Category Archives: 3D

Using VFX to bring the new Volkswagen Jetta to life

LA-based studio Jamm provided visual effects for the all-new 2019 Volkswagen Jetta campaign Betta Getta Jetta. Created by Deutsch and produced by ManvsMachine, the series of 12 spots bring the Jetta to life by combining Jamm’s CG design with a color palette inspired by the car’s 10-color ambient lighting system.

“The VW campaign offered up some incredibly fun and intricate challenges. Most notably was the volume of work to complete in a limited amount of time — 12 full-CG spots in just nine weeks, each one unique with its own personality,” says VFX supervisor Andy Boyd.

Collaboration was key to delivering so many spots in such a short span of time. Jamm worked closely with ManvsMachine on every shot. “The team had a very strong creative vision which is crucial in the full 3D world where anything is possible,” explains Boyd.

Jamm employed a variety of techniques for the music-centric campaign, which highlights updated features such as ambient lighting and Beats Audio. The series includes spots titled  Remix, Bumper-to-Bumper, Turb-Whoa, Moods, Bass, Rings, Puzzle and App Magnet, along with 15-second teasers, all of which aired on various broadcast, digital and social channels during the World Cup.

For “Remix,” Jamm brought both a 1985 and a 2019 Jetta to life, along with a hybrid mix of the two, adding a cool layer of turntablist VFX, whereas for “Puzzle,” they cut up the car procedurally in Houdini​, which allowed the team to change around the slices as needed.

For Bass, Jamm helped bring personality to the car while keeping its movements grounded in reality. Animation supervisor Stew Burris pushed the car’s performance and dialed in the choreography of the dance with ManvsMachine as the Jetta discovered the beat, adding exciting life to the car as it bounced to the bassline and hit the switches on a little three-wheel motion.

We reached out to Jamm’s Boyd to find out more.

How early did Jamm get involved?
We got involved as soon as agency boards were client approved. We worked hand in hand with ManvMachine to previs each of the spots in order to lay the foundation for our CG team to execute both agency and directors’ vision.

What were the challenges of working on so many spots at once.
The biggest challenge was for editorial to keep up with the volume of previs options we gave them to present to agency.

Other than Houdini, what tools did they use?
Flame, Nuke and Maya were used as well.

What was your favorite spot of the 12 and why?
Puzzle was our favorite to work on. It was the last of the bunch delivered to Deutsch which we treated with a more technical approach, slicing up the car like a Rubix’s Cube.

 

Siggraph: StarVR One’s VR headset with integrated eye tracking

StarVR was at SIGGRAPH 2018 with its StarVR One, its next-generation VR headset built to support the most optimal lifelike VR experience. Featuring advanced optics, VR-optimized displays, integrated eye tracking and a vendor-agnostic tracking architecture, StarVR One is built from the ground up to support use cases in the commercial and enterprise sectors.

The StarVR One VR head-mounted display provides a nearly 100 percent human viewing angle — a 210-degree horizontal and 130-degree vertical field-of-view — and supports a more expansive user experience. Approximating natural human peripheral vision, StarVR One can support rigorous and exacting VR experiences such as driving and flight simulations, as well as tasks such as identifying design issues in engineering applications.

StarVR’s custom AMOLED displays serve up 16 million subpixels at a refresh rate of 90 frames per second. The proprietary displays are designed specifically for VR with a unique full-RGB-per-pixel arrangement to provide a professional-grade color spectrum for real-life color. Coupled with StarVR’s custom Fresnel lenses, the result is a clear visual experience within the entire field of view.

StarVR One automatically measures interpupillary distance (IPD) and instantly provides the best image adjusted for every user. Integrated Tobii eye-tracking technology enables foveated rendering, a technology that concentrates high-quality rendering only where the eyes are focused. As a result, the headset pushes the highest-quality imagery to the eye-focus area while maintaining the right amount of peripheral image detail.

StarVR One eye-tracking thus opens up commercial possibilities that leverage user-intent data for content gaze analysis and improved interactivity, including heat maps.

