Category Archives: 360

Behind the Title: Left Field Labs ECD Yann Caloghiris

NAME: Yann Caloghiris

COMPANY: Left Field Labs (@LeftFieldLabs)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Left Field Labs is a Venice-California-based creative agency dedicated to applying creativity to emerging technologies. We create experiences at the intersection of strategy, design and code for our clients, who include Google, Uber, Discovery and Estée Lauder.

But it’s how we go about our business that has shaped who we have become. Over the past 10 years, we have consciously moved away from the traditional agency model and have grown by deepening our expertise, sourcing exceptional talent and, most importantly, fostering a “lab-like” creative culture of collaboration and experimentation.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
My role is to drive the creative vision across our client accounts, as well as our own ventures. In practice, that can mean anything from providing insights for ongoing work to proposing creative strategies to running ideation workshops. Ultimately, it’s whatever it takes to help the team flourish and push the envelope of our creative work.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably that I learn more now than I did at the beginning of my career. When I started, I imagined that the executive CD roles were occupied by seasoned industry veterans, who had seen and done it all, and would provide tried and tested direction.

Today, I think that cliché is out of touch with what’s required from agency culture and where the industry is going. Sure, some aspects of the role remain unchanged — such as being a supportive team lead or appreciating the value of great copy — but the pace of change is such that the role often requires both the ability to leverage past experience and accept that sometimes a new paradigm is emerging and assumptions need to be adjusted.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with the team, and the excitement that comes from workshopping the big ideas that will anchor the experiences we create.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The administrative parts of a creative business are not always the most fulfilling. Thankfully, tasks like timesheeting, expense reporting and invoicing are becoming less exhaustive thanks to better predictive tools and machine learning.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
The early hours of the morning, usually when inspiration strikes — when we haven’t had to deal with the unexpected day-to-day challenges that come with managing a busy design studio.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d probably be somewhere at the cross-section between an artist, like my mum was, and an engineer like my dad. There is nothing more satisfying than to apply art to an engineering challenge or vice versa.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I went to school in France, and there wasn’t much room for anything other than school and homework. When I got my Baccalaureate, I decided that from that point onward that whatever I did, it would be fun, deeply engaging and at a place where being creative was an asset.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We recently partnered with ad agency RK Venture to craft a VR experience for the New Mexico Department of Transportation’s ongoing ENDWI campaign, which immerses viewers into a real-life drunk-driving scenario.

ENDWI

To best communicate and tell the human side of this story, we turned to rapid breakthroughs within volumetric capture and 3D scanning. Working with Microsoft’s Mixed Reality Capture Studio, we were able to bring every detail of an actor’s performance to life with volumetric performance capture in a way that previous techniques could not.

Bringing a real actor’s performance into a virtual experience is a game changer because of the emotional connection it creates. For ENDWI, the combination of rich immersion with compelling non-linear storytelling proved to affect the participants at a visceral level — with the goal of changing behavior further down the road.

Throughout this past year, we partnered with the VMware Cloud Marketing Team to create a one-of-a-kind immersive booth experience for VMworld Las Vegas 2018 and Barcelona 2018 called Cloud City. VMware’s cloud offering needed a distinct presence to foster a deeper understanding and greater connectivity between brand, product and customers stepping into the cloud.

Cloud City

Our solution was Cloud City, a destination merging future-forward architecture, light, texture, sound and interactions with VMware Cloud experts to give consumers a window into how the cloud, and more specifically how VMware Cloud, can be an essential solution for them. VMworld is the brand’s penultimate engagement where hands-on learning helped showcase its cloud offerings. Cloud City garnered 4000-plus demos, which led to a 20% lead conversion in 10 days.

Finally, for Google, we designed and built a platform for the hosting of online events anywhere in the world: Google Gather. For its first release, teams across Google, including Android, Cloud and Education, used Google Gather to reach and convert potential customers across the globe. With hundreds of events to date, the platform now reaches enterprise decision-makers at massive scale, spanning far beyond what has been possible with traditional event marketing, management and hosting.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Recently, a friend and I shot and edited a fun video homage to the original technology boom-town: Detroit, Michigan. It features two cultural icons from the region, an original big block ‘60s muscle car and some gritty electro beats. My four-year-old son thinks it’s the coolest thing he’s ever seen. It’s going to be hard for me to top that.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Human flight, the Internet and our baby monitor!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram, Twitter, Medium and LinkedIn.

