Arraiy 4.11.19

Category Archives: 4k

Cobalt Digital’s card-based solution for 4K/HDR conversions

Cobalt Digital was at NAB showing with card-based solutions for openGear frames for 4K and HDR workflows. Cobalt’s 9904-UDX-4K up/down/cross converter and image processor offers an economical SDR-to-HDR and HDR-to-SDR conversion for 4K.

John Stevens, director of engineering at Burbank post house The Foundation, calls it “a swiss army knife” for a post facility.

The 9904-UDX-4K upconverts 12G/6G/3G/HD/SD to either UHD1 3840×2160 square division multiplex (SDM) or two-sample interleave (2SI) quad 3G-SDI-based formats, or it can output SMPTE ST 2082 12G-SDI for single-wire 4K transport. With both 12G-SDI and quad 3G-SDI inputs, the 9904-UDX-4K can downconvert 12G and quad UHD. The 9904-UDX-4K provides an HDMI 2.0 output for economical 4K video monitoring and offers numerous options, including SDR-to-HDR conversion and color correction.

The 9904-UDX-4K-IP model offers the same functionality as the 9904-UDX-4K SDI-based model, plus it also provides dual 10GigE ports to support for the emerging uncompressed video/audio/data over IP standards.

The 9904-UDX-4K-DSP model provides the same functionality as the 9904-UDX-4K model, and additionally also offers a DSP-based platform that supports multiple audio DSP options, including Dolby realtime loudness leveling (automatic loudness processing), Dolby E/D/D+ encode/decode and Linear Acoustic Upmax automatic upmixing. Embedded audio and metadata are properly delayed and re-embedded to match any video processing delay, with full adjustment available for audio/video offset.

The product’s high-density openGear design allows for up to five 9904-UDX-4K cards to be installed in one 2RU openGear frame. Card control/monitoring is available via the DashBoard user interface, integrated HTML5 web interface, SNMP or Cobalt’s RESTful-based Reflex protocol.

“I have been looking for a de-embedder that will work with SMPTE ST-2048 raster sizes — specifically 2048×1080 and 4096×2160,” explains Stevens. “The reason this is important is Netflix deliverables require these rasters. We use all embedded audio and I need to de-embed for monitoring. The same Cobalt Digital card will take almost every SDI input from quad link to 12G and output HDMI. There are other converters that will do some of the same things, but I haven’t seen anything that does what this product does.”

Quantum offers new F-Series NVMe storage arrays

During the NAB show, Quantum introduced its new F-Series NVMe storage arrays designed for performance, availability and reliability. Using non-volatile memory express (NVMe) Flash drives for ultra-fast reads and writes, the series supports massive parallel processing and is intended for studio editing, rendering and other performance-intensive workloads using large unstructured datasets.

Incorporating the latest Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) networking technology, the F-Series provides direct access between workstations and the NVMe storage devices, resulting in predictable and fast network performance. By combining these hardware features with the new Quantum Cloud Storage Platform and the StorNext file system, the F-Series offers end-to-end storage capabilities for post houses, broadcasters and others working in rich media environments, such as visual effects rendering.

The first product in the F-Series is the Quantum F2000, a 2U dual-node server with two hot-swappable compute canisters and up to 24 dual-ported NVMe drives. Each compute canister can access all 24 NVMe drives and includes processing power, memory and connectivity specifically designed for high performance and availability.

The F-Series is based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform, a software-defined block storage stack tuned specifically for video and video-like data. The platform eliminates data services unrelated to video while enhancing data protection, offering networking flexibility and providing block interfaces.

According to Quantum, the F-Series is as much as five times faster than traditional Flash storage/networking, delivering extremely low latency and hundreds of thousands of IOPs per chassis. The series allows users to reduce infrastructure costs by moving from Fiber Channel to Ethernet IP-based infrastructures. Additionally, users leveraging a large number of HDDs or SSDs to meet their performance requirements can gain back racks of data center space.

The F-Series is the first product line based on the Quantum Cloud Storage Platform.

