Author Archives: Randi Altman

Review: Picture Instruments’ plugin and app, Color Cone 2

By Brady Betzel

There are a lot of different ways to color correct an image. Typically, colorists will start by adjusting contrast and saturation followed by adjusting the lift, gamma and gain (a.k.a. shadows, midtones and highlights). For video, waveforms and vectorscopes are great ways of measuring color values and about the only way to get the most accurate scientific facts on the colors you are manipulating.

Whether you are in Blackmagic Resolve, Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple FCP X, or any other nonlinear editor or color correction app, you usually have similar color correction tools across apps — whether you color based on curves, wheels, sliders or even interactively on screen. So when I heard about the way that Picture Instruments Color Cone 2 color corrects — via a Cone (or really a bicone) — I was immediately intrigued.

Color Cone 2 is a standalone app but, more importantly, a plugin for Adobe After Effects, Adobe Premiere Pro and FCP X. In this review I am focusing on the Premiere Pro plugin, but keep in mind that the standalone version works on still images and allows you to export a 3dl or cube LUTs — a great way for a client to see what type of result you can get quickly from just a still image.

Color Cone 2 is literally a color corrector when used as a plugin for Adobe Premiere. There are no contrast and saturation adjustments, just the ability to select a color and transform it. For instance, you can select a blue sky and adjust the hue, chromanance (saturation) and/or luminance of the resulting color inside of the Color Cone plugin.

To get started you apply the Color Cone 2 plugin to your clip — the plugin is located under Picture Instruments in the Effects tab. Then you click the little square icon in the effect editor panel to open up the Color Cone 2 interface. The interface contains the bicone image representation of the color correction, presets to set up a split-tone color map or a three-point color correct, and the radius slider to adjust the effect your correction has on surrounding color.

Once you are set on a look you can jump out of the Color Cone interface and back into the effect editor inside of Premiere. There you can keyframe all of the parameters you adjusted in the Color Cone interface. This allows for a nice and easy way to transition from no color correction to color correction.

The Cone
The Cone itself is the most interesting part of this plugin. Think of the bicone as the 3D side view of a vectorscope. In other words, if the vectorscope view from a traditional scope is the top view — the bicone in Color Cone would be a side view. Moving your target color from the top cone to the bottom cone will adjust your lightness to darkness (or luminance). At the intersection of the cones is the saturation (or chromanance) and when moving from the center outwards saturation is increased. When a color is selected using the eye dropper you will see a square, which represents the source color selection, a circle representing the target color and an “x” with a line for reference on the middle section.

Additionally, there is a black circle on the saturation section in the middle that shows the boundaries of how far you can push your chromanance. There is a light circle that represents the radius of how surrounding colors are affected. Each video clip can have effects layered on them and one instance of the plugin can handle five colors. If you need more than five, you can add another instance of the plugin to the same clip.

If you are looking to export 3dl and Cube LUTs of your work you will need to use the standalone Color Cone 2 app. The one caveat to using the standalone app is that you can only apply color to still images. Once you do that you can export the LUT to be used in any modern NLE/color correction app.

Summing Up
To be honest, working in Color Cone 2 was a little weird for me. It’s not your usual color correction workflow, so I would need to sit with the plugin for awhile to get used to its setup. That being said, it has some interesting components that I wish other color correction apps would use, such as the Cone view. The bicone is a phenomenal way to visualize color correction in realtime.

In my opinion, if Picture Instruments would sell just the Cone as a color measurement tool to work in conjunction with Lumetri, they would have another solid tool. Color Cone 2 has a very unique and interesting way to color correct in Premiere that acts as an advanced secondary color correct tool to the Lumetri color correction tools.

The Color Cone 2 standalone app and plugin costs $139 when purchased together, or $88 individually. In my opinion, video people should probably just stick to the plugin version. Check out Picture Instrument’s website for more info on Color Cone 2 as well as their other products. And check them out on Twitter @Pic_instruments.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Josie Rourke on her feature directorial debut, Mary Queen of Scots

By Iain Blair

Given all the recent talk about the lack of opportunity for women in Hollywood, it’s apt that for her feature film directorial debut, Josie Rourke took on the story of Mary Queen of Scots, the period drama about two of the most famous women in history.

It’s also apt that this retelling of the turbulent life of Mary Stuart (Saoirse Ronan) and that of her English cousin Queen Elizabeth I (Margot Robbie) has all the deeply emotional interpersonal drama of an intense play since Rourke is the artistic director of London’s prestigious Donmar Warehouse, where she’s staged acclaimed and groundbreaking productions.

Josie Rourke on set.

Based on the book Queen of Scots: The True Life of Mary Stuart by Dr. John Guy, the film offers a fresh take on the two strong women who occupy center stage in what was very much a man’s world. Queen of France at age 16, widowed at 18, Mary defies pressure to remarry and instead returns to her native Scotland to reclaim her rightful throne. By birth, Mary has a rival claim to the English throne — contrary to earlier accounts and based on the latest research — but is a capable politician and leader who wants an alliance with her cousin Elizabeth.

Mary fights to govern her unruly kingdom at a time when female monarchs are reviled as monstrous. To secure their thrones, the two Queens make very different choices about marriage and children. Mary’s reputation is under continual attack from her enemies, who construct lies about her sexual conduct. Betrayal, rebellion and conspiracies within each court imperil both Queens, driving them apart, as each woman experiences the bitter cost of power.

The film co-stars Jack Lowden, Joe Alwyn, Martin Compston, Brendan Coyle, David Tennant and Guy Pearce. Behind the scenes, Rourke assembled a team that included writer Beau Willimon, costume designer Alexandra Byrne, production designer James Merifield, editor Chris Dickens, composer Max Richter and director of photography John Mathieson.

I spoke with Rourke about making the film, the Oscar buzz and her workflow.

What sort of film did you set out to make?
I love historical dramas and have done tons of Shakespeare in the theater. I always think that they’re so relevant to the present and that they can often give you a clearer picture and understanding of “now” than of the past. So my aim was to really create something relevant, and to also right a wrong about Mary and how she’s been portrayed through history.

This film is based on historian Dr. John Guy’s biography “Queen of Scots: The True Life of Mary Stuart,” which explored Mary’s life and her claim to the throne. It’s a very vivid book. He got back into the archives and discovered that she’s really been besmirched, in a fake news way. Her enemies not only made sure she met her end, but they also destroyed her reputation by portraying her as a woman totally driven by emotion, not intelligence, and someone too sexual and unable to govern properly. So I wanted to tell the truth about her.