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Where to start?! Music has always played an important part of my creative process, and the joy I derive from what we do. I have day-long playlists curated around what I’m trying to achieve during that time. Being able to influence how I feel when working on a brief is essential — it helps set me in the right mindset.

Sometimes, it might be film scores when working on visuals, jazz to design a workshop schedule or techno to dial-up productivity when doing expenses.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Spend time with my kids. They remind me that there is a simple and unpretentious way to look at life.

Lucid and Eys3D partner on VR180 depth camera module

EYS3D Microelectronics Technology, the company behind embedded camera modules in some top-tier AR/VR headsets, has partnered with that AI startup Lucid. Lucid will power their next-generation depth-sensing camera module, Axis. This means that a single, small, handheld device can capture accurate 3D depth maps with up to a 180-degree field of view at high resolution, allowing content creators to scan, reconstruct and output precise 3D point clouds.

This new camera module, which was demoed for the first time at CES, will allow developers, animators and game designers a way to transform the physical world into a virtual one, ramping up content for 3D, VR and AR all with superior performance in resolution and field of view at a lower cost than some technologies currently available.

A device capturing the environment exactly as you perceive it, but enhanced with capabilities of precise depth, distance and understanding could help eliminate the boundaries between what you see in the real world and what you can create in the VR and AR world. This is what the Lucid-powered EYS3D’s Axis camera module aims to bring to content creators, as they gain the “super power” of transforming anything in their vision into a 3D object or scene which others can experience, interact with and walk in.

What was only previously possible with eight to 16 high-end DSLR cameras, and expensive software or depth sensors is now combined into one tiny camera module with stereo lenses paired with IR sensors. Axis will cover up to a 180-degree field of view while providing millimeter-accurate 3D in point cloud or depth map format. This device provides a simple plug-and-play experience through USB 3.1 Gen1/2 and supported Windows and Linux software suites, allowing users to further develop their own depth applications such as 3D reconstructing an entire scene, scanning faces into 3D models or just determining how far away an object is.

Lucid’s AI-enhanced 3D/depth solution, known as 3D Fusion Technology, is currently deployed in many devices, such as 3D cameras, robots and mobile phones, including the Red Hydrogen One, which just launched through AT&T and Verizon nationwide.

EYS3D’s new depth camera module powered by Lucid will be available in Q3 2019.

DigitalGlue 2.5

Satore Tech tackles post for Philharmonia Orchestra’s latest VR film

The Philharmonia Orchestra in London debuted its latest VR experience at Royal Festival Hall alongside the opening two concerts of the Philharmonia’s new season. Satore Tech completed VR stitching for the Mahler 3: Live From London film. This is the first project completed by Satore Tech since it was launched in June of this year.

The VR experience placed users at the heart of the Orchestra during the final 10 minutes of Mahler’s Third Symphony, which was filmed live in October 2017. The stitching project was completed by creative technologist/SFX/VR expert Sergio Ochoa, who leads Satore Tech. The company used SGO Mistika technology to post the project, which Ochoa helped to develop during his time in that company — he was creative technologist and CEO of SGO’s French division.

Luke Ritchie, head of innovation and partnerships at the Philharmonia Orchestra, says, “We’ve been working with VR since 2015, it’s a fantastic technology to connect new audiences with the Orchestra in an entirely new way. VR allows you to sit at the heart of the Orchestra, and our VR experiences can transform audiences’ preconceptions of orchestral performance — whether they’re new to classical music or are a die-hard fan.”

It was a technically demanding project for Satore Tech to stitch together, as the concert was filmed live, in 360 degrees, with no retakes using Google’s latest Jump Odyssey VR camera. This meant that Ochoa was working with four to five different depth layers at any one time. The amount of fast movement also meant the resolution of the footage needed to be up-scaled from 4K to 8K to ensure it was suitable for the VR platform.

“The guiding principle for Satore Tech is we aspire to constantly push the boundaries, both in terms of what we produce and the technologies we develop to achieve that vision,” explains Ochoa. “It was challenging given the issues that arise with any live recording, but the ambition and complexity is what makes it such a very suitable initial project for us.”

