Legwork

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Legwork is an independent creative studio combining animation and technology to create memorable stories and experiences for advertising, entertainment and education.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director of Production

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I touch almost all parts of the business, including business development, client relationships, scoping, resourcing, strategy, producer mentorship and making sure every project that goes out the door is up to our high standards. Oh, and I still produce several projects myself.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It might be cliché, but you still need to get your hands dirty producing things. You just can’t escape it, nor should you want to. It sets the example for your team.

Dominos

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The problem-solving aspect of it. No matter how tight your project plan is, it’s a given that curveballs are going to happen. Planning for those and being able to react with smart solutions is what makes every day different.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Anxiety isn’t fun, but it comes with the job. Just know how to deal with it and don’t let it rub off on others.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
First hour of the day for emails. I do my best to keep my afternoons meeting-free, unless it’s a client meeting, My last job put a lot of emphasis on “flow” and staying in it, so I do my best to keep all internals in the morning so the whole team can work in the afternoon, including myself.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve always wanted to own a cool bodega/deli type of place. We’d specialize in proper sandwiches, hard to find condiments, cheap beer. Keeping this dream alive…

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew in college. Crispin Porter + Bogusky was moving to Boulder during my junior or senior year at Colorado University. I read up on them and thought to myself “That’s it. That’s what I want to do.” I was lucky enough to get an internship there after graduation and I haven’t really looked back.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Can I take credit for the team on these two? Cool, because we’re super-proud of these, but I didn’t “produce” them:
Rise: Hope-a-monics
Pandora: Smokepurpp

Yeti

Some stuff I worked on recently that we are equally proud of:
https://www.yeticycles.com/
https://ifthisthendominos.com/
L.L.Bean: Find Your Park

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
More than a project, our relationship with YouTube has been super rewarding. The View in 2 series is now on its fifth season and it was one of the first things I worked on when I got to Legwork. Watching the show and our relationship with the client evolve is something I am proud of. In the coming months, there will be a new show that we’re releasing with them that pushes the style even further.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
1. This is a cheat because it covers music, my calendar, email, etc., but one is my iCloud and Google accounts — because 75 percent of my life on there now.
2. My Nest camera gives me peace of mind when I’m out of town and lets me know my dog isn’t too lonely.
3. Phonograph records — old tech that I love to collect.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Besides friends and family? Lots of food-related ones (current favorites are @wdurney and @turkeyandthewolf), sports/sneakers (@houseofhighlights, @jordansdaily), history (@ww2nowandthen) and a good random one is @celebsonsandwhiches.

I also like every @theonion post.

That was all for Instagram. I save Twitter for political rants and Liverpool F.C.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
We have a Sonos at the office and more often than not it forces me to put on my headphones. Sorry, Legworkers. So it might be a podcast, Howard Stern, KEXP or something British.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’m a new dad, so that helps keep everything in perspective. That and some brewery visits on the weekend, which are totally socially acceptable to bring infants to!


Behind the Title: Gentleman Scholar MD/EP Jo Arghiris

LA-based Jo Arghiris embraces the creativity of the job and enjoys “pulling treatments together with our directors. It’s always such a fun, collaborative process.” Find out more…

Name: Jo Arghiris

Company: Gentleman Scholar (@gentscholar)

Can You Describe Your Company?
Gentleman Scholar is a creative production studio, drawn together by a love of design and an eagerness to push boundaries.  Since launching in Los Angeles in 2010, and expanding to New York in 2016, we have evolved within the disciplines of live-action production, digital exploration, print and VR. At our very core, we are a band of passionate artists and fearless makers.

The biggest thing that struck me when I joined Scholar was everyone’s willingness to roll up their sleeves and give it a go. There are so many creative people working across both our studios, it’s quite amazing what we can achieve when we put our collective minds to it. In fact, it’s really hard to put us in a category or to define what we do on a day-to-day basis. But if I had to sum it up in just one word, our company feels like “home”; there’s no place quite like it.

What’s Your Job Title?
Managing Director/EP Los Angeles

What Does That Entail?
Truth be told, it’s evolving all the time. In its purest form, my job entails having top-line involvement on everything going on in the LA studio, both from operational and new business POVs. I face inwards and outwards. I mentor and I project. I lead and I follow. But the main thing I want to mention is that I couldn’t do my job without all these incredible people by my side. It really does take a village, every single day.