In a way, the film is a battle of will and wits between these two queens — Mary and Elizabeth. What did Saoirse and Margot bring to the roles?
Well, I needed two of the greatest actresses of this generation — young women since they’re two young queens. Katherine Hepburn, Judy Dench, Cate Blanchett and others have gone before, so there were big shoes to fill. And the roles demand great range, emotional complexity and that power where they can command men and the room. Saoirse was already attached, and I passionately went after Margot, who was initially unsure about taking on such an iconic character. The were both amazing. They both totally inhabit the roles.

What were the main technical challenges in pulling it all together?
We didn’t have a big budget, although compared with theater it was huge. We had ambitions to shoot a lot of it on location in Scotland and England, so we could show the soft, poetic beauty of the English countryside and the extreme majesty of Scotland and its rugged landscapes.

Two very different looks.
Exactly, and those contrasting visuals really helped tell their two stories. We basically see Elizabeth’s life as a very interior one; always in court and very formal. But Mary’s often out in the wilds, on horseback, and far more earthy. We shot in pretty remote locations in Scotland, where the weather changes every hour, so I just decided we’d shoot in the rain when it rained. But then suddenly, the skies would clear and you’d get these beautiful views and vistas, which was magical. I think that made everyone — the cast and crew — just bond even more over the project. You can’t fake that sort of thing — real locations, real weather. All that in turn affected their clothes and costumes, and I think Alex Byrne did a brilliant job with that.

The film looks very beautiful, and two-time Oscar-nominee John Mathieson (Gladiator, Hannibal, Matchstick Men, The Phantom of the Opera) shot it. Can you talk about how you collaborated on the look?
I’d seen his work, particularly in Logan, which had such incredible tonal control. John has great discipline with tone and color, and the other great thing is that he has a background in music, so he can improvise.

There’s a scene by a dead tree where John Knox is giving one of his rabble-rousing speeches, and it had been raining so hard that where we’d originally scouted and decided to shoot was totally inaccessible on the day. Instead we found this amazing tree in the same glen, and John quickly lit it and it turned out so well. We went for a very painterly look with a lot of the interior scenes, so some scenes are like Rembrandt paintings with great shadow play and highlights.

Where did you post?
We did most of it at Pinewood and Abbey Road in London, and did a Dolby Atmos mix at the new mix stage there. I was beside myself to be mixing there, where The Beatles and everyone else has worked. Post took about nine months, mainly because I’m also running a theater as well as my day job — or night job, to be more accurate. We did the DI at Company 3 with Paul Ensby.

Do you like the post process?
I really love it, especially the editing, which for me is very similar to being in a room rehearsing with actors. You’re basically getting a series of different performances from them. You’re trying out different things and trying to find the rhythm of a scene.

Talk about editing with Chris Dickens, who won the Oscar and BAFTA for his work on Slumdog Millionaire. What were the big editing challenges?
He’s brilliant and thought I was completely bonkers as I’d talk out loud to the actors while we cut, just like I would do in rehearsal. He was on set with us a little bit, but he far prefers to get all the material cold without any preconceptions about how we got it, or what the actors are actually like as people. He tries to preserve impartiality, and that’s great.

The big challenge was balancing the two stories and two women, and we tried various ways but in the end we largely followed the screenplay. One of Chris’ great skills is the way he cut between the two. He would hone in on the psychology and find those moments when one woman is thinking about the other.

All period films use some visual effects. What was involved?
You’re right, and the biggest challenge was the battle sequence where all the Highland cattle block the bridge. On that day we got far fewer than we’d booked, so we had to add a bunch, and London’s Bluebolt did an absolutely seamless job. Then we had shots of Edinburgh Castle in the distance, and we had a fair amount of clean up, but it was all very subtle.

Talk about the importance of sound and music,
Working on the sound mix was one of the most creative experiences I’ve ever had. In theater, sound is important in that one of a director’s most basic functions is telling whether or not an actor on stage can be heard. Are they loud enough? Was that line clear? It’s the least glamorous part of the job, but really important. To do that, we spend a lot of time thinking about the acoustics of a room or space, how reflective surfaces might be, where the ideal spot on stage is for a certain speech or line. So to then get into a post process where you’re discussing the atmospherics and sound dynamics of the room you’re working in was so exciting to me. Normally, you’re tuning the actors to the room, but now I could tune the room to the actors, and that was so cool.

Josie Rourke and Iain Blair

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
It did, and I can’t wait to direct another film. I don’t have anything lined up yet, but I’m looking.

We’re heading into awards season, and this is getting a lot of attention. How important is all that?
It’s all very new to me, a bit like a dream in a way. I’d love to see everyone recognized for all their hard work. Everyone was so willing to share their knowledge and experience with a first-timer. I’m just so grateful.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Full-service creative agency Carousel opens in NYC

Carousel, a new creative agency helmed by Pete Kasko and Bernadette Quinn, has opened its doors in New York City. Billing itself as “a collaborative collective of creative talent,” Carousel is positioned to handle projects from television series to ad campaigns for brands, media companies and advertising agencies.

Clients such as PepsiCo’s Pepsi, Quaker and Lays brands; Victoria’s Secret; Interscope Records; A&E Network and The Skimm have all worked with the company.

Designed to provide full 360 capabilities, Carousel allows its brand partners to partake of all its services or pick and choose specific offerings including strategy, creative development, brand development, production, editorial, VFX/GFX, color, music and mix. Along with its client relationships, Carousel has also been the post production partner for agencies such as McGarryBowen, McCann, Publicis and Virtue.

“The industry is shifting in how the work is getting done. Everyone has to be faster and more adaptable to change without sacrificing the things that matter,” says Quinn. “Our goal is to combine brilliant, high-caliber people, seasoned in all aspects of the business, under one roof together with a shared vision of how to create better content in a more efficient way.”

According to managing director Dee Tagert comments, “The name Carousel describes having a full set of capabilities from ideation to delivery so that agencies or brands can jump on at any point in their process. By having a small but complete agency team that can manage and execute everything from strategy, creative development and brand development to production and post, we can prove more effective and efficient than a traditional agency model.”

Danielle Russo, Dee Tagert, AnaLiza Alba Leen

AnaLiza Alba Leen comes on board Carousel as creative director with 15 years of global agency experience, and executive producer Danielle Russo brings 12 years of agency experience.
Tagert adds, “The industry has been drastically changing over the last few years. As clients’ hunger for content is driving everything at a much faster pace, it was completely logical to us to create a fully integrative company to be able to respond to our clients in a highly productive, successful manner.”

