Author Archives: Randi Altman

Method Studios adds Bill Tlusty joins as global head of production

Method Studios has brought on veteran production executive and features VFX Producer Bill Tlusty on board in the new role of global head of production. Reporting to EVP of global features VFX, Erika Burton, Tlusty will oversee Method’s global feature film and episodics production operation, leading teams worldwide.

Tlusty’s career as both a VFX producer and executive spans two decades. Most recently, as an executive with Universal Pictures, he managed more than 30 features, including First Man and The Huntsman: Winter’s War. His new role marks a return to Method Studios, as he served as head of studio in Vancouver prior to his gig at Universal. Tlusty also spent eight years as a VFX producer and executive producer at Rhythm & Hues.

In this capacity he was lead executive on Snow White and the Huntsman and the VFX Oscar-winning Life of Pi. His other VFX producer credits include Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian, The Mummy: Tomb of the Emperor Dragon and Yogi Bear, and he served as production manager on Hulk and Peter Pan and coordinator on A.I Artificial Intelligence. Early in his career Tlusty worked as a production aAssistant at American Zoetrope, working for its iconic filmmaker founders, Francis Ford Coppola and George Lucas. His VFX career began at Industrial Light & Magic where he worked in several capacities on the Star Wars prequel trilogy, first as a VFX coordinator and later, production  manager on the series. He is a member of the Producers Guild of America.

“Method has pursued intelligent growth, leveraging the strength across all of its studios, gaining presence in key regions and building on that to deliver high quality work on a massive scale,” Tlusty. “Coming from the client side, I understand how important it is to have the flexibility to grow as needed for projects.”

Tlusty is based in Los Angeles and will travel extensively among Method’s global studios.

Cold War’s Oscar-nominated director Pawel Pawlikowski

By Iain Blair

Polish filmmaker Pawel Pawlikowski is a BAFTA-winning writer and director whose film Ida won the 2015 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Pawlikowski, who left Poland at age 14 and currently resides in the UK, is Oscar nominated again — as Best Director for his latest film, Cold War. Also nominated for Best Foreign Language Film, Cold War earned cinematographer Lukasz Zal an Oscar nomination, as well as an ASC Award win.

Pawel Pawlikowski                            Credit: Magda Wunsche and Aga Samsel

Cold War traces the passionate love story between Wiktor and Zula, a couple who meet in the ruins of post-war Poland. With vastly different backgrounds and temperaments, they are fatefully mismatched and yet condemned to each other. Set against the background of the Cold War in 1950s Poland, Berlin, Yugoslavia and Paris, it’s the tale of a couple separated by politics, character flaws and unfortunate twists of fate — an impossible love story in impossible times.

I spoke with Pawlikowski, whose credits include The Woman in the Fifth, which starred Ethan Hawke and Kristin Scott Thomas, about making the film, the Oscars and his workflow.

How surprised are you by the Oscar nominations, including the one for Best Director?
I’m pleasantly surprised as it’s very unusual for a small film like this — and it’s in B&W — to cut through all the noise of the big films, especially as it’s an American competition and there’s so much money and PR involved.

Your Ida cinematographer Lukasz Zal also got an Oscar nomination for his beautiful B&W work. It’s interesting that Roma is also semi-autobiographical and in B&W.
I’m so happy for him, and yes, it is a bit of a coincidence. Someone told me that having two foreign-language film directors both nominated in the same year has only happened once before, and I feel we were both trying to reconnect with the past through something personal and timeless. But they’re very different films and very different in their use of B&W. In Roma you can see everything, it’s all in focus and lit very evenly, while ours is far more contrast-y, shot with a lot of very different lenses — some very wide, some very long.

You won the Oscar for Ida. How important are the Oscars to a film like this?
Very, I think. This was made totally as we wanted. There wasn’t an ounce of compromise, and it’s not formulaic, yet it’s getting all this attention. This, of course, means a wider audience — and that’s so important when there’s so much stuff out there vying for attention. It’s very encouraging.

What sort of film did you set out to make, as the story is so elliptical and leaves a lot unsaid?
That’s true, and I think it’s a great pleasure for audiences to work things out for themselves, and to not spell every single thing out. When you work by suggestion, I think it stays in your imagination much longer, and leaving certain types of gaps in the narrative makes the audience fill them in with their own imagination and own experience of life. As a film lover and audience member myself, I feel that approach lets you enter the space of a film much more, and it stays with you long after you’ve left the cinema. When a film ties up every loose end and crosses every “T” and dots every “I” you tend to forget it quite quickly, and I think not showing everything is the essence of art.

Is it true that the two main characters of Wiktor and Zula are based on your own parents?
Yes, but very loosely. They have the same names and share a lot of the same traits. They had a very tempestuous, complicated relationship — they couldn’t live with each other and couldn’t live without each other. That was the starting point, but then it took on its own life, like all films do.

The film looks very beautiful in B&W, but I heard you originally planned to shoot it in color?
No. Not at all. It’s been like this Chinese whisper, where people got it all wrong. When the DP and I first started discussing it, we immediately knew it’d be a B&W film for this world, this time period, this story, especially as Poland wasn’t very colorful back then. So whatever colors we could have come up with would have been so arbitrary anyway. And we knew it’d be very high contrast and very dramatic. Lukasz did say, “Maybe we shouldn’t do two films in a row in B&W,” but we never seriously considered color. If it had been set in the ‘70s or ‘80s I would have shot it in color, but B&W was just visually perfect for this.

Where did you post?
All in Poland, at various places in Warsaw, and it took over six months. It was very tricky and very hard to get it right because we had a lot of greenscreen work, and it wasn’t straightforward. People would say, “That’s good enough,” but it wasn’t for me, and I kept pushing and pushing to get it all as nearly perfect as we could. That was quite nerve-wracking.

