Author Archives: Randi Altman

  Molinare hires Nigel Bennett as commercial director

Nigel Bennett will be joining London’s Molinare as commercial director. He was most recently at Pinewood Studios and starts in May. 

Bennett brings experience managing creative, technical and financial pressures within post production.

At Pinewood Studios, Bennett was the group director of creative services, a position he had held since 2014, where he oversaw the opening of Pinewood Digital in Atlanta. With a career in post, Nigel worked his way up from re-recording mixer, through operations management across film, TV and games, head of operations of digital content services, up to his most recent role.

As a re-recording mixer at Shepperton Studios, he worked on a range of titles such as Nanny McPhee, Troy, Love Actually, Gosford Park and Last Orders. 

The London facility looks to build on the success of award-winning dramas Killing Eve and Bodyguard, the Primetime Emmy award-nominated Patrick Melrose, the documentary Three Identical Strangers and feature Mission: Impossible – Fallout, all from last year.

Free Solo: The filmmakers behind the Oscar-nominated doc

By Iain Blair

Do you suffer from vertigo? Are you deathly afraid of heights? Does the thought of hanging by your fingertips over the void make you feel like throwing up? Then the new, nail-biting climbing film Free Solo, Oscar-nominated for Best Documentary feature, might not be for you.

But if you enjoy an edge-of-your-seat thriller that allows you — thanks to truly awesome cinematography — to virtually ‘free solo’ (climb a rock face without any safety gear) from the comfort of your own armchair, then you should rush to see this inspiring portrait of an athlete who challenges both his body and his beliefs on a quest to triumph over the impossible.

Jimmy Chin and E. Chai Vasarhelyi

Made by the award-winning husband-and-wife team of documentary filmmakers E. Chai Vasarhelyi and renowned photographer and mountaineer Jimmy Chin, it follows daredevil climber Alex Honnold as he prepares to tackle the greatest challenge of his career: a death-defying ascent of Yosemite’s famous 3,200-foot sheer rock face El Capitan — without any ropes, safety harness or assistance in a “free solo” climb. His meticulous preparation is complicated by his falling in love with a new girlfriend, Sanni.

I spoke with the couple, whose credits include the acclaimed 2015 climbing epic Meru, about making the Nat Geo film, their love of post, and the Oscars.

Congratulations on your nomination. How important are Oscars to a film like this?
E. Chai Vasarhelyi (ECV): Incredibly important, as they bring so much attention to it and get it to a far wider audience than it might otherwise get. But, of course, we didn’t make this with awards in mind. You can’t think like that when you’re doing it, but we’re so grateful for the nomination.

This is not your typical climbing movie. Jimmy, you’re also an elite climber. What drives someone to do this, and what sort of film did you set out to make?
Jimmy Chin (JC): I think it’s the same thing as what makes us want to go to the moon, or why someone pushes themselves to the edge for their calling or passion: to see how far you can take it. That’s at the heart of this and the sort of film we set out to make, and what’s amazing about Alex and his story is just how far he’s come.

He was this very shy. Sort of awkward kid who was scared of all kinds of things, and through his determination to face all his fears — whether it was simply hugging people or his dislike of vegetables — he’s gone through this huge transformation. Climbing like this was, I think, ultimately easier for him to conquer than some other stuff in his life. So we wanted to capture all of that, but also all the raw emotional moments that really engage an audience. It’s a film about this amazing climb, but it’s not just a climbing movie. That’s how we approached it.

Alex is also a friend of yours. How do you film a potentially fatal climb like this without exploiting it?
ECV: It was a big ethical question, even if a more extreme case of it that comes with every documentary. Did we even want to make this film? And, if so, how did we honor Alex and what he was trying to do without making it at all sensational. There are so many different ways to tell a story, and Alex had to trust us. Then there’s that existential ethical question at the center of it all — is he more likely to fall because we’re there filming it? That’s something we really had to wrestle with.

Alex thought more about his own mortality than anyone else, and he chooses every day to live a certain way and we were going to do everything in our power to mitigate the risk. So it was all about doing justice to the story and respecting Alex and every decision he makes, including the way he prepared so carefully for the climb.

How tough was the shoot?
ECV: It was very hard, even though we had a big team of elite climbers who were also great cameramen and trained for two years to do this.

JC: We had over 30 people on El Cap alone, including four cameramen on the wall, including myself, and most of us were very up high — around 2,000 feet. We used some very long lens cameras on the ground, as well as some remote rigs and drones and other equipment. But we knew that we were in situations where a simple mistake could be catastrophic. There were a lot of potential hazards, and the big thing for the crew was to never get distracted, which is so easy when you’re watching someone free solo up 3,000 feet in front of you. It was grueling and exhausting for everyone involved — super-intense, both physically and mentally. It’s hard to overstate what everyone went through to make this film.

Talk about re-teaming with Meru editor Bob Eisenhardt, who just won the ACE Eddie for this film. He told me it took over a year to edit.
ECV: It actually took over 18 months, partly because we had so much footage to look at and sort through. But I don’t think the sheer volume of footage was the main editing challenge. We were attracted to his story because there’s so much more to it than just the climb itself, and while we were all so prepared for that, we never anticipated him and Sanni falling in love. When that happened, you have to just go with it. We spent a lot of time trying stuff and figuring out how to marry that with the climb so that it played authentically to people very familiar with climbing as well as to people like me, who aren’t. It was all about a negotiation.

Where did you post?
ECV: All in New York, at our own post place called Little Monster Films, and then we did our sound work and mixing at Soundtrack with re-recording mixer Tommy Fleischman, and we also did some ADR work at C5 Inc.

Do you like the post process?
ECV: We love it, because you finally start pulling in all the layers — like the music and sound and VFX — and you see the film come to life and change as you go along. We also had the luxury of a long post schedule to play around with the material, and it’s so much fun.

Obviously, sound is very important, especially when Alex was out of range of wireless mics.
ECV: Having made a few films, we know just how important the sound is and we had a great sound recordist in the field and a great sound team. When you don’t climb with ropes, all the sounds are very subtle.

What VFX were involved?
JC: One of the big ones was trying to give you a sense of El Cap’s true scale. It’s so hard to get across just how big it is. We tried a lot of things and finally ended up getting access to Google Earth high-res satellite imagery, and we were able to 3D map that and then build out those moving, contextual shots, and all that stuff was done by Big Star.

Where did you do the DI, and how important was it to you?
JC: We did the DI at Company 3 with Stefan Sonnenfeld. It was very important as one of the big challenges was that we shot using a lot of different cameras, and so we had to work to get a consistent look and feel the whole way through, so you don’t pull people out of it at key moments. But we also didn’t want to create a stylized look to the footage. We wanted to keep it fairly naturalistic, and we worked hard on that.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
ECV: Yes, as we’d planned it so carefully — how to treat the climb, how you get to know Alex. This whole project took about four years, from start to finish. But Sanni was the big surprise.