Carousel is currently working on several upcoming projects for clients including Victoria’s Secret, DNTL, Subway, US Army, Tazo Tea and Range Rover.

Main Image: Bernadette Quinn and Pete Kasko

New codec, workflow options via Red, Nvidia and Adobe

By Mike McCarthy

There were two announcements last week that will impact post production workflows. The first was the launch of Red’s new SDK, which leverages Nvidia’s GPU-accelerated CUDA framework to deliver realtime playback of 8K Red footage. I’ll get to the other news shortly. Nvidia was demonstrating an early version of this technology at Adobe Max in October, and I have been looking forward to this development since I am about to start post on a feature film shot on the Red Monstro camera. This should effectively render the RedRocket accelerator cards obsolete, replacing them with cheaper, multipurpose hardware that can also accelerate other computational tasks.

While accelerating playback of 8K content at full resolution requires a top-end RTX series card from Nvidia (Quadro RTX 6000, Titan RTX or GeForce RTX 2080Ti), the technology is not dependent on RTX’s new architecture (RT and Tensor cores), allowing earlier generation hardware to accelerate smooth playback at smaller frame sizes. Lots of existing Red footage is shot at 4K and 6K, and playback of these files will be accelerated on widely deployed legacy products from previous generations of Nvidia GPU architecture. It will still be a while before this functionality is in the hands of end users, because now Adobe, Apple, Blackmagic and other software vendors have to integrate the new SDK functionality into their individual applications. But hopefully we will see those updates hitting the market soon (targeting late Q1 of 2019).

Encoding ProRes on Windows via Adobe apps
The other significant update, which is already available to users as of this week, is Adobe’s addition of ProRes encoding support on its video apps in Windows. Developed by Apple, ProRes encoding has been available on Mac for a long time, and ProRes decoding and playback has been available on Windows for over 10 years. But creating ProRes files on Windows has always been a challenge. Fixing this was less a technical challenge than a political one, as Apple owns the codec and it is not technically a standard. So while there were some hacks available at various points during that time, Apple has severely restricted the official encoding options available on Windows… until now.

With the 13.0.2 release of Premiere Pro and Media Encoder, as well as the newest update to After Effects, Adobe users on Windows systems can now create ProRes files in whatever flavor they happen to need. This is especially useful since many places require delivery of final products in the ProRes format. In this case, the new export support is obviously a win all the way around.

Adobe Premiere

Now users have yet another codec option for all of their intermediate files, prompting another look at the question: Which codec is best for your workflow? With this release, Adobe users have at least three major options for high-quality intermediate codecs: Cineform, DNxHR and now ProRes. I am limiting the scope to integrated cross-platform codecs supporting 10-bit color depth, variable levels of image compression and customizable frame sizes. Here is a quick overview of the strengths and weaknesses of each option:

ProRes
ProRes was created by Apple over 10 years ago and has become the de-facto standard throughout the industry, regardless of the fact that it is entirely owned by Apple. ProRes is now fully cross-platform compatible, has options for both YUV and RGB color and has six variations, all of which support at least 10-bit color depth. The variable bit rate compression scheme scales well with content complexity, so encoding black or static images doesn’t require as much space as full-motion video. It also supports alpha channels with compression, but only in the 444 variants of the codec.

Recent tests on my Windows 10 workstation resulted in ProRes taking 3x to 5x as much CPU power to playback as similar DNxHR of Cineform files, especially as frame sizes get larger. The codec supports 8K frame sizes but playback will require much more processing power. I can’t even playback UHD files in ProRes 444 at full resolution, while the Cineform and DNxHR files have no problem, even at 444. This is less of concern if you are only working at 1080p.

Multiply those file sizes by four for UHD content (and by 16 for 8K content).

Cineform
Cineform, which has been available since 2004, was acquired by GoPro in 2011. They have licensed the codec to Adobe, (among other vendors) and it is available as “GoPro Cineform” in the AVI or QuickTime sections of the Adobe export window. Cineform is a wavelet compression codec, with 10-bit YUV and 12-bit RGB variants, which like ProRes support compressed alpha channels in the RGB variant. The five levels of encoding quality are selected separately from the format, so higher levels of compression are available for 4444 content compared to the limited options available in the other codecs.

It usually plays back extremely efficiently on Windows, but my recent tests show that encoding to the format is much slower than it used to be. And while it has some level of support outside of Adobe applications, it is not as universally recognized as ProRes or DNxHD.

DNxHD
DNxHD was created by Avid for compressed HD playback and has now been extended to DNxHR (high resolution). It is a fixed bit rate codec, with each variant having a locked multiplier based on resolution and frame rate. This makes it easy to calculate storage needs but wastes space for files that are black or contain a lot of static content. It is available in MXF and Mov wrappers and has five levels of quality. The top option is 444 RGB, and all variants support alpha channels in Mov but uncompressed, which takes a lot of space. For whatever reason, Adobe has greatly optimized DNxHR playback in Premiere Pro, of all variants, in both MXF and Mov wrappers. On my project 6Below, I was able to get 6K 444 files to playback, with lots of effects, without dropping frames. The encodes to and from DNxHR are faster in Adobe apps as well.

So for most PC Adobe users, DNxHR-LB (low bandwidth) is probably the best codec to use for intermediate work. We are using it to offline my current project, with 2.2K DNxHR-LB, Mov files. People with a heavy Mac interchange may lean toward ProRes, but up your CPU specs for the same level of application performance.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

postPerspective’s Storage Update: Selected Highlights, Dell EMC

Virtual Roundtable: Storage – Dell EMC

The world of storage is ever and complicated. There are many flavors that are meant to match up to specific workflow needs. What matters most to users? In addition to easily-installed and easy-to-use systems that let them focus on the creative and not the tech? Scalability, speed, data protection, the cloud and the need to handle higher and higher frame rates with higher resolutions — meaning larger and larger files. The good news is the tools are growing to meet these needs. New technologies and software enhancements around NVMe are providing extremely low-latency connectivity that supports higher performance workflows. Time will tell how that plays a part in day-to-day workflows.

For this virtual roundtable, we reached out to makers of storage and users of storage. Their questions differ a bit, but their answers often overlap. Enjoy.

Dell EMC‘s Tom Burns 

What is the biggest trend you’ve seen in the past year in terms of storage?
The most important storage trend we’ve seen is an increasing need for access to shared content libraries accommodating global production teams. This is becoming an essential part of the production chain for feature films, episodic television, sports broadcasting and now e-sports. For example, teams in the UK and in California can share asset libraries for their file-based workflow via a common object store, whether on-prem or hybrid cloud. This means they don’t have to synchronize workflows using point-to-point transmissions from California to the UK, which can get expensive.