Arraiy 4.11.19

Red Ranger all-in-one camera system now available

Red Digital Cinema has made its new Red Ranger all-in-one camera system available to select Red authorized rental houses. Ranger includes Red’s cinematic full-frame 8K sensor Monstro in an all-in-one camera system, featuring three SDI outputs (two mirrored and one independent) allowing two different looks to be output simultaneously; wide-input voltage (11.5V to 32V); 24V and 12V power outs (two of each); one 12V P-Tap port; integrated 5-pin XLR stereo audio input (Line/Mic/+48V Selectable); as well as genlock, timecode, USB and control.

Ranger is capable of handling heavy-duty power sources and boasts a larger fan for quieter and more efficient temperature management. The system is currently shipping in a gold mount configuration, with a v-lock option available next month.

Ranger captures 8K RedCode RAW up to 60fps full-format, as well as Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHR formats at 4K up to 30fps and 2K up to 120fps. It can simultaneously record RedCode RAW plus Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD or DNxHR at up to 300MB/s write speeds.

To enable an end-to-end color management and post workflow, Red’s enhanced image processing pipeline (IPP2) is also included in the system.

Ranger ships complete, including:
• Production top handle
• PL mount with supporting shims
• Two 15mm LWS rod brackets
• Red Pro Touch 7.0-inch LCD with 9-inch arm and LCD/EVF cable
• LCD/EVF adaptor A and LCD/EVF adaptor D
• 24V AC power adaptor with 3-pin 24V XLR power cable
• Compatible Hex and Torx tools


Goldcrest adds 4K theater and colorist Marcy Robinson

Goldcrest Post in New York City has expanded its its picture finishing services, adding veteran colorist Marcy Robinson and unveiling a new, state-of-the-art 4K theater that joins an existing theater and other digital intermediate rooms. The moves are part of a broader strategy to offer film and television productions packaged post services encompassing editorial, picture finishing and sound.

Robinson brings experience working in features, television, documentaries, commercials and music videos. She has recently been working as a freelance colorist, collaborating with directors Noah Baumbach and Ang Lee. Her background also includes 10 years at the creative boutique Box Services, best known for its work in fashion advertising.

Robinson, who was recruited to Goldcrest by Nat Jencks, the facility’s senior colorist, says she was attracted by the opportunity to work on a diversity of high-quality projects. Robinson’s first projects for Goldcrest include the Netflix documentary The Grass is Greener and an advertising campaign for Reebok.

Robinson started out in film photography and operated a custom color photographic print lab for 13 years. She became a digital colorist after joining Box Services in 2008. As a freelance colorist, her credits include the features Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, DePalma and Frances Ha, the HBO documentary Suited, commercials for Steve Madden, Dior and Prada, and music videos for Keith Urban and Madonna.

Goldcrest’s new 4K theater is set up for the dual purposes of feature film and HDR television mastering. Its technical features include a Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve Linux Advanced color correction and finishing system, a Barco 4K projector, a Screen Research projection screen and Dolby-calibrated 7:1 surround sound.


AJA ships HDR Image Analyzer developed with Colorfont

AJA is now shipping HDR Image Analyzer, a realtime HDR monitoring and analysis solution developed in partnership with Colorfront. HDR Image Analyzer features waveform, histogram and vectorscope monitoring and analysis of 4K/UltraHD/2K/HD, HDR and WCG content for broadcast and OTT production, post, QC and mastering.

Combining AJA’s video I/O with HDR analysis tools from Colorfront in a compact 1RU chassis, the HDR Image Analyzer features a toolset for monitoring and analyzing HDR formats, including Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) for 4K/UltraHD workflows. The HDR Image Analyzer takes in up to 4K sources across 4x 3G-SDI inputs and loops the video out, allowing analysis at any point in the production workflow.