What’s your view of Alex today?
JC: He’s an incredible person who did something no one else has ever done. It’s still hard to comprehend just how amazing this feat was.

What’s next? Another climbing film?
ECV: (Laughs) No. No more climbing for a while. It’s a documentary about conservation.

London’s Jelly opens in NYC, EP relocates

London-based Jelly, an animation, design and production company that’s produced for many US-based agencies and direct clients, has opened a full-time presence in New York. Their senior creative producer Eri Panasci will relocate to lead the new entity as executive producer.

Launched in 2002, Jelly functions as both a production company and artist management agency. On the commercials front, Jelly represents a global roster of directors and creators who’ve produced animation and motion graphics for brands like Lacoste, Apple, Samsung, Adidas and others. In the latter role, it represents a roster of illustrators and designers who regularly collaborate with brands on print, digital and outdoor ad campaigns.

Panasci’s move to New York is also a homecoming. This Connecticut native and graduate of Boston University, has worked in New York, San Francisco and London for McCann and Vice Media. She joined Jelly in London in 2016, overseeing design and production assignments for such clients as Virgin Media, Google, Nespresso, McDonald’s and Bombay Sapphire.

“One of the things I’ll be able to do is provide a deeper level of service for our US clients from New York versus London,” says Panasci, “and meld that with the Jelly model and culture. And being able to put a face to a name is always good, especially when you’re dealing with someone who understands the American market and its expectations.”

The studio has lined up US representation with James Bartlett of Mr. Bartlett, whose initial brief will be to handle the East Coast.

Coming from the UK, how does Panasci describe the Jelly approach? “It’s playful yet competent,” she says with enthusiasm. “We don’t take ourselves too seriously, but on the other hand we get shit done, and we do it well. We’re known for craft and solutions, and famously for not saying the word ‘no’ — unless we really have to!”

Recent Jelly projects include Hot House, a zany TVC for Virgin Mobile, co-directed by Design Lad and Kitchen; Soho, an animated short for the shared workspace company Fora and London agency Anyways, directed by Niceshit; and Escape, a spot for the outdoor clothing company Berghaus, directed by Em Cooper for VCCP that uses the director’s unique, hand-painted technique.

Panasci says the focus of Jelly’s US operations will initially be motion work, but adds their illustration talents will also be available, and they’ll be showing print portfolios along with showreels when meeting with agencies and clients. Jelly’s head of illustration, Nicki Field, will accompany Panasci in March to kick off the New York presence with a series of meetings and screenings.

While based in London, the studio is at ease working in America, Panasci says. They’ve produced campaigns for such shops as 72andSunny, Mother, Droga5, BBH, Wieden + Kennedy, Publicis and more, working with both their US and European offices.

Most recently, Jelly signed the New York-based animation team Roof to a representation agreement for the UK market; the team played a leading role in the recent “Imaginary Friends” campaign from RPA in Santa Monica.

CAS and MPSE honor audio post pros and their work

By Mel Lambert

With a BAFTA win and high promise for the upcoming Oscar Awards, the sound team behind Bohemian Rhapsody secured a clean sweep at both the Cinema Audio Society (CAS) and Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) ceremonies here in Los Angeles last weekend.

Paul Massey

The 55th CAS Awards also honored sound mixer Lee Orloff with a Cinema Audio Society Career Achievement Award, while director Steven Spielberg received its Cinema Audio Society Filmmaker Award. And at the MPSE Awards, director Antoine Fuqua accepted the the 2019 Filmmaker Award, while supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick secured the MPSE Career Achievement honor.

Re-recording mixer Paul Massey — accepting the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture-Live Action on behalf of his fellow dubbing mixers Tim Cavagin and Niv Adiri, together with production mixer John Casali — thanked Bohemian Rhapsody’s co-executive producer and band members Roger Taylor and Brian May for “trusting me to mix the music of Queen.”

The film topped a nominee field that also included A Quiet Place, A Star is Born, Black Panther and First Man; for several years the CAS winner in the feature-film category also has secured an Oscar Award for sound mixing.

Isle of Dogs secured a CAS Award in the animation category, which also included Incredibles 2, Ralph Breaks the Internet, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and The Grinch. The sound-mixing team included original dialogue mixer Darrin Moore and re-recording mixers Christopher Scarabosio and Wayne Lemmer, together with scoring mixers Xavier Forcioli and Simon Rhodes and Foley mixer Peter Persaud.

Free Solo won a documentary award for production mixer Jim Hurst, re-recording mixers Tom Fleischman and Ric Schnupp, together with scoring mixer Tyson Lozensky, ADR mixer David Boulton and Foley mixer Joana Niza Braga.

Finally, American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace (Part 1) The Man Who Would Be Vogue, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: Vote For Kennedy, Vote For Kennedy and Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (Bhutan) won CAS Awards within various broadcast sound categories.

Steven Spielberg and Bradley Cooper

The CAS Filmmaker Award was presented to Steven Spielberg by fellow director Bradley Cooper. This followed tributes from regular members of Spielberg’s sound team, including production sound mixer Ron Judkins plus re-recording mixers Andy Nelson and Gary Rydstrom, who quipped: “We spent so much money on Jurassic Park that [Steven] had to shoot Schindler’s List in black & white!”

“Through your talent, [sound editors and mixers] allow the audience to see with their ears,” Spielberg acknowledged, while stressing the full sonic and visual impact of a theatrical experience. “There’s nothing like a big, dark theater,” he stated. He added that he still believes that movie theaters are the best environment in which to fully enjoy his cinematic creations.

Upon receiving his Career Achievement Award from sound mixer Chris Noyes and director Dean Parisot, production sound mixer Lee Orloff acknowledged the close collaboration that needs to exist between members of the filmmaking team. “It is so much more powerful than the strongest wall you could build,” he stated, recalling a 35-year career that spans nearly 80 films.

Lee Orloff

Outgoing CAS president Mark Ulano presented the President’s Award to leading Foley mixer MaryJo Lang, while the CAS Student Award went to Anna Wozniewicz of Chapman University. Finalists included Maria Cecilia Ayalde Angel of Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Allison Ng of USC, Bo Pang of Chapman University, and Kaylee Yacono of Savannah College of Art and Design.

Finally, the CAS Outstanding Product Awards went to Dan Dugan Sound Design for its Dugan Automixing in the Sound Devices 633 Compact Mixer, and to Izotope for its RX7 Audio Repair Software.

The CAS Awards ceremony was hosted by comedian Michael Kosta.

 

Motion Picture Sound Editors Awards

During the 66th Annual Golden Reels, outstanding achievement in sound editing awards were presented in 23 categories, encompassing feature films, long- and short-form television, animation, documentaries, games, special venue and other media.

The Americans, Atlanta, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Westworld figured prominently within the honored TV series.

Following introductions by re-recording mixer Steve Pederson and supervising sound editor Mandell Winter, director/producer Michael Mann presented the 2019 MPSE Filmmaker Award to Antoine Fuqua, while Academy Award-winning supervising sound editor Ben Wilkins presented the MPSE Career Achievement Award to fellow supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick, who also serves as professor of cinematic arts at the University of Southern California.

Antoine Fuqua

“We celebrate the creation of entertainment content that people will enjoy for generations to come,” MPSE president Tom McCarthy stated in his opening address. “As new formats appear and new ways to distribute content are developed, we need to continue to excel at our craft and provide exceptional soundtracks that heighten the audience experience.”

As Pederson stressed during his introduction to the MPSE Filmmaker Award, Fuqua “counts on sound to complete his vision [as a filmmaker].” “His films are stylish and visceral,” added Winter, who along with Pederson has worked on a dozen films for the director during the past two decades.

“He is a director who trusts his own vision,” Mandell confirmed. “Antoine loves a layered soundtrack. And ADR has to be authentic and true to his artistic intentions. He is a bone fide storyteller.”

Four-time Oscar-nominee Mann stated that the honored director “always elevates everything he touches; he uses sound design and music to its fullest extent. [He is] a director who always pushes the limits, while evolving his art.”

Pre-recorded tributes to Fuqua came from actor Chis Pratt, who starred in The Magnificent Seven (2017). “Nobody deserves [this award] more,” he stated. Actor Mark Wahlberg, who starred in Shooter (2007), and producer Jerry Bruckheimer were also featured.

Stephen Hunter Flick

During his 40-year career in the motion picture industry, while working on some 150 films, Steven H. Flick has garnered two Oscar Award wins for Speed (1994) and Robocop (1987) together with nominations for Total Recall (1990), Die Hard (1988) and Poltergeist (1982).

The award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Animation Short Form went to Overwatch – Reunion from Blizzard Entertainment, headed by supervising sound editor Paul Menichini. The Non-Theatrical Animation Long Form award was awarded to NextGen from Netflix, headed by supervising sound editors David Acord and Steve Slanec.

The Feature Animation award went to the Oscar-nominated Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse from Sony Pictures Entertainment/Marvel, headed by supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey. The Non-Theatrical Documentary award went to Searching for Sound — Islandman and Veyasin from Karga Seven Pictures/Red Bull TV, headed by supervising sound editor Suat Ayas. Finally, the Feature Documentary was a tie between Free Solo from National Geographic Documentary Films, headed by supervising sound editor Deborah Wallach, and They Shall Not Grow Old from Wingnut Films/Fathom Events/Warner Bros., headed by supervising sound editors Martin Kwok, Brent Burge, Melanie Graham and Justin Webster.

The Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing — Music Score award also went to Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, with music editors Katie Greathouse and Catherine Wilson, while the Musical award went to Bohemian Rhapsody from GK Films/Fox Studios, with supervising music editor John Warhurst and music editor Neil Stemp. The Dialogue/ADR award also went to Bohemian Rhapsody, with supervising ADR/dialogue editors Nina Hartston and Jens Petersen, while the Effects/Foley award went to A Quiet Place from Paramount Pictures, with supervising sound editors Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl.

The Student Film/Verna Fields Award went to Facing It from National Film and Television School, with supervising sound designer/editor Adam Woodhams.


LA-based Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

Black Panther editors Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver

By Amy Leland

Black Panther was a highly anticipated film that became a massive hit with audiences and critics alike. Just the fact that it’s a Marvel film would have been enough to create both anticipation and success, but this movie went beyond that, breaking barriers as well as box office records. The film was nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture.

Instead of being referred to as a great superhero film, it was simply called a great film. It’s also the kind of high-quality offering you would expect from director Ryan Coogler, whose prior credits include Fruitvale Station and Creed, both of which feature Michael B. Jordon, who is also in Black Panther.

Michael Shawver

I had a chance to talk with the Black Panther editing team — Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver — about the film and their process co-editing such a huge project.

How did you both end up on this project?
Michael Shawver: I’ve known Ryan since our days in film school at the University of Southern California. We met back in 2009 in a directing class, and he was making short films that were just above and beyond everybody else. They were about society, race, culture, everything, and they really made you feel and think. That’s the kind of thing that I always wanted to do, the whole reason I wanted to make movies.

One day after class I went up to him and said, “I’d love to work with you. I can edit a little bit.” Things then fell into place, and I was able to work on a short film we did in school. From there he fought to keep me and the rest of the short film team involved in Fruitvale Station. Then we worked on Creed and then Black Panther.

Debbie Berman: For me it was kind of a serendipitous backstory. I was awarded an editing fellowship to the Sundance Institute in 2012, and as part of the fellowship I went to the Sundance Film Festival and went to the awards ceremony for the first time. That was the year that Fruitvale won Sundance. So I was actually there watching Ryan’s career begin, and I remember absolutely loving the movie and really being drawn to him as a filmmaker. I thought Creed was absolutely brilliant. I ugly cried through most of Creed. I think it’s phenomenal.

Debbie Berman

When I was working on Spider-Man: Homecoming, I kept talking about Black Panther. As a South African, it was a film that really spoke to me, and really felt like it was going to be important to me. So Marvel connected us.

Shawver: When we met with Debbie, we just kind of knew. Ryan and I both knew a few minutes in that she was the right choice and that this was going to be the right fit. Between her work ethic, her worldview, her passion and what she focuses on to tell a story and to bring characters alive, I think it all just rang true with how we felt and our process.
And you never know. It’s tough when you co-edit with somebody because you kind of just go on one date and then you’re married. You never know how it’s going to work out. And there’s always creative discussion; there’s always, “What if this is better? What if that’s better?” But everybody left their egos at the door. We’re all “movies first.” We don’t take anything personally, and we help each other not take anything personally, and we support each other. It couldn’t have worked out better.

Berman: I totally agree. It’s like one day you’re married, but you’re married during a world war. You’re going through a very stressful time together. I did feel an instant kinship with Mike and Ryan the second we all met. It just felt like meeting old family. I’ve been passionate about filmmaking my entire life, and they have the same amount of passion. And as Mike said, we always put the film first, and with having that shared love of this movie in particular, it really just got us through everything.

I got to meet Ryan at a screening of Fruitvale Station, and I was struck by how humble he is. As a leader of a project, he must bring that to the environment. Did you all feel that when you were working with him?
Shawver: Oh yeah. That’s what he’s really like. I tell people that he’s a great director, but he’s a hundred times better person. He believes that people who make the movies are more important than the movie itself. That humility that he has allows him to learn. He’ll be the first one to say that he’s not the smartest person in the room, even though everybody would disagree with him. He understands that when you can admit that you don’t know everything, you can start to learn.