Do you like the post process?
Very much, and I especially love the editing and the grading. I’m basically an editor in my approach to filmmaking, and I usually do all the editing while I shoot, so by the time we get to post it’s practically all edited.

Talk about editing with Jaroslaw Kaminski, who cut Ida for you. What were the big editing challenges?
We sit down after the shoot and go through it all, but there’s not that much to tweak because of the coverage. I like to do one shot from one angle, with a simple, square composition, but I do quite a lot of takes, so it’s more about finding the best one, and he’s very used to the way I work.

This spans some 15 years, and all period films use some VFX. What was involved?
Quite a lot, like the whole transition in Berlin when he crosses the border. We don’t have all the ruins, so we had to use enormous greenscreens and VFX. West Berlin is far brighter and more colorful, which is both symbolic and also realistic. We shot all the Paris interiors in Poland, so everything that happens outside the windows is greenscreen, and that was very hard to get right. I didn’t want it to feel like it was done in post. We scoured Poland for locations, so we could use real elements to build on with the VFX, and the story also takes place in Split, Yugoslavia, so the level of realism had to be very high.

Talk about the importance of sound and music.
It was so important, and it took a long time to do as it’s really a silent movie when there’s no music, and as it’s not an action film, it was really critical that we didn’t overdo it or under-do it. I took a very long time working with my sound mixer — over four months. Before we shot, I went around Poland with my casting director to lots of folk music festivals and selected various faces, voices and tunes for the first part of the film. That took over half a year. Then I chose three tunes performed by Mazowsze, a real ensemble founded after the war and still performing today. A tune could be used in different ways — as a simple folk song at the start of the film, but then also later as a haunting jazz number in the Paris scenes. For me, all this was like the glue holding it all together. Then I chose a lot of other music, like the Russian piece, Gershwin and also a song like “Rock Around The Clock,” which really drives a wedge between Wiktor and Zula. The film ends with Bach, which gives it a whole different feel and perspective.

The grading must have also been very important for the look?
Yes. Michal Herman was the colorist and we spent a long time getting the contrast and grain just right. I love that process.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
It did. It’s more or less everything I felt and imagined about my parents and their story, even though it’s a work of fiction.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

ASC Awards honor cinematography

At this year’s ASC Awards, Łukasz Żal, PSC, took home Feature Cinematography Award for his work on Cold War. Giorgi Shvelidze won the Spotlight Award for Namme. In the TV categories, winners included Adriano Goldman, ASC, ABC, BSC, for The Crown; Jon Joffin, ASC for Beyond; and James Friend, BSC, for Patrick Melrose.

The 33 rd ASC Awards gala took place tonight in the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland, with Ben Mankiewicz from TCM taking his second turn as host.

The complete list of winners and nominees follows:

Theatrical Release Category (presented by John Bailey, ASC)

  • Alfonso Cuarón for “Roma”
  • Matthew Libatique, ASC for “A Star Is Born”
  • Robbie Ryan, BSC, ISC for “The Favourite”
  • Linus Sandgren, ASC, FSF for “First Man”
  • Łukasz Żal, PSC for “Cold War” – WINNER

Spotlight Award Category (presented by George Tillman Jr. and Ellen Kuras, ASC)

  • Joshua James Richards for “The Rider”
  • Giorgi Shvelidze for “Namme” – WINNER
  • Frank van den Eeden, NSC, SBC for “Girl”

Episode of a Series for Non-Commercial Television (presented by Lea Thompson)

  • Gonzalo Amat for “The Man in the High Castle” (Jahr Null)
  • Adriano Goldman, ASC, ABC, BSC for “The Crown” (Beryl) – WINNER
  • David Klein, ASC for “Homeland” (Paean to the People)
  • Colin Watkinson, ASC, BSC for “The Handmaid’s Tale” (The Word)
  • Cathal Watters, ISC for “Peaky Blinders” (The Company)
  • Zoë White, ACS for “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Holly)

Episode of a Series for Commercial Television (presented by Merrin Dungey)

  • Nathaniel Goodman, ASC for “Timeless” (The King of the Delta Blues)
  • Jon Joffin, ASC for “Beyond” (Two Zero One) – WINNER
  • Ben Richardson for “Yellowstone” (Daybreak)
  • David Stockton, ASC for “Gotham” (A Dark Knight: Queen Takes Knight)
  • Thomas Yatsko, ASC for “Damnation” (A Different Species)

Motion Picture, Miniseries, or Pilot Made for Television (presented by Thomas Lennon)

  • James Friend, BSC for “Patrick Melrose” (Bad News) – WINNER
  • Mathias Herndl, AAC for “Genius: Picasso” (Chapter 1)
  • Florian Hoffmeister, BSC for “The Terror” (Go for Broke)
  • M. David Mullen, ASC for “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Pilot)
  • Brendan Steacy, CSC for “Alias Grace” (Part 1)

This is Żal’s second win. He previously earned a Spotlight Award for his co-cinematography duties with Ryszard Lenczewsk on “Ida.” Goldman also won last year for “The Crown.” Shvelidze, Joffin and Friend are first-time winners.

The Spotlight Award – co-presented by George Tillman Jr., who produced the Oscar®-nominated “Mudbound” and directed this year’s “The Hate U Give” – recognizes cinematography in smaller features that may not receive wider theatrical release or awareness.

Honorary awards also handed out at the event included:

  • The ASC Board of Governors Award was presented to Jeff Bridges by actor-stuntman Loyd Catlett for his significant and indelible contributions to cinema. It is the only ASC Award not given to a cinematographer and is reserved for filmmakers who have been champions for directors of photography and the visual art form. 
  • The ASC Lifetime Achievement Award was given to Robert Richardson, ASC and presented by frequent collaborator, writer-director Quentin Tarantino. 
  • The ASC Career Achievement in Television Award was presented to Jeffrey Jur, ASC by director John Dahl. 
  • The ASC Bud Stone Award of Distinction was given to Franz Kraus, managing director, ARRI Group. This award is presented to an ASC Associate Member who has demonstrated extraordinary service to the society and/or has made a significant contribution to the motion-picture industry.