Additional feature highlights include:
– Support for display referred SDR (Rec.709), HDR ST 2084/PQ and HLG analysis
– Support for scene referred ARRI, Canon, Panasonic, Red and Sony camera color spaces
– Display and color processing look up table (LUT) support
– Automatic color space conversion based on the award winning Colorfront Engine
– CIE graph, vectorscope, waveform and histogram support– Nit levels and phase metering
– False color mode to easily spot out-of-gamut/out-of-brightness pixels
– Advanced out-of-gamut and out-of-brightness detection with error intolerance
– Data analyzer with pixel picker
– Line mode to focus a region of interest onto a single horizontal or vertical line
– File-based error logging with timecode
– Reference still store
– UltraHD UI for native-resolution picture display
– Up to 4K/UltraHD 60p over 4x 3G-SDI inputs, with loop out
– SDI auto signal detection
– Loop through output to broadcast monitors
– Three-year warranty

The HDR Image Analyzer is the second technology collaboration between AJA and Colorfront, following the integration of Colorfront Engine into AJA’s FS-HDR realtime HDR/WCG converter. Colorfront has exclusively licensed its Colorfront HDR Image Analyzer software to AJA for the HDR Image Analyzer.

The HDR Image Analyzer is available through AJA’s worldwide reseller network for $15,995.


Shutterstock Select: 4K footage shot on cinema cameras

Shutterstock has introduced a new tier of footage: Shutterstock Select. This collection of exclusive video clips includes far-ranging content — everything from everyday moments to blockbuster-worthy action scenes — all captured by industry pros using cinema-grade cameras. The Shutterstock Select video collection is available to download in both 4K and HD.

“As most filmmakers and cinematographers know, creating high-quality establishing shots are important to any film, but are also very expensive to produce,” says Jon Oringer, founder/CEO of Shutterstock.

This new tier offering features in-demand content categories, such as cinematic aerials, millennial adventure, gastronomy, action scenes and workplace scenes. The shots are filmed on high-end cinema cameras using cinema lenses.

According to Shutterstock’s director, creative video content, Kyle Trotter, a variety of cinema-grade equipment was used to create this collection. The Phantom Flex4K was used for super slow motion 1000fps footage. Contributors also used Red’s latest sensor, the Monstro, on some shoots and as a result filmed large format for some of the content. Additionally, they used the Shotover K1 and Cineflex (both camera rigs for helicopters). In terms of lenses, the Cooke S4s, ARRI/Zeiss Ultra Primes and Sigma Cine Primes were used. This footage was created with a particular focus on Hollywood-style camera movements, composition and acting.

Two of the contributors Shutterstock worked with and are highlighting in this collection are VIA Films’ Daniel Hurst and Aila Images’ Bevan Goldswain. “We aim to build the Shutterstock Select collection by working with more contributors [who can provide  high-quality content] we expect for this offering,” says Trotter. To learn more about contributing, check out their FAQ here.

 


Franz Kraus to advisory role at ARRI, Michael Neuhaeuser takes tech lead

The ARRI Group has named Dr. Michael Neuhaeuser as the new executive board member responsible for technology. He succeeds Professor Franz Kraus, who after more than 30 years at ARRI, joins the Supervisory Board and will continue to be closely associated with the company. Neuhaeuser starts September 1.

Kraus, who has been leading tech development at ARRI for the last few decades, played an essential role in the development of the Alexa digital camera system and early competence in multi-channel LED technology for ARRI lighting. During Kraus’ tenure at ARRI, and while he was responsible for research and development, the company was presented with nine Scientific and Technical Awards by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for its outstanding technical achievements.

In 2011, along with two colleagues, Kraus was honored with an Academy Award of Merit, an Oscar statuette for the design and development of the digital film
recorder, the ARRILASER.

Neuhaeuser, who is now responsible for technology at the ARRI Group, previously served as VP of automotive microcontroller development at Infineon Technologies in Munich. He studied electrical engineering at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, and subsequently completed his doctorate in semiconductor devices. He brings with him 30 years of experience in the electronics industry.

Neuhaeuser started his industrial career at Siemens Semiconductor in Villach, Austria, and also took over leadership development at Micram Microelectronic in Bochum. He joined Infineon Technologies in 1998, where he performed various management functions in Germany and abroad. Some of his notable accomplishments include being responsible for the digital cordless business since 2005 and, together with his team, having developed the world’s first fully integrated DECT chip. In 2009, he was appointed to VP/GM at Infineon Technologies Romania in Bucharest where, as country manager, he built up various local activities with more than 300 engineers. In 2012, he was asked to head up the automotive microcontroller development division for which he and his team developed the highly successful Aurix product family, which is used in every second car worldwide.