Two products are available with two different integrated tracking systems. The StarVR One is ready out of the box for the SteamVR 2.0 tracking solution. Alternatively, StarVR One XT is embedded with active optical markers for compatibility with optical tracking systems for more demanding use cases. It is further enhanced with ready-to-use plugins for a variety of tracking systems and with additional customization tools.

The StarVR One headset weighs 450 grams, and its ergonomic headband design evenly distributes this weight to ensure comfort even during extended sessions.

The StarVR software development kit (SDK) simplifies the development of new content or the upgrade of an existing VR experience to StarVR’s premium wide-field-of-view platform. Developers also have the option of leveraging the StarVR One dual-input VR SLI mode, maximizing the rendering performance. The StarVR SDK API is designed to be familiar to developers working with existing industry standards.

The development effort that culminated in the launch of StarVR One involved extensive collaboration with StarVR technology partners, which include Intel, Nvidia and Epic Games.

DG 7.9.18

Allegorithmic’s Substance Painter adds subsurface scattering

Allegorithmic has released the latest additions to its Substance Painter tool, targeted to VFX, game studios and pros who are looking for ways to create realistic lighting effects. Substance Painter enhancements include subsurface scattering (SSS), new projections and fill tools, improvements to the UX and support for a range of new meshes.

Using Substance Painter’s newly updated shaders, artists will be able to add subsurface scattering as a default option. Artists can add a Scattering map to a texture set and activate the new SSS post-effect. Skin, organic surfaces, wax, jade and any other translucent materials that require extra care will now look more realistic, with redistributed light shining through from under the surface.

The release also includes updates to projection and fill tools, beginning with the user-requested addition of non-square projection. Images can be loaded in both the projection and stencil tool without altering the ratio or resolution. Those projection and stencil tools can also disable tiling in one or both axes. Fill layers can be manipulated directly in the viewport using new manipulator controls. Standard UV projections feature a 2D manipulator in the UV viewport. Triplanar Projection received a full 3D manipulator in the 3D viewport, and both can be translated, scaled and rotated directly in-scene.

Along with the improvements to the artist tools, Substance Painter includes several updates designed to improve the overall experience for users of all skill levels. Consistency between tools has been improved, and additions like exposed presets in Substance Designer and a revamped, universal UI guide make it easier for users to jump between tools.

Additional updates include:
• Alembic support — The Alembic file format is now supported by Substance Painter, starting with mesh and camera data. Full animation support will be added in a future update.
• Camera import and selection — Multiple cameras can be imported with a mesh, allowing users to switch between angles in the viewport; previews of the framed camera angle now appear as an overlay in the 3D viewport.
• Full gITF support — Substance Painter now automatically imports and applies textures when loading gITF meshes, removing the need to import or adapt mesh downloads from Sketchfab.
• ID map drag-and-drop — Both materials and smart materials can be taken from the shelf and dropped directly onto ID colors, automatically creating an ID mask.
• Improved Substance format support — Improved tweaking of Substance-made materials and effects thanks to visible-if and embedded presets.


Behind the Title: Weta Digital VFX supervisor Erik Winquist

NAME: Erik Winquist

COMPANY: Wellington, New Zealand’s Weta Digital

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re currently a collection of about 1,600 ridiculously talented artists and developers down at the bottom of the world who have created some the most memorable digital characters and visual effects for film over the last couple of decades. We’re named after a giant New Zealand bug.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Visual Effects Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Making the director and studio happy without making my crew unhappy. Ensuring that everybody on the shoot has the same goal in mind for a shot before the cameras start rolling is one way to help accomplish both of those goals. Using the strengths and good ideas of everybody on your team is another.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The amount of problem solving that is required. Every show is completely different from the last. We’re often asked to do something and don’t know how we’re going to accomplish it at the outset. That’s where it’s incredibly important to have a crew full of insanely brilliant people you can bash ideas around with.

HOW DID YOU START YOUR CAREER IN VFX?
I went to school for it. After graduating from the Ringling College of Art and Design with a degree in computer animation, I eventually landed a job as an assistant animator at Pacific Data Images (PDI). The job title was a little misleading, because although my degree was fairly character animation-centric, the first thing I was asked to do at PDI was morphing. I found that I really enjoyed working on the 2D side of things, and that sent me down a path that ultimately got me hired as a compositor at Weta on The Lord of the Rings.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN VFX?
I was hired by PDI in 1998, so I guess that means 20 years now. (Whoa.)