Main Image: Cold War camera operator Ernest Wilczynski_and John Bailey, ASC. Łukasz Żal, PSC, wasn’t at the ceremony.

Sundance Videos: Watch our editor interviews

postPerspective traveled to Sundance for the first time this year, and it was great. In addition to attending some parties, brunches and panels, we had the opportunity to interview a number of editors who were in Park City to help promote their various projects. (Watch here.)

Billy McMillin

We caught up with the editors on the comedy docu-series Documentary Now!, Michah Gardner and Jordan Kim. We spoke to Courtney Ware about cutting the film Light From Light, as well as Billy McMillin, editor on the documentary Mike Wallace is Here. We also chatted with Phyllis Housen, the editor on director Chinonye Chukwu’s Clemency and Kent Kincannon who cut Hannah Pearl Utt’s comedy, Before you Know It. Finally, we sat down with Bryan Mason, who had the dual roles of cinematographer and editor on Animals.

We hope you enjoy watching these interviews as much as we enjoyed shooting them.

Don’t forget, click here to view!

Oh, and a big shout out to Twain Richardson from Jamaica’s Frame of Reference, who edited and color graded the videos. Thanks Twain!

More Than Just Words: Lucky Post helps bring Jeep’s viral piece to life


Jeep’s More Than Words commercial, out of agency The Richards Group, premiered online just prior to this year’s Super Bowl as part of its Big Game Blitz, which saw numerous projects launched leading up to the Super Bowl.

Quickly earning millions of views, the piece features a version of our national anthem by One Republic, as well as images of the band. The two-minute spot is made up of images of small, everyday moments that add up to something big and evoke a feeling of America.

There is a father and his infant son, people gathered in front of a barn, a football thrown through a hanging tire swing. We see bits of cities and suburbs, football, stock images of Marilyn Monroe and soldiers training for battle — and every once in a while, an image of a Jeep is in view.

The spot ends as it began, with images of One Republic in the studio before the screen goes black and text appears reading: More Than Just Words. Then the Jeep logo appears.

The production Company was Zoom USA with partner Mark Toia directing. Lucky Post in Dallas contributed editorial, color, sounds design and finish to the piece.

Editor Sai Selvarajan used Adobe’s Premiere. Neil Anderson provided the color grade in Blackmagic Resolve, while Scottie Richardson performed the sound design and mix using Avid Pro Tools. Online finishing and effects were via Tim Nagle, who worked in Autodesk Flame.

“The concept is genius in its simplicity; a tribute to faith in our country’s patchwork with our anthem’s words reinforced and represented in image,” says Lucky Post’s Selvarajan. “Behind the scenes, everyone provided collective energy and creativity to bring it to life. It was the product of many, just like the message of the film, and I was so excited to see the groundswell of positive reaction.”

 

 

 

Sundance: Audio post for Honey Boy and The Death of Dick Long

By Jennifer Walden

Brent Kiser, an Emmy award-winning supervising sound editor/sound designer/re-recording mixer
at LA’s Unbridled Sound, is no stranger to the Sundance Film Festival. His resume includes such Sundance premieres as Wild Wild Country, Swiss Army Man and An Evening with Beverly Luff Lin.

He’s the only sound supervisor to work on two films that earned Dolby fellowships: Swiss Army Man back in 2016 and this year’s Honey Boy, which premiered in the US Dramatic Competition. Honey Boy is a biopic of actor Shia LaBeouf’s damaging Hollywood upbringing.

Brent Kiser (in hat) and Will Files mixing Honey Boy.

Also showing this year, in the Next category, was The Death of Dick Long. Kiser and his sound team once again collaborated with director Daniel Scheinert. For this dark comedy, the filmmakers used sound to help build tension as a group of friends tries to hide the truth of how their buddy Dick Long died.

We reached out to Kiser to find out more.

Honey Boy was part of the Sundance Institute’s Feature Film Program, which is supported by several foundations including the Ray and Dagmar Dolby Family Fund. You mentioned that this film earned a grant from Dolby. How did that grant impact your approach to the soundtrack?
For Honey Boy, Dolby gave us the funds to finish in Atmos. It allowed us to bring MPSE award-winning re-recording mixer Will Files on to mix the effects while I mixed the dialogue and music. We mixed at Sony Pictures Post Production on the Kim Novak stage. We got time and money to be on a big stage for 11 days — a five-day pre-dub and six-day final mix.

That was huge because the film opens up with these massive-robot action/sci-fi sound sequences and it throws the audience off the idea of this being a character study. That’s the juxtaposition, especially in the first 15 to 20 minutes. It’s blurring the reality between the film world and real life for Shia because the film is about Shia’s upbringing. Shia LaBeouf wrote the film and plays his father. The story focuses on the relationship of young actor Otis Lort (Lucas Hedges) and his alcoholic father James.

The story goes through Shia’s time on Disney Channel’s Even Stevens series and then on Transformers, and looks at how this lifestyle had an effect on him. His father was an ex-junkie, sex-offender, ex-rodeo clown and would just push his son. By age 12, Shia was drinking, smoking weed and smoking cigarettes — all supplied to him by his dad. Shia is isolated and doesn’t have too many friends. He’s not around his mother that much.

This year is the first year that Shia has been sober since age 12. So this film is one big therapeutic movie for him. The director Alma Har’el comes from an alcoholic family, so she’s able to understand where Shia is coming from. Working with Alma is great. She wants to be in every part of the process — pick each sound and go over every bit to make sure it’s exactly what she wants.