Main Image: L-R: Franz Kraus and Michael Neuhaeuser.


Lenovo intros 15-inch VR-ready ThinkPad P52

Lenovo’s new ThinkPad P52 is a 15-inch, VR-ready and ISV-certified mobile workstation featuring an Nvidia Quadro P3200 GPU. The all-new hexa-core Intel Xeon CPU doubles the memory capacity to 128GB and increases PCIe storage. Lenovo says the ThinkPad excels in animation and visual effects project storage, the creation of large models and datasets, and realtime playback.

“More and more, M&E artists have the need to create on-the-go,” reports Lenovo senior worldwide industry manager for M&E Rob Hoffmann. “Having desktop-like capabilities in a 15-inch mobile workstation, allows artists to remain creative anytime, anywhere.”

The workstation targets traditional ISV workflows, as well as AR and VR content creation or deployment of mobile AI. Lenovo points to Virtalis, a VR and advanced visualization company, as an example of who might take advantage of the workstation.

“Our virtual reality solutions help clients better understand data and interact with it. Being able to take these solutions mobile with the ThinkPad P52 gives us expanded flexibility to bring the technology to life for clients in their unique environments,” says Steve Carpenter, head of solutions development for Virtalis. “The ThinkPad P52 powering our Virtalis Visionary Render software is perfect for engineering and design professionals looking for a portable solution to take their first steps into the endless possibilities of VR.”

The P52 also will feature a 4K UHD display with 400nits, 100% Adobe color gamut and 10-bit color depth. There are dual USB-C Thunderbolt ports supporting the display of 8K video, allowing users to take advantage of the ThinkPad Thunderbolt Workstation Dock.

The ThinkPad P52 will be available later this month.


Testing large format camera workflows

By Mike McCarthy

In the last few months, we have seen the release of the Red Monstro, Sony Venice, Arri Alexa LF and Canon C700 FF, all of which have larger or full-frame sensors. Full frame refers to the DSLR terminology, with full frame being equivalent to the entire 35mm film area — the way that it was used horizontally in still cameras. All SLRs used to be full frame with 35mm film, so there was no need for the term until manufacturers started saving money on digital image sensors by making them smaller than 35mm film exposures. Super35mm motion picture cameras on the other hand ran the film vertically, resulting in a smaller exposure area per frame, but this was still much larger than most video imagers until the last decade, with 2/3-inch chips being considered premium imagers. The options have grown a lot since then.

L-R: 1st AC Ben Brady, DP Michael Svitak and Mike McCarthy on the monitor.

Most of the top-end cinema cameras released over the last few years have advertised their Super35mm sensors as a huge selling point, as that allows use of any existing S35 lens on the camera. These S35 cameras include the Epic, Helium and Gemini from Red, Sony’s F5 and F55, Panasonic’s VaricamLT, Arri’s Alexa and Canon’s C100-500. On the top end, 65mm cameras like the Alexa65 have sensors twice as wide as Super35 cameras, but very limited lens options to cover a sensor that large. Full frame falls somewhere in between and allows, among other things, use of any 35mm still film lenses. In the world of film, this was referred to as Vista Vision, but the first widely used full-frame digital video camera was Canon’s 5D MkII, the first serious HDSLR. That format has suddenly surged in popularity recently, and thanks to this I recently had opportunity to be involved in a test shoot with a number of these new cameras.

Keslow Camera was generous enough to give DP Michael Svitak and myself access to pretty much all their full-frame cameras and lenses for the day in order to test the cameras, workflows and lens options for this new format. We also had the assistance of first AC Ben Brady to help us put all that gear to use, and Mike’s daughter Florendia as our model.

