The ASC: Mentoring and nurturing diversity

Cynthia Pusheck, ASC, co-chairs the ASC Vision Committee, along with John Simmons, ASC. Working together they focus on encouraging and supporting the advancement of underrepresented cinematographers, their crews and other filmmakers. They hope their efforts inspire others in the industry to help positive change through hiring talent that better reflects society.

In addition to her role on the ASC Vision Committee, Pusheck is a VP of the ASC board. She became a member in 2013. Her credits include Sacred Lies, Good Girls Revolt, Revenge and Brothers & Sisters. She is currently shooting Limetown for Facebook Watch.

To find out more about their work, we reached out to Pusheck.

Can you talk about what the ASC Vision Committee has done since its inception? What it hopes to accomplish?
The ASC Vision Committee was formed in January 2016 as a way for the ASC to actively support those who face unique hurdles as they build their cinematography careers. We’ve held three full-day diversity events, and some individual panel discussions.

We’ve also awarded a number of scholarships to the ASC Master Class and will continue awarding a handful each year. Our mentorship program is getting off the ground now with many ASC members offering to give time to young DPs from underrepresented groups. There’s a lot more that John Simmons (my co-chair) and our committee members want to accomplish, and with the support of the ASC staff, board members and president, we will continue to push things forward.

(L-R) Diversity Day panel: Rebecca Rhine, Dr. Stacy Smith, Alan Caso, Natasha Foster-Owens, Xiomara Comrie, Tema Staig, Sarah Caplan.

The word “progress” has always been part of the ASC mission statement. So, with the goal of progress in mind, we redesigned an ASC red lapel pin and handed it out at the ASC Awards earlier this year (#ASCVision). We wanted to use it to call attention to the work of our committee and to encourage our own community of cinematographers and camera people to do their part. If directors of photography and their department heads (camera, grip and set lighting) hire with inclusivity in mind, then we can change the face of the industry.

What do you think is contributing to more females becoming interested in camera crew careers? What are you seeing in terms of tangible developments?
Gender inequality in this industry has certainly gotten a lot of attention the last few years, which is fantastic but despite all that attention, the actual facts and figures don’t show as much change as you’d think.

The percentage of women or people of color shooting movies and TV shows hasn’t really changed much. There certainly is a lot more “content” getting produced for TV, and that has been great for many of us, and it’s a very exciting time. But, we have a long way to go still.

What’s very hopeful, though, is that more producers and studios are really pushing for inclusivity. That means hiring more women and people of color in positions of leadership, and encouraging their crews to bring more underrepresented crew members onto the production.

Currently we’re also seeing more young female DPs getting some really good shooting opportunities very early in their careers. That didn’t happen so much in the past, and I think that continues to motivate more young women to consider the camera department, or cinematography, as a viable career path.

We also have to remember that it’s not just about getting more women on set, it’s about having our sets look like society at large. The ultimate goal should be that everyone has a fair chance to succeed in this industry.

How can women looking to get into this part of the industry find mentors?
The union (Local 600), and also now the ASC have mentorship programs. The union’s program is great for those coming up the ranks looking for help or advice as they build their career.

For example, an assistant can find another assistant, or an operator, to help them navigate the next phase of their career and give them advice. The ASC mentorship program is aimed more for young cinematographers or operators from underrepresented groups who may benefit from the support of an experienced DP.

Another way to find a mentor is by contacting someone whom you admire directly. Many women would be surprised to find that if they reach out and request a coffee or phone call, often that person will try and find time for them.

My advice would be to do your homework about the person you’re contacting and be specific in your questions and your goals. Asking broad questions like “How do I get a job” or “Will you hire me?” won’t get you very far.

What do you think will create the most change? What are the hurdles that still must be overcome?
Bias and discrimination, whether conscious or unconscious, is still a problem on our sets. It may have lessened in the last 25 years, but we all continue to hear stories about crew members (at all levels) who behave badly, make inappropriate comments or just have trouble working for woman or people of color. These are all unnecessary stresses for those trying to get hired and build their careers.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.