Author Archives: Amy

AJA intros Ki Pro Go, Corvid 44 12G and more at NAB

AJA was at NAB this year showing the new Ki Pro Go H.264 multichannel HD/SD recorder/player, as well as 14 openGear converter cards featuring DashBoard software support, two new IP video transmitters that bridge HDMI and 3G-SDI signals to SMPTE ST 2110 and the Corvid 44 12G I/O card for AJA Developers. AJA also introduced updates featuring improvements for its FS-HDR HDR/WCG converter, desktop and mobile I/O products, AJA Control Room software, HDR Image Analyzer and the Helo recorder/streamer.

Ki Pro Go is a genlock-free, multichannel H.264 HD and SD recorder/player with a flexible architecture. This portable device allows users to record up to four channels of pristine HD and SD content from SDI and HDMI sources to off-the-shelf USB media via 4x USB 3.0 ports, with a fifth port for redundant recording. The Ki Pro Go will be available in June for $3,995.

A FS-HDR v3.0 firmware update features enhanced coloring tools and support for multichannel Dynamic LUTs, plus other improvements. The release includes a new integrated Colorfront Engine Film Mode offering a rich grading and look creation toolset with optional ACES colorspace, ASC color decision list controls and built-in look selection. It’s available in June as a free update.

Developed with Colorfront, the HDR Image Analyzer v1.1 firmware update features several new enhancements, including a new web UI that simplifies remote configuration and control from multiple machines, with updates over Ethernet offering the ability to download logs and screenshots. New remote desktop support provides facility-friendly control from desktops, laptops and tablets on any operating system. The update also adds new HDR monitoring and analysis tools. It’s available soon as a free update.

The Desktop Software v15.2 update offers new features and performance enhancements for AJA Kona and Io products. It offers psupport for Apple ProRes capture and playback across Windows, Linux and macOS in AJA Control Room, at up to 8K resolutions, while also adding new IP SMPTE ST 2110 workflows using AJA Io IP and updates for Kona IP, including ST 2110-40 ANC support. The free Desktop Software update will be available in May.

The Helo v4.0 firmware update introduces new features that allow users to customize their streaming service and improve monitoring and control. AV Mute makes it easy to personalize the viewing experience with custom service branding when muting audio and video streams, while Event Logging enables encoder activity monitoring for simpler troubleshooting. It’s available in May as a free update.

The new openGear converter cards combine the capabilities of AJA’s mini converters with openGear’s high-density architecture and support for DashBoard, enabling industry-standard configuration, monitoring and control in broadcast and live event environments over a PC or local network on Windows, macOS or Linux. New models include re-clocking SDI distribution amplifiers, single-mode 3G-SDI fiber converters plus Multi-Mode variants and an SDI audio embedder/ disembedder. The openGear cards are available now, with pricing dependent upon the model.

AJA’s new IPT-10G2-HDMI and IPT-10G2-SDI mini converters are single-channel IP video transmitters for bridging traditional HDMI and 3G-SDI signals to SMPTE ST 2110 for IP-based workflows. Both models feature dual 10 GigE SFP+ ports for facilities using SMPTE ST 2022-7 for redundancy in critical distribution and monitoring. They will be available soon for $1,295.

The Corvid 44 12G is an 8-lane PCIe 3.0 video and audio I/O card featuring support for 12G-SDI I/O in a low-profile design for workstations and servers and 8K/UltraHD2/4K/UltraHD high frame rate, deep color and HDR workflows. Corvid 44 12G also facilitates multichannel 12G-SDI I/O, enabling either 8K or multiple 4K streams of input or output. It is compatible across macOS, Windows and Linux and used in high-performance applications for imaging, post, broadcast and virtual production. Corvid 44 12G cards will be available soon.

Sony’s NAB updates — a cinematographer’s perspective

By Daniel Rodriguez

With its NAB offerings, Sony once again showed that they have a firm presence in nearly every stage of production, be it motion picture, broadcast media or short form. The company continues to keep up to date with the current demands while simultaneously preparing for the inevitable wave of change that seems to come faster and faster each year. While the introduction of new hardware was kept to a short list this year, many improvements to existing hardware and software were released to ensure Sony products — both new and existing — still have a firm presence in the future.

The ability to easily access, manipulate, share and stream media has always been a priority for Sony. This year at NAB, Sony continued to demonstrate its IP Live, SR Live, XDCAM Air and Media Backbone Hive platforms, which give users the opportunity to manage media all over the globe. IP Live allows users to access remote production, which contains core processing hardware while accessing it anywhere. This extends to 4K and HDR/SDR streaming as well, which is where SR Live comes into play. SR Live allows for a native 4K HDR signal to be processed into full HD and regular SDR signals, and a core improvement is the ability to adjust the curves during a live broadcast for any issues that may arise in converting HDR signals to SDR.

For other media, including XDCAM-based cameras, XDCAM Air allows for the wireless transfer and streaming of most media through QoS services, and turns almost any easily accessible camera with wireless capabilities into a streaming tool.

Media Backbone Hive allows users to access their media anywhere they want. Rather than just being an elaborate cloud service, Media Backbone Hive allows internal Adobe Cloud-based editing, accepts nearly every file type, allows a user to embed metadata and makes searching simple with keywords and phrases that are spoken in the media itself.