Satore Tech’s next project is currently in development in Mexico, using experimental volumetric capture techniques with some of the world’s most famous dancers. It is slated for release early next year.


Our SIGGRAPH 2018 video coverage

SIGGRAPH is always a great place to wander around and learn about new and future technology. You can get see amazing visual effects reels and learn how the work was created by the artists themselves. You can get demos of new products, and you can immerse yourself in a completely digital environment. In short, SIGGRAPH is educational and fun.

If you weren’t able to make it this year, or attended but couldn’t see it all, we would like to invite you to watch our video coverage from the show.

SIGGRAPH 2018


Siggraph: StarVR One’s VR headset with integrated eye tracking

StarVR was at SIGGRAPH 2018 with its StarVR One, its next-generation VR headset built to support the most optimal lifelike VR experience. Featuring advanced optics, VR-optimized displays, integrated eye tracking and a vendor-agnostic tracking architecture, StarVR One is built from the ground up to support use cases in the commercial and enterprise sectors.

The StarVR One VR head-mounted display provides a nearly 100 percent human viewing angle — a 210-degree horizontal and 130-degree vertical field-of-view — and supports a more expansive user experience. Approximating natural human peripheral vision, StarVR One can support rigorous and exacting VR experiences such as driving and flight simulations, as well as tasks such as identifying design issues in engineering applications.

StarVR’s custom AMOLED displays serve up 16 million subpixels at a refresh rate of 90 frames per second. The proprietary displays are designed specifically for VR with a unique full-RGB-per-pixel arrangement to provide a professional-grade color spectrum for real-life color. Coupled with StarVR’s custom Fresnel lenses, the result is a clear visual experience within the entire field of view.

StarVR One automatically measures interpupillary distance (IPD) and instantly provides the best image adjusted for every user. Integrated Tobii eye-tracking technology enables foveated rendering, a technology that concentrates high-quality rendering only where the eyes are focused. As a result, the headset pushes the highest-quality imagery to the eye-focus area while maintaining the right amount of peripheral image detail.

StarVR One eye-tracking thus opens up commercial possibilities that leverage user-intent data for content gaze analysis and improved interactivity, including heat maps.

Two products are available with two different integrated tracking systems. The StarVR One is ready out of the box for the SteamVR 2.0 tracking solution. Alternatively, StarVR One XT is embedded with active optical markers for compatibility with optical tracking systems for more demanding use cases. It is further enhanced with ready-to-use plugins for a variety of tracking systems and with additional customization tools.

The StarVR One headset weighs 450 grams, and its ergonomic headband design evenly distributes this weight to ensure comfort even during extended sessions.

The StarVR software development kit (SDK) simplifies the development of new content or the upgrade of an existing VR experience to StarVR’s premium wide-field-of-view platform. Developers also have the option of leveraging the StarVR One dual-input VR SLI mode, maximizing the rendering performance. The StarVR SDK API is designed to be familiar to developers working with existing industry standards.

The development effort that culminated in the launch of StarVR One involved extensive collaboration with StarVR technology partners, which include Intel, Nvidia and Epic Games.


Composer and sound mixer Rob Ballingall joins Sonic Union

NYC-based audio studio Sonic Union has added composer/experiential sound designer/mixer Rob Ballingall to its team. He will be working out of both Sonic Union’s Bryant Park and Union Square locations. Ballingall brings with him experience in music and audio post, with an emphasis on the creation of audio for emerging technology projects, including experiential and VR.

Ballingall recently created audio for an experiential in-theatre commercial for Mercedes-Benz Canada, using Dolby Atmos, D-Box and 4DX technologies. In addition, for National Geographic’s One Strange Rock VR experience, directed by Darren Aronofsky, Ballingall created audio for custom VR headsets designed in the style of astronaut helmets, which contained a pinhole projector to display visuals on the inside of the helmet’s visor.

Formerly at Nylon Studios, Ballingall also composed music on brand campaigns for clients such as Ford, Kellogg’s and Walmart, and provided sound design/engineering on projects for AdCouncil and Resistance Radio for Amazon Studios and The Man in the High Castle, which collectively won multiple Cannes Lion, Clio and One Show awards, as well as garnering two Emmy nominations.