What Would Surprise People the Most About What Falls Under That Title?
Not so much “surprising” but certainly different from other roles, is that my job is never done (or at least it shouldn’t be). I never go home with all my to-do’s ticked off. The deck is constantly shuffled and re-dealt. This fluidity can be off-putting to some people who like to have a clear idea of what they need to achieve on any given day. But I really like to work that way, as it keeps my mind nimble and fresh.

What’s Your Favorite Part of the Job?
Learning new things and expanding my mind. I like to see our teams push themselves in this way, too. It’s incredibly satisfying watching folks overcome challenges and grow into their roles. Also, I obviously love winning work, especially if it’s an intense pitch process. I’m a creative person and I really enjoy pulling treatments together with our directors. It’s always such a fun, collaborative process.

What’s Your Least Favorite?
Well, I guess the 24/7 availability thing that we’ve all become accustomed to and are all guilty of. It’s so, so important for us to have boundaries. If I’m emailing the team late at night or on the weekend, I will write in the subject line, “For the Morning” or “For Monday.” I sometimes need to get stuff set up in advance, but I absolutely do not expect a response at 10pm on a Sunday night. To do your best work, it’s essential that you have a healthy work/life balance.

What is Your Favorite Time of the Day?
As clichéd as it may sound, I love to get up before anyone else and sit, in silence, with a cup of coffee. I’m a one-a-day kind of girl, so it’s pretty sacred to me. Weekdays or weekends, I have so much going on, I need to set my day up in these few solitary moments. I am not a night person at all and can usually be found fast asleep on the sofa sometime around 9pm each night. Equally favorite is when my kids get up and we do “huggle” time together, before the day takes us away on our separate journeys.

Bleacher Report

Can you Name Some Recent Projects?
Gentleman Scholar worked on a big Acura TLX campaign, which is probably one of my all-time favorites. Other fun projects include Legends Club for Timberland, Upwork “Hey World!” campaign from Duncan Channon, the Sponsor Reel for the 2018 AICP Show and Bleacher Report’s Sports Alphabet.

If You Didn’t Have This Job, What Would You be Doing Instead?
I love photography, writing and traveling. So if I could do it all again, I’d be some kind of travel writer/photographer combo or a journalist or something. My brother actually does just that, and I’m super-proud of his choices. To stand behind your own creative point of view takes skill and dedication.

How Did You Know This Would Be Your Path?
The road has been long, and it has carried me from London to New York to Los Angeles. I originally started in post production and VFX, where I got a taste for creative problem-solving. The jump from this world to a creative production studio like Scholar was perfectly timed and I relished the learning curve that came with it. I think it’s quite hard to have a defined “path” these days.

My advice to anyone getting into our industry right now would be to understand that knowledge and education are powerful tools, so go out of your way to harness them. And never stand still; always keep pushing yourself.

Name Three Pieces of Technology You Can’t Live Without.
My Ear Pods — so happy to not have that charging/listening conflict with my iPhone anymore; all the apps that allow me to streamline my life and get shit done any time of day no matter what, no matter where; I think my electric toothbrush is pretty high up there too. Can I have one more? Not “tech” per se, but my super-cute mini-hair straightener, which make my bangs look on point, even after working out!

What Social Media Channels Do You Follow?
Well, I like Instagram mostly. Do you count Pinterest? I love a Pinterest board. I have many of those. And I read Twitter, but I don’t Tweet too much. To be honest, I’m pretty lame on social media, and all my accounts are private. But I realize they are such important tools in our industry so I use them on an as-needed basis. Also, it’s something I need to consider soon for my kids, who are obsessed with watching random, “how-to” videos online and periodically ask me, “Are you going to put that on YouTube?” So I need to keep on top of it, not just for work, but also for them. It will be their world very soon.

Do You Listen to Music While You Work? Care to Share Your Favorite Music to Work to?
Yes, I have a Sonos set up in my office. I listen to a lot of playlists — found ones and the random ones that your streaming services build for you. Earlier this morning I had an album called Smino by blkswn playing. Right now I’m listening to a band called Pronoun. They were on a playlist Nylon Studios released called, “All the Brooklyn Bands You Should Be Listening To.”