HOW HAS THE VFX INDUSTRY CHANGED IN THE TIME YOU’VE BEEN WORKING? WHAT’S BEEN GOOD? WHAT’S BEEN BAD?
Oh, there’s just been so much great stuff. We’re able to make images now that are completely indistinguishable from reality. Thanks to massive technology advancements over the years, interactivity for artists has gotten way better. We’re sculpting incredible amounts of detail into our models, painting them with giga-pixels worth of texture information, scrubbing our animation in realtime, using hardware-accelerated engines to light our scenes, rendering them with physically-based renderers and compositing with deep images and a 3D workspace.

Of course, all of these efficiency gains get gobbled up pretty quickly by the ever-expanding vision of the directors we work for!

The industry’s technology advancements and flexibility have also perhaps had some downsides. Studios demand increasingly shorter post schedules, prep time is reduced, shots can be less planned out because so much can be decided in post. When the brief is constantly shifting, it’s difficult to deliver the quality that everyone wants. And when the quality isn’t there, suddenly the Internet starts clamoring that “CGI is ruining movies!”

But, when a great idea — planned well by a decisive director and executed brilliantly by a visual effects team working in concert with all of the other departments — the movie magic that results is just amazing. And that’s why we’re all here doing what we do.

DID A PARTICULAR FILM INSPIRE YOU ALONG THIS PATH IN ENTERTAINMENT?
There were some films I saw very early on that left a lasting impression: Clash of the Titans, The Empire Strikes Back. Later inspiration came in high school with the TV spots that Pixar was doing prior to Toy Story, and the early computer graphics work that Disney Feature Animation was employing in their films of the early ‘90s.

But the big ones that really set me off around this time were ILM’s work on Jurassic Park, and films like Jim Cameron’s The Abyss and Terminator 2. That’s why it was a particular kick to find myself on set with Jim on Avatar.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Dailies. When I challenge an artist to bring their best, and they come up with an idea that completely surprises me; that is way better than what I had imagined or asked for. Those moments are gold. Dailies is pretty much the only chance I have to see a shot for the first time like an audience member gets to, so I pay a lot of attention to my reaction to that very first impression.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Getting a shot ripped from our hands by those pesky deadlines before every little thing is perfect. And scheduling meetings. Though, the latter is critically important to make sure that the former doesn’t happen.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
There was a time when I was in grade school where I thought I might like to go into sound effects, which is a really interesting what-if scenario for me to think about. But these days, if I were to hang up my VFX hat, I imagine I would end up doing something photography-related. It’s been a passion for a very long time.

Rampage

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I supervised Weta’s work on Rampage, starring Dwayne Johnson and a very large albino gorilla. Prior to that was War for the Planet of the Apes, Spectral and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT/S THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
We had a lot of fun working on Rampage, and I think audiences had a ton of fun watching it. I’m quite proud of what we achieved with Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. But I’m also really fond of what our crew turned out for the Netflix film Spectral. That project gave us the opportunity to explore some VFX-heavy sci-fi imagery and was a really interesting challenge.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY TO DAY?
Most of my day revolves around reviewing work and communicating with my production team and the crew, so it’s our in-house review software, Photoshop and e-mail. But I’m constantly jumping in and out of Maya, and always have a Nuke session open for one thing or another. I’m also never without my camera and am constantly shooting reference photos or video, and have been known to initiate impromptu element shoots at a moment’s notice.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION NOW?
Everywhere. It’s why I always have my camera in my bag.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Scuba diving and sea kayaking are two hobbies that get me out in the water, though that happens far less than I would like. My wife and I recently bought a small rural place north of Wellington. I’ve found going up there doing “farm stuff” on the weekend is a great way to re-calibrate.


Animation and design studio Lobo expands to NYC’s Chinatown

After testing the New York market with a small footprint in Manhattan, creative animation/design studio Lobo has moved its operations to a new studio in New York’s Chinatown. The new location will be led by creative director Guilherme Marcondes, art director Felipe Jornada and executive producer Luis Ribeiro.