Tom Burns

Achieving this requires seamless integration of on-premises file storage for the high-throughput, low-latency workloads with object storage. The object storage can be in the public cloud or you can have a hybrid private cloud for your media assets. A private or hybrid cloud allows production teams to distribute assets more efficiently and saves money, versus using the public cloud for sharing content. If the production needs it to be there right now, they can still fire up Aspera, Signiant, File Catalyst or other point-to-point solutions and have prioritized content immediately available, while allowing your on-premise cloud to take care of the shared content libraries.

Users want more flexible workflows — storage in the cloud, on-premises, etc. Are your offerings reflective of that?
Dell Technologies offers end-to-end storage solutions where customers can position the needle anywhere they want. Are you working purely in the cloud? Are you working on-prem? Or, like most people, are you working somewhere in the middle? We have a continuous spectrum of storage between high-throughput low-latency workloads and cloud-based object storage, plus distributed services to support the mix that meets your needs.

The most important thing that we’ve learned is that data is expensive to store, granted, but it’s even more expensive to move. Storing your assets in one place and having that path name never change, that’s been a hallmark of Isilon for 15 years. Now we’re extending that seamless file-to-object spectrum to a global scale, deploying Isilon in the cloud in addition to our ECS object store on premises.

With AI, VR and machine learning, etc., our industry is even more dependent on storage. How are you addressing this?
AR, VR, AI and other emerging technologies offer new opportunities for media companies to change the way they tell and monetize their stories. However, due to the large amounts of data involved, many media organizations are challenged when they rely on storage systems that lack either scalability or performance to meet the needs of these new workflows.

Dell EMC’s file and object storage solutions help media companies cost effectively tier their content based upon access. This allows media organizations to use emerging technologies to improve how stories are told and monetize their content with the assistance of AI-generated metadata, without the challenges inherent in many traditional storage systems.

With artificial intelligence, for example, where it was once the job of interns to categorize content in projects that could span years, AI gives media companies the ability to analyze content in near-realtime and create large, easily searchable content libraries as the content is being migrated from existing tape libraries to object-based storage, or ingested for current projects. The metadata involved in this process includes brand recognition and player/actor identification, as well as speech-to-text, making it easy to determine logo placement for advertising analytics and to find footage for use in future movies or advertisements.

With Dell EMC storage, AI technologies can be brought to the data, removing the need to migrate or replicate data to direct-attach storage for analysis. Our solutions also offer the scalability to store the content for years using affordable archive nodes in Isilon or ECS object storage.

In terms of AR and VR, we are seeing video game companies using this technology to change the way players interact with their environments. Not only have they created a completely new genre with games such as Pokemon Go, they have figured out that audiences want nonlinear narratives told through realtime storytelling. Although AR and VR adoption has been slower for movies and TV compared to the video game industry, we can learn a lot from the successes of video game production and apply similar methodologies to movie and episodic productions in the future.

Can you talk about NVMe?
NVMe solutions are a small but exciting part of a much larger trend: workflows that fully exploit the levels of parallelism possible in modern converged architectures. As we look forward to 8K, 60fps and realtime production, the usage of PCIe bus bandwidth by compute, networking and storage resources will need to be much more balanced than it is today.

When we get into realtime productions, these “next-generation” architectures will involve new production methodologies such as realtime animation using game engines rather than camera-based acquisition of physically staged images. These realtime processes will take a lot of cooperation between hardware, software and networks to fully leverage the highly parallel, low-latency nature of converged infrastructure.

Dell Technologies is heavily invested in next-generation technologies that include NVMe cache drives, software-defined networking, virtualization and containerization that will allow our customers to continuously innovate together with the media industry’s leading ISVs.

What do you do in your products to help safeguard your users’ data?
Your content is your most precious capital asset and should be protected and maintained. If you invest in archiving and backing up your content with enterprise-quality tools, then your assets will continue to be available to generate revenue for you. However, archive and backup are just two pieces of data security that media organizations need to consider. They must also take active measures to deter data breaches and unauthorized access to data.

Protecting data at the edge, especially at the scale required for global collaboration can be challenging. We simplify this process through services such as SecureWorks, which includes offerings like security management and orchestration, vulnerability management, security monitoring, advanced threat services and threat intelligence services.

Our storage products are packed with technologies to keep data safe from unexpected outages and unauthorized access, and to meet industry standards such as alignment to MPAA and TPN best practices for content security. For example, Isilon’s OneFS operating system includes SyncIQ snapshots, providing point-in-time backup that updates automatically and generates a list of restore points.

Isilon also supports role-based access control and integration with Active Directory, MIT Kerberos and LDAP, making it easy to manage account access. For production houses working on multiple customer projects, our storage also supports multi-tenancy and access zones, which means that clients requiring quarantined storage don’t have to share storage space with potential competitors.

Our on-prem object store, ECS, provides long-term, cost-effective object storage with support for globally distributed active archives. This helps our customers with global collaboration, but also provides inherent redundancy. The multi-site redundancy creates an excellent backup mechanism as the system will maintain consistency across all sites, plus automatic failure detection and self-recovery options built into the platform.

 

Storage for VFX Studios – Zoic Studios

A Culver City-based visual effects facility, with shops in Vancouver and New York, Zoic Studios has been crafting visual effects for a host of television series since its founding in 2002, starting with Firefly. In addition to a full plate of episodics, Zoic also counts numerous feature films and spots to its credits.

Saker Klippsten

According to Saker Klippsten, CTO, the facility has used a range of storage solutions over the past 16 years from BlueArc (before it was acquired by Hitachi), DataDirect Networks and others, but now uses Dell EMC’s Isilon cluster file storage system for its current needs. “We’ve been a fan of theirs for quite a long time now. I think we were customer number two,” he says, “back when they were trying to break into the media and entertainment sector.”

Locally, the studio uses Intel and NVMe drives for its workstations. NVMe, or non-volatile memory express, is an open logical device interface specification for accessing all-flash storage media attached via PCI Express (PCIe) bus. Previously, Zoic had been using Samsung SSD drives, with Samsung 1TB and 2TB EVO drives, but in the past year and a half, began migrating to NVMe on the local workstations.