My drive home is all about the podcast. I’m trying to educate myself more on American history at the moment. I’m also tempted to get into Babel and learn French. With all the hours I spend in the car, I’m pretty sure I would be fluent in no time!

What Do You Do to De-stress From it All?
So many things! I literally never stop. Hot yoga, spinning, hiking, mountain biking, cooking and thinking of new projects for my house. Road tripping, camping and exploring new places with my family and friends. Taking photographs and doing art projects with my kids. My all-time favorite thing to do is hit the beach for the day, winter and summer. I find it one of the most restorative places on Earth. I’m so happy to call LA my home. It suits me down to the ground!


Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse: sound editors talk ‘magical realism’

By Randi Altman

Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse isn’t your ordinary Spider-Man movie, from its story to its look to its sound. The filmmakers took a familiar story and turned it on its head a bit, letting audiences know that Spider-Man isn’t just one guy wearing that mask… or even a guy, or even from this dimension.

The film focuses on Miles Morales, a teenager from Brooklyn, struggling with all things teenager while also dealing with the added stress of being Spider-Man.

Geoff Rubay

Audio played a huge role in this story, and we recently reached out to Sony supervising sound editors Geoff Rubay and Curt Schulkey to dig in a bit deeper. The duo recently won an MPSE Award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing — Feature Animation… industry peers recognizing the work that went into creating the sound for this stylized world.

Let’s find out more about the sound process on Spider-Man: Into the Spider Verse, which won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

What do you think is the most important element of this film’s sound?
Curt Schulkey: It is fun, it is bold, it has style and it has attitude. It has energy. We did everything we could to make the sound as stylistic and surprising as the imagery. We did that while supporting the story and the characters, which are the real stars of the movie. We had the opportunity to work with some incredibly creative filmmakers, and we did our best to surprise and delight them. We hope that audiences like it too.

Geoff Rubay: For me, it’s the fusion of the real and the fantastic. Right from the beginning, the filmmakers made it clear that it should feel believable — grounded — while staying true to the fantastic nature of the visuals. We did not hold back on the fantastic side, but we paid close attention to the story and made sure we were supporting that and not just making things sound awesome.

Curt Schulkey

How early did your team get involved in the film?
Rubay: We started on an SFX pre-design phase in late February for about a month. The goal was to create sounds for the picture editors and animators to work with. We ended up doing what amounted to a temp mix of some key sequences. The “Super Collider” was explored. We only worked on the first sequence for the collider, but the idea was that material could be recycled by the picture department and used in the early temp mixes until the final visuals arrived.

Justin Thompson, the production designer, was very generous with his time and resources early on. He spent several hours showing us work-in-progress visuals and concept art so that we would know where visuals would eventually wind up. This was invaluable. We were able to work on sounds long before we saw them as part of the movie. In the temp mix phase, we had to hold back or de-emphasize some of those elements because they were not relevant yet. In some cases, the sounds would not work at all with the storyboards or un-lit animation that was in the cut. Only when the final lit animation showed up would those sounds make sense.

Schulkey: I came onto the film in May, about 9.5 months before completion. We were neck-deep in following changes throughout our work. We were involved in the creation of sounds from the very first studio screening, through previews and temp mixes, right on to the end of the final mix. This sometimes gave us the opportunity to create sounds in advance of the images, or to influence the development of imagery and timing. Because they were so involved in building the movie, the directors did not always have time to discuss their needs with us, so we would speculate on what kinds of sounds they might need or want for events that they were molding visually. As Geoff said, the time that Justin Thompson spent with us was invaluable. The temp-mix process often gave us the opportunity to audition creations for the directors/producers.

What sort of direction did you receive from the directors?
Schulkey: Luckily, because of our previous experiences with producers Chris Miller and Phil Lord and editor Bob Fisher, we had a pretty good idea of their tastes and sensitivities, so our first attempts were usually pointed in the right direction. The three directors — Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman — also provided input, so we were rich with direction.

As with all movies, we had hundreds of side discussions with the directors along the way about details, nuances, timing and so on. I think that the most important overall direction we got from the filmmakers was related to the dynamic arc of the movie. They wanted the soundtrack to be forceful but not so much that it hurt. They wanted it to breathe — quiet in some spots, loud in others, and they wanted it to be fun. So, we had to figure out what “fun” sounds like.