The space includes two suites, featuring the Adobe Creative Cloud apps, Autodesk Flame, Foundry Nuke and Blackmagic Resolve. There is also a finished rooftop deck and a multipurpose production space that will allow the team to scale per the specifications of each project.

Director/founder Mateus De Paula Santos will continue to oversee both New York offices creatively. Lobo’s NYC team will work closely with the award-winning São Paulo office, offering the infrastructure and horsepower of its nearly 200 staff with their US-based creative team.

Marcondes brings a distinct styling that fuses live action and animation techniques to craft immersive worlds. His art-driven style can be seen in work for clients such as Google, Chobani, Autism Speaks, Hyundai, Pepsi, Audi and British Gas. His short films have been screened at festivals worldwide, with his Tiger winning over 20 international awards. His latest film, Caveirão, made its worldwide premiere at SXSW.

Ribeiro brings over two decades of experience running business development and producing for creative post shops in the US, including Framestore, Whitehouse Post, Deluxe, Method Studios, Beast, Company 3 and Speedshape. He also served as the US consultant for FilmBrazil for four years, connecting US and Brazilian companies in the advertising production network.

Recent work out of Lobo’s US office includes the imaginative mixed media FlipLand campaign for Chobani, the animated PSA Sunshine for Day One out of BBDO NY and an animated short for the Imaginary Friends Society out of RPA.

Our Main Image: L-R: Luis Ribeiro, Mateus De Paula Santos, Felipe Jornada and Guilherme Marcondes.


Maxon intros Cinema 4D Release 20

Maxon will be at Siggraph this year showing the next iteration of its Cinema 4D Release 20 (R20), an update of its 3D design and animation software. Release 20 introduces high-end features for VFX and motion graphics artists including node-based materials, volume modeling, CAD import and an evolution of the MoGraph toolset.

Maxon expects Cinema 4D Release 20 to be available this September for both Mac and Windows operating systems.

Key highlights in Release 20 include:
Node-Based Materials – This feature provides new possibilities for creating materials — from simple references to complex shaders — in a node-based editor. With more than 150 nodes to choose from that perform different functions, artists can combine nodes to easily build complex shading effects. Users new to a node-based material workflow still can rely on Cinema 4D’s standard Material Editor interface to create the corresponding node material in the background automatically. Node-based materials can be packaged into assets with user-defined parameters exposed in a similar interface to Cinema 4D’s Material Editor.

MoGraph Fields – New capabilities in this procedural animation toolset offer an entirely new way to define the strength of effects by combining falloffs — from simple shapes, to shaders or sounds to objects and formulas. Artists can layer Fields atop each other with standard mixing modes and remap their effects. They can also group multiple Fields together and use them to control effectors, deformers, weights and more.

CAD Data Import – Popular CAD formats can be imported into Cinema 4D R20 with a drag and drop. A new scale-based tessellation interface allows users to adjust detail to build amazing visualizations. Step, Solidworks, JT, Catia V5 and IGES formats are supported.

Volume Modeling – Users can create complex models by adding or subtracting basic shapes in Boolean-type operations using Cinema 4D R20’s OpenVDB–based Volume Builder and Mesher. They can also procedurally build organic or hard-surface volumes using any Cinema 4D object, including new Field objects. Volumes can be exported in sequenced .vdb format for use in any application or render engine that supports OpenVDB.

ProRender Enhancements — ProRender in Cinema 4D R20 extends the GPU-rendering toolset with key features including subsurface scattering, motion blur and multipasses. Also included are Metal 2 support, an updated ProRender core, out-of-core textures and other architectural enhancements.

Core Technology Modernization —As part of the transition to a more modern core in Cinema 4D, R20 comes with substantial API enhancements, the new node framework, further development on the new modeling framework and a new UI framework.

During Siggraph, Maxon will have guest artists presenting at their booth each day of the show. Presentations will be live streamed on C4DLive.com.

 

 


SIGGRAPH conference chair Roy C. Anthony: VR, AR, AI, VFX, more

By Randi Altman

Next month, SIGGRAPH returns to Vancouver after turns in Los Angeles and Anaheim. This gorgeous city, whose convention center offers a water view, is home to many visual effects studios providing work for film, television and spots.