Zoic transitioned to the Isilon system in 2004-2005 because of the heavy usage its renderfarm was getting. “Renderfarms work 24/7 and don’t take breaks. Our storage was getting really beat up, and people were starting to complain that it was slow accessing the file system and affecting playback of their footage and media,” explains Klippsten. “We needed to find something that could scale out horizontally.”

At the time, however, file-level storage was pretty much all that was available — “you were limited to this sort of vertical pool of storage,” says Klippsten. “You might have a lot of storage behind it, but you were still limited at the spigot, at the top end. You couldn’t get the data out fast enough.” But Isilon broke through that barrier by creating a cluster storage system that allotted the scale horizontally, “so we could balance our load, our render nodes and our artists across a number of machines, and access and update in parallel at the same time,” he adds.

Klippsten believes that solution was a big breakthrough for a lot of users; nevertheless, it took some time for others to get onboard. “In the media and entertainment industry, everyone seemed to be locked into BlueArc or NetApp,” he notes. Not so with Zoic.

Fairly recently, some new players have come onto the market, including Qumulo, touted as a “next-generation NAS company” built around advanced, distributed software running on commodity hardware. “That’s another storage platform that we have looked at and tested,” says Klippsten, adding that Zoic even has a number of nodes from the vendor.

There are other open-source options out there as well. Recently, Red Hat began offering Gluster Storage, an open, software-defined storage platform for physical, virtual and cloud environments. “And now with NVMe, it’s eliminating a lot of these problems as well,” Klippsten says.

Back when Zoic selected Isilon, there were a number of major issues that affected the studio’s decision making. As Klippsten notes, they had just opened the Vancouver office and were transferring data back and forth. “How do we back up that data? How do we protect it? Storage snapshot technology didn’t really exist at the time,” he says. But, Isilon had a number of features that the studio liked, including SyncIQ, software for asynchronous replication of data. “It could push data between different Isilon clusters from a block level, in a more automated fashion. It was very convenient. It offered a lot of parameters, such as moving data by time of day and access frequency.”

SyncIQ enabled the studio to archive the data. And for dealing with interim changes, such as a mistakenly deleted file, Zoic found Isilon’s SnapshotIQ ideal for fast data recovery. Moreover, Isilon was one of the first to support Aspera, right on the Isilon cluster. “You didn’t have to run it on a separate machine. It was a huge benefit because we transfer a lot of secure, encrypted data between us and a lot of our clients,” notes Klippsten.

Netflix’s The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Within the pipeline, Zoic’s storage system sits at the core. It is used immediately as the studio ingests the media, whether it is downloaded or transferred from hard drives – terabytes upon terabytes of data. The data is then cleaned up and distributed to project folders for tasks assigned to the various artists. In essence, it acts as a holding tank for the main production storage as an artist begins working on those specific shots, Klippsten explains.

Aside from using the storage at the floor level, the studio also employs it at the archive level, for data recovery as well as material that might not be accessed for weeks. “We have sort of a tiered level of storage — high-performance and deep-archival storage,” he says.

And the system is invaluable, as Zoic is handling 400 to 500 shots a week. If you multiply that by the number of revisions and versions that take place during that time frame, it adds up to hundreds of terabytes weekly. “Per day, we transfer between Los Angeles, Vancouver and New York somewhere around 20TB to 30TB,” he estimates. “That number increases quite a bit because we do a lot of cloud rendering. So, we are pushing a lot of data up to Google and back for cloud rendering, and all of that hits our Isilon storage.”

When Zoic was founded, it originally saw itself as a visual effects company, but at the end of the day, Klippsten says they’re really a technology company that makes pretty pictures. “We push data and move it around to its limits. We’re constantly coming up with new, creative ideas, trying to find partners that can help provide solutions collaboratively if we cannot create them ourselves. The shot cost is constantly being squeezed by studios, which want these shots done faster and cheaper. So, we have to make sure our artists are working faster, too.”

The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Recently, Zoic has been working on a TV project involving a good deal of water simulations and other sims in general — which rapidly generate a tremendous amount of data. Then the data is transferred between the LA and Vancouver facilities. Having storage capable of handling that was unheard of three years ago, Klippsten says. However, Zoic has managed to do so using Isilon along with some off-the-shelf Supermicro storage with NVMe drives, enabling its dynamics department to tackle this and other projects. “When doing full simulation, you need to get that sim in front of the clients as soon as possible so they can comment on it. Simulations take a long time — we’re doing 26GB/sec, which is crazy. It’s close to something in the high-performance computing realm.”

With all that considered, it is hardly surprising to hear Klippsten say that Zoic could not function without a solid storage solution. “It’s funny. When people talk about storage, they are always saying they don’t have enough of it. Even when you have a lot of storage, it’s always running at 99 percent full, and they wonder why you can’t just go out to Best Buy and purchase another hard drive. It doesn’t work that way!”

For more information from Dell EMC, check out their techToolbox: Storage page.

Behind the Title: Aardman director/designer Gavin Strange

NAME: Gavin Strange

COMPANY: Bristol, England-based Aardman. They also have an office in NYC under the banner Aardman Nathan Love

CAN YOU DESCRIBE HOW YOUR CAREER AT AARDMAN BEGAN?
I can indeed! I started 10 years ago as a freelancer, joining the fledgling Interactive department (or Aardman Online as it was known back then). They needed a digital designer for a six-month project for the UK’s Channel 4.

I was a freelancer in Bristol at the time and I made it my business to be quite vocal on all the online platforms, always updating those platforms and my own website with my latest work — whether that be client work or self-initiated projects. Luckily for me, the creative director of Aardman Online, Dan Efergan, saw my work when he was searching for a designer and got in touch (it was the most exciting email ever, with the subject of “Hello from Aardman!”

The short version of this story is that I got Dan’s email, popped in for a cup of tea and a chat, and 10 years later I’m still here! Ha!

The slightly longer but still truncated version is that after the six-month freelance project was done, the role of senior designer for the online team became open and I gave up the freelance life and, very excitedly, joined the team as an official Aardmanite!

Thing is, I was never shy about sharing with my new colleagues the other work I did. My role in the beginning was primarily digital/graphic design, but in my own time, under the banner of JamFactory (my own artist alter-ego name) I put out all sorts of work that was purely passion projects; films, characters, toys, clothing, art.

Gavin Strange directed this Christmas spot for the luxury brand Fortnum & Mason .

Filmmaking was a huge passion of mine and even at the earliest stages in my career when I first started out (I didn’t go to university so I got my first role as a junior designer when I was 17) I’d always be blending graphic design and film together.