Born in London, Ballingall immigrated to the US eight years ago to seek a job as a mixer, assisting numerous Grammy Award-winning engineers at NYC’s Magic Shop recording studio. Having studied music composition and engineering from high school to college in England, he soon found his niche offering compositional and arranging counterpoints to sound design, mix and audio post for the commercial world. Following stints at other studios, including Nylon Studios in NYC, he transitioned to Sonic Union to service agencies, brands and production companies.


Assimilate intros media toolkit, Scratch Play Pro

Assimilate is now offering Scratch Play Pro, which includes a universal professional format player, immersive media player, look creator (with version management), transcoder and QC tool.

Play Pro is able to play back most formats, such as camera formats (including Raw), deliverable formats of any kind, as well as still frame formats. You can also show the image in full screen on a second/output display, either attached to the GPU or through SDI video-IO (AJA, Blackmagic, Bluefish444). Users also have the ability to load and play as much media as they can store in a timely manner.

Part of Play Pro is the Construct (timeline) environment, a graphical media manager that allows users to load and manage stills/shots/timelines. It runs on Windows or OS X.

As an immersive video player, Play Pro supports equirectangular 360, cubic/cubic packed 360, 180° VR, stereo, mono, side-by-side or over/under, embedded ambisonic audio and realtime mesh de-warping of 180° VR media. Playback is on screen or through immersive headsets like Oculus Rift, HTC Vive and HMDs supporting OpenVR on both Windows and Mac. In addition to playback and CDL color correction, Play Pro can directly publish your 360/180 media to Facebook 360 or YouTube 360.
As a look creator, Play Pro supports 1D and 3D LUT formats of any size for import and export. It also supports import/export of CDLs in both CDL and CC. It also allows you to combine two different LUTs and still add a display LUT on top. A CDL-based toolset, which is compatible with all other color tools, allows you to modify looks and/or create complete new looks.

It can also export LUTs in different depths and sizes to fit different LUT boxes, cameras and monitors. The ability to create looks in production or to import looks created by post production allows you to establish a consistent color pipeline from on-set to delivery. Using the Construct (timeline) environment, users can store all look versions and apply them at any time in the production process.

Play Pro reads in all formats and can transcode to ProRes, H.264 and H.265. For VR delivery, it supports H.264 rendering up to 8K, including the metadata needed for online portals, such as YouTube and Facebook. Users can add custom metadata, such as scene and take information and include it in any exported file. Or they can export it as a separate ALE-file for use further down the pipeline.

As a QC tool, Play Pro can be used on-set and in post. It supports SDI output, split-screen, A-B overlay and audio monitoring and routing. It also comes with a number of QC-tools for video measuring, like a vectorscope, waveform, curves, histogram, as well extensive annotation capabilities through its note feature.

All metadata and comments can be exported as a report in different styles, including an HDR-analysis report that calculates MaxFall and MaxCLL. Action- and title-safe guides, as well as blanking and letterboxing, can be enabled as an overlay for review.

Scratch Play Pro is available now for $19 per month, or $199 for a yearly license.


Epic Games launches Unreal Engine 4.20

Epic Games has introduced Unreal Engine 4.20, which allows developers to build even more realistic characters and immersive environments across games, film and TV, VR/AR/MR and enterprise applications. The Unreal Engine 4.20 release combines the latest realtime rendering advancements with improved creative tools, making it even easier to ship games across all platforms. With hundreds of optimizations, especially for iOS, Android and Nintendo Switch — which have been built for Fortnite and are now rolled into Unreal Engine 4.20 and released to all users — Epic is providing developers with the scalable tools they need for these types of projects.

Artists working in visual effects, animation, broadcast and virtual production will find enhancements for digital humans, VFX and cinematic depth of field, allowing them to create realistic images across all forms of media and entertainment. In the enterprise space, Unreal Studio 4.20 includes upgrades to the UE4 Datasmith plugin suite, such as SketchUp support, which make it easier to get CAD data prepped, imported and working in Unreal Engine.