Honey Boy director Alma Har’el.

What were director Alma Har’el’s initial ideas for the role of sound in Honey Boy?
They were editing this film for six months or more, and I came on board around mid-edit. I saw three different edits of the film, and they were all very different.

Finally, they settled on a cut that felt really nice. We had spotting sessions before they locked and we were working on creating the environment of the motel where Otis and James were staying. We were also working on creating the sound of Otis being on-set. It had to feel like we were watching a film and when someone screams, “Cut!” it had to feel like we go back into reality. Being able to play with those juxtapositions in a sonic way really helped out. We would give it a cinematic sound and then pulled back into a cinéma vérité-type sound. That was the big sound motif in the movie.

We worked really close with the composer Alex Somers. He developed this little crank sound that helped to signify Otis’ dreams and the turning of events. It makes it feel like Otis is a puppet with all his acting jobs.

There’s also a harness motif. In the very beginning you see adult Otis (Lucas Hedges) standing in front of a plane that has crashed and then you hear things coming up behind him. They are shooting missiles at him and they blow up and he gets yanked back from the explosions. You hear someone say, “Cut!” and he’s just dangling in a body harness about 20 feet up in the air. They reset, pull him down and walk him back. We go through a montage of his career, the drunkenness and how crazy he was, and then him going to therapy.

In the session, he’s told he has PTSD caused by his upbringing and he says, “No, I don’t.” It kicks to the title and then we see young Otis (Noah Jupe) sitting there waiting, and he gets hit by a pie. He then gets yanked back by that same harness, and he dangles for a little while before they bring him down. That is how the harness motif works.

There’s also a chicken motif. Growing up, Otis has a chicken named Henrietta La Fowl, and during the dream sequences the chicken leads Otis to his father. So we had to make a voice for the chicken. We had to give the chicken a dreamy feel. And we used the old-school Yellow Sky wind to give it a Western-feel and add a dreaminess to it.

On the dub stage with director Alma Har’el and her team, plus Will Files (front left) and Andrew Twite (front right).

Andrew Twite was my sound designer. He was also with me on Swiss Army Man. He was able to make some rich and lush backgrounds for that. We did a lot of recording in our neighborhood of Highland Park, which is much like Echo Park where Shia grew up and where the film is based. So it’s Latin-heavy communities with taco trucks and that fun stuff. We gave it that gritty sound to show that, even though Otis is making $8,000 a week, they’re still living on the other side of the tracks.

When Otis is in therapy, it feels like Malibu. It’s nicer, quieter, and not as stressful versus the motel when Otis was younger, which is more pumped up.

My dialogue editor was Elliot Thompson, and he always does a great job for me. The production sound mixer Oscar Grau did a phenomenal job of capturing everything at all moments. There was no MOS (picture without sound). He recorded everything and he gave us a lot of great production effects. The production dialogue was tricky because in many of the scenes young Otis isn’t wearing a shirt and there are no lav mics on him. Oscar used plant mics and booms and captured it all.

What was the most challenging scene for sound design on Honey Boy?
The opening, the intro and the montage right up front were the most challenging. We recut the sound for Alma several different ways. She was great and always had moments of inspiration. We’d try different approaches and the sound would always get better, but we were on a time crunch and it was difficult to get all of those elements in place in the way she was looking for.

Honey Boy on the mix stage at Sony’s Kim Novak Theater.

In the opening, you hear the sound of this mega-massive robot (an homage to a certain film franchise that Shia has been part of in the past, wink, wink). You hear those sounds coming up over the production cards on a black screen. Then it cuts to adult Otis standing there as we hear this giant laser gun charging up. Otis goes, “No, no, no, no, no…” in that quintessential Shia LaBeouf way.

Then, there’s a montage over Missy Elliott’s “My Struggles,” and the footage goes through his career. It’s a music video montage with sound effects, and you see Otis on set and off set. He’s getting sick, and then he’s stuck in a harness, getting arrested in the movie and then getting arrested in real life. The whole thing shows how his life is a blur of film and reality.

What was the biggest challenge in regards to the mix?
The most challenging aspect of the mix, on Will [Files]’s side of the board, was getting those monsters in the pocket. Will had just come off of Venom and Halloween so he can mix these big, huge, polished sounds. He can make these big sound effects scenes sound awesome. But for this film, we had to find that balance between making it sound polished and “Hollywood” while also keeping it in the realm of indie film.

There was a lot of back and forth to dial-in the effects, to make it sound polished but still with an indie storytelling feel. Reel one took us two days on stage to get through. We even spent some time on it on the last mix day as well. That was the biggest challenge to mix.

The rest of the film is more straightforward. The challenge on dialogue was to keep it sounding dynamic instead of smoothed out. A lot of Shia’s performance plays in the realm of vocal dynamics. We didn’t want to make the dialogue lifeless. We wanted to have the dynamics in there, to keep the performance alive.

We mixed in Atmos and panned sounds into the ceiling. I took a lot of the composer’s stems and remixed those in Atmos, spreading all the cues out in a pleasant way and using reverb to help glue it together in the environment.

 

The Death of Dick Long

Let’s look at another Sundance film you’ve worked on this year. The Death of Dick Long is part of the Next category. What were director Daniel Scheinert’s initial ideas for the role of sound on this film?
Daniel Scheinert always shows up with a lot of sound ideas, and most of those were already in place because of picture editor Paul Rogers from Parallax Post (which is right down the hall from our studio Unbridled Sound). Paul and all the editors at Parallax are sound designers in their own right. They’ll give me an AAF of their Adobe Premiere session and it’ll be 80 tracks deep. They’re constantly running down to our studio like, “Hey, I don’t have this sound. Can you design something for me?” So, we feed them a lot of sounds.