I think that, much like T’Challa does in the movie, Ryan feeds off of the people around him. There’s a reason we have certain members of the team that have stayed with Ryan for so long, and he would fight for us. When he brought Debbie into the fold, it was the same way. We all feel like we have so much to learn, and we’re so grateful to be in the position that we’re in. We can’t see operating any other way.

Berman: Ryan insists on honesty from his crew, and never feels that anything you say is a critique of him or his work. He understands that everything you say is just trying to make the film better. There is an open environment where it’s okay to say anything you want. It’s a safe environment to fail because out of a hundred ideas, if you get three that are great then it was worth the other 97 that maybe weren’t so great, because it’s all for the greater good of the film.

Were you both on the project from the beginning, and how did that process work with the two of you cutting the film together?
Berman: Mike started a bit before me, but the film as you see today is something we built from scratch together. We mostly worked on separate scenes. A film this big, it’s good to take ownership of certain sections, because there’s so much to track in terms of the visual effects load. But we collaborated on everything, we always watched each other’s work and we always gave input, suggestions and feedback. There were a couple of scenes we handed back and forth. If someone had an idea for something, then they would take over that scene and do a pass on it. It was basically a good mixture of complete ownership and collaboration all at the same time.

Shawver: I think the key for us was to work as organically as possible and never let anybody’s creative idea or creative juices go to waste. If Debbie came in one day just raring to go on a scene and had a dream about it, an epiphany about it or something, and wanted to dig in and explore more and see if she could elevate a moment, we would be dumb to get in the way of her doing that.

I think we understood that we had to find a balance of feeling of ownership over the scenes, the moments and the movie as a whole, but also understand that this is a story that needs to speak to everybody. We had a very diverse post team, and that’s not by accident. It’s because diversity can bring about the greatest art. Even down to some of our production assistants, who we would bring in to watch certain things just to give us thoughts, and that would always be filtered to Ryan. With a beast of a movie as big as Black Panther — what was it, like, 500 hours of footage.

As the editors, we’re the first audience. We’re the gatekeepers for everything else. So we have to focus on the details, and the movie as a whole. And with a thing that size and with that many people on a team, it helps to break it down but never be hard and fast with those boundaries.

Berman: One thing that was really important to me was all of the strong female characters in the film. I really focused on the ladies, and just making sure they were the most spectacular, powerful representations they could be. And, of course, we both worked on everything, but I think Mike probably took a bit more of T’Challa. It was such a difficult mix to have our central character surrounded by all of these other strong characters, but still make him feel like the strong and central presence. We both worked quite a lot on Killmonger, because we had to try creating an empathetic villain. It would have been easy to veer in either direction too far. We just had to keep the balance of, you can empathize with the point he’s making, but he’s going about it in the wrong way.

Shawver: With anything you do as an editor, these things are hard. I’m not going to lie. You’re second-guessing yourself. We all need to find our story in it, but also how we can share ourselves in each of these characters. What we focused on a lot, in our own ways, were the relationships in the movie. Because if you boil it down, the relationships make that world go upwards, downwards, leftward, rightwards. My son had just turned one at the time, so the theme of fathers and sons that’s achieved in the movie really resonated with me. Just like Debbie with the female characters. Female characters often don’t get what they deserve on screen, but we made sure that they did. Debbie really took guardianship of that, shepherding it through. I think those are some of the strongest points in the movie.

Berman: Mike was really incredible at putting emotion into scenes. The fight scenes, for example. There are these amazing Warrior Falls scenes, which are action scenes, but they’re so emotional. Most of that is the work Mike put in, like folding it around the characters watching the action, and how you’re filtering your own audience reaction through what they’re experiencing.

I remember there was a lot of talk in the press when the movie came out about representation and inclusion in the film, especially for an action or superhero film. As a woman, I really felt like, “Wow this is an action movie that’s showing people I can relate to on screen.”
Berman: Every time I watched a scene, I would do a pass where I would try to watch it through the female gaze. One of the examples of that editorially is right at the end, when the Dora Milaje are surrounded and the Jabari save them. Originally the Jabari warriors were all male. So I had a conversation with Ryan and I said, “You know, we go through this entire movie with these absolutely spectacular female warriors and then at the end of the film the men save them. I think that it undercuts a lot of what we have built up with them over the course of the film.” But I didn’t know what the solution was.

Ryan, in his brilliance, was like, “Well, what if we make some of the Jabari warriors female?” Which I thought was amazing. But, of course, they’d already shot this massive, complicated action sequence. Luckily, in additional photography, Marvel supported that idea, and they created Jabari female warriors. The very first warrior to break through the force field and save them is this absolutely kick-ass Jabari female warrior. It really made such a difference, not only to that moment, which is one of the coolest moments in the film to me, but just throughout the entire film with what we’re trying to say.

When you first started working, was there any sense of, “Okay, Michael, you’ve been working on the indie film side, so you start with some of the dialogue scenes. Debbie you just came from another Marvel film, so work on the action scenes”? How did you decide who was working on what scenes?

Shawver: We didn’t want to keep it separate in that way. I know for myself, and Debbie as well, if there’s something that we’re not as strong at as an editor, we use the opportunity to be able to edit and get better at those things.

Debbie was on Spider-Man, and I went to Atlanta a little early to start on Panther because I’d never done one of these before, and I was terrified. Every morning I woke up having to pinch myself that I was working on a movie like this. But then the whole rest of the day was, “Don’t screw this up. Don’t screw this up.” Then, when Debbie came in, and said, “This would be a good idea if we did it this way. Here’s what you can do to help this process move along faster. Here’s what you can do to have more specific discussions with the effects teams.” Just those in and outs of having gone through a process like that with Spider-Man helped us immensely. Debbie and I are strong editors. We have our strengths and we have a couple of weaknesses, but I feel like we’re both pretty well rounded. In certain ways, Debbie is stronger than I am, and she would critique certain things and give me notes.

We had a discussion early on. Ryan said he felt better when both of his editors touched a scene, because that way both of our stories could be told. He’d also say that if both of us agreed on something and he didn’t, he’d go with our idea because, “You guys are smart. If you guys say this is better and you both agree on it, then we’re going to do it.”

Berman: We actually pushed each other to go further, because there might be a point where you’re like, “Yeah, I’m happy with the scene” and then someone comes in and prompts you and questions things, and it forces you to re-evaluate and see if you can make every single moment just a little bit better.

I had just done Spider-Man, but I’d also done some indie films. I wasn’t too far removed from understanding what the knowledge gaps would be, ‘because I’d only filled those knowledge gaps myself about five seconds earlier. So I felt like I came from the same world, and I understood what they needed to know based on what I had just learned from my past experience.