For the broadcast market, Sony introduced the Sony HDC-5500 4K HDR three-CMOS sensor camcorder which they are calling their “flagship” camera in this market. Offering 4K HDR and high frame rates, the camera also offers a global shutter — which is essential for dealing with strobing from lights — and can now capture fast action without the infamous rolling shutter blur. The camera allows for 4K output over 12G SDI, allowing for 4K monitoring and HDR, and as these outputs continue to be the norm, the introduction of the HDC-5500 will surely be a hit with users, especially with the addition of global shutter.

Sony is very much a company that likes to focus on the longevity of their previous releases… cameras especially. Sony’s FS7 is a camera that has excelled in its field since its introduction in 2014, and to this day is an extremely popular choice for short form, narrative and broadcast media. Like other Sony camera bodies, the FS7 allows for modular builds and add-ons, and this is where the new CBK-FS7BK ENG Build-Up Kit comes in. Sporting a shoulder mount and ENG viewfinder, the kit includes an extension in the back that allows for two wireless audio inputs, RAW output, streaming and file transfer via Wireless LAN or 4G/LTE connection, as well as QoS streaming (only through XDCAM Air) and timecode input. This CBK-FS7BK ENG Build-Up Kit turns the FS7 into an even more well-rounded workhorse.

The Sony Venice is Sony’s flagship Cinema camera, replacing the Sony F65, which is still brilliant and a popular camera. Having popped up as recently as last year’s Annihilation, the Venice takes a leap further in entering the full-frame, VistaVision market. Boasting top-of-the-line specs and a smaller, more modular build than the F65, the camera isn’t exactly a new release — it came out in November 2017 — but Sony has secured longevity in their flagship camera in a time when other camera manufacturers are just releasing their own VistaVision-sensored cameras and smaller alternatives.

Sony recently released a firmware update to the Venice that allows X-OCN XT — their highest form of compressed 16-bit RAW — two new imager modes, allowing the camera to sample 5.7K 16:9 in full frame and 6K 2.39:1 in full width, as well as 4K signal over 6G/12G SDI output and wireless remote control with the CBK-WA02. Since the Venice is smaller and able to be mounted on harder-to-reach mounts, wireless control is quickly becoming a feature that many camera assistants need. Newer anamorphic desqueeze modes for 1.25x, 1.3x, 1.5x and 1.8x have also been added, which is huge, since many older and newer lenses are constantly being created and revisited, such as the Technovision 1.5x — made famous by Vittorio Storaro on Apocalypse Now (1979) — and the Cooke Full Frame Anamorphics 1.8X. With VistaVision full frame now being an easily accessible way of filming, new forms of lensing are now becoming common, so systems like anamorphic are no longer limited to 1.3X and 2X. It’s reassuring to see Sony look out for storytellers who may want to employ less common anamorphic desqueeze sizes.

As larger resolutions and higher frame rates become the norm, Sony has introduced the new Sony SxS Pro X cards. A follow up to the hugely successful Sony SxS Pro+ cards, these new cards boost an incredible transfer speed of 10Gbps (1250Mbps) in 120GB and 240GB cards. This is a huge step up from the previous SxS Pro+ cards that offered a read speed of 3.5Gbps and a write speed of 2.8Gbps. Probably the most exciting part of these new cards being introduced is the corresponding SBAC-T40 card reader which guarantees a full 240GB card to be offloaded in 3.5 minutes.

Sony’s newest addition to the Venice camera is the Rialto extension system. Using the Venice’s modular build, the Rialto is a hardware extension that allows you to remove the main body’s sensor and install it into a smaller body unit which is then tethered either nine or 18 feet by cable back to the main body. Very reminiscent of the design of ARRI’s Alexa M unit, the Rialto goes further by being an extension of its main system rather than a singular system, which may bring its own issues. The Rialto allows users to reach spots where it may otherwise prove difficult using the actual Venice body. Its lightweight design allows users to mount it nearly anywhere. Where other camera bodies that are designed to be smaller end up heavy when outfitted with accessories such as batteries and wireless transmitters, the Rialto can easily be rigged to aerials, handhelds, and Steadicams. Though some may question why you wouldn’t just get a smaller body from another camera company, the big thing to consider is that the Rialto isn’t a solution to the size of the Venice body — which is already very small, especially compared to the previous F65 — but simply another tool to get the most out of the Venice system, especially considering you’re not sacrificing anything as far as features or frame rates. The Rialto is currently being used on James Cameron’s Avatar sequels, as its smaller body allows him to employ two simultaneously for true 3D recording whilst giving all the options of the Venice system.

With innovations in broadcast and motion picture production, there is a constant drive to push boundaries and make capture/distribution instant. Creating a huge network for distribution, streaming, capture, and storage has secured Sony not only as the powerhouse that it already is, but also ensures its presence in the ever-changing future.


Daniel Rodriguez is a New York based director and cinematographer. Having spent years working for such companies as Light Iron, Panavision and ARRI Rental, he currently works as a freelance cinematographer, filming narrative and commercial work throughout the five boroughs. 

 

NAB 2019: Maxon acquires Redshift Rendering Technologies

Maxon, makers of Cinema 4D, has purchased Redshift Rendering Technologies, developers of the Redshift rendering engine. Redshift is a flexible GPU-accelerated renderer targeting high-end production. Redshift offers an extensive suite of features that makes rendering complicated 3D projects faster. Redshift is available as a plugin for Maxon’s Cinema 4D and other industry-standard 3D applications.

“Rendering can be the most time-consuming and demanding aspect of 3D content creation,” said David McGavran, CEO of Maxon. “Redshift’s speed and efficiency combined with Cinema 4D’s responsive workflow make it a perfect match for our portfolio.”