Rubay: This will sound strange, but we never did a spotting session for the movie. We just started our work and got feedback when we showed sequences or did temp mixes. Phil called when we started the pre-design phase and gave us general notes about tone and direction. He made it clear he did not want us to hold back, but he wanted to keep the film grounded. He explained the importance of the various levels of technology of different characters.

Peni Parker is from the 31st century, so her robot sidekick needed to sound futuristic. Scorpion is a pile of rusty metal. Prowler’s tech is appropriated from his surroundings and possibly with some help from Kingpin. We discussed the sound of previous Spider-Man movies and asked how much we needed to stay true to established sounds from those films. The direction was “not at all unless it makes sense.” We endeavored to make Peter Parker’s web-slings sound like the previous films. After that, we just “went for it.”

How was working on a film like this different than working on something live-action? Did it allow you more leeway?
Schulkey: In a live-action film, most or all of the imagery is shot before we begin working. Many aspects of the sound are already stamped in. On this film, we had a lot more creative involvement. At the start, a good percentage of the movie was still in storyboards, so if we expanded or contracted the timing of an event, the animators might adjust their work to fit the sounds. As the visual elements developed, we began creating layers of sound to support them.

For me, one of the best parts of an animated film’s soundtrack is that no sounds are imposed by the real world, as is often the case in live-action productions. In live-action, if a dialogue scene is shot on a city street in Brooklyn, there is a lot of uninteresting traffic noise built into the dialogue recordings.

Very few directors (or actors) want to lose the spontaneity of the original performance by re-recording dialogue in a studio, so we tweak, clean and process the dialogue to lessen unwanted noise, sometimes diminishing the quality of the recording. We sometimes make compromises with sound effects and music to support a not-so-ideal dialogue track. In an animated film, we don’t have that problem. Sound effects and ambiences can shine without getting in the way. This film has very quiet moments, which feel very natural and organic. That’s a pleasure to have in the movie.

Rubay: Everything Curt said! You have quite a bit of freedom because there is no “production track.” On the flip side, every sound that is added is just that — added. You have to be aware of that; more is not always better.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is an animated film with a unique visual style. At times, we played the effects straight, as we might in a live-action picture, to ground it. Other times, we stripped away any notion of “reality.” Sometimes we would do both in the same scene as we cut from one angle to the next. Chris and Phil have always welcomed hard right angle turns, snapping sounds off on a cut or mixing and matching styles in close proximity. They like to do whatever supports the story and directs the audience. Often, we use sound to make your eye notice one thing or look away from another. Other times, we expand the frame, adding sounds outside of what you can see to further enhance the image.

There are many characters in the film. Can you talk about helping to create personality for each?
Rubay: There was a lot of effort made to differentiate the various “spider people” from each other. Whether it was through their web-slings or inherent technology, we were directed to give as much individual personality as possible to each character. Since that directive was baked in from the beginning, every department had it in mind. We paid attention to every visual cue. For example, Miles wears a particular pair of shoes — Nike Air Jordan 1s. My son, Alec Rubay, who was the Foley supervisor, is a real sneakerhead. He tracked down those shoes — very rare — and we recorded them, capturing every sound we could. When you hear Miles’s shoes squeak, you are hearing the correct shoes. Those shoes sound very specific. We applied that mentality wherever possible.

Schulkey: We took the opportunity to exploit the fact that some characters are from different universes in making their sound signatures different from one another. Spider-Ham is from a cartoon universe, so many of the sounds he makes are cartoon sounds. Sniffles, punches, swishes and other movements have a cartoon sensibility. Peni Parker, the anime character, is in a different sync than the rest of the cast, and her voice is somewhat more dynamic. We experimented with making Spider-Man Noir sound like he was coming from an old movie soundtrack, but that became obnoxious, so we abandoned the idea. Nicolas Cage was quite capable of conveying that aspect of the character without our help.

Because we wanted to ground characters in the real world, a lot of effort was put into attaching their voices to their images. Sync, of course, is essential, as is breathing. Characters in most animated films don’t do much breathing, but we added a lot of breaths, efforts and little stutters to add realism. That had to be done carefully. We had a very special, stellar cast and we wanted to maintain the integrity of their performances. I think that effort shows up nicely in some of the more intimate, personal scenes.

