Tag Archives: VR

SGO’s Mistika VR is now available

 

SGO’s Mistika VR software app is now available. This solution has been developed using the company’s established Mistika technology and offers advanced realtime stitching capabilities combined with a new intuitive interface and raw format support with incredible speed.

Using Mistika Optical Flow Technology (our main image), the new VR solution takes camera position information and sequences then stitches the images together using extensive and intelligent pre-sets. Its unique stitching algorithms help with the many challenges facing post teams to allow for the highest image quality.

Mistika VR was developed to encompass and work with as many existing VR camera formats as possible, and SGO is creating custom pre-sets for productions where teams are building the rigs themselves.

The Mistika VR solution is part of SGO’s new natively integrated workflow concept. SGO has been dissecting its current turnkey offering “Mistika Ultima” to develop advanced workflow applications aimed at specific tasks.

Mistika VR runs on Mac, and Windows and is available as a personal or professional (with SGO customer support) edition license. Costs for licenses are:

–  30-day license (with no automatic renewals): Evaluation Version is free; Personal Edition: $78; Professional Edition $110

– Monthly subscription: Personal Edition $55; Professional Edition $78 per month

–  Annual subscription: Personal Edition: $556 per year; Professional Edition: $779 per year

What was new at GTC 2017

By Mike McCarthy

I, once again, had the opportunity to attend Nvidia’s GPU Technology Conference (GTC) in San Jose last week. The event has become much more focused on AI supercomputing and deep learning as those industries mature, but there was also a concentration on VR for those of us from the visual world.

The big news was that Nvidia released the details of its next-generation GPU architecture, code named Volta. The flagship chip will be the Tesla V100 with 5,120 CUDA cores and 15 Teraflops of computing power. It is a huge 815mm chip, created with a 12nm manufacturing process for better energy efficiency. Most of its unique architectural improvements are focused on AI and deep learning with specialized execution units for Tensor calculations, which are foundational to those processes.

Tesla V100

Similar to last year’s GP100, the new Volta chip will initially be available in Nvidia’s SXM2 form factor for dedicated GPU servers like their DGX1, which uses the NVLink bus, now running at 300GB/s. The new GPUs will be a direct swap-in replacement for the current Pascal based GP100 chips. There will also be a 150W version of the chip on a PCIe card similar to their existing Tesla lineup, but only requiring a single half-length slot.

Assuming that Nvidia puts similar processing cores into their next generation of graphics cards, we should be looking at a 33% increase in maximum performance at the top end. The intermediate stages are more difficult to predict, since that depends on how they choose to tier their cards. But the increased efficiency should allow more significant increases in performance for laptops, within existing thermal limitations.

Nvidia is continuing its pursuit of GPU-enabled autonomous cars with its DrivePX2 and Xavier systems for vehicles. The newest version will have a 512 Core Volta GPU and a dedicated deep learning accelerator chip that they are going to open source for other devices. They are targeting larger vehicles now, specifically in the trucking industry this year, with an AI-enabled semi-truck in their booth.

They also had a tractor showing off Blue River’s AI-enabled spraying rig, targeting individual plants for fertilizer or herbicide. It seems like farm equipment would be an optimal place to implement autonomous driving, allowing perfectly straight rows and smooth grades, all in a flat controlled environment with few pedestrians or other dynamic obstructions to be concerned about (think Interstellar). But I didn’t see any reference to them looking in that direction, even with a giant tractor in their AI booth.

On the software and application front, software company SAP showed an interesting implementation of deep learning that analyzes broadcast footage and other content looking to identify logos and branding, in order to provide quantifiable measurements of the effectiveness of various forms of brand advertising. I expect we will continue to see more machine learning implementations of video analysis, for things like automated captioning and descriptive video tracks, as AI becomes more mature.