Were you in edit rooms next to each other?
Berman: We had separate edit suites. But every time someone was finished with a scene we would sit together, either just the two of us or if Ryan was around sometimes the three of us together. We were on the same floor, a few doors away from each other, but we’re working on our own systems pretty much most of the day, and then checking in with each other. We also sat in the effects reviews together, making sure that the visual effects were serving the story and serving the way we created the scenes. We were also in the sound mix together.

Shawver: One of the things that I learned from Ryan, and about Ryan, is you just have to trust him. There are times as an editor, especially when you have a team of dozens and dozens of people, when they are looking at you and needing a scene to be done or a decision to be made, but we haven’t fully gotten it there yet. Ryan said to me, I think it was an Abraham Lincoln quote, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I’ll spend the first four sharpening the ax.” He told me that right after I was getting very nervous about a deadline we had, because he had to go to a bunch of other meetings and stuff like that, and that really put things into perspective.

There were times that we’d just sit and talk for an hour or two. The days are long — 10-, 12-hour days, sometimes longer. But we would have conversations; they’d be conversations about specific scenes, current events, our daily lives, how we feel, if one of us is going through something. First of all, if someone’s not having a good day, Ryan’s going to notice as soon as they step foot in the building, and he’s going to drop everything to make sure that that person is okay and find out if they need to go home. Whether it’s a personal tragedy, national tragedy, anything like that.

Berman: Whether it’s one of his key crew, or one of the PAs, he’ll notice.

Shawver: Yeah, it doesn’t matter who you are. The movie is a political movie. T’Challa’s a politician, and it has to do with world events and current events, and I think we’d be mistaken to not discuss those and see how we feel. But not just discuss, because the three of us probably agree on a lot of things that maybe a good amount of viewers in the world wouldn’t agree on. We talked from all different sides. That’s where that diversity comes in, and that love for making this movie that really is about bringing people together.

Berman: Yeah, that was very interesting to me, because I’m not used to sitting and talking so much. I’m used to like, “Editing! Editing! Editing!” It worked its way into the film. You spend a few hours chatting and you get to know each other, but it’s all working its way into the film. You’re connecting to each other as human beings and making this piece of art together, so it all works its way in… and it all makes the film better.

What’s up next for both of you?
Shawver: I’m working on a movie called Honest Thief. It’s starring Liam Neeson. It’s about a bank robber looking for redemption. It’s nice to be back on a movie just about relationships and small interpersonal drama to help sharpen those skills. It’s directed by Mark Williams, a really talented director.

Berman: I’m working on Captain Marvel, at the moment, sort of the final sprint to the finish line right now.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Sound designer Ash Knowlton joins Silver Sound

Emmy Award-winning NYC sound studio Silver Sound has added sound engineer Ash Knowlton to its roster. Knowlton is both a location sound recordist and sound designer, and on rare and glorious occasions she is DJ Hazyl. Knowlton has worked on film, television, and branded content for clients such as NBC, Cosmopolitan and Vice, among others.

“I know it might sound weird but for me, remixing music and designing sound occupy the same part of my brain. I love music, I love sound design — they are what make me happy. I guess that’s why I’m here,” she says.

Knowlton moved to Brooklyn from Albany when she was 18 years old. To this day, she considers making the move to NYC and surviving as one of her biggest accomplishments. One day, by chance, she ran into filmmaker John Zhao on the street and was cast on the spot as the lead for his feature film Alexandria Leaving. The experience opened Knowlton’s eyes to the wonders and complexity of the filmmaking process. She particularly fell in love with sound mixing and design.

Ten years later, with over seven independent feature films now under her belt, Knowlton is ready for the next 10 years as an industry professional.

Her tools of choice at Silver Sound are Reaper, Reason and Kontakt.

Main Photo Credit: David Choy

Helicopter Film Services intros Titan ultra-heavy lifting drone

Helicopter Filming Services (HFS) has launched an ultra-heavy lift drone that incorporates a large, capable airframe paired with the ARRI SRH-3. Known as the Titan, the drone’s ARRI SRH-3 stabilized head enables easy integration of existing ARRI lens motors and other functionality directly with the ARRI Alexa 65 and LF cameras.

HFS developed the large drone in response to requests from some legendary DPs and VFX supervisors to enable filmmakers to fly large-format digital or 35mm film packages.

“We have trialed other heavy-lift machines, but all of them have been marginal in terms of performance when carrying the larger cameras and lenses that we’re asked to fly,” says Alan Perrin, chief UAV pilot at HFS. “What we needed, and what we’ve designed, is a system that will capably and safely operate with the large-format cameras and lenses that top productions demand.”

The Titan combines triple redundancy on flight controls and double redundancy on power supply and ballistic recovery into an aircraft that can deploy and operate easily on any production involving a substantial flight duration. The drone can easily fly a 35mm film camera while carrying an ARRI 435 and 400-foot magazine.

Here are some specs:
• Optimized for large-format digital and 35mm film cameras
• Max payload up to 30 kilograms
• Max take-off mass — 80 kilograms
• Redundant flight control systems
• Ballistic recovery system (parachute)
• Class-leading stability
• Flight duration up to 15 minutes (subject to payload weight and configuration)
• HD video downlink
• Gimbal: ARRI SRH3 or Movi XL

Final payload-proving flights are taking place now, and the company is in the process of planning first use on major productions. HFS is also exploring the ability to fly a new 65mm film camera on the Titan.

SciTech Medallion Recipient: A conversation with Curtis Clark, ASC

By Barry Goch

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences has awarded Curtis Clark, ASC, the John A. Bonner Medallion “in appreciation for outstanding service and dedication in upholding the high standards of the Academy.” The presentation took place in early February and just prior to the event, I spoke to Clark and asked him to reflect on the transition from film to digital cinema and his contributions to the industry.

Clark’s career as a cinematographer includes features, TV and commercials. He is also the chair of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council that developed the ASC- CDL.

Can you reflect on the changes you’ve seen over your career and how you see things moving ahead in the future?
Once upon a time, life was an awful lot simpler. I look back on it nostalgically when it was all film-based, and the possibilities of the cinematographer included follow-up on the look of dailies and also follow through with any photographic testing that helped to hone in on the desired look. It had its photochemical limitations; its analog image structure was not as malleable or tonally expansive as the digital canvas we have now.

Do you agree that Kodak’s Cineon helped us to this digital revolution — the hybrid film/digital imaging system where you would shoot on film, scan it and then digitally manipulate it before going back out to film via a film recorder?
That’s where the term digital intermediate came into being, and it was an eye opener. I think at the time not everyone fully understood the ramifications of the sort of impact it was making. Kodak created something very potent and led the way in terms of methodologies, or how to arrive at integration of digital into what was then called a hybrid imaging system —combining digital and film together.