As usual, SIGGRAPH will host many presentations, showcase artists’ work, display technology and offer a glimpse into what’s on the horizon for this segment of the market.

Roy C. Anthony

Leading up to the show — which takes place August 12-16 — we reached out to Roy C. Anthony, this year’s conference chair. For his day job, Anthony recently joined Ventuz Technology as VP, creative development. There, he leads initiatives to bring Ventuz’s realtime rendering technologies to creators of sets, stages and ProAV installations around the world

SIGGRAPH is back in Vancouver this year. Can you talk about why it’s important for the industry?
There are 60-plus world-class VFX and animation studios in Vancouver. There are more than 20,000 film and TV jobs, and more than 8,000 VFX and animation jobs in the city.

So, Vancouver’s rich production-centric communities are leading the way in film and VFX production for television and onscreen films. They are also are also busy with new media content, games work and new workflows, including those for AR/VR/mixed reality.

How many exhibitors this year?
The conference and exhibition will play host to over 150 exhibitors on the show floor, showcasing the latest in computer graphics and interactive technologies, products and services. Due to the increase in the amount of new technology that has debuted in the computer graphics marketplace over this past year, almost one quarter of this year’s 150 exhibitors will be presenting at SIGGRAPH for the first time

In addition to the traditional exhibit floor and conferences, what are some of the can’t-miss offerings this year?
We have increased the presence of virtual, augmented and mixed reality projects and experiences — and we are introducing our new Immersive Pavilion in the east convention center, which will be dedicated to this area. We’ve incorporated immersive tech into our computer animation festival with the inclusion of our VR Theater, back for its second year, as well as inviting a special, curated experience with New York University’s Ken Perlin — he’s a legendary computer graphics professor.

We’ll be kicking off the week in a big VR way with a special session following the opening ceremony featuring Ivan Sutherland, considered by many as “the father of computer graphics.” That 50-year retrospective will present the history and innovations that sparked our industry.

We have also brought Syd Mead, a legendary “visual futurist” (Blade Runner, Tron, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Aliens, Time Cop, Tomorrowland, Blade Runner 2049), who will display an arrangement of his art in a special collection called Progressions. This will be seen within our Production Gallery experience, which also returns for its second year. Progressions will exhibit more than 50 years of artwork by Syd, from his academic years to his most current work.

We will have an amazing array of guest speakers, including those featured within the Business Symposium, which is making a return to SIGGRAPH after an absence of a few years. Among these speakers are people from the Disney Technology Innovation Group, Unity and Georgia Tech.

On Tuesday, August 14, our SIGGRAPH Next series will present a keynote speaker each morning to kick off the day with an inspirational talk. These speakers are Tony Derose, a senior scientist from Pixar; Daniel Szecket, VP of design for Quantitative Imaging Systems; and Bob Nicoll, dean of Blizzard Academy.

There will be a 25th anniversary showing of the original Jurassic Park movie, being hosted by “Spaz” Williams, a digital artist who worked on that film.

Can you talk about this year’s keynote and why he was chosen?
We’re thrilled to have ILM head and senior VP, ECD Rob Bredow deliver the keynote address this year. Rob is all about innovation — pushing through scary new directions while maintaining the leadership of artists and technologists.

Rob is the ultimate modern-day practitioner, a digital VFX supervisor who has been disrupting ‘the way it’s always been done’ to move to new ways. He truly reflects the spirit of ILM, which was founded in 1975 and is just one year younger than SIGGRAPH.

A large part of SIGGRAPH is its slant toward students and education. Can you discuss how this came about and why this is important?
SIGGRAPH supports education in all sub-disciplines of computer graphics and interactive techniques, and it promotes and improves the use of computer graphics in education. Our Education Committee sponsors a broad range of projects, such as curriculum studies, resources for educators and SIGGRAPH conference-related activities.

SIGGRAPH has always been a welcoming and diverse community, one that encourages mentorship, and acknowledges that art inspires science and science enables advances in the arts. SIGGRAPH was built upon a foundation of research and education.