First off was the Red Monstro, which while technically not the full 24mm height of true full frame, uses the same size lenses due to the width of its 17×9 sensor. It offers the highest resolution of the group at 8K. It records compressed RAW to R3D files, as well as options for ProRes and DNxHR up to 4K, all saved to Red mags. Like the rest of the group, smaller portions of the sensor can be used at lower resolution to pair with smaller lenses. The Red Helium sensor has the same resolution but in a much smaller Super35 size, allowing a wider selection of lenses to be used. But larger pixels allow more light sensitivity, with individual pixels up to 5 microns wide on the Monstro and Dragon, compared to Helium’s 3.65-micron pixels.

Next up was Sony’s new Venice camera with a 6K full-frame sensor, allowing 4K S35 recording as well. It records XAVC to SxS cards or compressed RAW in the X-OCN format with the optional ASX-R7 external recorder, which we used. It is worth noting that both full-frame recording and integrated anamorphic support require additional special licenses from Sony, but Keslow provided us with a camera that had all of that functionality enabled. With a 36x24mm 6K sensor, the pixels are 5.9microns, and footage shot at 4K in the S35 mode should be similar to shooting with the F55.

We unexpectedly had the opportunity to shoot on Arri’s new AlexaLF (Large Format) camera. At 4.5K, this had the lowest resolution, but that also means the largest sensor pixels at 8.25microns, which can increase sensitivity. It records ArriRaw or ProRes to Codex XR capture drives with its integrated recorder.

Another other new option is the Canon C700 FF with a 5.9K full-frame sensor recording RAW, ProRes, or XAVC to CFast cards or Codex Drives. That gives it 6-micron pixels, similar to the Sony Venice. But we did not have the opportunity to test that camera this time around, maybe in the future.

One more factor in all of this is the rising popularity of anamorphic lenses. All of these cameras support modes that use the part of the sensor covered by anamorphic lenses and can desqueeze the image for live monitoring and preview. In the digital world, anamorphic essentially cuts your overall resolution in half, until the unlikely event that we start seeing anamorphic projectors or cameras with rectangular sensor pixels. But the prevailing attitude appears to be, “We have lots of extra resolution available so it doesn’t really matter if we lose some to anamorphic conversion.”

Post Production
So what does this mean for post? In theory, sensor size has no direct effect on the recorded files (besides the content of them) but resolution does. But we also have a number of new formats to deal with as well, and then we have to deal with anamorphic images during finishing.

Ever since I got my hands on one of Dell’s new UP3218K monitors with an 8K screen, I have been collecting 8K assets to display on there. When I first started discussing this shoot with DP Michael Svitak, I was primarily interested in getting some more 8K footage to use to test out new 8K monitors, editing systems and software as it got released. I was anticipating getting Red footage, which I knew I could playback and process using my existing software and hardware.

The other cameras and lens options were added as the plan expanded, and by the time we got to Keslow Camera, they had filled a room with lenses and gear for us to test with. I also had a Dell 8K display connected to my ingest system, and the new 4K DreamColor monitor as well. This allowed me to view the recorded footage in the highest resolution possible.

Most editing programs, including Premiere Pro and Resolve, can handle anamorphic footage without issue, but new camera formats can be a bigger challenge. Any RAW file requires info about the sensor pattern in order to debayer it properly, and new compression formats are even more work. Sony’s new compressed RAW format for Venice, called X-OCN, is supported in the newest 12.1 release of Premiere Pro, so I didn’t expect that to be a problem. Its other recording option is XAVC, which should work as well. The Alexa on the other hand uses ArriRaw files, which have been supported in Premiere for years, but each new camera shoots a slightly different “flavor” of the file based on the unique properties of that sensor. Shooting ProRes instead would virtually guarantee compatibility but at the expense of the RAW properties. (Maybe someday ProResRAW will offer the best of both worlds.) The Alexa also has the challenge of recording to Codex drives that can only be offloaded in OS X or Linux.