The Death of Dick Long

We played with the bug sounds the most. They shot in Alabama, where both Paul and Daniel are from, so there were a lot of cicadas and bugs. It was important to make the distinction of what the bugs sounded like in the daytime versus what they sounded like in the afternoon and at night. Paul did a lot of work to make sure that the balance was right, so we didn’t want to mess with that too much. We just wanted to support it. The backgrounds in this film are rich and full.

This film is crazy. It opens up with a Creed song and ends with a Nickleback song, as a sort of a joke. They wanted to show a group of guys that never really made much of themselves. These guys are in a band called Pink Freud, and they have band practice.

The film starts with them doing dumb stuff, like setting off fireworks and catching each other on fire — just messing around. Then it cuts to Dick (Daniel Scheinert) in the back of a vehicle and he’s bleeding out. His friends just dump him at the hospital and leave. The whole mystery of how Dick dies unfolds throughout the course of the film. The two main guys are Earl (Andre Hyland) and Zeke (Michael Abbott, Jr.).

The Foley on this film — provided by Foley artist John Sievert of JRS Productions — plays a big role. Often, Foley is used to help us get in and out of the scene. For instance, the police are constantly showing up to ask more questions and you hear them sneaking in from another room to listen to what’s being said. There’s a conversation between Zeke and his wife Lydia (Virginia Newcomb) and he’s asking her to help him keep information from the police. They’re in another room but you hear their conversation as the police are questioning Dick Long’s wife, Jane (Jess Weixler).

We used sound effects to help increase the tension when needed. For example, there’s a scene where Zeke is doing the laundry and his wife calls saying she’s scared because there are murderers out there, and he has to come and pick her up. He knows it’s him but he’s trying to play it off. As he is talking to her, Earl is in the background telling Zeke what to say to his wife. As they’re having this conversation, the washing machine out in the garage keeps getting louder and it makes that scene feel more intense.

Director Daniel Scheinert (left) and Puddle relaxing during the mix.

“The Dans” — Scheinert and Daniel Kwan — are known for Swiss Army Man. That film used sound in a really funny way, but it was also relevant to the plot. Did Scheinert have the same open mind about sound on The Death of Dick Long? Also, were there any interesting recording sessions you’d like to talk about?
There were no farts this time, and it was a little more straightforward. Manchester Orchestra did the score on this one too, but it’s also more laid back.

For this film, we really wanted to depict a rural Alabama small-town feel. We did have some fun with a few PA announcements, but you don’t hear those clearly. They’re washed out. Earl lives in a trailer park, so there are trailer park fights happening in the background to make it feel more like Jerry Springer. We had a lot of fun doing that stuff. Sound effects editor Danielle Price cut that scene, and she did a really great job.

What was the most challenging aspect of the sound design on The Death of Dick Long?
I’d say the biggest things were the backgrounds, engulfing the audience in this area and making sure the bugs feel right. We wanted to make sure there was off-screen movement in the police station and other locations to give them all a sense of life.

The whole movie was about creating a sense of intensity. I remember showing it to my wife during one of our initial sound passes, and she pulled the blanket over her face while she was watching it. By the end, only her eyes were showing. These guys keep messing up and it’s stressful. You think they’re going to get caught. So the suspense that the director builds in — not being serious but still coming across in a serious manner — is amazing. We were helping them to build that tension through backgrounds, music and dropouts, and pushing certain everyday elements (like the washing machine) to create tension in scenes.

What scene in this film best represents the use of sound?
I’d say the laundry scene. Also, in the opening scene you hear the band playing in the garage and the perspective slowly gets closer and closer.

During the film’s climax, when you find out how Dick dies, we’re pulling down the backgrounds that we created. For instance, when you’re in the bedroom you hear their crappy fan. When you’re in the kitchen, you hear the crappy compressor on the refrigerator. It’s all about playing up these “bad” sounds to communicate the hopelessness of the situation they are living in.

I want to shout out all of my sound editors for their exceptional work on The Death of Dick Long. There was Jacob “Young Thor” Flack and Elliot Thompson, and Danielle Price who did amazing backgrounds. Also, a shout out to Ian Chase for help on the mix. I want to make sure they share the credit.

I think there needs to be more recognition of the contribution of sound and the sound departments on a film. It’s a subject that needs to be discussed, particularly in these somber days following the death of Oscar-winning re-recording mixer Gregg Rudloff. He was the nicest guy ever. I remember being an intern on the sound stage and he always took the time to talk to us and give us advice. He was one of the good ones.

When post sound gets a credit after the caterers’ on-set, it doesn’t do us justice. On Swiss Army Man, initially I had my own title card because The Dans wanted to give me a title card that said, “Supervising Sound Editor Brent Kiser,” but the Directors Guild took it away. They said it wasn’t appropriate. Their reasoning is that if they give it to one person then they’ll have to give it to everybody. I get it — the visual effects department is new on the block. They wrote their contract knowing what was going on, so they get a title card. But try watching a film on mute and then talk to me about the importance of sound. That needs to start changing, for the sheer fact of burnout and legacy.

At the end of the day, you worked so hard to get these projects done. You’re taking care of someone else’s baby and helping it to grow up to be this great thing, but then we’re only seen as the hired help. Or, we never even get a mention. There is so much pressure and stress on the sound department, and I feel we deserve more recognition for what we give to a film.


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. Follow her on Twitter @audiojeney

AES/SMPTE panel: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse sound

By Mel Lambert

As part of its successful series of sound showcases, a recent joint meeting of the Los Angeles Section of the Audio Engineering Society and SMPTE’s Hollywood Section focused on the soundtrack of the animated features Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which has garnered several Oscar, BAFTA, CAS and MPSE award nominations, plus a Golden Globes win.

On January 31 at Sony Pictures Studios’ Kim Novak Theater in Culver City many gathered to hear a panel discussion between the film’s sound and picture editors and re-recording mixers. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was co-directed by Peter Ramsey, Robert Persichetti Jr. and Rodney Rothman, the creative minds behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street.

