OWC 12.4

AES Paris: A look into immersive audio, cinematic sound design

By Mel Lambert

The Audio Engineering Society (AES) came to the City of Light in early June with a technical program and companion exhibition that attracted close to 2,600 pre-registrants, including some 700 full-pass attendees. “The Paris International Convention surpassed all of our expectations,” AES executive director Bob Moses told postPerspective. “The research community continues to thrive — there was great interest in spatial sound and networked audio — while the business community once again embraced the show, with a 30 percent increase in exhibitors over last year’s show in Warsaw.” Moses confirmed that next year’s European convention will be held in Berlin, “probably in May.”

Tom Downes

Getting Immersed
There were plenty of new techniques and technologies targeting the post community. One presentation, in particular, caught my eye, since it posed some relevant questions about how we perceive immersive sound. In the session, “Immersive Audio Techniques in Cinematic Sound Design: Context and Spatialization,” co-authors Tom Downes and Malachy Ronan — both of who are AES student members currently studying at the University of Limerick’s Digital Media and Arts Research Center, Ireland — questioned the role of increased spatial resolution in cinematic sound design. “Our paper considered the context that prompted the use of elevated loudspeakers, and examined the relevance of electro-acoustic spatialization techniques to 3D cinematic formats,” offered Downes. The duo brought with them a scene from writer/director Wolfgang Petersen’s submarine classic, Das Boot, to illustrate their thesis.

Using the university’s Spatialization and Auditory Display Environment (SpADE) linked to an Apple Logic Pro 9 digital audio workstations and a 7.1.4 playback configuration — with four overhead speakers — the researchers correlated visual stimuli with audio playback. (A 7.1-channel horizontal playback format was determined by the DAW’s I/O capabilities.) Different dynamic and static timbre spatializations were achieved by using separate EQ plug-ins assigned to horizontal and elevated loudspeaker channels.

“Sources were band-passed and a 3dB boost applied at 7kHz to enhance the perception of elevation,” Downes continued. “A static approach was used on atmospheric sounds to layer the soundscape using their dominant frequencies, whereas bubble sounds were also subjected to static timbre spatialization; the dynamic approach was applied when attempting to bridge the gap between elevated and horizontal loudspeakers. Sound sources were split, with high frequencies applied to the elevated layer, and low frequencies to the horizontal layer. By automating the parameters within both sets of equalization, a top-to-bottom trajectory was perceived. However, although the movement was evident, it was not perceived as immersive.”

The paper concluded that although multi-channel electro-acoustic spatialization techniques are seen as a rich source of ideas for sound designers, without sufficient visual context they are limited in the types of techniques that can be applied. “Screenwriters and movie directors must begin to conceptualize new ways of utilizing this enhanced spatial resolution,” said Downes.

Rich Nevens

Rich Nevens

Tools
Merging Technologies demonstrated immersive-sound applications for the v.10 release of Pyramix DAW software, with up to 30.2-channel routing and panning, including compatibly for Barco Auro, Dolby Atmos and other surround formats, without the need for additional plug-ins or apps, while Avid showcased additions for the modular S6 Assignable Digital Console, including a Joystick Panning Module and a new Master Film Module with PEC/DIR switching.

“The S6 offers improved ergonomics,” explained Avid’s Rich Nevens, director of worldwide pro audio solutions, “including enhanced visibility across the control surface, and full Ethernet connectivity between eight-fader channel modules and the Pro Tools DSP engines.” Reportedly, more than 1,000 S6 systems have been sold worldwide since its introduction in December 2013, including two recent installations at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, California.

Finally, Eventide came to the Paris AES Convention with a remarkable new multichannel/multi-element processing system that was demonstrated by invitation only to selected customers and distributors; it will be formally introduced during the upcoming AES Convention in Los Angeles in October. Targeted at film/TV post production, the rackmount device features 32 inputs and 32 discrete outputs per DSP module, thereby allowing four multichannel effects paths to be implemented simultaneously. A quartet of high-speed ARM processors mounted on plug-in boards can be swapped out when more powerful DSP chips became available.

Joe Bamberg and Ray Maxwell

Joe Bamberg and Ray Maxwell

“Initially, effects will be drawn from our current H8000 and H9 processors — with other EQ, dynamics plus reverb effects in development — and can be run in parallel or in series, to effectively create a fully-programmable, four-element channel strip per processing engine,” explained Eventide software engineer Joe Bamberg.

“Remote control plug-ins for Avid Pro Tools and other DAWs are in development,” said Eventide’s VP of sales and marketing, Ray Maxwell. The device can also be used via a stand-alone application for Apple iPad tablets or Windows/Macintosh PCs.

Multi-channel I/O and processing options will enable object-based EQ, dynamic and ambience processing for immersive-sound production. End user price for the codenamed product, which will also feature Audinate Dante, Thunderbolt, Ravenna/AES67 and AVB networking, has yet to be announced.

Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.


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