“We’ve always admired Maxon and the Cinema 4D community, and are thrilled to be a part of it,” said Nicolas Burtnyk, co-founder/CEO, Redshift. “We are looking forward to working closely with Maxon, collaborating on seamless integration of Redshift into Cinema 4D and continuing to push the boundaries of what’s possible with production-ready GPU rendering.”

Redshift is used by post companies, including Technicolor, Digital Domain, Encore Hollywood and Blizzard. Redshift has been used for VFX and motion graphics on projects such as Black Panther, Aquaman, Captain Marvel, Rampage, American Gods, Gotham, The Expanse and more.

Facilis Launches Hub shared storage line

Facilis Technology rolled out its new Hub Shared Storage line for media production workflows during the NAB show. Facilis Hub includes new hardware and an integrated disk-caching system for cloud and LTO backup and archive designed to provide block-level virtualization and multi-connectivity performance.

“Hub Shared Storage is an all-new product based on our Hub Server that launched in 2017. It’s the answer to our customers’ requests for a more compact server chassis, lower-cost hybrid (SSD and HDD) options and integrated cloud and LTO archive features,” says Jim McKenna, VP of sales and marketing at Facilis. “We deliver all of this with new, more powerful hardware, new drive capacity options and a new look to both the system and software interface.”

The Facilis shared storage network allows both block-mode Fibre Channel and Ethernet connectivity simultaneously with the ability to connect through either method with the same permissions, user accounts and desktop appearance. This expands user access, connection resiliency and network permissions. The system can be configured as a direct-attached drive or segmented into various-sized volumes that carry individual permissions for read and write access.

Facilis Object Cloud
Object Cloud is an integrated disk-caching system for cloud and LTO backup and archive that includes up to 100TB of cloud storage for an annual fee. The Facilis Virtual Volume can display cloud, tape and spinning disk data in the same directory structure on the client desktop.

“A big problem for our customers is managing multiple interfaces for the various locations of their data. With Object Cloud, files in multiple locations reside in the same directory structure and are tracked by our FastTracker asset tracking in the same database as any active media asset,” says McKenna. “Object Cloud uses Object Storage technology to virtualize a Facilis volume with cloud and LTO locations. This gives access to files that exist entirely on disk, in the Cloud or on LTO, or even partially on disk and partially in the cloud.”

Every Facilis Hub Shared Storage server comes with unlimited seats in the Facilis FastTracker asset tracking application. The Object Cloud Software and Storage package is available for most Facilis servers running version 7.2 or higher.

Behind the Title: Weta Digital’s Paolo Emilio Selva

NAME: Paolo Emilio Selva 

COMPANY: Weta Digital

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
In the middle of Middle-earth, Weta Digital is a VFX company with more than a thousand artists and developers. While focusing on delivering amazing movies, Weta Digital also focuses on research and development for VFX. 

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Head of Software Engineering 

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
In the software engineering department, we write tools for artists and make sure their creative intent is maintained across the pipeline. We also make sure production isn’t disrupted across the facility.  

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Writing code, maybe? Yeah, I’m still writing code when I can, mostly fixing bugs and off-loading other developers from nasty issues, keeping them focused on the research and development and providing support.  

HOW DID YOU START YOUR CAREER?
I started my career as researcher in Human-Computer interfaces at a university in Rome. I liked to solve problems, and the VFX industry has lots of problems to be solved 😉 

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN VFX?
Ten years  

DID A PARTICULAR FILM INSPIRE YOU ALONG THIS PATH IN ENTERTAINMENT?
I grew up with Pixar movies and lots of animated short movies. I also played video games. I was always fascinated by what was behind those things. I wanted to replicate them, and which I did by re-writing games or effects seen in movies.

 I started by using existing tools. Then, during high school — thanks to my older cousin — I found Basic and started writing my own tools. I found that I was able to control external devices with Basic and my Commodore64. I also started enjoying electronics and micro-controllers. All of this reached the acme with my thesis at university when I created a data-glove from scratch — from the hardware to the software — and started looking at example applications for it. This was in between 1999 and 2001, when I also started working at the Human-Computer Interaction Lab.  

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
It’s challenging, in a good way, every day. And as problem solver, I like this part of my job. 

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sometimes too many meetings, but it’s important to communicate with every department and understand their needs. 

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably teaching and researching at university in Human-Computer Interaction. 

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Just to name some of them: War for the Planet of the Apes, Valerian, The BFG and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.          

WHAT IS THE PROJECT/S THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I was lucky enough to be at Weta Digital when we worked on Avatar and The Jungle Book, which both won Oscars for Best Visual Effects, and also The Adventures of Tintin, where I was directly involved in the hair-rendering process and all the TopoClouds tools for the Pantaray pipeline.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY TO DAY?
Nowadays, it’s my email client, my phone and very little text-editor and C++ compilers.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Mostly enjoy time with my wife, my cats, video games and the gym when I can.

Adobe Max 2018: Creative Cloud updates and more

By Mike McCarthy

I attended my first Adobe Max 2018 last week in Los Angeles. This huge conference takes over the LA convention center and overflows into the surrounding venues. It began on Monday morning with a two-and-a-half-hour keynote outlining the developments and features being released in the newest updates to Adobe’s Creative Cloud. This was followed by all sorts of smaller sessions and training labs for attendees to dig deeper into the new capabilities of the various tools and applications.