The panel

The Sound Showcase panel included supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey, re-recording mixer/sound designer Tony Lamberti, re-recording mixer Michael Semanick and associate picture editor Vivek Sharma. The Hollywood Reporter’s Carolyn Giardina moderated. The event concluded with a screening of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which represents a different Spider-Man Universe, since it introduces Brooklyn teen Miles Morales and the expanding possibilities of the Spider-Verse, where more than one entity can wear the arachnid mask.

Following the screening of an opening sequence from the animated feature, Rubay acknowledged that the film’s producers were looking for a different look for the Spider-Man character based on the Marvel comic books, but with a reference to previous live-action movies in the franchise. “They wanted us to make more of the period in which the new film is set,” he told the standing-room audience in the same dubbing stage where the soundtrack was re-recorded.

“[EVPs] Phil Lord and Chris Miller have a specific style of soundtrack that they’ve developed,” stated Lamberti, “and so we premixed to get that overall shape.”

“The look is unique,” conceded Semanick, “and our mix needed to match that and make it sound like a comic book. It couldn’t be too dynamic; we didn’t want to assault the audience, but still make it loud here and softer there.”

Full house

“We also kept the track to its basics,” Rubay added, “and didn’t add a sound for every little thing. If the soundtrack had been as complicated as the visuals, the audience’s heads would have exploded.”

“Yes, simpler was often better,” Lamberti confirmed, “to let the soundtrack tell the story of the visuals.”

In terms of balancing sound effects against dialog, “We did a lot of experimentation and went with what seemed the best solution,” Semanick said. “We kept molding the soundtrack until we were satisfied.” As Lamberti confirmed: “It was always a matter of balancing all the sound elements, using trial and error.”

=Nominated for a Cinema Audio Society Award in the Motion Picture — Animated category, Brian Smith, Aaron Hasson and Howard London served as original dialogue mixers on the film, with Sam Okell as scoring mixer and Randy K. Singer as Foley mixer. The crew also included sound designer John Pospisil, Foley supervisor Alec G. Rubay, SFX editors Kip Smedley, Andy Sisul, David Werntz, Christopher Aud, Ando Johnson, Benjamin Cook, Mike Reagan and Donald Flick.

During picture editorial, “we lived with many versions until we got to the sound,” explained Sharma. “The premix was fantastic and worked very well. Visuals are important but sound fulfils a complementary role. Dialogue is always key; the audience needs to hear what the characters say!”

“We present ideas and judge the results until everybody is happy,” said Semanick. “[Writer/producer] Phil Lord was very good at listening to everybody; he made the final decision, but deferred to the directors. ‘Maybe we should drop the music?’ ‘Does the result still pull the audience into the music?’ We worked until the elements worked very well together.”

The lead character’s “Spidey Sense” also discussed. As co-supervisor Schulkey explained: “Our early direction was that it was an internal feeling … like a warm, fuzzy feeling. But warm and fuzzy didn’t cut through the music. In the end there was not just a single Spidey Sense — it was never the same twice. The web slings were a classic sound that we couldn’t get too far from.”

“And we used [Dolby] Atmos to spin and pan those sounds around the room,” added Lamberti, who told the audience that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse marked Sony Animation’s first native Atmos mix. “We used the format to get the most out of it,” concluded the SFX re-recording mixer, who mixed sound effects “in the box” using an Avid S6 console/controller, while Semanick handled dialogue and music on the Kim Novak Theater’s Harrison MPC4D X-Range digital console.


Mel Lambert has been intimately involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists. 

Review: Boris FX’s Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019

By Brady Betzel

I realize I might sound like a broken record, but if you are looking for the best plugin to help with object removals or masking, you should seriously consider the Mocha Pro plugin. And if you work inside of Avid Media Composer, you should also seriously consider Boris Continuum and/or Sapphire, which can use the power of Mocha.

As an online editor, I consistently use Continuum along with Mocha for tight blur and mask tracking. If you use After Effects, there is even a whittled-down version of Mocha built in for free. For those pros who don’t want to deal with Mocha inside of an app, it also comes as a standalone software solution where you can copy and paste tracking data between apps or even export the masks, object removals or insertions as self-contained files.

The latest releases of Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 continue the evolution of Boris FX’s role in post production image restoration, keying and general VFX plugins, at least inside of NLEs like Media Composer and Adobe Premiere.

Mocha Pro

As an online editor I am alway calling on Continuum for its great Chroma Key Studio, Flicker Fixer and blurring. Because Mocha is built into Continuum, I am able to quickly track (backwards and forwards) difficult shapes and even erase shapes that the built-in Media Composer tools simply can’t do. But if you are lucky enough to own Mocha Pro you also get access to some amazing tools that go beyond planar tracking — such as automated object removal, object insertion, stabilizing and much more.

Boris FX’s latest updates to Boris Continuum and Mocha Pro go even further than what I’ve already mentioned and have resulted in a new version naming, this round we are at 2019 (think of it as Version 12). They have also created the new Application Manager, which makes it a little easier to find the latest downloads. You can find them here. This really helps when jumping between machines and you need to quickly activate and deactivate licenses.

Boris Continuum 2019
I often get offline edits effects from a variety plugins — lens flares, random edits, light flashes, whip transitions, and many more — so I need Continuum to be compatible with offline clients. I also need to use it for image repair and compositing.

In this latest version of Continuum, BorisFX has not only kept plugins like Primatte Studio, they have brought back Particle Illusion and updated Mocha and Title Studio. Overall, Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 feel a lot snappier when applying and rendering effects, probably because of the overall GPU-acceleration improvements.