Over those 10 years at Aardman I continued to make films of all kinds and share them with my colleagues. Because of that more opportunities arose to develop my film work within my existing design role. I had the unique advantage of having a lot of brilliant mentors who guided me and helped me with my moving image projects.

Those opportunities continued to grow and happen more frequently. I was doing more and more directing here, finally becoming officially represented by Aardman and added to their roster of directors. It’s a dream come true for me, because, not only do I get to work at the place I’ve admired growing up, but I’ve been mentored and shaped by the very individuals who make this place so special — that’s a real privilege.

What I really love is that my role is so varied — I’m both a director and a senior designer. I float between projects, and I love that variety. Sometimes I’m directing a commercial, sometimes I’m illustrating icons, other times I’m animating motion graphics. To me though, I don’t see a difference — it’s all creating something engaging, beautiful and entertaining — whatever the final format or medium!

So that’s my Aardman story. Ten years in, and I just feel like I’m getting started. I love this place.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE OF DIRECTOR?
Hmm, it’s tricky, as I actually think that most people’s perception of being a director is true: it’s that person’s responsibility to bring the creative vision to life.

Maybe what people don’t know is how flexible the role is, depending on the project. I love smaller projects where I get to board, design and animate, but then I love larger jobs with a whole crew of people. It’s always hands-on, but in many different ways.

Perhaps what would surprise a lot of people is that it’s every directors responsibility to clean the toilets at the end of the day. That’s what Aardman has always told me and, of course, I honor that tradition. I mean, I haven’t actually ever seen anyone else do it, but that’s because everyone else just gets on with it quietly, right? Right!?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Oh man, can I say everything!? I really, really enjoy the job as a whole — having that creative vision, working with yourself, your colleagues and your clients to bring it to life. Adapting and adjusting to changes and ensuring something great pops out the other end.

I really, genuinely, get a thrill seeing something on screen. I love concentrating on every single frame — it’s a win-win situation. You get to make a lovely image each frame, but when you stitch them together and play them really fast one after another, then you get a lovely movie — how great is that?

In short, I really love the sum total of the job. All those different exciting elements that all come together for the finished piece.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I pride myself on being an optimist and being a right positive pain in the bum, so I don’t know if there’s any part I don’t enjoy — if anything is tricky I try and see it as a challenge and something that will only improve my skillset.

I know that sounds super annoying doesn’t it? I know that can seem all floaty and idealistic, but I pride myself on being a “realistic’ idealist” — recognizing the reality of a tricky situation, but seeing it through an idealistic lens.

If I’m being honest, then probably that really early stage is my least favorite — when the project is properly kicking off and you’ve got that gap between what the treatment/script/vision says it will be and the huge gulf in between that and the finished thing. That’s also the most exciting too, the not knowing how it will turn out. It’s terrifying and thrilling, in all good measure. It surprises me every single time, but I think that panic is an essential part of any creative process.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
In an alternate world, I’d be a photographer, traveling the world, documenting everything I see, living the nomadic life. But that’s still a creative role, and I still class it as the same job, really. I love my graphic design roots too — print and digital design — but, again, I see it as all the same role really.

So that means, if I didn’t have this job, I’d be roaming the lands, offering to draw/paint/film/make for anyone that wanted it! (Is that a mercenary? Is there such a thing as a visual mercenary? I don’t really have the physique for that I don’t think.)

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
This profession chose me. I’m just kidding, that’s ridiculous, I just always wanted to say that.

I think, like most folks, I fell into it in a series of natural choices. Art, design, graphics and games always stole my attention as a kid, and I just followed the natural path into that, which turned into my career. I’m lucky enough that I didn’t feel the need to single out any one passion, and kept them all bubbling along even as I made my career choices as designer to director. I still did and still do indulge my passion for all types of mediums in my own time.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I’m not sure. I wasn’t particularly driven or focused as a kid. I knew I loved design and art, but I didn’t know of the many, many different roles out there that existed. I like that though, I see that as a positive, and also as an achievable way to progress through a career path. I speak to a lot of students and young professionals and I think it can be so overwhelming to plot a big ‘X’ on a career map and then feel all confused about how to get there. I’m an advocate of taking it one step at a time, and make more manageable advances forward — as things always get in the way and change anyway.

I love the idea of a meandering, surprising path. Who knows where it will lead!? I think as long as your aim is to make great work, then you’ll surprise yourself where you end up.

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT DIRECTING THAT ATTRACTED YOU?
I’ve always obsessed over films, and obsessed over the creation of them. I’ll watch a behind-the-scenes on any film or bit of moving image. I just love the fact that the role is to bring something to life — it’s to oversee and create something from nothing, ensuring every frame is right. The way it makes you feel, the way it looks, the way it sounds.

It’s just such an exciting role. There’s a lot of unknowns too, on every project. I think that’s where the good stuff lies. Trusting in the process and moving forwards, embracing it.

HOW DOES DIRECTING FOR ANIMATION DIFFER FROM DIRECTING FOR LIVE ACTION — OR DOES IT?
Technically it’s different — with animation your choices are pretty much made all up front, with the storyboards and animatic as your guides, and then they’re brought to life with animation. Whereas, for me, the excitement in live action is not really knowing what you’ll get until there’s a lens on it. And even then, it can come together in a totally new way in the edit.

I don’t try to differentiate myself as an “animation director” or “live-action” director. They’re just different tools for the job. Whatever tells the best story and connects with audiences!

HOW DO YOU PICK THE PEOPLE YOU WORK WITH ON A PARTICULAR PROJECT?
Their skillset is paramount, but equally as important is their passion and their kindness. There are so many great people out there, but I think it’s so important to work with people who are great and kind. Too many people get a free pass for being brilliant and feel that celebration of their work means it’s okay to mistreat others. It’s not okay… ever. I’m lucky that Aardman is a place full of excited, passionate and engaged folk who are a pleasure to work with, because you can tell they love what they do.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’ve been lucky enough to work on a real variety of projects recently. I directed an ident for the rebrand of BBC2, a celebratory Christmas spot for the luxury brand Fortnum & Mason and an autobiographical motion graphics short film about Maya Angelou for BBC Radio 4.

Maya Angelou short film for BBC Radio 4

I love the variety of them; just those three projects alone were so different. The BBC2 ident was live-action in-camera effects with a great crew of people, whereas the Maya Angelou film was just me on design, direction and animation. I love hopping between projects of all types and sizes!

I’m working on development of a stop-frame short at the moment, which is all I can say for now, but just the process alone going from idea to a scribble in a notebook to a script is so exciting. Who knows what 2019 holds!?