To create the unique look of this movie, the production sometimes chose to animate sections of the film “on twos.” That means that mouth movements change every other frame rather than every frame, so sync can be harder than usual to pinpoint. I worked closely with director Bob Persichetti to get dialogue to look in its best sync, doing careful reviews and special adjustments, as needed, on all dialogue in the film.

The main character in this Spider-Man thread is Miles Morales, a brilliant African-American/Puerto Rican Brooklyn teenager trying to find his way in his multi-cultural world. We took special care to show his Puerto Rican background with added Spanish-language dialogue from Miles and his friends. That required dialect coaches, special record sessions and thorough review.

The group ADR required a different level of care than most films. We created voices for crowds, onlookers and the normal “general” wash of voices for New York City. Our group voices covered many very specific characters and were cast in detail by our group leader, Caitlin McKenna. We took a very realistic approach to crowd activity. It had to be subtler than most live-action films to capture the dry nonchalance of Miles Morales’s New York.

Would you describe the sounds as realistic? Fantastical? Both?
Schulkey: The sounds are fantastically realistic. For my money, I don’t want the sounds in my movie to seem fantastical. I see our job as creating an illusion for the audience — the illusion that they are hearing what they are seeing, and that what they are seeing is real. This is an animated film, where nothing is actually real, but has its own reality. The sounds need to live in the world we are watching. When something fantastical happens in the movie’s reality, we had to support that illusion, and we sometimes got to do fun stuff. I don’t mean to say that all sounds had to be realistic.

For example, we surmised that an actual supercollider firing up below the streets of Brooklyn would sound like 10,000 computer fans. Instead, we put together sounds that supported the story we were telling. The ambiences were as authentic as possible, including subway tunnels, Brooklyn streets and school hallways. Foley here was a great tool for giving reality to animated images. When Miles walks into the cemetery at night, you hear his footsteps on snow and sidewalk, gentle cloth movements and other subtle touches. This adds to a sense that he’s a real kid in a real city. Other times, we were in the Spider-Verse and our imagination drove the work.

Rubay: The visuals led the way, and we did whatever they required. There are some crazy things in this movie. The supercollider is based on a real thing so we started there. But supercolliders don’t act as they are depicted in the movie. In reality, they sound like a giant industrial site, fans and motors, but nothing so distinct or dramatic, so we followed the visuals.

Spider-sense is a kind of magical realism that supports, informs, warns, communicates, etc. There is no realistic basis for any of that, so we went with directions about feelings. Some early words of direction were “warm,” “organic,” “internal” and “magical.” Because there are no real sounds for those words, we created sounds that conveyed the emotional feelings of those ideas to the audience.

The portals that allow spider-people to move between dimensions are another example. Again, there was no real-world event to link to. We saw the visuals and assumed it should be a pretty big deal, real “force of nature” stuff. However, it couldn’t simply be big. We took big, energetic sounds and glued them onto what we were seeing. Of course, sometimes people are talking at the same time, so we shifted the frequency center of the moment to clear for the dialog. As music is almost always playing, we had to look for opportunities within the spaces it left.

 

Can you talk about working on the action scenes?
Rubay: For me, when the action starts, the sound had to be really specific. There is dialogue for sure. The music is often active. The guiding philosophy for me at that point is not “Keep adding until there is nothing left to add,” rather, it’s, “We’re done when there is nothing left to strip out.” Busy action scene? Broom the backgrounds away. Usually, we don’t even cut BG’s in a busy action scene, but, if we do, we do so with a skeptical eye. How can we make it more specific? Also, I keep a keen eye on “scale.” One wrong, small detail sound, no matter how cool or interesting, will get the broom if it throws off the scale. Sometimes everything might be sounding nice and big; impressive but not loud, just big, and then some small detail creeps in and spoils it. I am constantly looking out for that.

The “Prowler Chase” scene was a fun exploration. There are times where the music takes over and runs; we pull out every sound we can. Other times, the sound effects blow over everything. It is a matter of give and take. There is a truck/car/prowler motorcycle crash that turns into a suspended slo-mo moment. We had to decide which sounds to play where and when. Its stripped-down nature made it among my favorite moments in the picture.