The South Hall was filled with booths from various hardware and software partners, with more available than any one person could possibly take in. Tuesday started off with some early morning hands-on labs, followed by a second keynote presentation about creative and career development. I got a front row seat to hear five different people, who are successful in their creative fields — including director Ron Howard — discuss their approach to work and life. The rest of the day was so packed with various briefings, meetings and interviews that I didn’t get to actually attend any of the classroom sessions.

By Wednesday, the event was beginning to wind down, but there was still a plethora of sessions and other options for attendees to split their time. I presented the workflow for my most recent project Grounds of Freedom at Nvidia’s booth in the community pavilion, and spent the rest of the time connecting with other hardware and software partners who had a presence there.

Adobe released updates for most of its creative applications concurrent with the event. Many of the most relevant updates to the video tools were previously announced at IBC in Amsterdam last month, so I won’t repeat those, but there are still a few new video ones, as well as many that are broader in scope in regards to media as a whole.

Adobe Premiere Rush
The biggest video-centric announcement is Adobe Premiere Rush, which offers simplified video editing workflows for mobile devices and PCs.  Currently releasing on iOS and Windows, with Android to follow in the future, it is a cloud-enabled application, with the option to offload much of the processing from the user device. Rush projects can be moved into Premiere Pro for finishing once you are back on the desktop.  It will also integrate with Team Projects for greater collaboration in larger organizations. It is free to start using, but most functionality will be limited to subscription users.

Let’s keep in mind that I am a finishing editor for feature films, so my first question (as a Razr-M user) was, “Who wants to edit video on their phone?” But what if the user shot the video on their phone? I don’t do that, but many people do, so I know this will be a valuable tool. This has me thinking about my own mentality toward video. I think if I was a sculptor I would be sculpting stone, while many people are sculpting with clay or silly putty. Because of that I would have trouble sculpting in clay and see little value in tools that are only able to sculpt clay. But there is probably benefit to being well versed in both.

I would have no trouble showing my son’s first-year video compilation to a prospective employer because it is just that good — I don’t make anything less than that. But there was no second-year video, even though I have the footage because that level of work takes way too much time. So I need to break free from that mentality, and get better at producing content that is “sufficient to tell a story” without being “technically and artistically flawless.” Learning to use Adobe Rush might be a good way for me to take a step in that direction. As a result, we may eventually see more videos in my articles as well. The current ones took me way too long to produce, but Adobe Rush should allow me to create content in a much shorter timeframe, if I am willing to compromise a bit on the precision and control offered by Premiere Pro and After Effects.

Rush allows up to four layers of video, with various effects and 32-bit Lumetri color controls, as well as AI-based audio filtering for noise reduction and de-reverb and lots of preset motion graphics templates for titling and such.  It should allow simple videos to be edited relatively easily, with good looking results, then shared directly to YouTube, Facebook and other platforms. While it doesn’t fit into my current workflow, I may need to create an entirely new “flow” for my personal videos. This seems like an interesting place to start, once they release an Android version and I get a new phone.

Photoshop Updates
There is a new version of Photoshop released nearly every year, and most of the time I can’t tell the difference between the new and the old. This year’s differences will probably be a lot more apparent to most users after a few minutes of use. The Undo command now works like other apps instead of being limited to toggling the last action. Transform operates very differently, in that they made proportional transform the default behavior instead of requiring users to hold Shift every time they scale. It allows the anchor point to be hidden to prevent people from moving the anchor instead of the image and the “commit changes” step at the end has been removed. All positive improvements, in my opinion, that might take a bit of getting used to for seasoned pros. There is also a new Framing Tool, which allows you to scale or crop any layer to a defined resolution. Maybe I am the only one, but I frequently find myself creating new documents in PS just so I can drag the new layer, that is preset to the resolution I need, back into my current document. For example, I need a 200x300px box in the middle of my HD frame — how else do you do that currently? This Framing tool should fill that hole in the features for more precise control over layer and object sizes and positions (As well as provide its easily adjustable non-destructive masking.).

They also showed off a very impressive AI-based auto selection of the subject or background.  It creates a standard selection that can be manually modified anywhere that the initial attempt didn’t give you what you were looking for.  Being someone who gives software demos, I don’t trust prepared demonstrations, so I wanted to try it for myself with a real-world asset. I opened up one of my source photos for my animation project and clicked the “Select Subject” button with no further input and got this result.  It needs some cleanup at the bottom, and refinement in the newly revamped “Select & Mask” tool, but this is a huge improvement over what I had to do on hundreds of layers earlier this year.  They also demonstrated a similar feature they are working on for video footage in Tuesday night’s Sneak previews.  Named “Project Fast Mask,” it automatically propagates masks of moving objects through video frames and, while not released yet, it looks promising.  Combined with the content-aware background fill for video that Jason Levine demonstrated in AE during the opening keynote, basic VFX work is going to get a lot easier.

There are also some smaller changes to the UI, allowing math expressions in the numerical value fields and making it easier to differentiate similarly named layers by showing the beginning and end of the name if it gets abbreviated.  They also added a function to distribute layers spatially based on the space between them, which accounts for their varying sizes, compared to the current solution which just evenly distributes based on their reference anchor point.

In other news, Photoshop is coming to iPad, and while that doesn’t affect me personally, I can see how this could be a big deal for some people. They have offered various trimmed down Photoshop editing applications for iOS in the past, but this new release is supposed to be based on the same underlying code as the desktop version and will eventually replicate all functionality, once they finish adapting the UI for touchscreens.