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Oh man, that’s a tough one! A few years back I co-directed a title sequence for a creative festival called OFFF, which happens every year in Barcelona. I worked with Aardman legend Merlin Crossingham to bring this thing to life, and it’s a proper celebration of what we both love — it ended up being what we lovingly refer to as our “stop-frame live-action motion-graphics rap-video title-sequence.” It really was all those things.

That was really special as not only did we have a great crew, I got to work with one of my favorite rappers, P.O.S., who kindly provided the beats and the raps for the film.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT
– My iPhone. It’s my music player, Internet checker, email giver, tweet maker, picture capturer.
– My Leica M6 35mm camera. It’s my absolute pride and joy. I love the images it makes.
– My Screens. At work I have a 27-inch iMac and then two 25-inch monitors on either side. I just love screens. If I could have more, I would!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I genuinely love what I do, so I rarely feel like I “need to get away from it all.” But I do enjoy life outside of work. I’m a drummer and that really helps with any and all stress really. Even just practicing on a practice pad is cathartic, but nothing compares to smashing away on a real kit.

I like to run, and I sometimes do a street dance class, which is both great fun and excruciatingly frustrating because I’m not very good.

I’m a big gamer, even though I don’t have much time for it anymore. A blast on the PS4 is a treat. In fact, after this I’m going to have a little session on God of War before bedtime.

I love hanging with my family. My wife Jane, our young son Sullivan and our dog Peggy. Just hanging out, being a dad and being a husband is the best for de-stressing. Unless Sullivan gets up at 3am, then I change my answer back to the PS4.

I’m kidding, I love my family, I wouldn’t be anything or be anywhere without them.

Foundry Nuke 11.3’s performance, collaboration updates

Foundry has launched Nuke 11.3, introducing new features and updates to the company’s family of compositing and review tools. The release is the fourth update to the Nuke 11 Series and is designed to improve the user experience and to speed up heavy processing tasks for pipelines and individual users.

Nuke 11.3 lands with major enhancements to its Live Groups feature. It introduces new functionality along with corresponding Python callbacks and UI notifications that will allow for greater collaboration and offer more control. These updates make Live Groups easier for larger pipelines to integrate and give artists more visibility over the state of the Live Group and flexibility when using user knobs to override values within a Live Group.

The particle system in NukeX has been optimized to produce particle simulations up to six times faster than previous versions of the software, and up to four times faster for playback, allowing for faster iteration when setting up particle systems.

New Timeline Multiview support provides an extension to stereo and VR workflows. Artists can now use the same multiple-file stereo workflows that exist in Nuke on the Nuke Studio, Hiero and HieroPlayer timeline. The updated export structure can also be used to create multiple-view Nuke scripts from the timeline in Nuke Studio and Hiero.

Support for full-resolution stereo on monitor out makes review sessions even easier, and a new export preset helps with rendering of stereo projects.

New UI indications for changes in bounding box size and channel count help artists troubleshoot their scripts. A visual indication identifies nodes that increase bounding box size to be greater than the image, helping artists to identify the state of the bounding box at a glance. Channel count is now displayed in the status bar, and a warning is triggered when the 1024-channel limit is exceeded. The appearance and threshold for triggering the bounding box and channel warnings can be set in the preferences.

The selection tool has also been improved in both 2D and 3D views, and an updated marquee and new lasso tool make selecting shapes and points even easier.

Nuke 11.3 is available for purchase — alongside full release details — on Foundry’s website and via accredited resellers.

DP Chat: No Activity cinematographer Judd Overton

By Randi Altman

Judd Overton, who grew up in the Australian Outback, knew he wanted to be a DP before he even knew exactly what that was, spending a lot of his time watching and re-watching movies on VHS tapes. When he was young, a documentary film crew came to his town. “I watched as the camera operator was hanging off the side of my motorbike filming as we charged over sand dunes. I thought that was a pretty cool job!”

No Activity

The rest, as they say, is history. Overton’s recent work includes the Netflix comedy series The Letdown and No Activity, which is a remake of the Australian comedy series of the same name. It stars Patrick Brammall and Tim Meadows and is produced by CBS Television Studios in association with Funny or Die, Jungle and Gary Sanchez Productions. It streams on CBS All Access.

We recently reached out to Overton, who also just completed the documentary Lessons from Joan, about one of the first female British theater directors, Joan Littlewood.

What inspires you artistically? And how do you simultaneously stay on top of advancing technology that serves your vision?
What I love about what I do is being able to see things, and show the world to audiences in a way people haven’t seen before. I always keep abreast of technology, but for me the technology really needs to service the story. I choose particular equipment in order to capture the emotion of the piece.

What new technology has changed the way you work (looking back over the past few years?
The greatest change in my world is the high-quality, high-ISO cameras now on the market. This has meant being able to shoot in a much less obtrusive way, shooting and lighting to create footage that is far closer to reality.

The use of great-quality LED lighting is something I’m really enjoying. The ability to create and capture any color and control it from your iPhone opens the floodgates for some really creative lighting.

 

Judd Overton

Can you describe your ideal collaboration with the director when setting the look of a project?
Every director is different, it’s a role and relationship I fill as required. Some directors like to operate the camera themselves. In that case, I oversee the lighting. Some directors just want to work with the actors, so my job then involves more responsibilities for coverage, camera movement and selecting locations.

I try to be open to each new experience and make creative guidelines for a project in collaboration with the director and producers, trying to preempt obstacles before they strike.

Tell us about the CBS All Access show No Activity. Can you describe the overall look of the show and what you and the director/producers wanted to achieve?
I shot the pilot for the original No Activity five years ago. Trent O’Donnell (writer/director, co-creator) wanted to make a series out of simple two hander (two actor) scenes.

We decided to use the police procedural drama genre because we knew the audience would fill in gaps with their own knowledge. In a show where very little happens, the mood and style become far more important.

How early did you get involved in the production?
I’ve been involved since the show was conceptualized. We shot the pilot in a parking lot in one of Sydney’s seedier areas. We fought off a lot of rats.

No Activity

How did you go about choosing the right camera and lenses for this project?
I had to shoot three cameras, as the show is heavily improvised. Other than my main cameras with zoom lenses, I chose the best cameras for each sequence. We used Blackmagic cameras Ursa Pro and Micro for a lot of our rigged positions. I also used Panasonic cameras for our available light work, and even an Arri 65 for some projection plates.