Can you talk about the multiple universes?
Rubay: The multiverse presented many challenges. It usually manifested itself as a portal or something we move between. The portals were energetic and powerful. The multiverse “place” was something that we used as a quiet place. We used it to provide contrast because, usually, there was big action on either side.

A side effect of the multiple universes interacting was a buildup or collision/overlap. When universes collide or overlap, matter from each tries to occupy the same space. Visually, this created some very interesting moments. We referred to the multi-colored prismatic-looking stuff as “Picasso” moments. The supporting sound needed to convey “force of nature” and “hard edges,” but couldn’t be explosive, loud or gritty. Ultimately, it was a very multi-layered sound event: some “real” sounds teamed with extreme synthesis. I think it worked.

Schulkey: Some of the characters in the movie are transported from another dimension into the dimension of the movie, but their bodies rebel, and from time to time their molecules try to jump back to their native dimension, causing “glitching.” We developed, with a combination of plug-ins, blending, editing and panning, a signature sound that served to signal glitching throughout the movie, and was individually applied for each iteration.

What stands out in your mind as the most challenging scenes audio wise?
Rubay: There is a very quiet moment between Miles and his dad when dad is on one side of the door and Miles is on the other. It’s a very quiet, tender one-way conversation. When a movie gets that quiet every sound counts. Every detail has to be perfect.

What about the Dolby Atmos mix? How did that enhance the film? Can you give a scene or two as an example?
Schulkey: This film was a native Atmos mix, meaning that the primary final mix was directly in the Atmos format, as opposed to making a 7.1 mix and then going back to re-mix sections using the Atmos format.

The native Atmos mix allowed us a lot more sonic room in the theater. This is an extremely complex and busy mix, heavily driven by dialogue. By moving the score out into the side and surround speakers — away from the center speaker — we were able to make the dialogue clearer and still have a very rich and exciting score. Sonic movement is much more effective in this format. When we panned sounds around the room, it felt more natural than in other formats.

Rubay: Atmos is fantastic. Being able to move sounds vertically creates so much space, so much interest, that might otherwise not be there. Also, the level and frequency response of the surround channels makes a huge difference.

You guys used Avid Pro Tools for editing, can you mention some other favorite tools you employed on this film?
Schulkey : The Delete key and the Undo key.

Rubay: Pitch ‘n’ Time, Envy, Reverbs by Exponential Audio, Recording rigs and microphones of all sorts.

What haven’t I asked that’s important?
Our crew! Just in case anyone thinks this can be done by two people, it can’t.
– re-recording mixers Michael Semanick and Tony Lamberti
– sound designer John Pospisil
– dialogue editors James Morioka and Matthew Taylor
– sound effects editors David Werntz, Kip Smedley, Andy Sisul, Chris Aud, Donald Flick, Benjamin Cook, Mike Reagan and Ando Johnson
– Foley mixer Randy Singer
– Foley artists Gary Hecker, Michael Broomberg and Rick Owens


Behind the Title: ATK PLN Technical Supervisor Jon Speer

NAME: Jon Speer

COMPANY: ATK PLN (@atkpln_studio) in Dallas

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a strategic creative group that specializes in design and animation for commercials and short-form video productions.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Technical Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
In general, a technical supervisor is responsible for leading the technical director team and making sure that the pipeline enables our artists’ effort of fulfilling the client’s vision.

Day-to-day responsibilities include:
– Reviewing upcoming jobs and making sure we have the necessary hardware resources to complete them
– Working with our producers and VFX supervisors to bid and plan future work
– Working with our CG/VFX supervisors to develop and implement new technologies that make our pipeline more efficient
– When problems arise in production, I am there to determine the cause, find a solution and help implement the fix
– Developing junior technical directors so they can be effective in mitigating pipeline issues that crop up during production

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I would say the most surprising thing that falls under the title is the amount of people and personality management that you need to employ.

As a technical supervisor, you have to represent every single person’s different perspectives and goals. Making everyone from artists, producers, management and, most importantly, clients happy is a tough balancing act. That balancing act needs to be constantly evaluated to make sure you have both the short-term and long-term interests of the company, clients and artists in mind.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Maya, Houdini and Nuke are the main tools we support for shot production. We have our own internal tracking software that we also integrate with.