Here are some key features of Unreal Engine 4.20:

A new proxy LOD system: Users can handle sprawling worlds via UE4’s production-ready Proxy LOD system for the easy reduction of rendering cost due to poly count, draw calls and material complexity. Proxy LOD offers big gains when developing for mobile and console platforms.

A smoother mobile experience: Over 100 mobile optimizations developed for Fortnite come to all 4.20 users, marking a major shift for easy “shippability” and seamless gameplay optimization across platforms. Major enhancements include improved Android debugging, mobile Landscape improvements, RHI thread on Android and occlusion queries on mobile.

Works better with Switch: Epic has improved Nintendo Switch development by releasing tons of performance and memory improvements built for Fortnite on Nintendo Switch to 4.20 users as well.

Niagara VFX (early access): Unreal Engine’s new programmable VFX editor, Niagara, is now available in early access and will help developers take their VFX to the next level. This new suite of tools is built from the ground up to give artists unprecedented control over particle simulation, rendering and performance for more sophisticated visuals. This tool will eventually replace the Unreal Cascade particle editor.

Cinematic depth of field: Unreal Engine 4.20 delivers tools for achieving depth of field at true cinematic quality in any scene. This brand-new implementation replaces the Circle DOF method. It’s faster, cleaner and provides a cinematic appearance through the use of a procedural bokeh simulation. Cinematic DOF also supports alpha channel and dynamic resolution stability, and has multiple settings for scaling up or down on console platforms based on project requirements. This feature debuted at GDC this year as part of the Star Wars “Reflections” demo by Epic, ILMxLAB and Nvidia.

Digital human improvements: In-engine tools now include dual-lobe specular/double Beckman specular models, backscatter transmission in lights, boundary bleed color subsurface scattering, iris normal slot for eyes and screen space irradiance to build the most cutting-edge digital humans in games and beyond.

Live record and replay: All developers now have access to code from Epic’s Fortnite Replay system. Content creators can easily use footage of recorded gameplay sessions to create incredible replay videos.

Sequencer cinematic updates: New features include frame accuracy, media tracking, curve editor/evaluation and Final Cut Pro 7 XML import/export.

Shotgun integration: Shotgun, a production management and asset tracking solution, is now supported. This will streamline workflows for Shotgun users in game development who are leveraging Unreal’s realtime performance. Shotgun users can assign tasks to specific assets within Unreal Engine.

Mixed reality capture support (early access): Users with virtual production workflows will now have mixed reality capture support that includes video input, calibration and in-game compositing. Supported webcams and HDMI capture devices allow users to pull real-world greenscreened video into the engine, and supported tracking devices can match your camera location to the in-game camera for more dynamic shots.

AR support: Unreal Engine 4.20 ships with native support for ARKit 2, which includes features for creating shared, collaborative AR experiences. Also included is the latest support for Magic Leap One, Google ARCore 1.2 support.

Metadata control: Import metadata from 3ds Max, SketchUp and other common CAD tools for the opportunity to batch process objects by property, or expose metadata via scripts. Metadata enables more creative uses of Unreal Studio, such as Python script commands for updating all meshes of a certain type, or displaying relevant information in interactive experiences.

Mesh editing tools: Unreal Engine now includes a basic mesh editing toolset for quick, simple fixes to imported geometry without having to fix them in the source package and re-import. These tools are ideal for simple touch-ups without having to go to another application. Datasmith also now includes a base Python script that can generate Level of Detail (LOD) meshes automatically.

Non-destructive re-import: Achieve faster iteration through the new parameter tracking system, which monitors updates in both the source data and Unreal Editor, and only imports changed elements. Previous changes to the scene within Unreal Editor are retained and reapplied when source data updates.


SIGGRAPH conference chair Roy C. Anthony: VR, AR, AI, VFX, more

By Randi Altman

Next month, SIGGRAPH returns to Vancouver after turns in Los Angeles and Anaheim. This gorgeous city, whose convention center offers a water view, is home to many visual effects studios providing work for film, television and spots.

As usual, SIGGRAPH will host many presentations, showcase artists’ work, display technology and offer a glimpse into what’s on the horizon for this segment of the market.