Particle Illusion has been brought back from the brink of death in Continuum 2019 for a 64-bit keyframe-able particle emitter system that can even be tracked and masked with Mocha. In this revamp of Particle Illusion there is an updated interface, realtime GPU-based particle generation, expanded and improved emitter library (complete with motion-blur-enabled particle systems) and even a standalone app that can design systems to be used in the host app — you cannot render systems inside of the standalone app.

While Particle Illusion is a part of the entire Continuum toolset that works with OFX apps like Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, Media Composer, After Effects, and Premiere, it seems to work best in applications like After Effects, which can handle composites simply and naturally. Inside the Particle Illusion interface you can find all of the pre-built emitters. If you only have a handful make sure you download additional emitters, which you can find in the Boris FX App Manager.

       
Particle Illusion: Before and After

I had a hard time seeing my footage in a Media Composer timeline inside of Particle Illusion, but I could still pick my emitter, change specs like life and opacity, exit out and apply to my footage. I used Mocha to track some fire from Particle Illusion to a dumpster I had filmed. Once I dialed in the emitter, I launched Mocha and tracked the dumpster.

The first time I went into Mocha I didn’t see the preset tracks for the emitter or the world in which the emitter lives. The second time I launched Mocha, I saw track points. From there you can track where you want your emitter to track and be placed. Once you are done and happy with your track, jump back to your timeline where it should be reflected. In Media Composer I noticed that I had to go to the Mocha options and change the option from Mocha Shape to no shape. Essentially, the Mocha shape will act like a matte and cut off anything outside the matte.

If you are inside of After Effects, most parameters can now be keyframed and parented (aka pick-whipped) natively in the timeline. The Particle Illusion plugin is a quick, easy and good-looking tool to add sparks, Milky Way-like star trails or even fireworks to any scene. Check out @SurfacedStudio’s tutorial on Particle Illusion to get a good sense of how it works in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Continuum Title Studio
When inside of Media Composer (prior to the latest release 2018.12), there were very few ways to create titles that were higher resolution than HD (1920×1080) — the New Blue Titler was the only other option if you wanted to stay within Media Composer.

Title Studio within Media Composer

At first, the Continuum Title Studio interface appeared to be a mildly updated Boris Red interface — and I am allergic to the Boris Red interface. Some of the icons for the keyframing and the way properties are adjusted looks similar and threw me off. I tried really hard to jump into Title Studio and love it, but I really never got comfortable with it.

On the flip side, there are hundreds of presets that could help build quick titles that render a lot faster than New Blue Titler did. In some of the presets I noticed the text was placed outside of 16×9 Title Safety, which is odd since that is kind of a long standing rule in television. In the author’s defense, they are within Action Safety, but still.

If you need a quick way to make 4K titles, Title Studio might be what you want. The updated Title Studio includes realtime playback using the GPU instead of the CPU, new materials, new shaders and external monitoring support using Blackmagic hardware (AJA will be coming at some point). There are some great pre-sets including pre-built slates, lower thirds, kinetic text and even progress bars.

If you don’t have Mocha Pro, Continuum can still access and use Mocha to track shapes and masks. Almost every plugin can access Mocha and can track objects quickly and easily.
That brings me to the newly updated Mocha, which has some new features that are extremely helpful including a Magnetic Spline tool, prebuilt geometric shapes and more.

Mocha Pro 2019
If you loved the previous version of Mocha, you are really going to love Mocha Pro 2019. Not only do you get the Magnetic Lasso, pre-built geometric shapes, the Essentials interface and high-resolution display support, but BorisFX has rewritten the Remove Module code to use GPU video hardware. This increases render speeds about four to five times. In addition, there is no longer a separate Mocha VR software suite. All of the VR tools are included inside of Mocha Pro 2019.

If you are unfamiliar with what Mocha is, then I have a treat for you. Mocha is a standalone planar tracking app as well as a native plugin that works with Media Composer, Premiere and After Effects, or through OFX in Blackmagic’s Fusion, Foundry’s Nuke, Vegas Pro and Hitfilm.

Mocha tracking

In addition (and unofficially) it will work with Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve by way of importing the Mocha masks through Fusion. While I prefer to use After Effects for my work, importing Mocha masks is relatively painless. You can watch colorist Dan Harvey run through the process of importing Mocha masks to Resolve through Fusion, here.

But really, Mocha is a planar tracker, which means it tracks multiple points in a defined area that works best in flat surfaces or at least segmented surfaces, like the side of a face, ear, nose, mouth and forehead tracked separately instead of all at once. From blurs to mattes, Mocha tracks objects like glue and can be a great asset for an online editor or colorist.

If you have read any of my plugin reviews you probably are sick of me spouting off about Mocha, saying how it is probably the best plugin ever made. But really, it is amazing — especially when incorporated with plugins like Continuum and Sapphire. Also, thanks to the latest Media Composer with Symphony option you can incorporate the new Color Correction shapes with Mocha Pro to increase the effectiveness of your secondary color corrections.

Mocha Pro Remove module

So how fast is Mocha Pro 2019’s Remove Module these days? Well, it used to be a very slow process, taking lots of time to calculate an object’s removal. With the latest Mocha Pro 2019 release, including improved GPU support, the render time has been cut down tremendously. In my estimation, I would say three to four times the speed (that’s on the safe side). In Mocha Pro 2019 removal jobs that take under 30 seconds would have taken four to five minutes in previous versions. It’s quite a big improvement in render times.

There are a few changes in the new Mocha Pro, including interface changes and some amazing tool additions. There is a new drop-down tab that offers different workflow views once you are inside of Mocha: Essentials, Classic, Big Picture and Roto. I really wish the Essentials view was out when I first started using Mocha, because it gives you the basic tools you need to get a roto job done and nothing more.