How are the Computer Animation Festival films selected?
The Computer Animation Festival has two programs, the Electronic Theater and the VR Theater. Because of the large volume of submissions for the Electronic Theater (over 400), there is a triage committee for the first phase. The CAF Chair then takes the high scoring pieces to a jury comprised of industry professionals. The jury selects then become the Electronic Theater show pieces.

The selections for the VR Theater are made by a smaller panel comprised mostly of sub-committee members that watch each film in a VR headset and vote.

Can you talk more about how SIGGRAPH is tackling AR/VR/AI and machine learning?
Since SIGGRAPH 2018 is about the theme of “Generations,” we took a step back to look at how we got where we are today in terms of AR/VR, and where we are going with it. Much of what we know today couldn’t have been possible without the research and creation of Ivan Sutherland’s 1968 head-mounted display. We have a fanatic panel celebrating the 50-year anniversary of his HMD, which is widely considered and the first VR HMD.

AI tools are newer, and we created a panel that focuses on trends and the future of AI tools in VFX, called “Future Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning Tools for VFX.” This panel gains insight from experts embedded in both the AI and VFX industries and gives attendees a look at how different companies plan to further their technology development.

What is the process for making sure that all aspects of the industry are covered in terms of panels?
Every year new ideas for panels and sessions are submitted by contributors from all over the globe. Those submissions are then reviewed by a jury of industry experts, and it is through this process that panelists and cross-industry coverage is determined.

Each year, the conference chair oversees the program chairs, then each of the program chairs become part of a jury process — this helps to ensure the best program with the most industries represented from across all disciplines.

In the rare case a program committee feels they are missing something key in the industry, they can try to curate a panel in, but we still require that that panel be reviewed by subject matter experts before it would be considered for final acceptance.

 


Review: Maxon Cinema 4D R19 — an editor’s perspective

By Brady Betzel

It’s time for my yearly review of Maxon’s Cinema 4D. Currently in Release 19, Cinema 4D comes with a good amount of under-the-hood updates. I am an editor, first and foremost, so while I dabble in Cinema 4D, I am not an expert. There are a few things in the latest release, however, that directly correlate to editors like me.

Maxon offers five versions of Cinema 4D, not including BodyPaint 3D. There is the Cinema 4D Lite, which comes free with Adobe After Effects. It is really an amazing tool for discovering the world of 3D without having to invest a bunch of money. But, if you want all the goodies that come packed into Cinema 4D you will have to pay the piper and purchase one of the other four versions. The other versions include Prime, Broadcast, Visualize and Studio.

Cinema 4D Prime is the first version that includes features like lighting, cameras and animation. Cinema 4D Broadcast includes all of Cinema 4D Prime’s features as well as the beloved MoGraph tools and the Broadcast Library, which offers pre-built objects and cameras that will work with motion graphics. Cinema 4D Visualize includes Cinema 4D Prime features as well, but is geared more toward architects and designers. It includes Sketch and Toon, as well as an architecturally focused library of objects and presets. Cinema 4D Studio includes everything in the other versions plus unlimited Team Render nodes, a hair system, a motion/object tracker and much more. If you want to see a side-by-side comparison you can check out Maxon’s website.

What’s New
As usual, there are a bunch of new updates to Cinema 4D Release 19, but I am going to focus on my top three, which relate to the workflows and processes I might use as an editor: New Media Core, Scene Reconstruction and the Spherical Camera. Obviously, there are a lot more updates — including the incredible new OpenGL Previews and the cross-platform ProRender, which adds the ability to use AMD or Nvidia graphics cards — but to keep this review under 30 pages I am focusing on the three that directly impact my work.

New Media Core
Buckle up! You can now import animated GIFs into Cinema 4D. So, yes, you can import animated GIFs into Cinema 4D Release 19, but that is just one tiny aspect of this update. The really big addition is the QuickTime-free support of MP4 videos. Now MP4s can be imported and used as textures, as well as exported with different compression settings, directly from within Cinema 4D’s  interface — all of this without the need to have QuickTime installed. What is cool about this is that you no longer need to export image-based file sequences to get your movie inside of Cinema 4D. The only slowdown will be how long it takes Cinema 4D R19 to cache your MP4 so that you will have realtime playback… if possible.