Were there any scenes that you are particularly proud of?
The scene I had the most fun with was the siege, which plays over the last two episodes of Season 2. We dusted off and fired up two 1930s Arc lights. Carbon Arc lights are what all the old Hollywood films used before HMIs. They are a true 5600 Kelvin, daylight source.

My gaffer’s father actually made these units, and they were refurbished for Quentin Tarantino’s film Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. We used them as searchlights for our nighttime siege, and the bright beams and plumes of smoke rising really gave the scene an epic scale.

What’s your go-to gear — things you can’t live without?
Communication is everything, and the latest toy in my toy box is HME headsets. They allow me to have constant communications with my camera operators, grips and electrics, essential when you’re running five cameras across multiple units.

The Academy names Sci-Tech Oscar winners

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will be celebrating nine scientific and technical achievements represented by 27 individual award recipients at its annual Scientific and Technical Awards presentation on February 9 at the Beverly Wilshire in Beverly Hills.

In addition, cinematographer Curtis Clark, ASC, will receive the John A. Bonner Award (a medallion) for his extraordinary service to the motion picture industry.

“Each year, the Academy forms a diverse committee made up of nearly 60 experts on the technology of filmmaking tasked with examining the tools that artists use to create films,” says Doug Roble, chair of the Scientific and Technical Awards Committee. “This year, the committee is recognizing nine technologies from around the world. These extraordinary contributions to the science of filmmaking have elevated our art form to incredible new heights.”

Unlike other Academy Awards to be presented this year, achievements receiving Scientific and Technical Awards need not have been developed and introduced during 2018. Rather, the achievements must demonstrate a proven record of contributing significant value to the process of making motion pictures.

The Academy Awards for scientific and technical achievements are:

Technical Achievement Awards (Academy Certificates)
To Eric Dachs, Erik Bielefeldt, Craig Wood and Paul McReynolds for the design and development of the Pix System’s novel security mechanism for distributing media.

Pix System’s approach to secure media access has enabled wide adoption of their remotely collaborative dailies-review system by the motion picture industry.

To Per-Anders Edwards for the initial design and development of the MoGraph toolset in Maxon’s Cinema 4D for motion graphics.

MoGraph provides a fast, non-destructive and intuitive workflow for motion designers to create animated 3D graphics, as used for title design and fictional user interfaces in motion pictures.

To Paul Miller for the software design, principal engineering and continued innovation, and to Marco Paolini for the efficient, artist-friendly workflow design of the Silhouette rotoscope and paint system.
Silhouette provides a comprehensive solution for painting, rotoscoping and image manipulation of high-resolution image sequences. Its fast, scalable and extensible architecture has resulted in wide adoption in motion picture post.

To Paul Debevec, Tim Hawkins and Wan-Chun Ma for the invention of the Polarized Spherical Gradient Illumination facial appearance capture method, and to Xueming Yu for the design and engineering of the Light Stage X capture system.

Polarized Spherical Gradient Illumination was a breakthrough in facial capture technology allowing shape and reflectance capture of an actor’s face with sub-millimeter detail, enabling the faithful recreation of hero character faces. The Light Stage X structure was the foundation for all subsequent innovation and has been the keystone of the method’s evolution into a production system.

To Thabo Beeler, Derek Bradley, Bernd Bickel and Markus Gross for the conception, design and engineering of the Medusa Performance Capture System.

Medusa captures exceptionally dense animated meshes without markers or makeup, pushing the boundaries of visual fidelity and productivity for character facial performances in motion pictures.

To Charles Loop for his influential research on the fundamental scientific properties of subdivision surfaces as 3D geometric modeling primitives.

Loop’s 1987 master’s thesis, “Smooth Subdivision Surfaces Based on Triangles,” together with his subsequent research and publications, extended the theory of subdivision surfaces and inspired further development of methods that transformed the way digital artists represent 3D geometry throughout the motion picture industry.

Scientific and Engineering Awards (Academy Plaques)
To David Simons, Daniel Wilk, James Acquavella, Michael Natkin and David Cotter for the design and development of the Adobe After Effects software for motion graphics.

After Effects’ use of consumer hardware to host an application that is extensible, efficient and artist-focused has made it the preeminent motion graphics tool in film production, allowing motion designers to create complex animated elements for title design, screen graphics and fictional user interfaces.

To Thomas Knoll and John Knoll for the original architecture, design and development, and to Mark Hamburg for his continued development and engineering of Adobe Photoshop.

Photoshop’s efficient, extensible architecture, innovative virtual-memory design and powerful layering system introduced a new level of user interactivity, which led to its adoption as the preferred artistic tool for digital painting and image manipulation across the motion picture industry.

To Ed Catmull for the original concept, and to Tony DeRose and Jos Stam for their pioneering advancement of the underlying science of subdivision surfaces as 3D geometric modeling primitives.
Their creation of essential geometric operations and sustained research on the fundamental mathematics of subdivision surfaces helped transform the way digital artists represent 3D geometry throughout the motion picture industry.

John A. Bonner Award (Medallion)

Curtis Clark
Presented to an individual in recognition of extraordinary service to the motion picture industry.

Boxx adds new Apexx S-class workstations with 9th-gen Intel processors

Boxx Technologies is offering a new line of Apexx S-class workstations featuring the company’s flagship Apexx S3. Purpose-built for 3D design, CAD and motion media workflows requiring CPU frequencies suitable for lightly threaded apps, the compact Apexx S3 now features a 9th-generation, eight-core Intel Core i7 or i9 processor (professionally overclocked to 5.1GHz) to support more heavily threaded applications as well.

Designed to optimize Autodesk tools, Adobe Creative Cloud, Maxon Cinema 4D and other applications, the overclocked and liquid-cooled Apexx S3 sustains its 5.1GHz frequency across all cores. With increased storage and upgradability, as well as multiple Nvidia Quadro or AMD Radeon Pro graphics cards, S3 is also ideal for light GPU compute or virtual reality.

New to the S-class line is Apexx Enigma S3. Built to accelerate professional 3D applications, Enigma S3 is also configurable with 9th-generation, eight-core Intel Core i7/i9 processors overclocked to 5.1GHz and up to three professional GPUs, making it suitable for workflows that include significant GPU rendering or GPU compute work.

The compact Apexx S3 and Enigma S3 are joined by the Apexx S1. The S1 also features an overclocked, eight-core Intel Core i7 for 3D content creation, CAD design and motion media. With its ultra-compact chassis, the S1 is a good solution for limited desktop space, an open environment or workflows where a graphics card is used primarily for display.

Rounding out the S-class family is the Apexx S4, a rack-mount system designed for heavy rendering or GPU compute.