Category Archives: 360

NAB: Adobe’s spring updates for Creative Cloud

By Brady Betzel

Adobe has had a tradition of releasing Creative Cloud updates prior to NAB, and this year is no different. The company has been focused on improving existing workflows and adding new features, some based on Adobe’s Sensei technology, as well as improved VR enhancements.

In this release, Adobe has announced a handful of Premiere Pro CC updates. While I personally don’t think that they are game changing, many users will appreciate the direction Adobe is going. If you are color correcting, Adobe has added the Shot Match function that allows you to match color between two shots. Powered by Adobe’s Sensei technology, Shot Match analyzes one image and tries to apply the same look to another image. Included in this update is the long-requested split screen to compare before and after color corrections.

Motion graphic templates have been improved with new adjustments like 2D position, rotation and scale. Automatic audio ducking has been included in this release as well. You can find this feature in the Essential Sound panel, and once applied it will essentially dip the music in your scene based on dialogue waveforms that you identify.

Still inside of Adobe Premiere Pro CC, but also applicable in After Effects, is Adobe’s enhanced Immersive Environment. This update is for people who use VR headsets to edit and or process VFX. Team Project workflows have been updated with better version tracking and indicators of who is using bins and sequences in realtime.

New Timecode Panel
Overall, while these updates are helpful, none are barn burners, the thing that does have me excited is the new Timecode Panel — it’s the biggest new update to the Premiere Pro CC app. For years now, editors have been clamoring for more than just one timecode view. You can view sequence timecodes, source media timecodes from the clips on the different video layers in your timeline, and you can even view the same sequence timecode in a different frame rate (great for editing those 23.98 shows to a 29.97/59.94 clock!). And one of my unexpected favorites is the clip name in the timecode window.

I was testing this feature in a pre-release version of Premiere Pro, and it was a little wonky. First, I couldn’t dock the timecode window. While I could add lines and access the different menus, my changes wouldn’t apply to the row I had selected. In addition, I could only right click and try to change the first row of contents, but it would choose a random row to change. I am assuming the final release has this all fixed. If it the wonkiness gets flushed out, this is a phenomenal (and necessary) addition to Premiere Pro.

Codecs, Master Property, Puppet Tool, more
There have been some compatible codec updates, specifically Raw Sony X-OCN (Venice), Canon Cinema Raw Light (C200) and Red IPP2.

After Effects CC has also been updated with Master Property controls. Adobe said it best during their announcement: “Add layer properties, such as position, color or text, in the Essential Graphics panel and control them in the parent composition’s timeline. Use Master Property to push individual values to all versions of the composition or pull selected changes back to the master.”

The Puppet Tool has been given some love with a new Advanced Puppet Engine, giving access to improving mesh and starch workflows to animate static objects. Beyond updates to Add Grain, Remove Grain and Match Grain effects, making them multi-threaded, enhanced disk caching and project management improvements have been added.

My favorite update for After Effects CC is the addition of data-driven graphics. You can drop a CSV or JSON data file and pick-whip data to layer properties to control them. In addition, you can drag and drop data right onto your comp to use the actual numerical value. Data-driven graphics is a definite game changer for After Effects.

Audition
While Adobe Audition is an audio mixing application, it has some updates that will directly help anyone looking to mix their edit in Audition. In the past, to get audio to a mixing program like Audition, Pro Tools or Fairlight you would have to export an AAF (or if you are old like me possibly an OMF). In the latest Audition update you can simply open your Premiere Pro projects directly into Audition, re-link video and audio and begin mixing.

I asked Adobe whether you could go back and forth between Audition and Premiere, but it seems like it is a one-way trip. They must be expecting you to export individual audio stems once done in Audition for final output. In the future, I would love to see back and forth capabilities between apps like Premiere Pro and Audition, much like the Fairlight tab in Blackmagic’s Resolve. There are some other updates like larger tracks and under-the-hood updates which you can find more info about on: https://theblog.adobe.com/creative-cloud/.

Adobe Character Animator has some cool updates like overall character building updates, but I am not too involved with Character Animator so you should definitely read about things like the Trigger Improvements on their blog.

Summing Up
In the end, it is great to see Adobe moving forward on updates to its Creative Cloud video offerings. Data-driven animation inside of After Effects is a game-changer. Shot color matching in Premiere Pro is a nice step toward a professional color correction application. Importing Premiere Pro projects directly into Audition is definitely a workflow improvement.

I do have a wishlist though: I would love for Premiere Pro to concentrate on tried-and-true solutions before adding fancy updates like audio ducking. For example, I often hear people complain about how hard it is to export a QuickTime out of Premiere with either stereo or mono/discrete tracks. You need to set up the sequence correctly from the jump, adjust the pan on the tracks, as well as adjust the audio settings and export settings. Doesn’t sound streamlined to me.