New Apps
Adobe also showed off Project Gemini, which is a sketch and painting tool for iPad that sits somewhere between Photoshop and Illustrator. (Hence the name, I assume) This doesn’t have much direct application to video workflows besides being able to record time-lapses of a sketch, which should make it easier to create those “white board illustration” videos that are becoming more popular.

Project Aero is a tool for creating AR experiences, and I can envision Premiere and After Effects being critical pieces in the puzzle for creating the visual assets that Aero will be placing into the augmented reality space.  This one is the hardest for me to fully conceptualize. I know Adobe is creating a lot of supporting infrastructure behind the scenes to enable the delivery of AR content in the future, but I haven’t yet been able to wrap my mind around a vision of what that future will be like.  VR I get, but AR is more complicated because of its interface with the real world and due to the variety of forms in which it can be experienced by users.  Similar to how web design is complicated by the need to support people on various browsers and cell phones, AR needs to support a variety of use cases and delivery platforms.  But Adobe is working on the tools to make that a reality, and Project Aero is the first public step in that larger process.

Community Pavilion
Adobe’s partner companies in the Community Pavilion were showing off a number of new products.  Dell has a new 49″ IPS monitor, the U4919DW, which is basically the resolution and desktop space of two 27-inch QHD displays without the seam (5120×1440 to be exact). HP was displaying their recently released ZBook Studio x360 convertible laptop workstation, (which I will be posting a review of soon), as well as their Zbook X2 tablet and the rest of their Z workstations.  NVidia was exhibiting their new Turing-based cards with 8K Red decoding acceleration, ray tracing in Adobe Dimension and other GPU accelerated tasks.  AMD was demoing 4K Red playback on a MacBookPro with an eGPU solution, and CPU based ray-tracing on their Ryzen systems.  The other booths spanned the gamut from GoPro cameras and server storage devices to paper stock products for designers.  I even won a Thunderbolt 3 docking station at Intel’s booth. (Although in the next drawing they gave away a brand new Dell Precision 5530 2-in-1 convertible laptop workstation.)   Microsoft also garnered quite a bit of attention when they gave away 30 MS Surface tablets near the end of the show.  There was lots to see and learn everywhere I looked.

The Significance of MAX
Adobe MAX is quite a significant event, especially now that I have been in the industry long enough to start to see the evolution of certain trends — things are not as static as we may expect.  I have attended NAB for the last 12 years, and the focus of that show has shifted significantly away from my primary professional focus. (No Red, Ncidia, or Apple booths, among many other changes)  This was the first year that I had the thought “I should have gone to Sundance,” and a number of other people I know had the same impression. Adobe Max is similar, although I have been a little slower to catch on to that change.  It has been happening for over ten years, but has grown dramatically in size and significance recently.  If I still lived in LA, I probably would have started attending sooner, but it was hardly on my radar until three weeks ago.  Now that I have seen it in person, I probably won’t miss it in the future.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

NAB NY: A DP’s perspective

By Barbie Leung

At this year’s NAB New York show, my third, I was able to wander the aisles in search of tools that fit into my world of cinematography. Here are just a few things that caught my eye…

Blackmagic, which had large booth at the entrance to the hall, was giving demos of its Resolve 15, among other tools. Panasonic also had a strong presence mid-floor, with an emphasis on the EVA-1 cameras. As usual, B&H attracted a lot of attention, as did Arri, which brought a couple of Arri Trinity rigs to demo.

During the HDR Video Essentials session, colorist Juan Salvo of TheColourSpace, talked about the emerging HDR 10+ standard proposed by Samsung and Amazon Video. Also mentioned was the trend of consumer displays getting brighter every year and that impact on content creation and content grading. Salvo pointed out the affordability of LG’s C7 OLEDs (about 700 Nits) for use as client monitors, while Flanders Scientific (which had a booth at the show) remains the expensive standard for grading. It was interesting to note that LG, while being the show’s Official Display Partner, was conspicuously absent from the floor.

Many of the panels and presentations unsurprisingly focused on content monetization — how to monetize faster and cheaper. Amazon Web Service’s stage sessions emphasized various AWS Elemental technologies, including automating the creation of video highlight clips for content like sports videos using facial recognition algorithms to generate closed captioning, and improving the streaming experience onboard airplanes. The latter will ultimately make content delivery a streamlined enough process for airlines that it would enable advertisers to enter this currently untapped space.

Editor Janis Vogel, a board member of the Blue Collar Post Collective, spoke at the #galsngear “Making Waves” panel, and noted the progression toward remote work in her field. She highlighted the fact that DaVinci Resolve, which had already made it possible for color work to be done remotely, is now also making it possible for editors to collaborate remotely. The ability to work remotely gives professionals the choice to work outside of the expensive-to-live-in major markets, which is highly desirable given that producers are trying to make more and more content while keeping budgets low.

Speaking at the same panel, director of photography/camera operator Selene Richholt spoke to the fact that crews are being monetized with content producers either asking production and post pros to provide standard service at substandard rates, or more services without paying more.

On a more exciting note, she cited recent 9×16 projects that she has shot with the camera mounted vertically (as opposed to shooting 16×9 and cropping in) in order to take full advantage of lens properties. She looks forward to the trend of more projects that can mix aspects ratios and push aesthetics.

Well, that’s it for this year. I’m already looking forward to next year.