In my experience, it doesn’t take that much time, but that will be dependent on your system performance. While this is a big under-the-hood type of update, it is great for those quick exports of a scene for approval. No need to take your export into Adobe Media Encoder, or something else, to squeeze out an MP4.

Scene Reconstruction
First off, for any new Cinema 4D users out there, Scene Reconstruction is convoluted and a little thick to wade through. However, if you work with footage and want to add motion graphics work to a scene, you will want to learn this. You can check out this Cineversity.com video for an eight-minute overview.

Cinema 4D’s Scene Reconstruction works by tracking your footage to generate point clouds, and then after you go back and enable Scene Reconstruction, it creates a mesh from the resulting scene calculation that Cinema 4D computes. In the end, depending on how compatible your footage is with Scene Detection (i.e. contrasting textures and good lighting will help) you will get a camera view with matching scene vertices that are then fully animatable. I, unfortunately, do not have enough time to recreate a set or scene inside of Cinema 4D R19, however, it feels like Maxon is getting very close to fully automated scene reconstruction, which would be very, very interesting.

I’ve seen a lot of ideas from pros on Twitter and YouTube that really blow my mind, like 3D scanning with a prosumer camera to recreate objects inside of Cinema 4D. Scene Reconstruction could be a game-changing update, especially if it becomes more automated as it would allow base users like me to recreate a set in Cinema 4D without having to physically rebuild a set. A pretty incredible motion graphics-compositing future is really starting to emerge from Cinema 4D.

In addition, the Motion Tracker has received some updates, including manual tracking on R, G, B, or custom channel — viewed as Tracker View — and the tracker can now work with a circular tracking pattern.

Spherical Camera
Finally, the last update, which seems incredible, is the new Spherical Camera. It’s probably because I have been testing and using a lot more 360 video, but the ability to render your scene using a Spherical Camera is here. You can now create a scene, add a camera and enable Spherical mapping, including equirectangular, cubic string, cubic cross or even Facebook’s 360 video 3×2 cubic format. In addition, there is now support for Stereo VR as well as dome projection.

Other Updates
In addition to the three top updates I’ve covered, there are numerous others updates that are just as important, if not more so to those who use Cinema 4D in other ways. In my opinion, the rendering updates take the cake. Also, as mentioned before, there is support for both Nvidia and AMD GPUs, multi-GPU support, incredible viewport enhancements with Physical Rendering and interactive Preview Renders in the viewport.

Under MoGraph, there is an improved Voronoi Fracture system (ability to destroy an object quickly) including improved performance for high polygon counts and detailing to give the fracture a more realistic look. There is also a New Sound Effector to allow for interactive MoGraph creation to the beat of the music. One final note: the new Modern Modelling Kernel has been introduced. The new kernel gives more ability to things like polygon reduction and levels of detail.

In the end, Cinema 4D Release 19 is a huge under-the-hood update that will please legacy users but will also attract new users with AMD-based GPUs. Moreover, Maxon seems to be slowly morphing Cinema 4D into a total 2D and 3D modeling and motion graphics powerhouse, much like the way Blackmagic’s Resolve is for colorists, video editors, VFX creators and audio mixers.

Summing Up
With updates like Scene Recreation and improved motion tracking, Maxon gives users like me the ability to work way above their pay grade to composite 3D objects onto our 2D footage. If any of this sounds interesting to you and you are a paying Adobe Creative Cloud user, download and open up Cinema 4D Lite along with After Effects, then run over to Cineversity and brush up on the basics. Cinema 4D Release 19 is an immensely powerful 3D application that is blurring the boundaries between 3D and 2D compositing. With Cinema 4D Release 19’s large library of objects, preset scenes and lighting setups you can be experimenting in no time, and I didn’t even touch on the modeling and sculpting power!


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.


iPi Motion Capture V.4 software offers live preview

iPi Soft, makers of motion capture technology, has introduced iPi Motion Capture Version 4, the next version of its markerless motion capture software. Version 4 includes realtime preview capability for a single-depth sensor. Other new features and enhancements include support for new depth sensors (Intel RealSense D415/D435, ASUS Xtion2 and Orbbec Astra/ Astra Pro); improved arms and body tracking; and support for action cameras such as GoPro and SJCAM. With Version 4, iPi Soft also introduces a perpetual license model.

