What does Fraunhofer Digital Media Alliance do? A lot!

By Jonathan Abrams

While the vast majority of the companies with exhibit space at NAB are for-profit, there is one non-profit that stands out. With a history of providing ubiquitous technology to the masses since 1949, Fraunhofer focuses on applied research and developments that end up — at some point in the near future — as practical products or ready-for-market technology.

In terms of their revenue, one-third of their funding is for basic research, with the remaining two-thirds applied toward industry projects and coming directly from private companies. Their business model is focused on contract research and licensing of technologies. They have sold first prototypes and work with distributors, though Fraunhofer always keeps the rights to continue development.

What projects were they showcasing at NAB 2106 that have real-world applications in the near future? You may have heard about the Lytro camera. Fraunhofer Digital Media Alliance member Fraunhofer IIS has been taking a camera agnostic approach to their work with light-field technology. Their goal is to make this technology available for many different camera set-ups, and they were proving it with a demo of their multi-cam light-field plug-in for The Foundry’s Nuke. After capturing a light-field, users can perform framing correction and relighting, including changes to angles, depth and the creation of point clouds.

The Nuke plug-in (see our main image) allows the user to create virtual lighting (relighting) and interactive lighting. Light-field data also allows for depth estimation (called depth maps) and is useful for mattes and secondary color correction. Similar to Lytro, focus pulling can be performed with this light-field plug-in. Why Nuke? That is what their users requested. Even though Nuke is an OFX host, the Fraunhofer IIS light field plug-in only works within Nuke. As for using this light-field plug-in outside of Nuke, I was told that “porting to Mac should be an easy task.” Hopefully that is an accurate statement, though we will have to wait to find out.

DCP
Fraunhofer IIS has its hand in other parts of production and post as well. The last two steps of most projects are the creation of deliverables and their delivery. If you need to create and deliver a DCP (Digital Cinema Package), then easyDCP may be for you.easydcp1

This project began in 2008, when creating a DCP was not as familiar as it is today to most users, and a deep expertise of the specifications for correctly making a DCP was very complex. Small- to medium-sized post companies, in particular, profit from the easy-to-use easyDCP suite. The engineers of Fraunhofer IIS were also working on behalf of the DCI specifications for Digital Cinema, therefore they are experienced in integrating all important features in this software for DCPs.

The demo I saw indicated that the JPEG2000 encode was as fast as 108fps! In 2013, Fraunhofer partnered with both Blackmagic and Quantel to make this software available to the users of those respective finishing suites. The demo I saw was using a Final Cut Pro X project file and it was with the Creator+ version since it had support for encryption. Avid Media Composer users will have to export their sequence and import it into Resolve to use easyDCP Creator. Amazingly, this software works as far back as Mac OS X Leopard. IMF creation and playback can also be done with the easyDCP software suite.

VR/360
VR and 360-degree video were prominent at NAB, and the institutes of the Fraunhofer Digital Media Alliance are involved in this as well, having worked on live streaming and surround sound as part of a project with the Berlin Symphony Orchestra.

Fraunhofer had a VR demo pod at the ATSC 3.0 Consumer Experience (in South Hall Upper) — I tried it and the sound did track with my head movement. Speaking of ATSC 3.0, it calls for an immersive audio codec. Each country or geographic region that adopts ATSC 3.0 can choose to implement either Dolby AC-4 or MPEG-H, the latter of which is the result of research and development by Fraunhofer, Technicolor and Qualcomm. South Korea announced earlier this year that they will begin ATSC 3.0 (UHDTV) broadcasting in February 2017 using the MPEG-H audio codec.

From what you see to what you hear, from post to delivery, the Fraunhofer Digital Media Alliance has been involved in the process.

Jonathan S. Abrams is the Chief Technical Engineer at Nutmeg, a creative marketing, production and post resource.


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