 


Barbie Leung is a New York-based cinematographer and camera operator working in film, music video and branded content. Her work has played Sundance, the Tribeca Film Festival, Outfest and Newfest. She is also the DCP mastering technician at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Report: Sound for Film & TV conference focuses on collaboration

By Mel Lambert

The 5th annual Sound for Film & TV conference was once again held at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, in cooperation with Motion Picture Sound Editors and Cinema Audio Society and Mix Magazine. The one-day event featured a keynote address from veteran sound designer Scott Gershin, together with a broad cross section of panel discussions on virtually all aspects of contemporary sound and post production. Co-sponsors included Audionamix, Sound Particles, Tonsturm, Avid, Yamaha-Steinberg, iZotope, Meyer Sound, Dolby Labs, RSPE, Formosa Group and Westlake Audio, and attracted some 650 attendees.

With film credits that include Pacific Rim and The Book of Life, keynote speaker Gershin focused on advances in immersive sound and virtual reality experiences. Having recently joined Sound Lab at Keywords Studios, the sound designer and supervisor emphasized that “a single sound can set a scene,” ranging from a subtle footstep to an echo-laden yell of terror. “I like to use audio to create a foreign landscape, and produce immersive experiences,” he says, stressing that “dialog forms the center of attention, with music that shapes a scene emotionally and sound effects that glue the viewer into the scene.” In summary he concluded, “It is our role to develop a credible world with sound.”

The Sound of Streaming Content — The Cloverfield Paradox
Avid-sponsored panels within the Cary Grant Theater included an overview of OTT techniques titled “The Sound of Streaming Content,” which was moderated by Ozzie Sutherland, a production sound technology specialist with Netflix. Focusing on sound design and re-recording of the recent Netflix/Paramount Pictures sci-fi film mystery The Cloverfield Paradox from director Julius Onah, the panel included supervising sound editor/re-recording mixer Will Files, co-supervising sound editor/sound designer Robert Stambler and supervising dialog editor/re-recording mixer Lindsey Alvarez. Files and Stambler have collaborated on several projects with director J. J. Abrams through Abram’s Bad Robot production company, including Star Trek: Into Darkness (2013), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) and 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016), as well as Venom (2018).

The Sound of Streaming Content panel: (L-R) Ozzie Sutherland, Will Files, Robert Stambler and Lindsey Alvarez

“Our biggest challenge,” Files readily acknowledges, “was the small crew we had on the project; initially, it was just Robby [Stambler] and me for six months. Then Star Wars: The Force Awakens came along, and we got busy!” “Yes,” confirmed Stambler, “we spent between 16 and 18 months on post production for The Cloverfield Paradox, which gave us plenty of time to think about sound; it was an enlightening experience, since everything happens off-screen.” While orbiting a planet on the brink of war, the film, starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw, David Oyelowo and Daniel Brühl, follows a team of scientists trying to solve an energy crisis that culminates in a dark alternate reality.

Having screened a pivotal scene from the film in which the spaceship’s crew discovers the effects of interdimensional travel while hearing strange sounds in a corridor, Alvarez explained how the complex dialog elements came into play, “That ‘Woman in The Wall’ scene involved a lot of Mandarin-language lines, 50% of which were re-written to modify the story lines and then added in ADR.” “We also used deep, layered sounds,” Stambler said, “to emphasize the screams,” produced by an astronaut from another dimension that had become fused with the ship’s hull. Continued Stambler, “We wanted to emphasize the mystery as the crew removes a cover panel: What is behind the wall? Is there really a woman behind the wall?” “We also designed happy parts of the ship and angry parts,” Files added. “Dependent on where we were on the ship, we emphasized that dominant flavor.”

Files explained that the theatrical mix for The Cloverfield Paradox in Dolby Atmos immersive surround took place at producer Abrams’ Bad Robot screening theater, with a temporary Avid S6 M40 console. Files also mixed the first Atmos film, Brave, back in 2013. “J. J. [Abrams] was busy at the time,” Files said, “but wanted to be around and involved,” as the soundtrack took shape. “We also had a sound-editorial suite close by,” Stambler noted. “We used several Futz elements from the Mission Control scenes as Atmos Objects,” added Alvarez.

“But then we received a request from Netflix for a near-field Atmos mix,” that could be used for over-the-top streaming, recalled Files. “So we lowered the overall speaker levels, and monitored on smaller speakers to ensure that we could hear the dialog elements clearly. Our Atmos balance also translated seamlessly to 5.1- and 7.1-channel delivery formats.”

“I like mixing in Native Atmos because you can make final decisions with creative talent in the room,” Files concluded. “You then know that everything will work in 5.1 and 7.1. If you upmix to Atmos from 7.1, for example, the creatives have often left by the time you get to the Atmos mix.”

The Sound and Music of Director Damien Chazelle’s First Man
The series of “Composers Lounge” presentations held in the Anthony Quinn Theater, sponsored by SoundWorks Collection and moderated by Glenn Kiser from The Dolby Institute, included “The Sound and Music of First Man” with sound designer/supervising sound editor/SFX re-recording mixer Ai-Ling Lee, supervising sound editor Mildred latrou Morgan, SFX re-recording mixer Frank Montaño, dialog/music re-recording mixer Jon Taylor, composer Justin Hurwitz and picture editor Tom Cross. First Man takes a close look at the life of the astronaut Neil Armstrong, and the space mission that led him to become the first man to walk on the Moon in July 1969. It stars Ryan Gosling, Claire Foy and Jason Clarke.