The DCI (Digital Cinema Initiative) was created to establish digital projection standards. Without a standard we’d potentially be creating chaos in terms of how to move forward. For the studios, distributors and exhibitors, it would be a nightmare Can you talk about that?
In 2002, I had been asked to form a technology committee at the ASC to explore these issues: how the new emerging digital technologies were impacting the creative art form of cinematography and of filmmaking, and also to help influence the development of these technologies so they best serve the creative intent of the filmmaker.

DCI proposed that for digital projection to be considered ready for primetime, its image quality needed to be at least as good as, if not better than, a print from the original negative. I thought this was a great commitment that the studios were making. For them to say digital projection was going to be judged against a film print projection from the original camera negative of the exact same content was a fantastic decision. Here was a major promise of a solution that would give digital cinema image projection an advantage since most people saw release prints from a dupe negative.

Digital cinema had just reached the threshold of being able to do 2K digital cinema projection. At that time, 4K digital projection was emerging, but it was a bit premature in terms of settling on that as a standard. So you had digital cinema projection and the emergence of a sophisticated digital intermediate process that could create the image quality you wanted from the original negative, but projected on a digital projection.

In 2004, the Michael Mann film Collateral film was shot with the Grass Valley Viper Film Stream, the Sony F900 and Sony F950 cameras, the latest generation of digital motion picture cameras — basically video cameras that were becoming increasingly sophisticated with better dynamic range and tonal contrast, using 24fps and other multiple frame rates, but 24p was the key.
These cameras were used in the most innovative and interesting manner, because Mann combined film with digital, using the digital for the low-light level night scenes and then using film for the higher-light level day exterior scenes and day interior scenes where there was no problem with exposure.

Because of the challenge of shooting the night scenes, they wanted to shoot at such low light levels that film would potentially be a bit degraded in terms of grain and fog levels. If you had to overrate the negative, you needed to underexpose and overdevelop it, which was not desirable, whereas the digital cameras thrived in lower light levels. Also, you could shoot at a stop that gave you better depth of field. At the time, it was a very bold decision. But looking back on it historically, I think it was the inflection point that brought the digital motion picture camera into the limelight as a possible alternative to shooting on film.

That’s when they decided to do Camera Assessment Series tests, which evaluates all the different digital cinema cameras available at the time?
Yeah, with the idea being that we’d never compare two digital cameras together, we’d always compare the digital camera against a film reference. We did that first Camera Assessment Series, which was the first step in the direction of validating the digital motion picture camera as viable for shooting motion pictures compared with shooting on film. And we got part way there. A couple of the cameras were very impressive: the Sony F35, the Panavision Genesis, the Arri D21 and the Grass Valley Viper were pretty reasonable, but this was all still mainly within a 2K (1920×1080) realm. We had not yet broached that 4K area.

A couple years later, we decided to do this again. It was called the Image Control Assessment Series, ICAS. That was shot at Warner Bros. It was the scenes that we shot in a café — daylight interior and then night time exterior. Both scenes had a dramatically large range of contrast and different colors in the image. It was the big milestone. The new Arri Alexa was used, along with the Sony F65 and the then latest versions of the Red cameras.

So we had 4K projection and 4K cameras and we introduced the use of ACES (Academy Color Encoding System) color management. So we were really at the point where all the key components that we needed were beginning to come together. This was the first instance where these digital workflow components were all used in a single significant project testing. Using film as our common benchmark reference — How are these cameras in relation to film? That was the key thing. In other words, could we consider them to be ready for prime time? The answer was yes. We did that project in conjunction with the PGA and a company called Revelations Entertainment, which is Morgan Freeman’s company. Lori McCreary, his partner, was one of the producers who worked with us on this.

So filmmakers started using digital motion picture cameras instead of film. And with digital cinema having replaced film print as a distribution medium, these new generation digital cameras started to replace film as an image capture medium. Then the question was would we have an end-to-end digital system that would become potentially viable as an alternative to shooting on film.

L to R: Josh Pines, Steve MacMillan, Curtis Clark and Dhanendra Patel.

Part of the reason you are getting this acknowledgement from the Academy is your dedication on the highest quality of image and the respect for the artistry, from capture through delivery. Can you talk about your role in look management from on-set through delivery?
I think we all need to be on the same page; it’s one production team whose objective is maintaining the original creative intent of the filmmakers. That includes director and cinematographer and working with an editor and a production designer. Making a film is a collective team effort, but the overall vision is typically established by the director in collaboration with the cinematographer and a production designer. The cinematographer is tasked with capturing that with lighting, with camera composition, movement, lens choices — all those elements that are part of the process of creative filmmaking. Once you start shooting with these extremely sophisticated cameras, like the Sony F65 or Venice, Panavision Millennium DXL, an Arri or the latest versions of the Red camera, all of which have the ability to reproduce high dynamic range, wide color gamut and high resolution. All that raw image data is inherently there and the creative canvas has certainly been expanded.

So if you’re using these creative tools to tell your story, to advance your narrative, then you’re doing it with imagery defined by the potential of what these technologies are able to do. In the modern era, people aren’t seeing dailies at the same time, not seeing them together under controlled circumstances. The viewing process has become fragmented. When everyone had to come together to view projected dailies, there was a certain camaraderie constructive contributions that made the filmmaking process more effective. So if something wasn’t what it should be, then everyone could see exactly what it was and make a correction if you needed to do that.

But now, we have a more dispersed production team at every stage of the production process, from the initial image capture through to dailies, editorial, visual effects and final color grading. We have so many different people in disparate locations working on the production who don’t seem to be as unified, sometimes, as we were when it was all film-based analog shooting. But now, it’s far easier and simpler to integrate visual effects into your workflow. Like Cineon indicated when it first emerged, you could do digital effects as opposed to optical effects and that was a big deal.

So coming back to the current situation, and particularly now with the most advanced forms of imaging, which include high dynamic range, wider color gamut, wider than even P3, REC 2020, having a color management system like ACES that actually has enough color gamut to be able to contain any color space that you capture and want to be able to manipulate.

Can you talk about the challenges you overcame, and how that fits into the history of cinema as it relates to the Academy recognition you received?
As a cinematographer, working on feature films or commercials, I kept thinking, if I’m fortunate enough to be able to manage the dailies and certainly the final color grading, there are these tools called lift gain gamma, which are common to all the different color correctors. But they’re all implemented differently. They’re not cross-platform-compatible, so the numbers from a lift gain gamma — which is the primary RGB grading — from one color corrector will not translate automatically to another color corrector. So I thought, we should have a cross platform version of that, because that is usually seen as the first step for grading.