Nvidia also released an “AI-enabled” version of I-Ray to use image prediction to increase the speed of interactive ray tracing renders. I am hopeful that similar technology could be used to effectively increase the resolution of video footage as well. Basically, a computer sees a low-res image of a car and says, “I know what that car should look like,” and fills in the rest of the visual data. The possibilities are pretty incredible, especially in regard to VFX.

Iray AI

On the VR front, Nvidia announced a new SDK that allows live GPU-accelerated image stitching for stereoscopic VR processing and streaming. It scales from HD to 5K output, splitting the workload across one to four GPUs. The stereoscopic version is doing much more than basic stitching, processing for depth information and using that to filter the output to remove visual anomalies and improve the perception of depth. The output was much cleaner than any other live solution I have seen.

I also got to try my first VR experience recorded with a Light Field camera. This not only gives the user a 360 stereo look around capability, but also the ability to move their head around to shift their perspective within a limited range (based on the size the recording array). The project they were using to demo the technology didn’t highlight the amazing results until the very end of the piece, but when it did that was the most impressive VR implementation I have had the opportunity to experience yet.
———-
Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been working on new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

HP offering new ZBooks and DreamColor displays

By Claudio Santos

I have to admit, even though I consider myself to be a very outdoorsy person, I have a very soft spot for technology. How could I not? Working in post means I often spend more time staring at a computer screen than I do sleeping. Since I don’t plan on changing careers the least I can do is indulge myself and stare at a good computer screen.

I recently had the opportunity to meet with the team at HP for an early look at the new products they have brought to market: the ZBook mobile workstation series and two new DreamColor monitors.

DreamColor Displays
While I spent most of my time working in audio post, I don’t really have a reasonable excuse to be so excited about these monitors, but they seem to have been made with such care that it is hard not to get excited. They DreamColor z24x G2 and the DreamColor Z31x Studio are two new entries in the already well-reputed series of displays that is aimed at color professionals and post houses.

HP Z24x

They are both 10-bit displays with accessible options for color calibrations and great color accuracy. The build of both monitors doesn’t leave anything to desire, and they should be able to perform for years before being replaced. The Z24x G2 is a 24-inch monitor with aspect ratio of 16:10 and native resolution of 1920×1200. The Z31x Studio on the other hand is 31.1-inch and has a native resolution of 4096×2160 (cinema 4K).

While the specs alone seem great, it is the workflow enhancements where the HP displays really shine. The Z31x Studio is aimed at post facilities, which often have an IT department responsible for maintaining and managing the hardware. The display makes this usually boring task a breeze by allowing easy remote management over the network, scripting for profiles and user hotkeys and an API that allows facilities to fully integrate them into their system. It also boasts an integrated colorimeter that is embedded into the frame of the monitor and can be scheduled to automatically calibrate the display during off-hours. In order to tackle the common nuisance of having to manage two different machines from the same desk, the monitor has a built-in KVM switch that make the task of sharing a keyboard and mouse with two different systems absolutely painless.

ZBook Mobile Workstation Series
The ZBook workstations cover a range of sizes, starting at ultra-portable 14-inch all the way up to 17.3-inch machines. They are all very powerful machines that compete with all the best high-spec machines in the market. Once again, what sets these apart is the attention to detail HP put into designing them.

ZBook 17-inch

The whole series supports biometric authentication, with the added safety that the biometric authentication offers security at the BIOS level. This means that even if someone tries to tamper with the OS before it loads they will still have to bypass the biometric system before having access to any of the hardware.

They also offer comforts such as tool less access to the battery and hard drive, and easily expandable RAM, so upgrading/swapping parts shouldn’t be a whole-day ordeal. While I was demoing the laptops, I had the chance to try a VR experience that was being completely powered and rendered in realtime by one of the ZBooks on a HTC Vive. The experience was flawless and there were no obvious corners cut in the geometry or lighting to make a “pretend” demo. I had the impression I could confidently rely on one of the machines to work on VR projects.


Claudio Santos is a sound editor and spatial audio mixer at Silver Sound. Slightly too interested in technology and workflow hacks, he spends most of his waking ours tweaking, fiddling and tinkering away on his computer.

VR Workflows: The Studio | B&H panel during NAB

At this year’s NAB Show in Las Vegas, The Studio B&H hosted a series of panels at their booth. One of those panels addressed workflows for virtual reality, including shooting, posting, best practices, hiccups and trends.

The panel, moderated by postPerspective editor-in-chief Randi Altman, was made up of SuperSphere’s Lucas Wilson, ReDesign’s Greg Ciaccio, Local Hero Post’s Steve Bannerman and Jaunt’s Koji Gardner.

While the panel was streamed live, it also lives on YouTube. Enjoy…

New AMD Radeon Pro Duo graphics card for pro workflows

AMD was at NAB this year with its dual-GPU graphics card designed for pros — the Polaris-architecture-based Radeon Pro Duo. Built on the capabilities of the Radeon Pro WX 7100, the Radeon Pro Duo graphics card is designed for media and entertainment, broadcast and design workflows.

The Radeon Pro Duo is equipped with 32GB of ultra-fast GDDR5 memory to handle larger data sets, more intricate 3D models, higher-resolution videos and complex assemblies. Operating at a max power of 250W, the Radeon Pro Duo uses a total of 72 compute units (4,608 stream processors) for a combined performance of up to 11.45 TFLOPS of single-precision compute performance on one board, and twice the geometry throughput of the Radeon Pro WX 7100.

The Radeon Pro Duo enables pros to work on up to four 4K monitors at 60Hz, drive the latest 8K single monitor display at 30Hz using a single cable or drive an 8K display at 60Hz using a dual cable solution.

The Radeon Pro Duo’s distinct dual-GPU design allows pros the flexibility to divide their workloads, enabling smooth multi-tasking between applications by committing GPU resources to each. This will allow users to focus on their creativity and get more done faster, allowing for a greater number of design iterations in the same time.

On select pro apps (including DaVinci Resolve, Nuke/Care VR, Blender Cycles and VRed), the Radeon Pro Duo offers up to two times faster performance compared with the Radeon Pro WX 7100.

For those working in VR, the Radeon Pro Duo graphics card uses the power of two GPUs to render out separate images for each eye, increasing VR performance over single GPU solutions by up to 50% in the SteamVR test. AMD’s LiquidVR technologies are also supported by the industry’s leading realtime engines, including Unity and Unreal, to help ensure smooth, comfortable and responsive VR experiences on Radeon Pro Duo.

The Radeon Pro Duo’s planned availability is the end of May at an expected price of US $999.

Timecode and GoPro partner to make posting VR easier

Timecode Systems and GoPro’s Kolor team recently worked together to create a new timecode sync feature for Kolor’s Autopano Video Pro stitching software. By combining their technologies, the two companies have developed a VR workflow solution that offers the efficiency benefits of professional standard timecode synchronization to VR and 360 filming.

Time-aligning files from the multiple cameras in a 360° VR rig can be a manual and time-consuming process if there is no easy synchronization point, especially when synchronizing with separate audio. Visually timecode-slating cameras is a disruptive manual process, and using the clap of a slate (or another visual or audio cue) as a sync marker can be unreliable when it comes to the edit process.

The new sync feature, included in the Version 3.0 update to Autopano Video Pro, incorporates full support for MP4 timecode generated by Timecode’s products. The solution is compatible with a range of custom, multi-camera VR rigs, including rigs using GoPro’s Hero 4 cameras with SyncBac Pro for timecode and also other camera models using alternative Timecode Systems products. This allows VR filmmakers to focus on the creative and not worry about whether every camera in the rig is shooting in frame-level synchronization. Whether filming using a two-camera GoPro Hero 4 rig or 24 cameras in a 360° array creating resolutions as high as 32K, the solution syncs with the same efficiency. The end results are media files that can be automatically timecode-aligned in Autopano Video Pro with the push of a button.

“We’re giving VR camera operators the confidence that they can start and stop recording all day long without the hassle of having to disturb filming to manually slate cameras; that’s the understated benefit of timecode,” says Paul Bannister, chief science officer of Timecode Systems.

“To create high-quality VR output using multiple cameras to capture high-quality spherical video isn’t enough; the footage that is captured needs to be stitched together as simply as possible — with ease, speed and accuracy, whatever the camera rig,” explains Alexandre Jenny, senior director of Immersive Media Solutions at GoPro. “Anyone who has produced 360 video will understand the difficulties involved in relying on a clap or visual cue to mark when all the cameras start recording to match up video for stitching. To solve that issue, either you use an integrated solution like GoPro Omni with a pixel-level synchronization, or now you have the alternative to use accurate timecode metadata from SyncBac Pro in a custom, scalable multicamera rig. It makes the workflow much easier for professional VR content producers.”

Hobo’s Howard Bowler and Jon Mackey on embracing full-service VR

By Randi Altman

New York-based audio post house Hobo, which offers sound design, original music composition and audio mixing, recently embraced virtual reality by launching a 360 VR division. Wanting to offer clients a full-service solution, they partnered with New York production/post production studios East Coast Digital and Hidden Content, allowing them to provide concepting through production, post, music and final audio mix in an immersive 360 format.

The studio is already working on some VR projects, using their “object-oriented audio mix” skills to enhance the 360 viewing experience.

We touched base with Hobo’s founder/president, Howard Bowler, and post production producer Jon Mackey to get more info on their foray into VR.

Why was now the right time to embrace 360 VR?
Bowler: We saw the opportunity stemming from the advancement of the technology not only in the headsets but also in the tools necessary to mix and sound design in a 360-degree environment. The great thing about VR is that we have many innovative companies trying to establish what the workflow norm will be in the years to come. We want to be on the cusp of those discoveries to test and deploy these tools as the ecosystem of VR expands.

As an audio shop you could have just offered audio-for-VR services only, but instead aligned with two other companies to provide a full-service experience. Why was that important?
Bowler: This partnership provides our clients with added security when venturing out into VR production. Since the medium is relatively new in the advertising and film world, partnering with experienced production companies gives us the opportunity to better understand the nuances of filming in VR.

How does that relationship work? Will you be collaborating remotely? Same location?
Bowler: Thankfully, we are all based in West Midtown, so the collaboration will be seamless.

Can you talk a bit about object-based audio mixing and its challenges?
Mackey: The challenge of object-based mixing is not only mixing based in a 360-degree environment or converting traditional audio into something that moves with the viewer but determining which objects will lead the viewer, with its sound cue, into another part of the environment.

Bowler: It’s the creative challenge that inspires us in our sound design. With traditional 2D film, the editor controls what you see with their cuts. With VR, the partnership between sight and sound becomes much more important.

Howard Bowler pictured embracing VR.

How different is your workflow — traditional broadcast or spot work versus VR/360?
Mackey: The VR/360 workflow isn’t much different than traditional spot work. It’s the testing and review that is a game changer. Things generally can’t be reviewed live unless you have a custom rig that runs its own headset. It’s a lot of trial and error in checking the mixes, sound design, and spacial mixes. You also have to take into account the extra time and instruction for your clients to review a project.

What has surprised you the most about working in this new realm?
Bowler: The great thing about the VR/360 space is the amount of opportunity there is. What surprised us the most is the passion of all the companies that are venturing into this area. It’s different than talking about conventional film or advertising; there’s a new spark and its fueling the rise of the industry and allowing larger companies to connect with smaller ones to create an atmosphere where passion is the only thing that counts.

What tools are you using for this type of work?
Mackey: The audio tools we use are the ones that best fit into our Avid ProTools workflow. This includes plug-ins from G-Audio and others that we are experimenting with.

Can you talk about some recent projects?
Bowler: We’ve completed projects for Samsung with East Coast Digital, and there are more on the way.

Main Image: Howard Bowler and Jon Mackey

Comprimato plug-in manages Ultra HD, VR files within Premiere

Comprimato, makers of GPU-accelerated storage compression and video transcoding solutions, has launched Comprimato UltraPix. This video plug-in offers proxy-free, auto-setup workflows for Ultra HD, VR and more on hardware running Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

The challenge for post facilities finishing in 4K or 8K Ultra HD, or working on immersive 360­ VR projects, is managing the massive amount of data. The files are large, requiring a lot of expensive storage, which can be slow and cumbersome to load, and achieving realtime editing performance is difficult.

Comprimato UltraPix addresses this, building on JPEG2000, a compression format that offers high image quality (including mathematically lossless mode) to generate smaller versions of each frame as an inherent part of the compression process. Comprimato UltraPix delivers the file at a size that the user’s hardware can accommodate.

Once Comprimato UltraPix is loaded on any hardware, it configures itself with auto-setup, requiring no specialist knowledge from the editor who continues to work in Premiere Pro CC exactly as normal. Any workflow can be boosted by Comprimato UltraPix, and the larger the files the greater the benefit.

Comprimato UltraPix is a multi-platform video processing software for instant video resolution in realtime. It is a lightweight, downloadable video plug-in for OS X, Windows and Linux systems. Editors can switch between 4K, 8K, full HD, HD or lower resolutions without proxy-file rendering or transcoding.

“JPEG2000 is an open standard, recognized universally, and post production professionals will already be familiar with it as it is the image standard in DCP digital cinema files,” says Comprimato founder/CEO Jirˇí Matela. “What we have achieved is a unique implementation of JPEG2000 encoding and decoding in software, using the power of the CPU or GPU, which means we can embed it in realtime editing tools like Adobe Premiere Pro CC. It solves a real issue, simply and effectively.”

“Editors and post professionals need tools that integrate ‘under the hood’ so they can focus on content creation and not technology,” says Sue Skidmore, partner relations for Adobe. “Comprimato adds a great option for Adobe Premiere Pro users who need to work with high-resolution video files, including 360 VR material.”

Comprimato UltraPix plug-ins are currently available for Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Foundry Nuke and will be available on other post and VFX tools soon. You can download a free 30-day trial or buy Comprimato UltraPix for $99 a year.

Assimilate’s Scratch VR Suite 8.6 now available

Back in February, Assimilate announced the beta version of its Scratch VR Suite 8.6. Well, now the company is back with a final version of the product, including user requests for features and functions.

Scratch VR Suite 8.6 is a realtime post solution and workflow for VR/360 content. With added GPU stitching of 360-video and ambisonic audio support, as well as live streaming, the Scratch VR Suite 8.6 allows VR content creators — DPs, DITs, post artists — a streamlined, end-to-end workflow for VR/360 content.

The Scratch VR Suite 8.6 workflow automatically includes all the basic post tools: dailies, color grading, compositing, playback, cloud-based reviews, finishing and mastering.

New features and updates include:
– 360 stitching functionality: Load the source media of multiple shots from your 360 cameras. into Scratch VR and easily wrap them into a stitch node to combine the sources into a equirectangular image.
• Support for various stitch template format, such as AutoPano, Hugin, PTGui and PTStitch scripts.
• Either render out the equirectangular format first or just continue to edit, grade and composite on top of the stitched nodes and render the final result.
• Ambisonic audio: Load, set and playback ambisonic audio files to complete the 360 immersive experience.
• Video with 360 sound can be published directly to YouTube 360.
• Additional overlay handles to the existing. 2D-equirectangular feature for more easily positioning. 2D elements in a 360 scene.
• Support for Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, HTC Vive and Google Cardboard.
• Several new features and functions make working in HDR just as easy as SDR.
• Increased Format Support – Added support for all the latest formats for even greater efficiency in the DIT and post production processes.
• More Simplified DIT reporting function – Added features and functions enables even greater efficiencies in a single, streamlined workflow.
• User Interface: Numerous updates have been made to enhance and simplify the UI for content creators, such as for the log-in screen, matrix layout, swipe sensitivity, Player stack, tool bar and tool tips.

SMPTE’s ETCA conference takes on OTT, cloud, AR/VR, more

SMPTE has shared program details for its Entertainment Technology in the Connected Age (ETCA) conference, taking place in Mountain View, California, May 8-9 at the Microsoft Silicon Valley Campus.

Called “Redefining the Entertainment Experience,” this year’s conference will explore emerging technologies’ impact on current and future delivery of compelling connected entertainment experiences.

Bob DeHaven, GM of worldwide communications & media at Microsoft Azure, will present the first conference keynote, titled “At the Edge: The Future of Entertainment Carriage.” The growth of on-demand programming and mobile applications, the proliferation of the cloud and the advent of the “Internet of things” demands that video content is available closer to the end user to improve both availability and the quality of the experience.

DeHaven will discuss the relationships taking shape to embrace these new requirements and will explore the roles network providers, content delivery networks (CDNs), network optimization technologies and cloud platforms will play in achieving the industry’s evolving needs.

Hanno Basse, chief technical officer at Twentieth Century Fox Film, will present “Next-Generation Entertainment: A View From the Fox.” Fox distributes content via multiple outlets ranging — from cinema to Blu-ray, over-the-top (OTT), and even VR. Basse will share his views on the technical challenges of enabling next-generation entertainment in a connected age and how Fox plans to address them.

The first conference session, “Rethinking Content Creation and Monetization in a Connected Age,” will focus on multiplatform production and monetization using the latest creation, analytics and search technologies. The session “Is There a JND in It for Me?” will take a second angle, exploring what new content creation, delivery and display technology innovations will mean for the viewer. Panelists will discuss the parameters required to achieve original artistic intent while maintaining a just noticeable difference (JND) quality level for the consumer viewing experience.

“Video Compression: What’s Beyond HEVC?” will explore emerging techniques and innovations, outlining evolving video coding techniques and their ability to handle new types of source material, including HDR and wide color gamut content, as well as video for VR/AR.

Moving from content creation and compression into delivery, “Linear Playout: From Cable to the Cloud” will discuss the current distribution landscape, looking at the consumer apps, smart TV apps, and content aggregators/curators that are enabling cord-cutters to watch linear television, as well as the new business models and opportunities shaping services and the consumer experience. The session will explore tools for digital ad insertion, audience measurement and monetization while considering the future of cloud workflows.

“Would the Internet Crash If Everyone Watched the Super Bowl Online?” will shift the discussion to live streaming, examining the technologies that enable today’s services as well as how technologies such as transparent caching, multicast streaming, peer-assisted delivery and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) streaming might enable live streaming at a traditional broadcast scale and beyond.

“Adaptive Streaming Technology: Entertainment Plumbing for the Web” will focus specifically on innovative technologies and standards that will enable the industry to overcome inconsistencies of the bitrate quality of the Internet.

“IP and Thee: What’s New in 2017?” will delve into the upgrade to Internet Protocol infrastructure and the impact of next-generation systems such as the ATSC 3.0 digital television broadcast system, the Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) suite of internationally accepted open standards for digital television, and fifth-generation mobile networks (5G wireless) on Internet-delivered entertainment services.

Moving into the cloud, “Weather Forecast: Clouds and Partly Scattered Fog in Your Future” examines how local networking topologies, dubbed “the fog,” are complementing the cloud by enabling content delivery and streaming via less traditional — and often wireless — communication channels such as 5G.

“Giving Voice to Video Discovery” will highlight the ways in which voice is being added to pay television and OTT platforms to simplify searches.

In a session that explores new consumption models, “VR From Fiction to Fact” will examine current experimentation with VR technology, emerging use cases across mobile devices and high-end headsets, and strategies for addressing the technical demands of this immersive format.

You can resister for the conference here.