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Top 3: My picks from Adobe’s Creative Cloud update

By Brady Betzel

Adobe’s resolve to update its Creative Cloud apps on a regular basis has remained strong. The latest updates, released on December 1, really hammer home Adobe’s commitment to make editing video, creating visual effects and color correcting on a tablet a reality, but it doesn’t end there. They have made their software stronger across the board, whether you are using a tablet, mobile workstation or desktop.

After Effects and Stacked Panels

I know everyone is going to have their own favorites, but here are my top three from the latest release:

1. Stacked Panels
In both After Effects and Premiere you will notice the ability to arrange your menus in Stacked Panels. I installed the latest updates on a Sony VAIO tablet and these Stacked Panels were awesome!

It’s really a nice way to have all of your tools on screen without having them take up too much real estate. In addition, Adobe has improved touch-screen interaction with the improved ability to pinch and zoom different parts of the interface, like increasing the size of a thumbnail with a pinch-to-zoom.

In Premiere, to find the Stacked Panels you need to find the drop down menu in the project panel, locate Panel Group Settings and then choose Stacked Panel Group and Solo Panels in Stack, if you want to only view one at a time. I highly recommend using the Stacked Panels if you are using a touchscreen, like a tablet or some of the newer mobile workstations out there in the world. Even if you aren’t, I really think it works well.

Premiere Pro and Optical Flow

Premiere Pro and Optical Flow

2. Optical Flow Time Remapping
Most editors are probably thinking, “Avid has had this for years and years and years, just like Avid had Fluid Morph years before Adobe introduced Morph Cut.” While I thought the exact same thing, I really love that Adobe’s version is powered by the GPU. This really beefs up the speed of the latest HP z840 with Nvidia Quadro or GTX 980 Ti graphics cards and all their CUDA cores. Be warned though, Optical Flow (much like Morph Cut) works only in certain situations.

If you’ve ever used Twixtor or Fluid Motion in Media Composer, you know that sometimes there is a lot of work that goes into making those effects work. It’s not always the right solution to time remapping footage, especially if you are working on content that will air on broadcast television — even though Optical Flow may look great, some content will fail certain networks’ quality control because of the weird Jello-looking artifacting that can occur.

After Effects and the Lumetri Color Panel

3. Lumetri Color inside of After Effects
While you might already have a favorite coloring app or plug-in to use, having the ability to take clips from Premiere to After Effects, while carrying over the color correction you made inside of the Lumetri panels, is key. In addition, you can use the Lumetri effect inside of After Effects (located under the Utility category) to quickly color your clips inside of After Effects.

Overall, this round of updates seemed to be par for the course, nothing completely revolutionary but definitely useful and wanted. Personally, I don’t think that adding HDR capabilities should have taken precedence over some other updates, such as collaboration improvements (think Avid Media Composer and Avid’s Shared Storage solution, ISIS), general stability improvements, media management, etc. But Adobe is holding true to their word and bringing some of the latest and greatest improvements to their users… and causing users (and manufacturers) of other tools to take notice.

Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood. Previously, he was editing The Real World at Bunim Murray Productions. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com, and follow him on Twitter, @allbetzroff.

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