Having worked with the film’s director, Damien Chazelle, on two previous outings — La La Land (2016) and Whiplash (2014) — Cross advised that he likes to have sound available on his Avid workstation as soon as possible. “I had some rough music for the big action scenes,” he said, “together with effects recordings from Ai-Ling [Lee].” The latter included some of the SpaceX rockets, plus recordings of space suits and other NASA artifacts. “This gave me a sound bed for my first cut,” the picture editor continued. “I sent that temp track to Ai-Ling for her sound design and SFX, and to Milly [latrou Morgan] for dialog editorial.”

A key theme for the film was its documentary style, Taylor recalled, “That guided the shape of the soundtrack and the dialog pre-dubs. They had a cutting room next to the Hitchcock Theater [at Universal Studios, used for pre-dub mixes and finals] so that we could monitor progress.” There were no Temp Mixes on this project.

“We had a lot of close-up scenes to support Damien’s emotional feel, and used sound to build out the film,” Cross noted. “Damien watched a lot of NASA footage shot on 16 mm film, and wanted to make our film [immersive] and personal, using Neil Armstrong as a popular icon. In essence, we were telling the story as if we had taken a 16 mm camera into a capsule and shot the astronauts into space. And with an Atmos soundtrack!”

“We pre-scored the soundtrack against animatics in March 2017,” commented Hurwitz. “Damien [Chazelle] wanted to storyboard to music and use that as a basis for the first cut. I developed some themes on a piano and then full orchestral mock-ups for picture editorial. We then re-scored the film after we had a locked picture.” “We developed a grounded, gritty feel to support the documentary style that was not too polished,” Lee continued. “For the scenes on Earth we went for real-sounding backgrounds, Foley and effects. We also narrowed the mix field to complement the narrow image but, in contrast, opened it up for the set pieces to surround the audience.”

“The dialog had to sound how the film looked,” Morgan stressed. “To create that real-world environment I often used the mix channel for dialog in busy scenes like mission control, instead of the [individual] lavalier mics with their cleaner output. We also miked everybody in Mission Control – maybe 24 tracks in all.” “And we secured as many authentic sound recordings as we could,” Lee added. “In order to emphasize the emotional feel of being inside Neil Armstrong’s head space, we added surreal and surprising sounds like an elephant roar, lion growl or animal stampede to these cockpit sequences. We also used distortion and over-modulation to add ‘grit’ and realism.”

“It was a Native Atmos mix,” advised Montaño. “We used Atmos to reflect what the picture showed us, but not in a gimmicky way.” “During the rocket launch scenes,” Lee offered, “we also used the Atmos full-range surround channels to place many of the full-bodied, bombastic rocket roars and explosions around the audience.” “But we wanted to honor the documentary style,” Taylor added, “by keeping the music within the front LCR loudspeakers, and not coming too far out into the surrounds.”

“A Star Is Born” panel: (L-R) Steve Morrow, Dean Zupancic and Nick Baxter

The Sound of Director Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born
A subsequent panel discussion in the “Composers Lounge” series, again moderated by Kiser, focused on “The Sound of A Star Is Born,” with production sound mixer Steve Morrow, music production mixer Nick Baxter and re-recording mixer Dean Zupancic. The film is a retelling of the classic tale of a musician – Jackson Maine, played by Cooper – who helps a struggling singer find fame, even as age and alcoholism send his own career into a downward spiral. Morrow re-counted that the director’s costar, Lady Gaga, insisted that all vocals be recorded live.

“We arranged to record scenes during concerts at the Stagecoach 2017 Festival,” the production mixer explained. “But because these were new songs that would not be heard in the film until 18 months later, [to prevent unauthorized bootlegs] we had to keep the sound out of the PA system, and feed a pre-recorded band mix to on-stage wedges or in-ear monitors.” “We had just a handful of minutes before Willie Nelson was scheduled to take the stage,” Baxter added, “and so we had to work quickly” in front of an audience of 45,000 fans. “We rolled on the equipment, hooked up the microphones, connected the monitors and went for it!”

To recreate the sound of real-world concerts, Baxter made impulse-response recordings of each venue – in stereo as well as 5.1- and 7.1- channel formats. “To make the soundtrack sound totally live,” Morrow continued, “at Coachella Festival we also captured the IR sound echoing off nearby mountains.” Other scenes were shot during Lady Gaga’s “Joanne” Tour in August 2017 while on a stop in Los Angeles, and others in the Palm Springs Convention Center, where Cooper’s character is seen performing at a pharmaceutical convention.

“For scenes filmed at the Glastonbury Festival in the UK in front of 110,000 people,” Morrow recalled, “we had been allocated just 10 minutes to record parts for two original songs — ‘Maybe It’s Time’ and ‘Black Eyes’ — ahead of Kris Kristofferson’s set. But then we were told that, because the concert was running late, we only had three minutes. So we focused on securing 30 seconds of guitar and vocals for each song.”

During a scene shot in a parking lot outside a food market where Lady Gaga’s character sings acapella, Morrow advised that he had four microphones on the actors: “Two booms, top and bottom, for Bradley Cooper’s voice, and lavalier mikes; we used the boom track when Lady Gaga (as Ally) belted out. I always had my hand on the gain knob! That was a key scene because it established for the audience that Ally can sing.”

Zupancic noted that first-time director Cooper was intimately involved in all aspects of post production, just as he was in production. “Bradley Cooper is a student of film,” he said. “He worked closely with supervising sound editor Alan Robert Murray on the music and SFX collaboration.” The high-energy Atmos soundtrack was realized at Warner Bros Studio Facilities’ post production facility in Burbank; additional re-recording mixers included Michael Minkler, Matthew Iadarola and Jason King, who also handled SFX editing.