From text editors for coding, to content creation programs and even budgeting programs, I typically use it all.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Starting the next project. Each new project offers the chance for us to try out a new or revamped pipeline tool that we hope will make things that much better for our team. I love efficiencies, so getting to try new tools, whether they are internally or externally developed, is always fun.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I know it sounds cliché, but I don’t really have one. My entire job is based on figuring out why things don’t work or how they could work better. So when things are breaking or getting technically difficult, that is why I am here. If I had to pick one thing, I suppose it would be looking at spreadsheets of any kind.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early morning when no one else is in. This is the time of day that I get to see what new tools are out there and try them. This is when I get to come up with the crazy ideas and plans for what we do next from a pipeline standpoint. Most of the rest of my day usually includes dealing with issues that crop up during production, or being in meetings.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I think I would have to give teaching a try. Having studied architecture in school, I always thought it would be fun to teach architectural history.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We just wrapped on a set of Lego spots for the new Lego 2 movie.

Fallout 76

We also did an E3 piece for Fallout 76 this year that was a lot of fun. We are currently helping out with a spot for the big game this year that has been a blast.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I think I am most proud of our Lego spots we have created over the last three years. We have really experimented with pipeline on those spots. We saw a new technology out there — rendering in Octane — and decided to jump in head first. While it wasn’t the easiest thing to do, we forced ourselves to become even more efficient in all aspects of production.

NAME PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Houdini really makes the difficult things simple to do. I also love Nuke. It does what it does so well, and is amazingly fast and simple to program in.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Mainly I’ll listen to soundtracks when I am working, the lack of words is best when I am programming.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Golf is something I really enjoy on the weekends. However, like a lot of people, I find travel is easily the best way to for me to hit the reset button.


London’s Jelly opens in NYC, EP relocates

London-based Jelly, an animation, design and production company that’s produced for many US-based agencies and direct clients, has opened a full-time presence in New York. Their senior creative producer Eri Panasci will relocate to lead the new entity as executive producer.

Launched in 2002, Jelly functions as both a production company and artist management agency. On the commercials front, Jelly represents a global roster of directors and creators who’ve produced animation and motion graphics for brands like Lacoste, Apple, Samsung, Adidas and others. In the latter role, it represents a roster of illustrators and designers who regularly collaborate with brands on print, digital and outdoor ad campaigns.

Panasci’s move to New York is also a homecoming. This Connecticut native and graduate of Boston University has worked in New York, San Francisco and London for McCann and Vice Media. She joined Jelly in London in 2016, overseeing design and production assignments for such clients as Virgin Media, Google, Nespresso, McDonald’s and Bombay Sapphire.

“One of the things I’ll be able to do is provide a deeper level of service for our US clients from New York versus London,” says Panasci, “and meld that with the Jelly model and culture. And being able to put a face to a name is always good, especially when you’re dealing with someone who understands the American market and its expectations.”

The studio has lined up US representation with James Bartlett of Mr. Bartlett, whose initial brief will be to handle the East Coast.

Coming from the UK, how does Panasci describe the Jelly approach? “It’s playful yet competent,” she says with enthusiasm. “We don’t take ourselves too seriously, but on the other hand we get shit done, and we do it well. We’re known for craft and solutions, and famously for not saying the word ‘no’ — unless we really have to!”

Recent Jelly projects include Hot House, a zany TVC for Virgin Mobile, co-directed by Design Lad and Kitchen; Soho, an animated short for the shared workspace company Fora and London agency Anyways, directed by Niceshit; and Escape, a spot for the outdoor clothing company Berghaus, directed by Em Cooper for VCCP that uses the director’s unique, hand-painted technique.

Panasci says the focus of Jelly’s US operations will initially be motion work, but adds their illustration talents will also be available, and they’ll be showing print portfolios along with show reels when meeting with agencies and clients. Jelly’s head of illustration, Nicki Field, will accompany Panasci in March to kick off the New York presence with a series of meetings and screenings.

While based in London, the studio is at ease working in America, Panasci says. They’ve produced campaigns for such shops as 72andSunny, Mother, Droga5, BBH, Wieden + Kennedy, Publicis and more, working with both their US and European offices.