In addition, while shot color matching is great, let’s get an Adobe SpeedGrade-style view tab into Premiere Pro so it works like a professional color correction app… maybe Lumetri Pro? I know if the color correction setup was improved I would be way more apt to stay inside of Premiere Pro to finish something instead of going to an app like Resolve.

Finally, consolidating and transcoding used clips with handles is hit or miss inside of Premiere Pro. Can we get a rock-solid consolidate and transcode feature inside of Premiere Pro? Regardless of some of the few negatives, Premiere Pro is an industry staple and it works very well.

Check out Adobe’s NAB 2018 update video playlist for details on each and every update.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

NextComputing, Z Cam, Assimilate team on turnkey VR studio

NextComputing, Z Cam and Assimilate have teamed up to create a complete turnkey VR studio. Foundation VR Studio is designed to provide all aspects of the immersive production process and help the creatives be more creative.

According to Assimilate CEO Jeff Edson, “Partnering with Z Cam last year was an obvious opportunity to bring together the best of integrated 360 cameras with a seamless workflow for both live and post productions. The key is to continue to move the market from a technology focus to a creative focus. Integrated cameras took the discussions up a level of integration away from the pieces. There have been endless discussions regarding capable platforms for 360; the advantage we have is we work with just about every computer maker as well as the component companies, like CPU and GPU manufacturers. These are companies that are willing to create solutions. Again, this is all about trying to help the market focus on the creative as opposed to debates about the technology, and letting creative people create great experiences and content. Getting the technology out of their way and providing solutions that just work helps with this.”

These companies are offering a few options with their Power VR Studio.

The Foundation VR Studio, which costs $8,999 and is available now includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 6-core Intel core i7-8700K 3.7GHz processor
o Memory: 16GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

Then there is the Power VR Studio, for $10,999, which is also available now. It includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 10-core Intel core i9-7900K 3.3GHz processor
o Memory: 32GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

These companies will be at NAB demoing the systems.

 

 

DG 7.9.18

GTC embraces machine learning and AI

By Mike McCarthy

I had the opportunity to attend GTC 2018, Nvidia‘s 9th annual technology conference in San Jose this week. GTC stands for GPU Technology Conference, and GPU stands for graphics processing unit, but graphics makes up a relatively small portion of the show at this point. The majority of the sessions and exhibitors are focused on machine learning and artificial intelligence.

And the majority of the graphics developments are centered around analyzing imagery, not generating it. Whether that is classifying photos on Pinterest or giving autonomous vehicles machine vision, it is based on the capability of computers to understand the content of an image. Now DriveSim, Nvidia’s new simulator for virtually testing autonomous drive software, dynamically creates imagery for the other system in the Constellation pair of servers to analyze and respond to, but that is entirely machine-to-machine imagery communication.

The main exception to this non-visual usage trend is Nvidia RTX, which allows raytracing to be rendered in realtime on GPUs. RTX can be used through Nvidia’s OptiX API, as well as Microsoft’s DirectX RayTracing API, and eventually through the open source Vulkan cross-platform graphics solution. It integrates with Nvidia’s AI Denoiser to use predictive rendering to further accelerate performance, and can be used in VR applications as well.

Nvidia RTX was first announced at the Game Developers Conference last week, but the first hardware to run it was just announced here at GTC, in the form of the new Quadro GV100. This $9,000 card replaces the existing Pascal-based GP100 with a Volta-based solution. It retains the same PCIe form factor, the quad DisplayPort 1.4 outputs and the NV-Link bridge to pair two cards at 200GB/s, but it jumps the GPU RAM per card from 16GB to 32GB of HBM2 memory. The GP100 was the first Quadro offering since the K6000 to support double-precision compute processing at full speed, and the increase from 3,584 to 5,120 CUDA cores should provide a 40% increase in performance, before you even look at the benefits of the 640 Tensor Cores.

Hopefully, we will see simpler versions of the Volta chip making their way into a broader array of more budget-conscious GPU options in the near future. The fact that the new Nvidia RTX technology is stated to require Volta architecture CPUs leads me to believe that they must be right on the horizon.

Nvidia also announced a new all-in-one GPU supercomputer — the DGX-2 supports twice as many Tesla V100 GPUs (16) with twice as much RAM each (32GB) compared to the existing DGX-1. This provides 81920 CUDA cores addressing 512GB of HBM2 memory, over a fabric of new NV-Link switches, as well as dual Xeon CPUs, Infiniband or 100GbE connectivity, and 32TB of SSD storage. This $400K supercomputer is marketed as the world’s largest GPU.

Nvidia and their partners had a number of cars and trucks on display throughout the show, showcasing various pieces of technology that are being developed to aid in the pursuit of autonomous vehicles.

Also on display in the category of “actually graphics related” was the new Max-Q version of the mobile Quadro P4000, which is integrated into PNY’s first mobile workstation, the Prevail Pro. Besides supporting professional VR applications, the HDMI and dual DisplayPort outputs allow a total of three external displays up to 4K each. It isn’t the smallest or lightest 15-inch laptop, but it is the only system under 17 inches I am aware of that supports the P4000, which is considered the minimum spec for professional VR implementation.

There are, of course, lots of other vendors exhibiting their products at GTC. I had the opportunity to watch 8K stereo 360 video playing off of a laptop with an external GPU. I also tried out the VRHero 5K Plus enterprise-level HMD, which brings the VR experience to whole other level. Much more affordable is TP-Cast’s $300 wireless upgrade Vive and Rift HMDs, the first of many untethered VR solutions. HTC has also recently announced the Vive Pro, which will be available in April for $800. It increases the resolution by 1/3 in both dimensions to 2880×1600 total, and moves from HDMI to DisplayPort 1.2 and USB-C. Besides VR products, they also had all sorts of robots in various forms on display.

Clearly the world of GPUs has extended far beyond the scope of accelerating computer graphics generation, and Nvidia is leading the way in bringing massive information processing to a variety of new and innovative applications. And if that leads us to hardware that can someday raytrace in realtime at 8K in VR, then I suppose everyone wins.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


Supersphere offering flypacks for VR/360 streaming

Supersphere, a VR/360° production studio, will be at NAB this year debuting 12G glass-to-glass flypacks optimized for live VR/360° streaming. These multi-geometry (mesh/rectilinear/equirectangular) flypacks can handle 360°, 180°, 4K or HD production and seamlessly mix and match each geometry. They also include built-in VDN (video distribution network) encoding and delivery for live streaming to any platform or custom player.

“Live music, both in streaming and in ticket sales, has posted consistent growth in the US and Worldwide. It’s a multibillion-dollar industry and only getting bigger. We are investing in the immersive streaming market, because we see that trend reflected in our client requests,” explains founder/EP of Supershere. “Clients always want to provide audiences with the most engaging experience possible. An immersive environment is the way to do it.”

Each flypack is standard equipped with Z Cam K1 Pro 180° cameras and Z CAM S1 Pro 360° cameras, and customizable to any camera as productions demand. They are also equipped with Blackmagic’s latest ATEM Production Studio 4K live production switchers to facilitate multi-camera live production across a range of video sources. The included Assimilate Scratch VR Z enables realtime geometry, stitching, color grading, finishing and ambisonic audio. The system also offers fully integrated transcoding and delivery — Teleos Media’s VDN (Video Distribution Network) delivers immersive experiences to any devicewith instant start experience, sustained 16Mbps at high frame rates and 4K + VR resolutions. This allows clients to easily build custom 360° video players on their websites or apps as a destination for live-streamed content, in addition to streaming directly to YouTube, Facebook and other popular platforms.

“These flypacks provide an incredibly robust workflow that takes the complexity out of immersive live production — capable of handling the data required for stunning high-resolution projects in one flexible end-to-end package,” says Wilson. “Plus with Teleos’ VDN capabilities, we make it easy for any client to live stream high-end content directly to whatever device or app best suits their customers’ needs, including the option to quickly build custom, fully integrated 360° live players.”


Z Cam, Assimilate reduce price of S1 VR camera/Scratch VR bundle

The Z Cam S1 VR camera/WonderStitch/Assimilate Scratch VR Z bundle, an integrated VR production workflow offering, is now $3,999, down from $4,999.

The Z Cam S1/Scratch VR Z bundle provides acquisition via Z Cam’s S1 pro VR camera, stitching via the WonderStitch software and a streamlined VR post workflow via Assimilate’s realtime Scratch VR Z tools.

Here are some details:
If streaming live 360 from the Z Cam S1 through Scratch VR Z, users can take advantage of realtime features such as inserting/composting graphics/text overlays, including animations, and keying for elements like greenscreen — all streaming live to Facebook Live 360.

Scratch VR Z can be used to do live camera preview, prior to shooting with the S1. During the shoot, Scratch VR Z is used for dailies and data management, including metadata. It’s a direct connect to the PC and then to the camera via a high-speed Ethernet port. Stitching of the imagery is done in Z Cam’s WonderStitch, now integrated into Scratch VR Z, then comes traditional editing, color grading, compositing, multichannel audio from the S1 or adding external ambisonic sound, finishing and then publishing to all final online or stand-alone 360 platforms.

The Z Cam S1/Scratch VR Z bundle is available now.


Behind the Title: Light Sail VR’s Matthew Celia

NAME: Matthew Celia

COMPANY: LA’s Light Sail VR (@lightsailvr)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Light Sail VR is a virtual reality production company specializing in telling immersive narrative stories. We’ve built a strong branded content business over the last two years working with clients such as Google and GoPro, and studios like Paramount and ABC.

Whether it’s 360 video, cinematic VR or interactive media, we’ve built an end-to-end pipeline to go from script to final delivery. We’re now excited to be moving into creating original IP and more interactive content that fuses cinematic live-action film footage with game engine mechanics.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director and Managing Partner

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
A lot! We’re a small boutique shop so we all wear many hats. First and foremost, I am a director and work hard to deliver a compelling story and emotional connection to the audience for each one of our pieces. Story first is our motto, and I try and approach every technical problem with a creative solution. Figuring out execution is a large part of that.

In addition to the production side, I also carry a lot of the technical responsibilities in post production, such as keeping our post pipeline humming and inventing new workflows. Most recently, I have been dabbling in programming interactive cinema using the Unity game engine.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I am in charge of washing the lettuce when we do our famous “Light Sail VR Sandwich Club” during lunch. Yes, you get fed for free if you work with us, and I make an amazing italian sandwich.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Hard to say. I really like what I do. I like being on set and working with actors because VR is such a great medium for them to play in, and it’s exciting to collaborate with such creative and talented people.

National Parks Service

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Render times and computer crashes. My tech life is in constant beta. Price we pay for being on the bleeding edge, I guess!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the early morning because it is quiet, my brain is fresh, and I haven’t yet had 20 people asking something of me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably the same, but at a large company. If I left the film business I’d probably teach. I love working with kids.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I feel like I’ve wanted to be a filmmaker since I could walk. My parents like to drag out the home movies of me asking to look in my dad’s VHS video camera when I was 4. I spent most of high school in the theater and most people assumed I would be an actor. But senior year I fell in love with film when I shot and cut my first 16mm reversal stock on an old reel-to-reel editing machine. The process was incredibly fun and rewarding and I was hooked. I only recently discovered VR, but in many ways it feels like the right path for me because I think cinematic VR is the perfect intersection of filmmaking and theater.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
On the branded side, we just finished up two tourism videos. One for the National Parks Service which was a 360 tour of the Channel Islands with Jordan Fisher and the other was a 360 piece for Princess Cruises. VR is really great to show people the world. The last few months of my life have been consumed by Light Sail VR’s first original project, Speak of the Devil.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Speak of the Devil is at the top of that list. It’s the first live-action interactive project I’ve worked on and it’s massive. Crafted using the GoPro Odyssey camera in partnership with Google Jump it features over 50 unique locations, 13 different endings and is currently taking up about 80TB of storage (and counting). It is the largest project I’ve worked on to date, and we’ve done it all on a shoestring budget thanks to the gracious contributions of talented creative folks who believed in our vision.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My instant-read grill meat thermometer, my iPhone and my Philips Hue bulbs. Seriously, if you have a baby, it’s a life saver being able to whisper, Hey, Siri, turn off the lights.”

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m really active on several Facebook groups related to 360 video production. You can get a lot of advice and connect directly with vendors and software engineers. It’s a great community.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I tend to pop on some music when I’m doing repetitive mindless tasks, but when I have to be creative or solve a tough tech problem, the music is off so that I can focus. My favorite music to work to tends to be Dave Matthews Band live albums. They get into 20-minute long jams and it’s great.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
De-stressing is really hard when you own your own company. I like to go walking, but if that doesn’t work, I’ll try diving into some cooking for my family, which forces me to focus on something not work related. I tend to feel better after eating a really good meal.


Industry mainstay Click3X purchased by Industrial Color Studios

Established New York City post house Click3X has been bought by Industrial Color Studios. Click3X is a 25-year-old facility that specializes in new media formats such as VR, AR, CGI and live streaming. Industrial Color Studios is a visual content production company. Founded in 1992, Industrial Color’s services range from full image capture and e-commerce photography to production support and post services, including creative editorial, color grading and CG.

With offices in New York and LA, Industrial Color has developed its own proprietary systems to support online digital asset management for video editing and high-speed file transfers for its clients working in broadcast and print media. The company is an end-to-end visual content production provider, partnering with top brands, agencies and creative professionals to accelerate multi-channel creative content.

Click3X was founded in 1993 by Peter Corbett, co-founder of numerous companies specializing in both traditional and emerging forms of media.  These include Media Circus (a digital production and web design company), IllusionFusion, Full Blue, ClickFire Media, Reason2Be, Sound Lounge and Heard City. A long-time member of the DGA as a commercial film director, Corbett emigrated to the US from Australia to pursue a career as a commercial director and, shortly thereafter, segued into integrated media and mixed media, becoming one of the first established film directors to do so.

Projects produced at Click3X have been honored with the industry’s top awards, including Cannes Lions, Clios, Andy Awards and others. Click3X also was presented with the Crystal Apple Award, presented by the New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, in recognition of its contributions to the city’s media landscape.

Corbett will remain in place at Click3X and eventually the companies will share the ICS space on 6th Avenue in NYC.

“We’ve seen a growing need for video production capabilities and have been in the market for a partner that would not only enhance our video offering, but one that provided a truly integrated and complementary suite of services,” says Steve Kalalian, CEO of Industrial Color Studios. “And Click3X was the ideal fit. While the industry continues to evolve at lightning speed, I’ve long admired Click3X as a company that’s consistently been on the cutting edge of technology as it pertains to creative film, digital video and new media solutions. Our respective companies share a passion for creativity and innovation, and I’m incredibly excited to share this unique new offering with our clients.”

“When Steve and I first entered into talks to align on the state of our clients’ future, we were immediately on the same page,” says Corbett, president of Click3X. “We share a vision for creating compelling content in all formats. As complementary production providers, we will now have the exciting opportunity to collaborate on a robust and highly-regarded client roster, but also expand the company’s creative and new media capabilities, using over 200,000 square feet of state-of-the-art facilities in New York, Los Angeles and Philadelphia.”

The added capabilities Click3X gives Industrial Color in video production and new media mirrors its growth in the field of e-commerce photography and image capture. The company has recently opened a new 30,000 square-foot studio in downtown Los Angeles designed to produce high-volume, high-quality product photography for advertisers. That studio complements the company’s existing e-commerce photography hub in Philadelphia.

Main Image: (L-R) Peter Corbett and Steve Kalalian


Editing 360 video with Lenovo’s Explorer WMR headset

By Mike McCarthy

Microsoft has released its Windows Mixed Reality (WMR) platform as part of the Fall Creator’s Update to Windows 10. This platform allows users to experience a variety of immersive experiences, and thankfully there are now many WMR headsets available from many familiar names in the hardware business. One of those is from Lenovo who kindly sent me their Explorer WMR headset to test on my Thinkpad P71. This provided me with a complete VR experience on their hardware.

On November 15, Microsoft’s WMR released beta support for SteamVR on WMR devices. This allows WMR headsets to be used in applications that are compatible with SteamVR. For example, the newest release of Adobe Premiere Pro (CC 2018, or V.12.0) uses SteamVR for 360 video preview.

My goal for this article was to see if I could preview my 360 videos in a Lenovo headset while editing in Premiere, especially now that I had new 360 footage from my GoPro Fusion camera. I also provide some comparisons to the Oculus Rift which I reviewed for postPerspective in October.

There are a number of advantages to the WMR options, including lower prices and hardware requirements, higher image resolution and simpler setup. Oculus and HTC’s VR-Ready requirements have always been a bit excessive for 360 video, because unlike true 3D VR there is no 3D rendering involved when playing back footage from a fixed perspective. But would it work? No one seemed to know if it would, but Lenovo was willing to let me try.

The first step is to get your installation of Windows 10 upgraded with the Fall Creators Update. This includes integrated support for Windows Mixed Reality headsets. Once installed, you can plug in the single USB3 cable and HDMI port and Windows will automatically configure the device and its drivers for you. You will also need to install Valve’s Steam application and SteamVR, which adds support for VR content. The next step is to find Microsoft’s Windows Mixed Reality for SteamVR in the Steam store, which is a free installation. Once you confirm that the headset is functioning in WMR and then in SteamVR, open up Premiere Pro and test it out.

Working in Premiere Pro
Within Premiere Pro, preview and playback worked immediately within my existing immersive project. I watched footage captured with my Samsung Gear 360 and GoPro Fusion cameras. The files played, and the increased performance within the new version of the software is noticeable. My 4K and 5K 30fps content worked great, but my new 3Kp60 content only played when Mercury Playback was set to software-only, which disabled most of the new Immersive Video effects. In CUDA mode, I could hold down the right arrow and watch it progress in slow motion, but pressing the space bar caused the VR preview to freeze even though it played fine on the laptop monitor. The 60p content played fine in the Rift, so this appears to be an issue specific to WMR. Hopefully, that will be addressed in a software update in the near future.

The motion controllers were visible in the interface, and allow you to scrub the timeline, but I still had to use space-bar to start and stop playback. (Update: The 12.1 release of Premiere Pro support WMR headsets, and testing confirms that 60p now works, and the motion controllers are fully functional and can control playback.) One other issue that arose was that the mouse cursor is hidden when the display is snapped down into place over my eyes, which is an intrinsic feature of WMR. I had to tip it up out of the way every time I wanted to make a change, instead of just peeking under it, which is a lot of snapping up and down for the headset.

I found the WMR experience to be slightly less solid than the Oculus system. It would occasionally lag on the tracking for a couple of frames, causing the image to visibly jump. This may be due to the integrated tracking instead of dedicated external cameras. The boundary system is a visual distraction, so I would recommend disabling it if you are primarily using it for 360 video — because it doesn’t require moving much within your space. The setup on the WMR is better; it is much easier and has lower requirements and fewer ports needed. The resolution is higher than the Oculus Rift I had tested, (1440×1440 per eye instead of 1080×1200), so I wanted to see how much of a difference that would make. The Explorer also has a narrower field of view (105 degrees instead of 110), which I wouldn’t expect to make a difference, but I think it did.

By my calculations, the increased resolution should allow you to resolve a 5K sphere, compared to the 3.9K resolution available from the Rift — 1440pixels/105degrees*360 vs 1080pixels /110degrees*360. You will also want a pair of headphones or earbuds to plug into the headset so the audio tracks with your head (compared to your computer speakers, which are fixed).

The Feel of the Headset
The headset is designed very differently from the Rift, and the display can be tipped up out of the way while the headband is still on. It is also way easier to put on and remove, but a bit less comfortable to keep on for longer periods of time. The headband has to be on tight enough to hold the display in front of your eyes, since it doesn’t rest on your face, and the cabling has to slide through a clip on the headband when you fold the display upward. And since you have to fold the display upward to use the mouse, it is a frequent annoyance. But between the motion controllers and the keyboard, you can navigate and playback while the headset is on.

Using the Microsoft WMR lobby interface was an interesting experience, but I’m not sure if it’s going to catch on. SteamVR’s lobby experience isn’t much better, but Steam does offer a lot more content for its users. I anticipate Steam will be the dominant software platform based on the fact that most hardware vendors have support for it — HTC, Oculus, WMR. The fact that Adobe chose SteamVR to support their immersive preview experience is why these new WMR headsets work in Premiere Pro without any further software updates needed on their part. (Adobe doesn’t officially support this configuration yet, hence the “beta” designation in SteamVR, but besides 60p playback, I was very happy.) Hopefully we will only see further increased support and integration between the various hardware and software options in the future.

Summing Up
Currently, the Lenovo Explorer and the Oculus Rift are both priced the same at $399 — I say currently because prices have been fluctuating, so investigate thoroughly. So which one is better? Well, neither is a clear winner. Each has its own strengths. The Rift has more specific hardware requirements and lower total resolution. The Explorer requires Windows 10, but will work on a wider array of systems. The Rift is probably better for periods of extended use, while I would recommend the Explorer if you are going to be doing something that involves taking it on and off all the time (like tweaking effects settings in Adobe apps). Large fixed installations may offer a better user experience with the Rift or Vive on a powerful GPU, but most laptop users will probably have an easier time with the Explorer (no external camera to calibrate and fewer ports needed).


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.


Rogue takes us on VR/360 tour of Supermodel Closets

Rogue is a NYC-based creative boutique that specializes in high-end production and post for film, advertising and digital. Since its founding two years ago, executive creative director, Alex MacLean and his team have produced a large body of work providing color grading, finishing and visual effects for clients such as HBO, Vogue, Google, Vice, Fader and more. For the past three years MacLean has also been at the forefront of VR/360 content for narratives and advertising.

MacLean recently wrapped up post production on four five-minute episodes of 360-degree tours of Supermodel Closets. The series is a project of Conde Nast Entertainment and Vogue for Vogue’s 125th anniversary. If you’re into fashion, this VR tour gives you a glimpse at what supermodels wear in their daily lives. Viewers can look up, down and all around to feel immersed in the closet of each model as she shows her favorite fashions and shares the stories behind their most prized pieces.

 

Tours include the closets of Lily Aldridge, Cindy Crawford, Kendall Jenner  and
Amber Valletta.

MacLean worked with director Julina Tatlock, who is a co-founder and CEO of 30 Ninjas, a digital entertainment company that develops, writes and produces VR, multi-platform and interactive content. Rogue and 30 Ninjas worked together to determine the best workflow for the series. “I always think it’s best practice to collaborate with the directors, DPs and/or production companies in advance of a VR shoot to sort out any technical issues and pre-plan the most efficient production process from shoot to edit, stitching through all the steps of post-production,” reports MacLean. “Foresight is everything; it saves a lot of time, money, and frustration for everyone, especially when working in VR, as well as 3D.”

According to MacLean, they worked with a new camera format, the YI Halo camera, which is designed for professional VR data acquisition. “I often turn to the Assimilate team to discuss the format issues because they always support the latest camera formats in their Scratch VR tools. This worked well again because I needed to define an efficient VR and 3D workflow that would accommodate the conforming, color grading, creating of visual effects and the finishing of a massive amount of data at 6.7K x 6.7K resolution.”

 

The Post
“The post production process began by downloading 30 Ninjas’ editorial, stitched footage from the cloud to ingest into our MacBook Pro workstations to do the conform at 6K x 6K,” explains MacLean. “Organized data management is a critical step in our workflow, and Scratch VR is a champ at that. We were simultaneously doing the post for more than one episode, as well as other projects within the studio, so data efficiency is key.”