Once I had all of the files on my system, after using a MacBook Pro to offload the media cards, I tried to bring them into Premiere. The Red files came in just fine but didn’t play back smoothly over 1/4 resolution. They played smoothly in RedCineX with my Red Rocket-X enabled, and they export respectably fast in AME, (a five-minute 8K anamorphic sequence to UHD H.265 in 10 minutes), but for some reason Premiere Pro isn’t able to get smooth playback when using the Red Rocket-X. Next I tried the X-OCN files from the Venice camera, which imported without issue. They played smoothly on my machine but looked like they were locked to half or quarter res, regardless of what settings I used, even in the exports. I am currently working with Adobe to get to the bottom of that because they are able to play back my files at full quality, while all my systems have the same issue. Lastly, I tried to import the Arri files from the AlexaLF, but Adobe doesn’t support that new variation of ArriRaw yet. I would anticipate that will happen soon, since it shouldn’t be too difficult to add that new version to the existing support.

I ended up converting the files I needed to DNxHR in DaVinci Resolve so I could edit them in Premiere, and I put together a short video showing off the various lenses we tested with. Eventually, I need to learn how to use Resolve more efficiently, but the type of work I usually do lends itself to the way Premiere is designed — inter-cutting and nesting sequences with many different resolutions and aspect ratios. Here is a short clip demonstrating some of the lenses we tested with:

This is a web video, so even at UHD it is not meant to be an analysis of the RAW image quality, but instead a demonstration of the field of view and overall feel with various lenses and camera settings. The combination of the larger sensors and the anamorphic lenses leads to an extremely wide field of view. The table was only about 10 feet from the camera, and we can usually see all the way around it. We also discovered that when recording anamorphic on the Alexa LF, we were recording a wider image than was displaying on the monitor output. You can see in the frame grab below that the live display visible on the right side of the image isn’t displaying the full content that got recorded, which is why we didn’t notice that we were recording with the wrong settings with so much vignetting from the lens.

We only discovered this after the fact, from this shot, so we didn’t get the opportunity to track down the issue to see if it was the result of a setting in the camera or in the monitor. This is why we test things before a shoot, but we didn’t “test” before our camera test, so these things happen.

We learned a lot from the process, and hopefully some of those lessons are conveyed here. A big thanks to Brad Wilson and the rest of the guys at Keslow Camera for their gear and support of this adventure and, hopefully, it will help people better prepare to shoot and post with this new generation of cameras.

Main Image: DP Michael Svitak


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

Red simplifies camera lineup with one DSMC2 brain

Red Digital Cinema modified its camera lineup to include one DSMC2 camera Brain with three sensor options — Monstro 8K VV, Helium 8K S35 and Gemini 5K S35. The single DSMC2 camera Brain includes high-end frame rates and data rates regardless of the sensor chosen. In addition, this streamlined approach will result in a price reduction compared to Red’s previous camera line-up.

“We have been working to become more efficient, as well as align with strategic manufacturing partners to optimize our supply chain,” says Jarred Land, president of Red Digital Cinema. “As a result, I am happy to announce a simplification of our lineup with a single DSMC2 brain with multiple sensor options, as well as an overall reduction on our pricing.”

Red’s DSMC2 camera Brain is a modular system that allows users to configure a fully operational camera setup to meet their individual needs. Red offers a range of accessories, including display and control functionality, input/output modules, mounting equipment, and methods of powering the camera. The camera Brain is capable of up to 60fps at 8K, offers 300MB/s data transfer speeds and simultaneous recording of RedCode RAW and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD/HR.

The Red DSMC2 camera Brain and sensor options:
– DSMC2 with Monstro 8K VV offers cinematic full frame lens coverage, produces ultra-detailed 35.4 megapixel stills and offers 17+ stops of dynamic range for $54,500.
– DSMC2 with Helium 8K S35 offers 16.5+ stops of dynamic range in a Super 35 frame, and is available now for $24,500.
– DSMC2 with Gemini 5K S35 uses dual sensitivity modes to provide creators with greater flexibility using standard mode for well-lit conditions or low-light mode for darker environments priced at $19,500.

Red will begin to phase out new sales of its Epic-W and Weapon camera Brains starting immediately. In addition to the changes to the camera line-up, Red will also begin offering new upgrade paths for customers looking to move from older Red camera systems or from one sensor to another. The full range of upgrade options can be found here.