The realtime tracking feature in Version 4 uses iPi Recorder, a free software provided by iPi Soft for capturing, playback and processing video records from multiple cameras and depth sensors, to communicate with iPi Mocap Studio software, which tracks in realtime and instantly transfers motion to 3D characters. This allows users to see how the motion will look on a 3D character and improve motion accordingly at the time of acting and recording, without the need to redo multiple iterations of acting, recording and offline tracking.

Live tracking results can then be stored to disk for additional offline post processing, such as tracking refinement (to improve tracking accuracy), manual corrections and jitter removal.

iPi Mocap Version 4 currently includes the realtime tracking feature for a single depth sensor only. iPi Soft is scheduled to bring realtime functionality for multiple depth sensors to users by the end of this year.

Development of plug-ins for popular 3D game engines, including Unreal Engine and Unity, is also underway.

Tracking Improvements include:
• Realtime tracking support of human performance for live preview for a single-depth sensor (Basic and Pro configurations). Motion can be transferred to a 3D character.
• Improved individual body parts tracking, after performing initial tracking, allows users to re-do tracking for selected body parts to fix tracking errors more quickly.
• Tracking improvements of head and hands when used in conjunction with Sony’s PS Move motion controller takes into account joint limits.

New Sensors and cameras supported include:
• Support for Intel RealSense D415 / D435 depth cameras, Asus Xtion2 motion sensors and Orbbec Astra / Astra Pro 3D cameras.
• Support for action cameras such as GoPro and SJCAM, including wide-angle cameras, allows users to come closer to the camera decreasing space requirements.
• The ability to calibrate individual internal parameters of any camera, helps users to correctly reconstruct 3D information from video for improved overall tracking quality.
• The ability to load unsynchronized videos from multiple cameras and then use iPi Recorder to sync and convert footage to .iPiVideo format used by iPi Mocap Studio.
• Support of fast motion action cameras — video frame rate can reach up to 120fps to allow for tracking extremely fast motions.

Version 4’s perpetual license is not time-limited and includes two years with full support and software updates. Afterwards, users have the option to subscribe to a support plan to continue receiving full support and software updates. Alternatively, they can continue using their latest software version.

iPi Motion Capture Version 4 is also available as a subscription-based model. Prices range from $165 to $1995 depending on the version of software (Express, Basic, Pro) and the duration of subscription.

The Basic edition provides support for up to 6 Sony PS3 Eye cameras or 2 Kinect sensors, and tracking of a single actor. The Pro version features full 16-camera/four depth sensors capability and can track up to three actors. A 30-day free trial for Version 4 is available.

 

Boxx’s Apexx SE capable of 5.0GHz clock speed

Boxx Technologies has introduced the Apexx Special Edition (SE), a workstation featuring a professionally overclocked Intel Core i7-8086K limited edition processor capable of reaching 5.0GHz across all six of its cores.

In celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Intel 8086 (the processor that launched x86 architecture), Intel provided Boxx with a limited number of the high-performance CPUs ideal for 3D modeling, animation and CAD workflows.

Available only while supplies last and custom-configured to accelerate Autodesk’s 3ds Max and Maya, Adobe CC, Maxon Cinema 4D and other pro apps, Apexx SE features a six-core, 8th generation Intel core i7-8086K limited edition processor professionally overclocked to 5.0GHz. Unlike PC gaming systems, the liquid-cooled Apexx SE sustains that frequency across all cores — even in the most demanding situations.

Featuring a compact and metallic blue chassis, the Apexx S3 supports up to three Nvidia or AMD Radeon pro graphics cards, features solid state drives and 2600MHz DDR4 memory. Boxx is offering a three-year warranty on the systems.

“As longtime Intel partners, Boxx is honored to be chosen to offer this state-of-the-art technology. Lightly threaded 3D content creation tools are limited by the frequency of the processor, so a faster clock speed means more creating and less waiting,” explains Boxx VP, marketing and business development Shoaib Mohammad.