Roy C. Anthony

Leading up to the show — which takes place August 12-16 — we reached out to Roy C. Anthony, this year’s conference chair. For his day job, Anthony recently joined Ventuz Technology as VP, creative development. There, he leads initiatives to bring Ventuz’s realtime rendering technologies to creators of sets, stages and ProAV installations around the world

SIGGRAPH is back in Vancouver this year. Can you talk about why it’s important for the industry?
There are 60-plus world-class VFX and animation studios in Vancouver. There are more than 20,000 film and TV jobs, and more than 8,000 VFX and animation jobs in the city.

So, Vancouver’s rich production-centric communities are leading the way in film and VFX production for television and onscreen films. They are also are also busy with new media content, games work and new workflows, including those for AR/VR/mixed reality.

How many exhibitors this year?
The conference and exhibition will play host to over 150 exhibitors on the show floor, showcasing the latest in computer graphics and interactive technologies, products and services. Due to the increase in the amount of new technology that has debuted in the computer graphics marketplace over this past year, almost one quarter of this year’s 150 exhibitors will be presenting at SIGGRAPH for the first time

In addition to the traditional exhibit floor and conferences, what are some of the can’t-miss offerings this year?
We have increased the presence of virtual, augmented and mixed reality projects and experiences — and we are introducing our new Immersive Pavilion in the east convention center, which will be dedicated to this area. We’ve incorporated immersive tech into our computer animation festival with the inclusion of our VR Theater, back for its second year, as well as inviting a special, curated experience with New York University’s Ken Perlin — he’s a legendary computer graphics professor.

We’ll be kicking off the week in a big VR way with a special session following the opening ceremony featuring Ivan Sutherland, considered by many as “the father of computer graphics.” That 50-year retrospective will present the history and innovations that sparked our industry.

We have also brought Syd Mead, a legendary “visual futurist” (Blade Runner, Tron, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Aliens, Time Cop, Tomorrowland, Blade Runner 2049), who will display an arrangement of his art in a special collection called Progressions. This will be seen within our Production Gallery experience, which also returns for its second year. Progressions will exhibit more than 50 years of artwork by Syd, from his academic years to his most current work.

We will have an amazing array of guest speakers, including those featured within the Business Symposium, which is making a return to SIGGRAPH after an absence of a few years. Among these speakers are people from the Disney Technology Innovation Group, Unity and Georgia Tech.

On Tuesday, August 14, our SIGGRAPH Next series will present a keynote speaker each morning to kick off the day with an inspirational talk. These speakers are Tony Derose, a senior scientist from Pixar; Daniel Szecket, VP of design for Quantitative Imaging Systems; and Bob Nicoll, dean of Blizzard Academy.

There will be a 25th anniversary showing of the original Jurassic Park movie, being hosted by “Spaz” Williams, a digital artist who worked on that film.

Can you talk about this year’s keynote and why he was chosen?
We’re thrilled to have ILM head and senior VP, ECD Rob Bredow deliver the keynote address this year. Rob is all about innovation — pushing through scary new directions while maintaining the leadership of artists and technologists.

Rob is the ultimate modern-day practitioner, a digital VFX supervisor who has been disrupting ‘the way it’s always been done’ to move to new ways. He truly reflects the spirit of ILM, which was founded in 1975 and is just one year younger than SIGGRAPH.

A large part of SIGGRAPH is its slant toward students and education. Can you discuss how this came about and why this is important?
SIGGRAPH supports education in all sub-disciplines of computer graphics and interactive techniques, and it promotes and improves the use of computer graphics in education. Our Education Committee sponsors a broad range of projects, such as curriculum studies, resources for educators and SIGGRAPH conference-related activities.

SIGGRAPH has always been a welcoming and diverse community, one that encourages mentorship, and acknowledges that art inspires science and science enables advances in the arts. SIGGRAPH was built upon a foundation of research and education.

How are the Computer Animation Festival films selected?
The Computer Animation Festival has two programs, the Electronic Theater and the VR Theater. Because of the large volume of submissions for the Electronic Theater (over 400), there is a triage committee for the first phase. The CAF Chair then takes the high scoring pieces to a jury comprised of industry professionals. The jury selects then become the Electronic Theater show pieces.

The selections for the VR Theater are made by a smaller panel comprised mostly of sub-committee members that watch each film in a VR headset and vote.