Most recently, Jelly signed the New York-based animation team Roof to a representation agreement for the UK market; the team played a leading role in the recent “Imaginary Friends” campaign from RPA in Santa Monica.

AES/SMPTE panel: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse sound

By Mel Lambert

As part of its successful series of sound showcases, a recent joint meeting of the Los Angeles Section of the Audio Engineering Society and SMPTE’s Hollywood Section focused on the soundtrack of the animated features Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which has garnered several Oscar, BAFTA, CAS and MPSE award nominations, plus a Golden Globes win.

On January 31 at Sony Pictures Studios’ Kim Novak Theater in Culver City many gathered to hear a panel discussion between the film’s sound and picture editors and re-recording mixers. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was co-directed by Peter Ramsey, Robert Persichetti Jr. and Rodney Rothman, the creative minds behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street.

The panel

The Sound Showcase panel included supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey, re-recording mixer/sound designer Tony Lamberti, re-recording mixer Michael Semanick and associate picture editor Vivek Sharma. The Hollywood Reporter’s Carolyn Giardina moderated. The event concluded with a screening of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which represents a different Spider-Man Universe, since it introduces Brooklyn teen Miles Morales and the expanding possibilities of the Spider-Verse, where more than one entity can wear the arachnid mask.

Following the screening of an opening sequence from the animated feature, Rubay acknowledged that the film’s producers were looking for a different look for the Spider-Man character based on the Marvel comic books, but with a reference to previous live-action movies in the franchise. “They wanted us to make more of the period in which the new film is set,” he told the standing-room audience in the same dubbing stage where the soundtrack was re-recorded.

“[EVPs] Phil Lord and Chris Miller have a specific style of soundtrack that they’ve developed,” stated Lamberti, “and so we premixed to get that overall shape.”

“The look is unique,” conceded Semanick, “and our mix needed to match that and make it sound like a comic book. It couldn’t be too dynamic; we didn’t want to assault the audience, but still make it loud here and softer there.”

Full house

“We also kept the track to its basics,” Rubay added, “and didn’t add a sound for every little thing. If the soundtrack had been as complicated as the visuals, the audience’s heads would have exploded.”

“Yes, simpler was often better,” Lamberti confirmed, “to let the soundtrack tell the story of the visuals.”

In terms of balancing sound effects against dialog, “We did a lot of experimentation and went with what seemed the best solution,” Semanick said. “We kept molding the soundtrack until we were satisfied.” As Lamberti confirmed: “It was always a matter of balancing all the sound elements, using trial and error.”

=Nominated for a Cinema Audio Society Award in the Motion Picture — Animated category, Brian Smith, Aaron Hasson and Howard London served as original dialogue mixers on the film, with Sam Okell as scoring mixer and Randy K. Singer as Foley mixer. The crew also included sound designer John Pospisil, Foley supervisor Alec G. Rubay, SFX editors Kip Smedley, Andy Sisul, David Werntz, Christopher Aud, Ando Johnson, Benjamin Cook, Mike Reagan and Donald Flick.

During picture editorial, “we lived with many versions until we got to the sound,” explained Sharma. “The premix was fantastic and worked very well. Visuals are important but sound fulfils a complementary role. Dialogue is always key; the audience needs to hear what the characters say!”

“We present ideas and judge the results until everybody is happy,” said Semanick. “[Writer/producer] Phil Lord was very good at listening to everybody; he made the final decision, but deferred to the directors. ‘Maybe we should drop the music?’ ‘Does the result still pull the audience into the music?’ We worked until the elements worked very well together.”

The lead character’s “Spidey Sense” also discussed. As co-supervisor Schulkey explained: “Our early direction was that it was an internal feeling … like a warm, fuzzy feeling. But warm and fuzzy didn’t cut through the music. In the end there was not just a single Spidey Sense — it was never the same twice. The web slings were a classic sound that we couldn’t get too far from.”

“And we used [Dolby] Atmos to spin and pan those sounds around the room,” added Lamberti, who told the audience that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse marked Sony Animation’s first native Atmos mix. “We used the format to get the most out of it,” concluded the SFX re-recording mixer, who mixed sound effects “in the box” using an Avid S6 console/controller, while Semanick handled dialogue and music on the Kim Novak Theater’s Harrison MPC4D X-Range digital console.


Mel Lambert has been intimately involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists.