Cinnafilm 6.6.19

Atomos’ new Shogun 7: HDR monitor, recorder, switcher

The new Atomos Shogun 7 is a seven-inch HDR monitor, recorder and switcher that offers an all-new 1500-nit, daylight-viewable, 1920×1200 panel with a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio and 15+ stops of dynamic range displayed. It also offers ProRes RAW recording and realtime Dolby Vision output. Shogun 7 will be available in June 2019, priced at $1,499.

The Atomos screen uses a combination of advanced LED and LCD technologies which together offer deeper, better blacks the company says rivals OLED screens, “but with the much higher brightness and vivid color performance of top-end LCDs.”

A new 360-zone backlight is combined with this new screen technology and controlled by the Dynamic AtomHDR engine to show millions of shades of brightness and color. It allows Shogun 7 to display 15+ stops of real dynamic range on-screen. The panel, says Atomos, is also incredibly accurate, with ultra-wide color and 105% of DCI-P3 covered, allowing for the same on-screen dynamic range, palette of colors and shades that your camera sensor sees.

Atomos and Dolby have teamed up to create Dolby Vision HDR “live” — a tool that allows you to see HDR live on-set and carry your creative intent from the camera through into HDR post. Dolby have optimized their target display HDR processing algorithm which Atomos has running inside the Shogun 7. It brings realtime automatic frame-by-frame analysis of the Log or RAW video and processes it for optimal HDR viewing on a Dolby Vision-capable TV or monitor over HDMI. Connect Shogun 7 to the Dolby Vision TV and AtomOS 10 automatically analyzes the image, queries the TV and applies the right color and brightness profiles for the maximum HDR experience on the display.

Shogun 7 records images up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 or 2kp240 slow motion from compatible cameras, in RAW/Log or HLG/PQ over SDI/HDMI. Footage is stored directly to AtomX SSDmini or approved off-the-shelf SATA SSD drives. There are recording options for Apple ProRes RAW and ProRes, Avid DNx and Adobe CinemaDNG RAW codecs. Shogun 7 has four SDI inputs plus a HDMI 2.0 input, with both 12G-SDI and HDMI 2.0 outputs. It can record ProRes RAW in up to 5.7kp30, 4kp120 DCI/UHD and 2kp240 DCI/HD, depending on the camera’s capabilities. Also, 10-bit 4:2:2 ProRes or DNxHR recording is available up to 4Kp60 or 2Kp240. The four SDI inputs enable the connection of most quad-link, dual-link or single-link SDI cinema cameras. Pixels are preserved with data rates of up to 1.8Gb/s.

In terms of audio, Shogun 7 eliminates the need for a separate audio recorder. Users can add 48V stereo mics via an optional balanced XLR breakout cable, or select mic or line input levels, plus record up to 12 channels of 24/96 digital audio from HDMI or SDI. Monitoring selected stereo tracks is via the 3.5mm headphone jack. There are dedicated audio meters, gain controls and adjustments for frame delay.

Shogun 7 features the latest version of the AtomOS 10 touchscreen interface, first seen on the Ninja V.  The new body of Shogun 7 has a Ninja V-like exterior with ARRI anti-rotation mounting points on the top and bottom of the unit to ensure secure mounting.

AtomOS 10 on Shogun 7 has the full range of monitoring tools, including Waveform, Vectorscope, False Color, Zebras, RGB parade, Focus peaking, Pixel-to-pixel magnification, Audio level meters and Blue only for noise analysis.

Shogun 7 can also be used as a portable touchscreen-controlled multi-camera switcher with asynchronous quad-ISO recording. Users can switch up to four 1080p60 SDI streams, record each plus the program output as a separate ISO, then deliver ready-for-edit recordings with marked cut-points in XML metadata straight to your NLE. The current Sumo19 HDR production monitor-recorder will also gain the same functionality in a free firmware update.

There is asynchronous switching, plus use genlock in and out to connect to existing AV infrastructure. Once the recording is over, users can import the XML file into an NLE and the timeline populates with all the edits in place. XLR audio from a separate mixer or audio board is recorded within each ISO, alongside two embedded channels of digital audio from the original source. The program stream always records the analog audio feed as well as a second track that switches between the digital audio inputs to match the switched feed.


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