For instance, just giving access to the track motion objects (Translation, Scale, Rotate, Skew and Perspective) with big shiny buttons helps to eliminate my need to watch YouTube videos on how to navigate the Mocha interface. However, if like me you are more than just a beginner, the Classic interface is still available and one I reach for most often — it’s literally the old interface. Big Screen hides the tools and gives you the most screen real estate for your roto work. My favorite after Classic is Roto. The Roto interface shows just the project window and the classic top toolbar. It’s the best of both worlds.

Mocha Pro 2019 Essentials Interface

Beyond the interface changes are some additional tools that will speed up any roto work. This has been one of the longest running user requests. I imagine the most requested feature that BorisFX gets for Mocha is the addition of basic shapes, such as rectangles and circles. In my work, I am often drawing rectangles around license plates or circles around faces with X-splines, so why not eliminate a few clicks and have that done already? Answering my need, Mocha now has elliptical and rectangular shapes ready to go in both X-splines and B-splines with one click.

I use Continuum and Mocha hand in hand. Inside of Media Composer I will use tools like Gaussian Blur or Remover, which typically need tracking and roto shapes created. Once I apply the Continuum effect, I launch Mocha from the Effect Editor and bam, I am inside Mocha. From here I track the objects I want to affect, as well as any objects I don’t want to affect (think of it like an erase track).

Summing Up
I can save tons of time and also improve the effectiveness of my work exponentially when working in Continuum 2019 and Mocha Pro 2019. It’s amazing how much more intuitive Mocha is to track with instead of the built-in Media Composer and Symphony trackers.

In the end, I can’t say enough great things about Continuum and especially Mocha Pro. Mocha saves me tons of time in my VFX and image restoration work. From removing camera people behind the main cast in the wilderness to blurring faces and license plates, using Mocha in tandem with Continuum is a match made in post production heaven.

Rendering in Continuum and Mocha Pro 2019 is a lot faster than previous versions, really giving me a leg up on efficiency. Time is money right?! On top of that, using Mocha Pro’s magic Object removal and Modules takes my image restoration work to the next level, separating me from other online editors who use standard paint and tracking tools.

In Continuum, Primatte Studio gives me the leg up on greenscreen keys with its exceptional ability to auto analyze a scene and perform 80% of the keying work before I dial-in the details. Whenever anyone asks me what tools I couldn’t live without, I without a doubt always say Mocha.
If you want a real Mocha Pro education you need to watch all of Mary Poplin’s tutorials. You can find them on YouTube. Check out this one on how to track and replace a logo using Mocha Pro 2019 in Adobe After Effects. You can also find great videos at Borisfx.com.

Mocha point parameter tracking

I always feel like there are tons of tools inside of the Mocha Pro toolset that go unused simply because I don’t know about them. One I recently learned about in a Surfaced Studio tutorial was the Quick Stabilize function. It essentially stabilizes the video around the object you are tracking allowing you to more easily rotoscope your object with it sitting still instead of moving all over the screen. It’s an amazing feature that I just didn’t know about.

As I was finishing up this review I saw that Boris FX came out with a training series, which I will be checking out. One thing I always wanted was a top-down set of tutorials like the ones on Mocha’s YouTube page but organized and sent along with practical footage to practice with.

You can check out Curious Turtle’s “More Than The Essentials: Mocha in After Effects” on their website where I found more Mocha training. There is even a great search parameter called Getting Started on BorisFX.com. Definitely check them out. You can never learn enough Mocha!


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Audio post pro Julienne Guffain joins Sonic Union

NYC-based audio post studio Sonic Union has added sound designer/mix engineer Julienne Guffain to its creative team. Working across Sonic Union’s Bryant Park and Union Square locations, Guffain brings over a decade of experience in audio post production to her new role. She has worked on television, film and branded projects for clients such as Google, Mountain Dew, American Express and Cadillac among others.

A Virginia native, Guffain came to Manhattan to attend New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. She found herself drawn to sound in film, and it was at NYU where she cut her teeth as a Foley artist and mixer on student films and independent projects. She landed her first industry gig at Hobo Audio, working with clients such as The History Channel, The Discovery Channel and mixing the Emmy-winning television documentary series “Rising: Rebuilding Ground Zero.”

Making her way to Crew Cuts, she began lending her talents to a wide range of spot and brand projects, including the documentary feature “Public Figure,” which examines the psychological effects of constant social media use. It is slated for a festival run later this year.

 

Updated Quantum Xcellis targets robust video workflows

Quantum has updated its Xcellis storage environment, which allow users to ingest, edit, share and store media content. These new appliances, which are powered by the company’s StorNext platform, are based on a next-generation server architecture that includes dual eight-core Intel Xeon CPUs, 64GB memory, SSD boot drives and dual 100Gb Ethernet or 32Gb Fibre Channel ports.

The enhanced CPU and 50% increase in RAM over the previous generation greatly improve StorNext metadata performance. These enhancements make tasks such as file auditing less time-intensive, support an even greater number of clients per node and enable the management of billions of files per node. Users operating in a dynamic application environment on storage nodes will also see performance improvements.

With the ability to provide cross-protocol locking for shared files across SAN, NFS and SMB, Xcellis targets organizations that have collaborative workflows and need to share content across both Fibre Channel and Ethernet.

Leveraging this next-generation hardware platform, StorNext will provide higher levels of streaming performance for video playback. Xcellis appliances provide a high-performance gateway for StorNext advanced data management software to integrate tiers of scalable on-premise and cloud-based storage. This end-to-end capability provides a cost-effective solution to retain massive amounts of data.

StorNext offers a variety of features that ensure data-protection of valuable content over its entire life-cycle. Users can easily copy files to off-site tiers and take advantage of versioning to roll back to an earlier point in time (prior to a malware attack, for example) as well as set up automated replication for disaster recovery purposes — all of which is designed to protect digital assets.

Quantum’s latest Xcellis appliances are available now.