Artifex provides VFX limb removal for Facebook Watch’s Sacred Lies

Vancouver-based VFX house Artifex Studios created CG amputation effects for the lead character in Blumhouse Productions’ new series for Facebook Watch, Sacred Lies. In the show, the lead character, Minnow Bly (Elena Kampouris), emerges after 12 years in the Kevinian cult missing both of her hands. Artifex was called on to remove the actress’ limbs.

VFX supervisor Rob Geddes led Artifex’s team who created the hand/stump transposition, which encompassed 165 shots across the series. This involved detailed paint work to remove the real hands, while Artifex 3D artists simultaneously performed tracking and match move in SynthEyes to align the CG stump assets to the actress’ forearm.

This was followed up with some custom texture and lighting work in Autodesk Maya and Chaos V-Ray to dial in the specific degree of scarring or level of healing on the stumps, depending on each scene’s context in the story. While the main focus of Artifex’s work was on hand removal, the team also created a pair of severed hands for the first episode after rubber prosthetics didn’t pass the eye test. VFX work was run through Side Effects Houdini and composited in Foundry’s Nuke.

“The biggest hurdle for the team during this assignment was working with the actress’ movements and complex performance demands, especially the high level of interaction with her environment, clothing or hair,” says Adam Stern, founder of Artifex. “In one visceral sequence, Rob and his team created the actual severed hands. These were originally shot practically with prosthetics, however the consensus was that the practical hands weren’t working. We fully replaced these with CG hands, which allowed us to dial in the level of decomposition, dirt, blood and torn skin around the cuts. We couldn’t be happier with the results.”

Geddes adds, “One interesting thing we discovered when wrangling the stumps, is that the logical and accurate placement of the wrist bone of the stumps didn’t necessarily feel correct when the hands weren’t there. There was quite a bit of experimentation to keep the ‘hand-less’ arms from looking unnaturally long, or thin.”

Artifex also added a scene involving absolute devastation in a burnt forest in Episode 101, involving matte painting and set extension of extensive fire damage that couldn’t safely be achieved on set. Artifex fell back on their experience in environmental VFX creation, using matte painting and projections tied together with ample rotoscope work.

Approximately 20 Artifex artists took part in Sacred Lies across 3D, compositing, matte painting, I/O and production staff.

Watch Artifex founder Adam Stern talk about the show from the floor of SIGGRAPH 2018:


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