That’s about as basic as you can get, and it was designed so that it would be a cross-platform implementation, so that everybody who installs and applies the ASC-CDL in a color grading system compatible with that app, whether you did it on a DaVinci, Baselight, Lustre or whatever you were using, the results would be the same and transferable.

You could transport those numbers from one set-up on set using a dailies creation tool, like ColorFront for example. You could then use the ASC CDL to establish your dailies look during the shoot, not while you’re actually shooting, but with the DIT to establish a chosen look that could then be applied to dailies and used for VFX.

Then when you make your way into the final color grading session with the final cut — or whenever you start doing master color grading going back to the original camera source — you would have these initial grading corrections as a starting point as references. This now gives you the possibility of continuing on that color grading process using all the sophistication of a full color corrector, whether it’s power windows or secondary color correction. Whatever you felt you needed to finalize the look.

I was advocating this in the ASC Technology Committee, as it was called, now subsequently renamed the Motion Imaging Technology Council (MITC). We needed a solution like this and there were a group of us who got together and decided that we would do this. There were plenty of people who were skeptical, “Why would you do something like that when we already have lift gain gamma? Why would any of the manufacturers of the different color grading systems integrate this into their system? Would it not impinge upon their competitive advantage if they had a system that people were used to using, and if their own lift gain gamma would work perfectly well for them, why would they want to use the ASC CDL?

We live in a much more fragmented post world, and I saw that becoming even more so with the advances of digital. The ASC CDL would be a “look unifier” that would establish initial look parameters. You would be able to have control over the look at every stage of the way.

I’m assuming that the cinematographer would work with the director and editor, and they would assess certain changes that probably should be made because we’re now looking at cut sequences and what we had thought would be most appropriate when we were shooting is now in the context of an edit and there may need to be some changes and adjustments.

Were you involved in ACES? Was it a similar impetus for ACES coming about? Or was it just spawned because visual effects movies became so big and important with the advent of digital filmmaking?
It was bit of both, including productions without VFX. So I would say that initially it was driven by the fact that there really should be a standardized color management system. Let me give you an example of what I’m talking about. When we were all photochemical and basically shooting with Kodak stock, we were working with film-based Kodak color science.

It’s a color science that everybody knew and understood, even if they didn’t understand it from an engineering photochemical point of view, they understood the effects of it. It’s what helps enable the look and the images that we wanted to create.

That was a color management system that was built into film. That color science system could have been adapted into the digital world, but Kodak resisted that because of the threat to negatives. If you apply that film color science to digital cameras, then you’re making digital cameras look more like film and that could pose a threat to the sale of color film negative.

So that’s really where the birth of ACES came about — to create a universal, unified color management system that would be appropriate anywhere you shot and with the widest possible color gamut. And it supports any camera or display technology because it would always have a more expanded (future proofing) capability within which the digital camera and display technologies would work effectively and efficiently but accurately, reliably and predictably.

Very early on, my ASC Technology Committee (now called Motion Imaging Technology Council) got involved with ACES development and became very excited about it. It was the missing ingredient needed to be able to make the end-to-end digital workflow the success that we thought that it could become. Because we no longer could rely on film-based color science, we had to either replicate that or emulate it with a color management system that could accommodate everything we wanted to do creatively. So ACES became that color management system.

So, in addition to becoming the first cross-platform primary color grading tool, the ASC CDL became the first official ACES look modification transform. Because ACES is not a color grading tool, it’s a color management system, you have to have color grading tools with color management. So you have the color management with ACES, you have the color grading with ASC CDL and the combination of those together is the look management system because it takes them all to make that work. And it’s not that the ASC CDL is the only tool you use for color grading, but it has the portable cross-platform ability to be able to control the color grading from dailies through visual effects up to the final color grade when you’re then working with a sophisticated color corrector.

What do you see for the future of cinematography and the merging of the worlds of post and on-set work and, what do you see as future challenges for future integrations between maintaining the creative intent and the metadata.
We’re very involved in metadata at the moment. Metadata is a crucial part of making all this work, as you well know. In fact, we worked on the common 3D LUT format, which we worked on with the Academy. So there is a common 3D LUT format that is something that would again have cross-platform consistency and predictability. And it’s functionality and its scope of use would be better understood if everyone were using it. It’s a work in progress. Metadata is critical.

I think as we expand the canvas and the palette of the possibility of image making, you have to understand what these technologies are capable of doing, so that you can incorporate them into your vision. So if you’re saying my creative vision includes doing certain things, then you would have to understand the potential of what they can do to support that vision. A very good example in the current climate is HDR.

That’s very controversial in a lot of ways, because the set manufacturers really would love to have everything just jump off the screen to make it vibrant and exciting. However, from a storytelling point of view, it may not be appropriate to push HDR imagery where it distracts from the story.
Well, it depends on how it’s done and how you are able to use that extended dynamic range when you have your bright highlights. And you can use foreground background relationships with bigger depth of field for tremendous effect. They have a visceral presence, because they have a dimensionality when, for example, you see the bright images outside of a window.

When you have an extended dynamic range of scene tones that could add dimensional depth to the image, you can choreograph and stage the blocking for your narrative storytelling with the kind of images that take advantage of those possibilities.

So HDR needs to be thought of as something that’s integral to your storytelling, not just something that’s there because you can do it. That’s when it can become a distraction. When you’re on set, you need a reference monitor that is able to show and convey, all the different tonal and color elements that you’re working with to create your look, from HDR to wider color gamut, whatever that may be, so that you feel comfortable that you’ve made the correct creative decision.

With virtual production techniques, you can incorporate some of that into your live-action shooting on set with that kind of compositing, just like James Cameron started with Avatar. If you want to do that with HDR, you can. The sky is the limit in terms of what you can do with today’s technology.

So these things are there, but you need to be able to pull them all together into your production workflow to make sure that you can comfortably integrate in the appropriate way at the appropriate time. And that it conforms to what the creative vision for the final result needs to be and then, remarkable things can happen. The aesthetic poetry of the image can visually drive the narrative and you can say things with these images without having to be expositional in your dialogue. You can make it more of an experientially immersive involvement with the story. I think that’s something that we’re headed toward, that’s going to make the narrative storytelling very interesting and much more dynamic.

Certainly, and certainly with the advancements of consumer technology and better panels and the high dynamic range developments, and Dolby Vision coming into the home and Atmos audio coming into the home. It’s really an amazing time to be involved in the industry; it’s so fun and challenging.

It’s a very interesting time, and a learning curve needs to happen. That’s what’s driven me from the very beginning and why I think our ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council has been so successful in its 16 years of continuous operation influencing the development of some of these technologies in very meaningful ways. But always with the intent that these new imaging technologies are there to better serve the creative intent of the filmmaker. The technology serves the art. It’s not about the technology per se, it’s about the technology as the enabling component of the art. It enables the art to happen. And expands it’s scope and possibility to broader canvases with wider color gamuts in ways that have never been experienced or possible before.


