AMD 2.1

Behind the Title: Design director Liron Eldar-Ashkenazi

NAME: Liron Eldar-Ashkenazi  (@iamlirona)

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Design Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I help companies execute on their creative hopes and dreams, both hands-on and as a consultant and director.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Educating my clients about the lay of the land when it comes to getting what they want creatively. People typically think coming up with creative concepts is easy and quick. A big part of my job is helping companies see the full scope of taking a project from beginning to end with success while being mindful of timeline and budget.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN MOTION GRAPHICS?
I was accepted to the prestigious position of motion graphics artist in the Israeli defense force when I was 18 — all women and men have to serve in the military. It’s now been about 12 years that I’ve been creating and animating.

HOW HAS THE INDUSTRY CHANGED IN THE TIME YOU’VE BEEN WORKING? WHAT’S BEEN GOOD, WHAT’S BEEN BAD?
I see a lot more women 3D artists and animators. It’s so refreshing! It used to be a man’s world and I’m so thrilled to see the shift. Overall, it’s becoming a bit more challenging as screens are changing so fast and there are so many of them. Everything you create has to suit a thousand different use-cases and coming up with the right strategy for that takes longer than it did when we were only thinking in 15’s and 30’s 16:9.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love that there are so many facets to my work under one title. Coming up with concepts, designing, animating, creating prints and artworks, working with typography is just so much more rewarding than in the days when you only had one job — lighting, texturing, animating, designing. Now an artist is free to do multiple things, and it’s well appreciated.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Long rendering times. I think computers are becoming stronger, but we also demand more and more from them. I still hate sitting and waiting for a computer to show me what I’m working on.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Morning! I’m a morning person who loves to start early and finish when there’s still light out.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I didn’t really choose it; it chose me.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
At age 16 I knew I would never be great at sitting on my behind and just studying the text. I knew I needed to create in order to succeed. It’s my safe space and what I do best.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Some other form of visual artist, or a psychologist.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Right before I left The-Artery as a design director, where I’d been working the past three years, we created visuals for a really interesting documentary. All the content was created in 3D using Cinema 4D and Octane. We produced about 18 different spots explaining different concepts. My team and I did everything from concept to rendering. It’ll be amazing to see it when it comes out.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
At The-Artery, I was in charge of a really interesting branding project for a Fin-tech company. We created an entire visual language in 3D for their everyday marketing, website, and blog use. All content was designed and rendered using Cinema 4D and it was so great combining a branding exercise with motion graphics to bring all the visuals to life.

YOU HAVE RECENTLY PRESENTED YOUR WORKFLOW AT TRADES SHOWS AND ROAD TOURS. TELL US ABOUT SHARING YOUR WORK PUBLICLY.
I’ve was invited by Maxon, the developers of Cinema 4D, to give a live-demo presentation at SIGGRAPH 2019. It was an exceptional experience, and I received really lovely responses from the community and artists looking to combine more graphic design into their motion graphics and 3D pipeline. I’ve shared some cool methods I’ve developed in Cinema 4D for creating fine-art looks for renders.

PRESENTLY, YOU ARE WORKING AS ARTIST IN RESIDENCE AT FACEBOOK. HOW DID THIS COME ABOUT AND WHAT KIND OF WORK ARE YOU DOING?
Facebook somehow found me. I assume it was through my Instagram account, where I share my wild, creative experiments. The program is a six-week residency at their New York office, where I get to flex my analog muscles and create prints at their Analog lab. In the lab, they have all the art supplies you can ask for along with an amazing Risograph printer. I’ve been creating posters and zines from my 3D rendered illustrations.

WHAT SOFTWARE TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY-TO-DAY?
Maxon Cinema 4D is my primary tool. I design almost everything I create in it, including work that seems to be flat and graphic.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION NOW?
I find talking to people and brainstorming has always been the thing that sparks the most creativity in me. Solving problems is another way I tackle every design assignment. I always need to figure out what needs to be fixed, be better or change completely, and that’s what I find most inspires me to create.

THIS IS A HIGH-STRESS JOB WITH DEADLINES AND CLIENT EXPECTATIONS. WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Planning is critical for me to feel confident about projects and helps me avoid stress in general. Giving my work 100% and not promising any false expectations to my clients also helps limit stress. It’s key to be honest from the get-go if I think something wouldn’t work in the timeline, or if late changes would hurt the final product. If I do get to a point that I’m really stressed, I find that running, going out dancing or dancing to my favorite music at home, and generally listening to music are all helpful.


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