“We then moved the conformed raw 6.7K x 6.7K raw footage to our HP Z840 workstations to do the color grading, visual effects, compositing and finishing. You really need powerful workstations when working at this resolution and with this much data,” reports MacLean. “Spherical VR/360 imagery requires focused concentration, and then we’re basically doing everything twice when working in 3D. For these episodes, and for all VR/360 projects, we create a lat/long that breaks out the left eye and right eye into two spherical images. We then replicate the work from one eye to the next, and color correct any variances. The result is seamless color grading.

 

“We’re essentially using the headset as a creative tool with Scratch VR, because we can work in realtime in an immersive environment and see the exact results of work in each step of the post process,” he continues. “This is especially useful when doing any additional compositing, such as clean-up for artifacts that may have been missed or adding or subtracting data. Working in realtime eases the stress and time of doing a new composite of 360 data for the left eye and right eye 3D.”

Playback of content in the studio is very important to MacLean and team, and he calls the choice of multiple headsets another piece to the VR/360 puzzle. “The VR/3D content can look different in each headset so we need to determine a mid-point aesthetic look that displays well in each headset. We have our own playback black box that we use to preview the color grading and visual effects, before committing to rendering. And then we do a final QC review of the content, and for these episodes we did so in Google Daydream (untethered), HTV Live (tethered) and the Oculus Rift (tethered).”

MacLean sees rendering as one of their biggest challenges. “It’s really imperative to be diligent throughout all the internal and client reviews prior to rendering. It requires being very organized in your workflow from production through finishing, and a solid QC check. Content at 6K x 6K, VR/360 and 3D means extremely large files and numerous hours of rendering, so we want to restrict re-rendering as much as possible.”

Review: GoPro Fusion 360 camera

By Mike McCarthy

I finally got the opportunity to try out the GoPro Fusion camera I have had my eye on since the company first revealed it in April. The $700 camera uses two offset fish-eye lenses to shoot 360 video and stills, while recording ambisonic audio from four microphones in the waterproof unit. It can shoot a 5K video sphere at 30fps, or a 3K sphere at 60fps for higher motion content at reduced resolution. It records dual 190-degree fish-eye perspectives encoded in H.264 to separate MicroSD cards, with four tracks of audio. The rest of the magic comes in the form of GoPro’s newest application Fusion Studio.

Internally, the unit is recording dual 45Mb H.264 files to two separate MicroSD cards, with accompanying audio and metadata assets. This would be a logistical challenge to deal with manually, copying the cards into folders, sorting and syncing them, stitching them together and dealing with the audio. But with GoPro’s new Fusion Studio app, most of this is taken care of for you. Simply plug-in the camera and it will automatically access the footage, and let you preview and select what parts of which clips you want processed into stitched 360 footage or flattened video files.

It also processes the multi-channel audio into ambisonic B-Format tracks, or standard stereo if desired. The app is a bit limited in user-control functionality, but what it does do it does very well. My main complaint is that I can’t find a way to manually set the output filename, but I can rename the exports in Windows once they have been rendered. Trying to process the same source file into multiple outputs is challenging for the same reason.

Setting Recorded Resolution (Per Lens) Processed Resolution (Equirectangular)
5Kp30 2704×2624 4992×2496
3Kp60 1568×1504 2880×1440
Stills 3104×3000 5760×2880

With the Samsung Gear 360, I researched five different ways to stitch the footage, because I wasn’t satisfied with the included app. Most of those will also work with Fusion footage, and you can read about those options here, but they aren’t really necessary when you have Fusion Studio.

You can choose between H.264, Cineform or ProRes, your equirectangular output resolution and ambisonic or stereo audio. That gives you pretty much every option you should need to process your footage. There is also a “Beta” option to stabilize your footage, which once I got used to it, I really liked. It should be thought of more as a “remove rotation” option since it’s not for stabilizing out sharp motions — which still leave motion blur — but for maintaining the viewer’s perspective even if the camera rotates in unexpected ways. Processing was about 6x run-time on my Lenovo Thinkpad P71 laptop, so a 10-minute clip would take an hour to stitch to 360.

The footage itself looks good, higher quality than my Gear 360, and the 60p stuff is much smoother, which is to be expected. While good VR experiences require 90fps to be rendered to the display to avoid motion sickness that does not necessarily mean that 30fps content is a problem. When rendering the viewer’s perspective, the same frame can be sampled three times, shifting the image as they move their head, even from a single source frame. That said, 60p source content does give smoother results than the 30p footage I am used to watching in VR, but 60p did give me more issues during editorial. I had to disable CUDA acceleration in Adobe Premiere Pro to get Transmit to work with the WMR headset.