An Avid session called “Monitoring and Control Solutions for Post Production with Immersive Audio” featured the company’s senior product specialist, Jeff Komar, explaining how Pro Tools with an S6 Controller and an MTRX interface can manage complex immersive audio projects, while a MIX Panel entitled “Mixing Dialog: The Audio Pipeline,” moderated by Karol Urban from Cinema Audio Society, brought together re-recording mixers Gary Bourgeois and Mathew Waters with production mixer Phil Palmer and sound supervisor Andrew DeCristofaro. “The Business of Immersive,” moderated by Gadget Hopkins, EVP with Westlake Pro, addressed immersive audio technologies, including Dolby Atmos, DTS and Auro 3D; other key topics included outfitting a post facility, new distribution paradigms and ROI while future-proofing a stage.

A companion “Parade of Carts & Bags,” presented by Cinema Audio Society in the Barbra Streisand Scoring Stage, enabled production sound mixers to show off their highly customized methods of managing the tools of their trade, from large soundstage productions to reality TV and documentaries.

Finally, within the Atmos-equipped William Holden Theater, the regular “Sound Reel Showcase,” sponsored by Formosa Group, presented eight-minute reels from films likely to be in consideration for a Best Sound Oscar, MPSE Golden Reel and CAS Awards, including A Quiet Place (Paramount) introduced by Erik Aadahl, Black Panther introduced by Steve Boeddecker, Deadpool 2 introduced by Martyn Zub, Mile 22 introduced by Dror Mohar, Venom introduced by Will Files, Goosebumps 2 introduced by Sean McCormack, Operation Finale introduced by Scott Hecker, and Jane introduced by Josh Johnson.

Main image: The Sound of First Man panel — Ai-Ling Lee (left), Mildred latrou Morgan & Tom Cross.

All photos copyright of Mel Lambert


Mel Lambert has been involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists.

 

GoPro introduces new Hero7 camera lineup

GoPro’s new Hero7 lineup includes the company’s flagship Hero7 Black, which comes with a timelapse video mode, live streaming and improved video stabilization. The new video stabilization, HyperSmooth, allows users to capture professional-looking, gimbal-like stabilized video without  a motorized gimbal. HyperSmooth also works underwater and in high-shock and wind situations where gimbals fail.

With Hero7 Black, GoPro is also introducing a new form of video called TimeWarp. TimeWarp Video applies a high-speed, “magic-carpet-ride” effect, transforming longer experiences into short, flowing videos. Hero7 Black is the first GoPro to live stream, enabling users to automatically share in realtime to Facebook, Twitch, YouTube, Vimeo and other platforms internationally.

Other Hero7 Black features:

  • SuperPhoto – Intelligent scene analyzation for professional-looking photos via automatically applied HDR, Local Tone Mapping and Multi-Frame Noise Reduction
  • Portrait Mode – Native vertical-capture for easy sharing to Instagram Stories, Snapchat and others
  • Enhanced Audio – Re-engineered audio captures increased dynamic range, new microphone membrane reduces unwanted vibrations during mounted situations
  • Intuitive Touch Interface – 2-inch touch display with simplified user interface enables native vertical (portrait) use of camera
  • Face, Smile + Scene Detection – Hero7 Black recognizes faces, expressions and scene-types to enhance automatic QuikStory edits on the GoPro app
  • Short Clips – Restricts video recording to 15- or 30-second clips for faster transfer to phone, editing and sharing.
  • High Image Quality – 4K/60 video and 12MP photos
  • Ultra Slo-Mo – 8x slow motion in 1080p240
  • Waterproof – Waterproof without a housing to 33ft (10m)
  • Voice Control – Verbal commands are hands-free in 14 languages
  • Auto Transfer to Phone – Photos and videos move automatically from camera to phone when connected to the GoPro app for on-the-go sharing
  • GPS Performance Stickers – Users can track speed, distance and elevation, then highlight them by adding stickers to videos in the GoPro app

The Hero7 Black is available now on pre-order for $399.

Panavision, Sim, Saban Capital agree to merge

Saban Capital Acquisition Corp., a publicly traded special purpose acquisition company, Panavision and Sim Video International have agreed to combine their businesses to create a premier global provider of end-to-end production and post production services to the entertainment industry. Under the terms of the business combination agreement, Panavision and Sim will become wholly owned subsidiaries of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. Upon completion, Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. will change its name to Panavision Holdings Inc. and is expected to continue to trade on the Nasdaq stock exchange. Kim Snyder, president and chief executive officer of Panavision, will serve as chairman and chief executive officer. Bill Roberts, chief financial officer of Panavision, will serve in that role for the combined company.

Panavision designs, manufactures and provides high-precision optics and camera technology for the entertainment industry and is a leading global provider of production equipment and services. Sim is a leading provider of production and post production solutions with facilities in Los Angeles, Vancouver, Atlanta, New York and Toronto.

“This acquisition will leverage the best of Panavision’s and Sim’s resources by providing comprehensive products and services to best address the ever-adapting needs of content creators globally,” says Snyder.

“We’re combining the talent and integrated services of Sim with two of the biggest names in the business, Panavision and Saban,” adds James Haggarty, president and CEO of Sim. “The resulting scale of the new combined enterprise will better serve our clients and help shape the content-creation landscape.”

The respective boards of directors of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp., Panavision and Sim have unanimously approved the merger with completion subject to Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. stockholder approval, certain regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions. The parties expect that the process will be completed in the first quarter of 2019.