Barry Goch is a Finishing Artist at The Foundation and a Post Production Instructor at UCLA Extension. You can follow him on Twitter at @gochya.

Behind the Title: Carousel’s Head of VFX/CD Jeff Spangler

This creative has been an artist for as long as he could remember. “I’ve always loved the process of creation and can’t imagine any career where I’m not making something,” he says.

Name: Jeff Spangler

Company: NYC’s Carousel

Can you describe your company?
Carousel is a “creative collective” that was a response to this rapidly changing industry we all know and love. Our offerings range from agency creative services to editorial, design, animation (including both motion design and CGI), retouching, color correction, compositing, music licensing, content creation, and pretty much everything that falls between.

We have created a flexible workflow that covers everything from concept to execution (and delivery), while also allowing for clients whose needs are less all-encompassing to step on or off at any point in the process. That’s just one of the reasons we called ourselves Carousel — our clients have the freedom to climb on board for as much of the ride as they desire. And with the different disciplines all living under the same roof, we find that a lot of the inefficiencies and miscommunications that can get in the way of achieving the best possible result are eliminated.

What’s your job title?
Head of VFX/Creative Director

What does that entail?
That’s a really good question. There is the industry standard definition of that title as it applies to most companies. But it’s quite different if you are talking about a collective that combines creative with post production, animation and design. So for me, the dual role of CD and head of VFX works in a couple of ways. Where we have the opportunity to work with agencies, I am able to bring my experience and talents as a VFX lead to bear, communicating with the agency creatives and ensuring that the different Carousel artist involved are all able to collaborate and communicate effectively to get the work done.

Alternatively, when we work direct-to-client, I get involved much earlier in the process, collaborating with the Carousel creative directors to conceptualize and pitch new ideas, design brand elements, visualize concept art, storyboard and write copy or even work with stargeists to help hone the direction and target of a campaign.

That’s the true strength of Carousel — getting creatives from different backgrounds involved early on in the process where their experience and talent can make a much bigger impact in the long run. Most importantly, my role is not about dictating direction as much as it is about guiding and allowing for people’s talents to shine. You have to give artists the room to flourish if you really want to serve your clients and are serious about getting them something more than what they expected.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think that there is this misconception that it’s one creative sitting in a room that comes up with the “Big Idea” and he or she just dictates that idea to everyone. My experience is that any good idea started out as a lot of different ideas that were merged, pruned, refined and polished until they began to resemble something truly great.

Then after 24 hours, you look at that idea again and tear it apart because all of the flaws have started to show and you realize it still needs to be pummeled into shape. That process is generally a collaboration within a group of talented people who all look at the world very differently.

What tools do you use?
Anything that I can get my hands on (and my brain wrapped around). My foundation is as a traditional artist and animator and I find that those core skills are really the strength behind what I do everyday. I started out after college as a broadcast designer and later transitioned into a Flame artist where I spent many years working as a beauty retouch artist and motion designer.

These days, I primarily use Adobe Creative Suite as my role has become more creative in nature. I use Photoshop for digital painting and concept art , Illustrator for design and InDesign for layouts and decks. I also have a lot of experience in After Effects and Autodesk Maya and will use those tools for any animation or CGI that requires me to be hands-on, even if just to communicate the initial concept or design.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Coming up with new ideas at the very start. At that point, the gloves are off and everything is possible.

What’s your least favorite?
Navigating politics within the industry that can sometimes get in the way of people doing their best work.

What is your favorite time of the day?
I’m definitely more of a night person. But if I had to choose a favorite time of day, it would be early morning — before everything has really started and there’s still a ton of anticipation and potential.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Working as a full-time concept artist. Or a logo designer. While I frequently have the opportunity to do both of those things in my role at Carousel, they are, for me, the most rewarding expression of being creative.

A&E’s Scraps

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I’ve been an artist for as long as I can remember and never really had any desire (or ability) to set it aside. I’ve always loved the process of creation and can’t imagine any career where I’m not “making” something.

Can you name some recents projects you have worked on?
We are wrapping up Season 2 of an A&E food show titled Scraps that has allowed us to flex our animation muscles. We’ve also been doing some in-store work with Victoria’s Secret for some of their flagship stores that has been amazing in terms of collaboration and results.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
It’s always hard to pick a favorite and my answer would probably change if you asked me more than once. But I recently had the opportunity to work with an up-and-coming eSports company to develop their logo. Collaborating with their CD, we landed on a design and aesthetic that makes me smile every time I see it out there. The client has taken that initial work and continues to surprise me with the way they use it across print, social media, swag, etc. Seeing their ability to be creative and flexible with what I designed is just validation that I did a good job. That makes me proud.

Name pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPad Pro. It’s my portable sketch tablet and presentation device that also makes for a damn good movie player during long commutes.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Muay Thai. Don’t get me wrong. I’m no serious martial artist and have never had the time to dedicate myself properly. But working out by punching and kicking a heavy bag can be very cathartic.

Karol Urban is president of CAS, others named to board

As a result of the Cinema Audio Society board of Directors election Karol Urban will replace CAS president Mark Ulano, whose term has come to an end.  Steve Venezia with replace treasurer Peter Damski who opted not to run for re-election.

“I am so incredibly honored to have garnered the confidence of our esteemed members,” says Urban. “After years of serving under different presidents and managing the content for the CAS Quarterly I have learned so much about the achievements, interests, talents and concerns of our membership. I am excited to given this new platform to celebrate the achievements and herald new opportunities to serve this incredibly dynamic and talented community.”

For 2019 the Executive Committee with include newly elected Urban and Venezia as well as VP Phillip W. Palmer, CAS, and secretary David J. Bondelevitch, CAS,  who were not up for election.

The incumbent CAS Board of Directors (Production) that were re-elected are  Peter J. Devlin CAS, Lee Orloff CAS, and Jeffrey W. Wexler, CAS. They will be joined by newly elected Amanda Beggs, CAS, and Mary H. Ellis, CAS, who are taking the seats of outgoing  board members Chris Newman CAS and Lisa Pinero, CAS.

Incumbent board members (Post Production) who were reelected are Bob Bronow CAS, and Mathew Waters, CAS, and they will be joined by newly elected Board Members Onnalee Blank, CAS, and Mike Minkler CAS, who will be taking the seats of board members Urban and Steve Venezia, CAS, who are now officers.

Continuing to serve as their terms were not up for reelection are for production Willie Burton, CAS, and Glen Trew, CAS, and for post production Tom Fleischman, CAS, Doc Kane CAS, Sherry Klein, CAS, and Marti Humphrey, CAS.

The new Board will be installed at the 55 Annual CAS Awards Saturday, February 16.