Can you talk more about how SIGGRAPH is tackling AR/VR/AI and machine learning?
Since SIGGRAPH 2018 is about the theme of “Generations,” we took a step back to look at how we got where we are today in terms of AR/VR, and where we are going with it. Much of what we know today couldn’t have been possible without the research and creation of Ivan Sutherland’s 1968 head-mounted display. We have a fanatic panel celebrating the 50-year anniversary of his HMD, which is widely considered and the first VR HMD.

AI tools are newer, and we created a panel that focuses on trends and the future of AI tools in VFX, called “Future Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning Tools for VFX.” This panel gains insight from experts embedded in both the AI and VFX industries and gives attendees a look at how different companies plan to further their technology development.

What is the process for making sure that all aspects of the industry are covered in terms of panels?
Every year new ideas for panels and sessions are submitted by contributors from all over the globe. Those submissions are then reviewed by a jury of industry experts, and it is through this process that panelists and cross-industry coverage is determined.

Each year, the conference chair oversees the program chairs, then each of the program chairs become part of a jury process — this helps to ensure the best program with the most industries represented from across all disciplines.

In the rare case a program committee feels they are missing something key in the industry, they can try to curate a panel in, but we still require that that panel be reviewed by subject matter experts before it would be considered for final acceptance.

 

Combining 3D and 360 VR for The Cabiri: Anubis film

Whether you are using 360 VR or 3D, both allow audiences to feel in on the action and emotion of a film narrative or performance, but combine the two together and you can create a highly immersive experience that brings the audience directly into the “reality” of the scenes.

This is exactly what film producers and directors Fred Beahm and Bogdan Darev have done in The Cabiri: Anubis, a 3D/360VR performance art film showing at the Seattle International Film Festival’s (SIFF) VR Zone on May 18 through June 10.

The Cabiri is a Seattle-based performance art group that creates stylistic and athletic dance and entertainment routines at theater venues throughout North America. The 3D/360VR film can now be streamed from the Pixvana app to the new Oculus Go headset, which is specifically designed for 3D and 360 streaming and viewing.

“As a director working in cinema to create worlds where reality is presented in highly stylized stories, VR seemed the perfect medium to explore. What took me by complete surprise was the emotional impact, the intimacy and immediacy the immersive experience allows,” says Darev. “VR is truly a medium that highlights our collective responsibility to create original and diverse content through the power of emerging technologies that foster curiosity and the imagination.”

“Other than a live show, 3D/360VR is the ideal medium for viewers to experience the rhythmic movement in The Cabiri’s performances. Because they have the feeling of being within the scene, the viewers become so engaged in the experience that they feel the emotional and dramatic impact,” explains Beahm, who is also the cinematographer, editor and post talent for The Cabiri film.

Beahm has a long list of credits to his name, and a strong affinity for the post process that requires a keen sense of the look and feel a director or producer is striving to achieve in a film. “The artistic and technical functions of the post process take a film from raw footage to a good result, and with the right post artist and software tools to a great film,” he says. “This is why I put a strong emphasis on the post process, because along with a great story and cinematography, it’s a key component of creating a noteworthy film. VR and 3D require several complex steps, and you want to use tools that simplify the process so you can save time, create high-quality results and stay within budget.”

For The Cabiri film, he used the Kandao Obsidian S camera, filming in 6K 3D360, then SGO’s Mistika VR for their stereo 3D optical-flow stitching. He edited in Adobe’s Premiere Pro CC 2018 and finished in Assimilate’s Scratch VR, using their 3D/360VR painting, tracking and color grading tools. He then delivered in 4K 3D360 to Pixvana’s Spin Studio.”

“Scratch VR is fast. For example, with the VR transform-and-vector paint tools I can quickly paint out the nadir, or easily delete unwanted artifacts like portions of a camera rig and wires, or even a person. It’s also easy to add in graphics and visual effects with the built-in tracker and compositing tools. It’s also the only software I use that renders content in the background while you continue working on your project. Another advantage is that Scratch VR will automatically connect to an Oculus headset for viewing 3D and 360,” he continues. “During our color grading session, Bogdan would wear an Oculus Rift headset and give me suggestions about changes I should make, such as saturation and hues, and I could quickly do these on the fly and save the versions for comparison.”