Arraiy 4.11.19

Behind the Title: Carousel’s Head of VFX/CD Jeff Spangler

This creative has been an artist for as long as he could remember. “I’ve always loved the process of creation and can’t imagine any career where I’m not making something,” he says.

Name: Jeff Spangler

Company: NYC’s Carousel

Can you describe your company?
Carousel is a “creative collective” that was a response to this rapidly changing industry we all know and love. Our offerings range from agency creative services to editorial, design, animation (including both motion design and CGI), retouching, color correction, compositing, music licensing, content creation, and pretty much everything that falls between.

We have created a flexible workflow that covers everything from concept to execution (and delivery), while also allowing for clients whose needs are less all-encompassing to step on or off at any point in the process. That’s just one of the reasons we called ourselves Carousel — our clients have the freedom to climb on board for as much of the ride as they desire. And with the different disciplines all living under the same roof, we find that a lot of the inefficiencies and miscommunications that can get in the way of achieving the best possible result are eliminated.

What’s your job title?
Head of VFX/Creative Director

What does that entail?
That’s a really good question. There is the industry standard definition of that title as it applies to most companies. But it’s quite different if you are talking about a collective that combines creative with post production, animation and design. So for me, the dual role of CD and head of VFX works in a couple of ways. Where we have the opportunity to work with agencies, I am able to bring my experience and talents as a VFX lead to bear, communicating with the agency creatives and ensuring that the different Carousel artist involved are all able to collaborate and communicate effectively to get the work done.

Alternatively, when we work direct-to-client, I get involved much earlier in the process, collaborating with the Carousel creative directors to conceptualize and pitch new ideas, design brand elements, visualize concept art, storyboard and write copy or even work with stargeists to help hone the direction and target of a campaign.

That’s the true strength of Carousel — getting creatives from different backgrounds involved early on in the process where their experience and talent can make a much bigger impact in the long run. Most importantly, my role is not about dictating direction as much as it is about guiding and allowing for people’s talents to shine. You have to give artists the room to flourish if you really want to serve your clients and are serious about getting them something more than what they expected.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think that there is this misconception that it’s one creative sitting in a room that comes up with the “Big Idea” and he or she just dictates that idea to everyone. My experience is that any good idea started out as a lot of different ideas that were merged, pruned, refined and polished until they began to resemble something truly great.

Then after 24 hours, you look at that idea again and tear it apart because all of the flaws have started to show and you realize it still needs to be pummeled into shape. That process is generally a collaboration within a group of talented people who all look at the world very differently.

What tools do you use?
Anything that I can get my hands on (and my brain wrapped around). My foundation is as a traditional artist and animator and I find that those core skills are really the strength behind what I do everyday. I started out after college as a broadcast designer and later transitioned into a Flame artist where I spent many years working as a beauty retouch artist and motion designer.

These days, I primarily use Adobe Creative Suite as my role has become more creative in nature. I use Photoshop for digital painting and concept art , Illustrator for design and InDesign for layouts and decks. I also have a lot of experience in After Effects and Autodesk Maya and will use those tools for any animation or CGI that requires me to be hands-on, even if just to communicate the initial concept or design.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Coming up with new ideas at the very start. At that point, the gloves are off and everything is possible.

What’s your least favorite?
Navigating politics within the industry that can sometimes get in the way of people doing their best work.

What is your favorite time of the day?
I’m definitely more of a night person. But if I had to choose a favorite time of day, it would be early morning — before everything has really started and there’s still a ton of anticipation and potential.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Working as a full-time concept artist. Or a logo designer. While I frequently have the opportunity to do both of those things in my role at Carousel, they are, for me, the most rewarding expression of being creative.

A&E’s Scraps

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I’ve been an artist for as long as I can remember and never really had any desire (or ability) to set it aside. I’ve always loved the process of creation and can’t imagine any career where I’m not “making” something.

Can you name some recents projects you have worked on?
We are wrapping up Season 2 of an A&E food show titled Scraps that has allowed us to flex our animation muscles. We’ve also been doing some in-store work with Victoria’s Secret for some of their flagship stores that has been amazing in terms of collaboration and results.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
It’s always hard to pick a favorite and my answer would probably change if you asked me more than once. But I recently had the opportunity to work with an up-and-coming eSports company to develop their logo. Collaborating with their CD, we landed on a design and aesthetic that makes me smile every time I see it out there. The client has taken that initial work and continues to surprise me with the way they use it across print, social media, swag, etc. Seeing their ability to be creative and flexible with what I designed is just validation that I did a good job. That makes me proud.

Name pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPad Pro. It’s my portable sketch tablet and presentation device that also makes for a damn good movie player during long commutes.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Muay Thai. Don’t get me wrong. I’m no serious martial artist and have never had the time to dedicate myself properly. But working out by punching and kicking a heavy bag can be very cathartic.


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