Once you have your footage processed in Fusion Studio, it can be edited in Premiere Pro — like any other 360 footage — but the audio can be handled a bit differently. Exporting as stereo will follow the usual workflow, but selecting ambisonic will give you a special spatially aware audio file. Premiere can use this in a 4-track multi-channel sequence to line up the spatial audio with the direction you are looking in VR, and if exported correctly, YouTube can do the same thing for your viewers.

In the Trees
Most GoPro products are intended for use capturing action moments and unusual situations in extreme environments (which is why they are waterproof and fairly resilient), so I wanted to study the camera in its “native habitat.” The most extreme thing I do these days is work on ropes courses, high up in trees or telephone poles. So I took the camera out to a ropes course that I help out with, curious to see how the recording at height would translate into the 360 video experience.

Ropes courses are usually challenging to photograph because of the scale involved. When you are zoomed out far enough to see the entire element, you can’t see any detail, or if you are so zoomed in close enough to see faces, you have no good concept of how high up they are — 360 photography is helpful in that it is designed to be panned through when viewed flat. This allows you to give the viewer a better sense of the scale, and they can still see the details of the individual elements or people climbing. And in VR, you should have a better feel for the height involved.

I had the Fusion camera and Fusion Grip extendable tripod handle, as well as my Hero6 kit, which included an adhesive helmet mount. Since I was going to be working at heights and didn’t want to drop the camera, the first thing I did was rig up a tether system. A short piece of 2mm cord fit through a slot in the bottom of the center post and a triple fisherman knot made a secure loop. The cord fit out the bottom of the tripod when it was closed, allowing me to connect it to a shock-absorbing lanyard, which was clipped to my harness. This also allowed me to dangle the camera from a cord for a free-floating perspective. I also stuck the quick release base to my climbing helmet, and was ready to go.

I shot segments in both 30p and 60p, depending on how I had the camera mounted, using higher frame rates for the more dynamic shots. I was worried that the helmet mount would be too close, since GoPro recommends keeping the Fusion at least 20cm away from what it is filming, but the helmet wasn’t too bad. Another inch or two would shrink it significantly from the camera’s perspective, similar to my tripod issue with the Gear 360.

I always climbed up with the camera mounted on my helmet and then switched it to the Fusion Grip to record the guy climbing up behind me and my rappel. Hanging the camera from a cord, even 30-feet below me, worked much better than I expected. It put GoPro’s stabilization feature to the test, but it worked fantastically. With the camera rotating freely, the perspective is static, although you can see the seam lines constantly rotating around you. When I am holding the Fusion Grip, the extended pole is completely invisible to the camera, giving you what GoPro has dubbed “Angel View.” It is as if the viewer is floating freely next to the subject, especially when viewed in VR.

Because I have ways to view 360 video in VR, and because I don’t mind panning around on a flat screen view, I am less excited personally in GoPro’s OverCapture functionality, but I recognize it is a useful feature that will greater extend the use cases for this 360 camera. It is designed for people using the Fusion as a more flexible camera to produce flat content, instead of to produce VR content. I edited together a couple OverCapture shots intercut with footage from my regular Hero6 to demonstrate how that would work.

Ambisonic Audio
The other new option that Fusion brings to the table is ambisonic audio. Editing ambisonics works in Premiere Pro using a 4-track multi-channel sequence. The main workflow kink here is that you have to manually override the audio settings every time you import a new clip with ambisonic audio in order to set the audio channels to Adaptive with a single timeline clip. Turn on Monitor Ambisonics by right clicking in the monitor panel and match the Pan, Tilt, and Roll in the Panner-Ambisonics effect to the values in your VR Rotate Sphere effect (note that they are listed in a different order) and your audio should match the video perspective.

When exporting an MP4 in the audio panel, set Channels to 4.0 and check the Audio is Ambisonics box. From what I can see, the Fusion Studio conversion process compensates for changes in perspective, including “stabilization” when processing the raw recorded audio for Ambisonic exports, so you only have to match changes you make in your Premiere sequence.

While I could have intercut the footage at both settings together into a 5Kp60 timeline, I ended up creating two separate 360 videos. This also makes it clear to the viewer which shots were 5K/p30 and which were recorded at 3K/p60. They are both available on YouTube, and I recommend watching them in VR for the full effect. But be warned that they are recorded at heights up to 80 feet up, so it may be uncomfortable for some people to watch.

Summing Up
GoPro’s Fusion camera is not the first 360 camera on the market, but it brings more pixels and higher frame rates than most of its direct competitors, and more importantly it has the software package to assist users in the transition to processing 360 video footage. It also supports ambisonic audio and offers the OverCapture functionality for generating more traditional flat GoPro content.

I found it to be easier to mount and shoot with than my earlier 360 camera experiences, and it is far easier to get the footage ready to edit and view using GoPro’s Fusion Studio program. The Stabilize feature totally changes how I shoot 360 videos, giving me much more flexibility in rotating the camera during movements. And most importantly, I am much happier with the resulting footage that I get when shooting with it.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.